April 14, 2-3 p.m. EDT: Coronavirus – Covering the Business Impact of the Pandemic

Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Wednesday April 1, 2020

Tuesday, April 14
2-3 p.m. EDT
Listen to the recording.

The full economic impact of the new coronavirus has yet to be seen. But workers are idled at companies large and small, travel is at a standstill, and a $2 trillion economic relief package is making assistance available directly to households. During SABEW’s next teletraining session, we’ll examine how the global outbreak is impacting business and the economy. We’ll also talk about what the outlook is, and what some of the big story lines going forward will be for business journalists.

MODERATOR

Jim Tankersley, The New York Times

Jim Tankersley covers economic and tax policy for The New York Times. Over more than a decade covering politics and economics in Washington, he has written extensively about the stagnation of the American middle class and the decline of economic opportunity in wide swaths of the country. Jim was previously policy and politics editor at Vox and before that, an economics reporter for The Washington Post. He covered the 2008 presidential campaign for the Chicago Tribune and began his career working for The Oregonian, The Rocky Mountain News and The Toledo Blade. A native of McMinnville, Ore., Jim is a Stanford University graduate, an avid camper and backpacker and the father of a 13-year-old named Max.


PANELISTS

Robert Faturechi, ProPublica

Robert Faturechi covers money in politics. At ProPublica, he has reported on self-dealing by political consultants, industry lobbyists blocking safety standards, corporate donors targeting state elections officials and political committees running afoul of the law. Before joining ProPublica, he was a reporter at The Los Angeles Times, where his work exposed inmate abuse, cronyism, secret cop cliques and wrongful jailings at the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Robert grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from UCLA in 2008.

 


Suzanne Clark, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Suzanne Clark is president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the largest business federation in the world. She focuses on strategy, government relations and market innovation working in support of the group’s more than 3 million member companies internationally. She leads a wide range of policy and operational initiatives and was the first senior executive vice president in the institution’s 104-year history. Suzanne sits on the board of two public companies – AGCO, a Fortune 500 global leader in the design, manufacture and distribution of agricultural equipment, and TransUnion, a provider of global risk and credit information. Suzanne earned her bachelor’s degree and an MBA from Georgetown University. Provided by Suzanne: Implementing a National Return to Work plan.

 

Rami Grunbaum, The Seattle Times

Rami Grunbaum is business editor of The Seattle Times, and oversees a staff of half a dozen journalists covering the hometown of Amazon, Microsoft, Nordstrom, Starbucks and Boeing’s Commercial Airplanes division, among others. Grunbaum became business editor in 2016, having previously served as deputy business editor and as editor of Puget Sound Business Journal. Seattle Times coverage of Boeing’s 737 MAX Crisis has recently been honored with a George Polk award, a Scripps Howard award and two SABEW Best in Business awards. Provided by Rami: Seattle Times stories discussed during training.

  • June 9, 2-3 p.m. EDT: Covering the Election on the Business Desk

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Tuesday February 4, 2020

    Listen to the recording.

    It’s one of the big stories of the year, and business journalists can play an important role in the coverage. In this virtual training, we’ll talk about the November elections and the election-related stories that can be assigned on the business desk. We’ll also dive into campaign finance and the stories that can be mined from this data. Whether your organization is covering the White House or City Hall, this session will be packed with practical tips and advice for you.

    Moderator
    Fred Monyak, business news editor, The Associated Press
    Fred is a Washington news editor who oversees coverage of the global economy. He has a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s in journalism, both from Northwestern University. He began his career in Norfolk, Virginia, where he covered local news, before moving to Washington, where he initially helped oversee coverage of politics, diplomacy and other areas as news editor in The Baltimore Sun’s Washington bureau. After a stint managing personal finance coverage for USA Today, he joined the AP’s Washington bureau. For more than 10 years, he has supervised AP reporters who cover the economy, the housing industry, the Federal Reserve, the Treasury and financial regulatory institutions.

     

     

    Panelists
    Carrie Levine, senior reporter, The Center for Public Integrity
    Carrie Levine joined the Center for Public Integrity in October 2014, where she investigates the influence of money in politics. For four years before joining the center, she worked as research director at Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, where she managed a five-person staff that exposed the activities of politically active “dark money” nonprofits and uncovered instances of congressional self-dealing.

    Carrie previously worked as a reporter and associate editor for The National Law Journal, where she covered the inner workings of lobbying firms and lobbyists’ strategies. Carrie also previously reported for the Charlotte Observer, the Patriot Ledger of Quincy, Mass., and The Sun in Lowell, Mass. She is a graduate of Boston University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

     

    Bill Steiden, investigative and business editor, Des Moines Register
    Bill Steiden is the investigative and business editor at the Des Moines Register, where he participated in coverage of the Iowa Caucuses. His career has also included stops at the Columbus Dispatch, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

    Bill earned a bachelor’s in journalism from the University of Kentucky  and a master’s in public administration from Georgia State University.

  • Virtual Training June 2019: How to Cover One of the Newest Beats on the Business Desk: Marijuana

    Posted By sabew on Wednesday May 29, 2019

    As more states consider legalizing recreational marijuana, the nation’s cannabis industry has emerged as one of today’s hot business stories. The fast-growing marijuana sector is creating jobs, generating new business opportunities and, increasingly, justifying its own beat on the business desk. SABEW’s next virtual training session will do a deep dive into the growing cannabis industry. Our panel will talk about how to cover the business of cannabis beat, the nuances associated with that coverage and potential big stories on the horizon. We’ll also look at what’s ahead for this burgeoning sector.

    Listen to the recording.

     

    Moderator
    John Schroyer, Marijuana Business Daily. A Sacramento-based journalist, John Schroyer has focused on Colorado politics for most of his career, which included covering the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver. In 2012, he covered the Amendment 64 campaign to legalize recreational marijuana for the Colorado Springs Gazette. As then-video editor for The Gazette, he was on hand for the first-ever legal recreational marijuana sale in Denver on Jan. 1, 2014. He’s been writing about the cannabis industry since joining Marijuana Business Daily over the summer of 2014.

     

     

     

    Panelists
    Dan Adams, The Boston Globe. Dan Adams is a cannabis reporter at The Boston Globe and author of the “This Week in Weed” email newsletter — the irreverent and definitive insider’s diary of legalization in Massachusetts. A graduate of Emerson College and eight-year veteran of the Globe, Dan previously covered breaking news, municipal politics, business and the alcohol industry. He was a member of the team that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in breaking news reporting for its coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings and manhunt and drew acclaim for his investigation into illegal pay-to-play tactics by major brewers and beer distributors. Since being named the Globe’s first-ever dedicated cannabis journalist in 2017, Dan has embedded himself in the marijuana community and spotlighted the concerns of marginalized groups, while holding the industry and government officials to account.

    Kris Krane, 4Front Advisors. Having founded 4Front Advisors in 2011, Kris Krane is now president of the firm. Prior to forming 4Front, Kris served as director of client services for CannBe, a pioneer in developing best practices within the medical cannabis industry. Kris has dedicated his career to reforming the nation’s drug policies, working as associate director of NORML from 2000 to 2005 and executive director of Students for Sensible Drug Policy from 2006 to 2009. He serves on the National Cannabis Industry Association board of directors as well as the New Jersey Cannabis Industry Association Board, the largest nonprofit association in the state dedicated to the legal cannabis industry.

     

     

     

    Brooke Edwards Staggs, Orange County Register. Brooke Edwards Staggs is a reporter based at the Orange County Register in Anaheim, Calif. She covers the politics, business, health and culture of cannabis for her company’s chain of newspapers and websites throughout California. That coverage has led to multiple TV and radio appearances plus a number of awards, including a win for explanatory writing in the 2017 Best of the West competition, honoring the best journalism in the western United States, and best enterprise news series in the recent 2018 California Journalism Awards. Brooke also covers state and federal politics through an Orange County lens. The Big Bear native earned her bachelor’s degree in English from California Baptist University, then got her master’s in education as she taught high school English in the Inland Empire. She left in 2006 to be a student again herself, earning a master’s degree in journalism from New York University while freelancing for a variety of publications.

     

     

    Linn Washington, Temple University. Linn Washington Jr. is a professor of journalism at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pa. He continues to work as a professional journalist, specializing in investigative news coverage and analytical commentary. Linn’s reporting and research examine issues involving race-based inequities impacting both the criminal justice system and the news media. His reporting career has involved news coverage across the U.S. and on four of the world’s seven continents. He has held positions ranging from general assignment reporter to executive editor.

  • Covering health care important as ever for business reporters – SABEW19

    Posted By David Wilhite on Saturday May 18, 2019

    Stephanie Innes, a health care reporter at The Arizona Republic, and health care experts Swapna Reddy, clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery, College of Health Solutions, and Colin Baillio, director of policy and communications at Health Action New Mexico discussed the ramifications of the ACA and how it affects health care.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    By Kara Carlson
    The Cronkite School

    For many Americans, health care and everything tied to it is never far from the mind.

    How they spend, where they work, their prescription costs and many regular occurrences are all affected by health care and insurance.

    Perhaps none are as contentious as the Affordable Care Act, which brings affordable health care to millions of Americans. It currently hangs in the balance, unclear if it will be allowed to continue after being ruled unconstitutional. 

    Changes in the health care landscape largely in part to the ACA have changed the surrounding cultural landscape of health care and how Americans view it, and how health care reporters do their jobs.

    Stephanie Innes, a health care reporter at The Arizona Republic, and health care experts Swapna Reddy, clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery, College of Health Solutions, and Colin Baillio, director of policy and communications at Health Action New Mexico discussed the ramifications of the ACA and how it affects health care at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing spring conference Friday in Phoenix.  

    While the ACA’s future has been debated for about two years, for now, Reddy said it’s still the “law of the land,” and therefore dictates how health care works in this country across all populations.

    In December 2018, a Texas federal trial court judge in Texas ruled the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, leaving it, and the nearly 20 million Americans that rely on it, hanging in the balance.

    “We’re always talking about the very low income, vulnerable populations,” Swapna Reddy said. “The vast majority of us, the ebbs and flows of what happens to us, is regulated by the ACA.”

    Today 20 million Americans rely on the ACA for their health care. In 2019, 11.4 million people enrolled in ACA marketplace plans, a drastic increase from 2014 when most provisions took place, which saw 8 million people, but a dip from the 12.7 million people in 2016.

    “As a nation, the conversation has shifted and so has what we expect,” Reddy said. “The majority of people were not just uninsured, but uninsured and the services were not covered to what they thought they were paying into.”

    State to state these policies can be vastly different, giving states largely different health care landscapes.

    “It’s almost like living in two different countries” for health care standards, Baillio said, using Texas and California as an example. “Within each state there are unique stories to tell but there also are completely unique policy standards.”

    Innes said it’s important to bring the stories of real people into health care, beyond just numbers and markets.  

    “A lot of times health care is hard to engage readers, because it can be abstract policy,” she said.

    Navigating health care and its costs all have real people behind them. The ACA helps set policies across a number of hot button issues from reproductive and contraceptive health to chronic conditions. Baillio said hearing stories about real people with pre-existing conditions has largely shaped how people view that issue.

    “We’ve changed the dialogue about pre-existing condition protections, but there are two sides. They cost money so it makes premiums more expensive,” Baillio said.

    Premiums have seen significant increases in recent years. In 2014 average benchmark premiums were $273, compared to $477 on average in 2019.

    “To me, what the ACA did that has been so incredible is it shifted this idea of what we think we deserve in health care, and what the government provides us,” Reddy said.

    She said this is especially true with people’s view of pre-existing conditions. Largely, attitudes have shifted to demand coverage for these conditions, Reddy said, which is a recent development she believes is here to stay.

    “If you want to win an election you need to support pre-existing conditions,” Reddy said. “Any proposals for health reform i don’t think have a chance if they’re not truly protecting consumers with preexisting conditions.”

  • June 26 at 2:00 p.m. EDT: Covering all the bases – Reporting on Sports Business

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday June 15, 2017

    Reporting on Sports Business Slides

    Writing about the business of sports has become more than just game coverage in recent years. In fact, sports business has been elevated to a significant stand-alone beat at many news outlets. The beat offers fertile ground for compelling enterprise and investigative stories on collective bargaining agreements, marketing and management initiatives, intellectual property issues, team financial operations, and stadium and arena deals.

    SABEW’s June training session will feature a panel of experts who will discuss how reporters can come up with story ideas by delving into the financial operations of professional teams, universities, and other organizations that run athletic events. They will discuss how to use public records to dig up information on owners of professional sports franchises as well as college teams, and talk about major stories they have uncovered on the sports business beat.

    Monday, June 26
    2-3 p.m. ET

    Listen to the recording.

    Instructions: On the day of the call, dial (512) 879-2134. When prompted enter access code 846394#.

    Moderator

    Kristi Dosh is a professional writer, speaker, sports business analyst, attorney and author who runs Guide My Brand, a boutique publicity firm representing entrepreneurs and authors. As a sports business reporter/analyst, she has reported on everything from collective bargaining to endorsements to the finances of pro and intercollegiate athletics for outlets such as ESPN, Forbes, Golf Digest, SportsBusiness Journal, Campus Insiders, Bleacher Report, SB Nation, The Motley Fool, and Comcast Sports Southeast. She is the author of Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges.

    Panelists

    Geoff Baker is a Montreal-born sports enterprise and investigative reporter for The Seattle Times, who writes the weekly “Inside Sports Business” column and produces the paper’s “Hard Count with Geoff Baker” podcast. He has gained critical acclaim for covering Seattle’s years-long pursuit of a new major sports arena and NBA and NHL teams. Geoff is a two-time Associated Press Sports Editors award winner and nine-time finalist. He also has won three National Newspaper Awards in Canada with the Toronto Star and Montreal Gazette.

     

     

    Mark Conrad directs the sports business concentration and is an associate professor of law and ethics at Fordham University’s Gabelli School of Business, where he teaches sports law and the business and ethics of sports. The third edition of his book The Business of Sports: Off the Field, In the Office, On the News was published in March.

     

     

     

    Danny Ecker covers the local sports business scene for Crain’s Chicago Business, focusing on the marketing, media, products and personalities tied to the city’s professional and college teams. He is a frequent panelist on CSN Chicago’s daily “Sports Talk Live” show and WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight.” Prior to joining Crain’s in January 2010, Danny worked as a producer for college sports and news website UWire.com. He is a 2008 graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and a native of Columbus, Ohio.

     

     

    Alex Reimer is a seasoned sports writer and host on the “Kirk & Callahan Show” at WEEI Sports Radio Network in the Greater Boston area. He is a contributor to Boston Magazine, Forbes and the sports news website SB Nation.

  • Training – Covering all the Bases: Reporting on Sports Business

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday June 14, 2017

    Click the link below to download the slides for this training session:

    Reporting on Sports Business Slides

    Writing about the business of sports has become more than just game coverage in recent years. In fact, sports business has been elevated to a significant stand-alone beat at many news outlets. The beat offers fertile ground for compelling enterprise and investigative stories on collective bargaining agreements, marketing and management initiatives, intellectual property issues, team financial operations, and stadium and arena deals.

    SABEW’s June training session will feature a panel of experts who will discuss how reporters can come up with story ideas by delving into the financial operations of professional teams, universities, and other organizations that run athletic events. They will discuss how to use public records to dig up information on owners of professional sports franchises as well as college teams, and talk about major stories they have uncovered on the sports business beat.

    Monday, June 26, 2017
    2-3 p.m. ET

    Listen to the recording.

    Moderator

    Kristi Dosh is a professional writer, speaker, sports business analyst, attorney and author who runs Guide My Brand, a boutique publicity firm representing entrepreneurs and authors. As a sports business reporter/analyst, she has reported on everything from collective bargaining to endorsements to the finances of pro and intercollegiate athletics for outlets such as ESPN, Forbes, Golf Digest, SportsBusiness Journal, Campus Insiders, Bleacher Report, SB Nation, The Motley Fool, and Comcast Sports Southeast. She is the author of Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges.

    Panelists

    Geoff Baker is a Montreal-born sports enterprise and investigative reporter for The Seattle Times, who writes the weekly “Inside Sports Business” column and produces the paper’s “Hard Count with Geoff Baker” podcast. He has gained critical acclaim for covering Seattle’s years-long pursuit of a new major sports arena and NBA and NHL teams. Geoff is a two-time Associated Press Sports Editors award winner and nine-time finalist. He also has won three National Newspaper Awards in Canada with the Toronto Star and Montreal Gazette.

     

     

    Mark Conrad directs the sports business concentration and is an associate professor of law and ethics at Fordham University’s Gabelli School of Business, where he teaches sports law and the business and ethics of sports. The third edition of his book The Business of Sports: Off the Field, In the Office, On the News was published in March.

     

     

     

    Danny Ecker covers the local sports business scene for Crain’s Chicago Business, focusing on the marketing, media, products and personalities tied to the city’s professional and college teams. He is a frequent panelist on CSN Chicago’s daily “Sports Talk Live” show and WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight.” Prior to joining Crain’s in January 2010, Danny worked as a producer for college sports and news website UWire.com. He is a 2008 graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and a native of Columbus, Ohio.

     

     

    Alex Reimer is a seasoned sports writer and host on the “Kirk & Callahan Show” at WEEI Sports Radio Network in the Greater Boston area. He is a contributor to Boston Magazine, Forbes and the sports news website SB Nation.

     

     

     

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  • Teletraining – Covering the election on the business desk

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday September 2, 2016

    September 2016 

    November’s election is coming up fast, but is your organization ready? This election cycle is proving to be one of the most significant in decades – according to a UBS AG Wealth Management Americas survey of 2,300 wealthy investors, 77 percent expect the November election to be a game-changing event for the U.S. economy. On SABEW’s next teletraining session, our panel of editors will discuss how business desks can best cover the election – from the presidential race to elections of local importance. We’ll talk about what kind of stories can be assigned and covered now, those that should be done after Election Day and angles to follow after the winners take office. Don’t let the political reporters have all the fun – whether your organization is covering the White House or City Hall, this session will be packed with information and advice for you.

    Listen to the call.

    Suggested links.

    Moderator

    Monyak sqFred Monyak, The Associated Press. Fred is a Washington news editor who oversees coverage of the global economy. He has a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s in journalism, both from Northwestern University. He began his career in Norfolk, Virginia, where he covered local news, before moving to Washington, where he initially helped oversee coverage of politics, diplomacy and other areas as news editor in The Baltimore Sun’s Washington bureau. After a stint managing personal finance coverage for USA Today, he joined the AP’s Washington bureau. For the past eight years, he has supervised AP reporters who cover the economy, the housing industry, the Federal Reserve, the Treasury and financial regulatory institutions.

     

    Panelists

    Haar SqDan Haar, The Hartford Courant. Dan is a columnist at the Courant, writing about the intersection of politics, business and economics. Dan has toggled between roles as columnist, political reporter and business editor since 2000.  Previously he was a business writer, reporting on manufacturing, jobs, technology and telecom. He joined the Courant as a photographer after graduating from Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Dan has written extensively about urban development, tax policy, gun control, the AR-15 rifle and the character of Connecticut, including a summer-long walk across the state.

     

    levin sqCarrie Levine, The Center for Public Integrity. Carrie Levine joined the Center for Public Integrity in October 2014 as a federal politics reporter investigating the influence of money in politics. For four years before joining the Center, she worked as research director at Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, where she managed a five-person staff that exposed the activities of politically active “dark money” nonprofits and uncovered instances of congressional self-dealing. Carrie previously worked as a reporter and associate editor for The National Law Journal, where she covered the inner workings of lobbying firms and lobbyists’ strategies. Carrie also previously reported for The Charlotte Observer, The Patriot Ledger of Quincy, Mass., and The Sun (Lowell, Mass.). She is a graduate of Boston University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

  • SABEW Canada announces the finalists for the 6th Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday April 15, 2020

    The Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is excited to (belatedly) announce the list of finalists for the 6th Annual Best in Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published and produced in Canada in 2019.

    This year’s finalists covered a wide range of stories, including a rags-to-riches-to-rags tale of Dofasco’s founding family, the spin-off effects of climate change, the future of work, an inside look at how lawyers get paid, money laundering, and the mysterious death of a crypto CEO.

    We hope to be able to hand out the awards in the After Times, once Covid-19 restrictions have been lifted (maybe sometime in the fall, with plenty of free drinks in hand). In the meantime, as we all sit at home in our sweat pants, searching for a glimmer of good news, here are the winners and finalists for this year’s awards:

     


    Jeff Sanford Best Young Journalist Award

    Our second annual Best Young Journalist Award (named after former Financial Post and Canadian Business journalist Jeff Sanford) goes to Natalie Wong of Bloomberg News. Soon after joining Bloomberg in 2017, Natalie broke news about the Canadian government’s plan to impose steel tariffs on importers, which moved the loonie and shares of some of the biggest steel companies. Last year, she penned a feature about college kids living in Vancouver mansions amid a luxury housing upheaval, which garnered global attention. It was the most-read Bloomberg Canada story of 2019. She also scooped her competitors on some of the biggest real estate stories in Canada last year, including Oxford’s sale of its Fairmont portfolio and the state of talks between Waterfront and Sidewalk Labs.

    Natalie’s impact extends beyond real estate: She wrote a profile on the co-inventor of BlackBerry for Bloomberg Businessweek magazine and spent days in a courthouse digging up documents essential for the feature, “The Unsolved Murder of an Unusual Billionaire,” which chronicled the mysterious circumstances behind the deaths of Barry and Honey Sherman and won a 2019 Best in Business Canada Award. She also broke news about NBA player Steph Curry’s investment in a Canadian travel startup, landing an exclusive TV interview with him.

    When a commercial property reporter position opened in New York late last year, the U.S. team snatched Natalie up and gave her ownership over one of the biggest real estate markets in the world. She has approached that beat with gusto and has already developed an array of sources that led to scoops about the fallout from WeWork’s botched IPO and the impact of the retail apocalypse on iconic high-streets, among other stories.


    Outstanding Achievement Award

    The winner of our second annual Outstanding Achievement Award is Marina Strauss, who retired from The Globe and Mail last summer. Marina has been among the most important voices in Canadian retailing over the past two decades, gaining the respect of both her peers and industry executives (who often dreaded her phone calls but took them anyway). She was known for her tenacious probing, critical eye and profound knowledge of the sector, bringing analysis and context to her stories, but with an easy-to-understand style that broadened her appeal beyond the business pages. As a beat reporter, she consistently broke news but also delved deep into big stories, providing definitive coverage on the collapse of Sears Canada, early troubles at Target Canada, the ups and downs of Hudson’s Bay Co., tensions between Tim Hortons franchisees and their new Brazilian owner, and so much more. She won Best in Business Awards in both the U.S. and Canada in 2019 for her story, “Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons,” and won best beat reporter at SABEW Canada’s inaugural awards in 2015.

    Beyond her writing, Marina was the model citizen in the office, often collaborating on stories and helping mentor other journalists. Internally at The Globe, she led workshops on writing business stories, developing sources and covering bankruptcies. She loved her work, and her enthusiasm rubbed off on her colleagues. Even after retiring, she took time to prepare her successor for the beat and still provides counsel—a mark of her commitment to her craft.


    Audio or Visual Storytelling

    Scott Gill and James McLeod (Financial Post), “Focals by north”

    Sean Stanleigh, Stephanie Chan, Laura Regehr, Ann Lang and Tara Deschamps (The Globe and Mail), “Industry interrupted”

    Matt Lundy (The Globe and Mail), data visualizations


    Beat Reporting

    Brent Jang, The Globe and Mail (natural gas industry)

    Eric Atkins, The Globe and Mail (transportation)

    Catherine McIntyre, The Logic (the gig economy)


    Breaking News

    The Logic (Amanda Roth and Catherine McIntyre), “Sidewalk Labs and Waterfront Toronto reach a deal”

    The Globe and Mail (Josh O’Kane, Alex Bozikovic, Jeff Gray, Rachelle Younglai and Tom Cardoso), Sidewalk Lab negotiations

    The Globe and Mail (Emma Graney, Jeffrey Jones, Carrie Tait, Kelly Cryderman, Gary Mason, James Bradshaw, Christine Dobby, Andrew Willis, Ian McGugan, David Milstead and David Berman), “Encana to move its headquarters to U.S.”


    Commentary

    Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)

    David Parkinson (The Globe and Mail)

    Rita Trichur (The Globe and Mail)


    Editorial Newsletter

    HuffPost Canada (Daniel Tencer), HuffPost Canada Housing Newsletter

    The Logic (The Logic staff), Daily Briefing

    Financial Post (Yadullah Hussein and Pam Heaven), Posthaste


    Feature (Long-Form)

    Charles Wilkins (Report on Business magazine), “Castaways”

    Zander Sherman (Report on Business magazine), “Forged by fire”

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Jessica Leeder and Lindsay Jones (The Globe and Mail), “Crypto chaos”


    Feature (Short-Form)

    Joe O’Connor (Financial Post), “An historic gold mine in a tiny Ontario town…”

    Danielle Bochove (Bloomberg News), “In planet’s fastest-warming region, jobs come with thaw”

    Sean Silcoff (The Globe and Mail), “Montreal analytics startup uses AI to play a big role
    in NHL playoffs”


    Investigative

    Matthew McClearn, Geoffrey York and Stephanie Nolen (The Globe and Mail),
    “See No Evil”

    Gordon Hoekstra and Kim Bolan (Vancouver Sun), money laundering

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Nathan VanderKlippe and Jessica Leeder
    (The Globe and Mail), “How did Gerald Cotton die?”


    Package

    Geoffrey Morgan and Vanmala Subramaniam (Financial Post), “Rural Alberta (dis)advantage”

    Ryan Stuart (BCBusiness Magazine), “The future of work”

    Chris Fournier, Erik Hertzberg, Natalie Wong, Kevin Orland and Paula Sambo (Bloomberg News), consumer debt


    Personal Finance and Investing

    Victor Ferreira (Financial Post), “The inconvenient truth about responsible investing”

    Tim Shufelt (The Globe and Mail), “The data game”

    Mark Brown, Sandra E. Martin, Julie Cazzin, Chris Richard and Daisy Barette (MoneySense), “Canada’s best dividend stocks 2020”


    Profile

    Kristine Owram and Susan Berfield (Bloomberg News), Bruce Linton

    Steve Kupferman (Pivot), “Toy Story”

    Jason Kirby (Report on Business magazine), “Trash talking”


    Scoop

    Geoffrey Morgan (Financial Post), “Billionaire Koch brothers dump Canada’s
    oil sands leases…”

    Niall McGee and Rachelle Younglai (The Globe and Mail), “Barrick eyes hostile bid…”

    Mark Rendell and Jeffrey Jones (The Globe and Mail), “CannTrust allegedly used fake walls to hide pot…”


    Trade Article

    Kelsey Rolfe (Benefits Canada), “Rise of the machines”

    Daniel Fish (Precedent Magazine), “Paying the partners”

    Leah Golob (Investment executive), “Singles: a growing demographic”

     

    Thank you to everyone who entered and to all our amazing judges. Stay tuned!

     

  • 2019 Best in Business Honorees – Judging Comments

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday March 30, 2020

    Audio

    Winner – A collaboration of The Wall Street Journal and Gimlet Media; WeWork trilogy
    The Wall Street Journal’s WeWork trilogy dissected one on the biggest business stories of the year: the rise and fall of WeWork. The podcast employed smart questions to reporters covering the story and even smarter answers that not only explained WeWork’s spectacular collapse, but also revealed new information. Each program was driven by a compelling narrative that pulled listeners through the story and its complications, leaving them to want to hear more.

    Honorable Mention – NPR; Profiles of America in full employment
    NPR’s Profiles Of America In Full Employment is a smart look at what full employment means in the early 21st century, covering the landscape in tight, well-produced and insightful reports that range from workers in the Midwest regaining bargaining power to a California agricultural community bypassed by the record economic expansion.

    Honorable Mention – American Banker; Bankshot
    American Banker’s Bankshot podcast took boring but important issues and made them interesting without diminishing their importance. Holding a listener’s attention while explaining LIBOR and why everyone should care about it – and even having fun doing it – is no small accomplishment.


    Banking/Finance, Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Covert operation
    Covert Operation is a strong, original work that highlighted great reporting with the potential for industry change. The story revealed how an opaque industry is structured but, in the end, it’s the character-driven narrative that was both riveting and infuriating.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and 16 media partners; Mauritius Leaks
    Mauritius Leaks is another great ICIJ investigation that involved the heavy-lift work of going through leaked documents. The strong visual treatment let the data tell the story and the historical analysis set the context for understanding the players and their motivations.

    Banking/Finance, Medium division

    Winner – ProPublica; Trump’s taxes
    This was a tour de force of investigative journalism that broke new ground in a series of well-structured stories about President Donald Trump and his family business. The articles gave some of the clearest and most detailed account of the finances of the Trump Organization and the Trump family. They provided two clear insights. First, that the Trump organization and its advisors are expert at creating and exploiting ambiguities in financial reporting to add and subtract value to their various holdings when it suits their financial needs. Second, that one reason why the Trump family and business entities are fighting tooth and nail to hide their tax returns from the public is that the tax returns might reveal even more about exploitation of various aspects of the IRS code.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of American Banker and ProPublica; How Trump’s political appointees thwarted tougher settlements with two big banks
    This entry represents a groundbreaking collaboration between an established financial publication and a non-profit. With unusual insight and rich detail, it explains how the Trump Administration’s political appointees intervened to reduce sanctions against two large banking organizations involved in trading risky securities leading to the 2008 financial crisis. The reporting provides unusual insights into how the Trump administration has reversed the Obama administration’s policies and provided substantial relief for banks whose actions led to the Great Recession. The project benefited from strong writing and editing, and it resulted in demands for review of the settlements.

    Banking/Finance, Small division

    Winner – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    Every paragraph left one judge saying, “you gotta be kidding.” I thought this was a spectacular piece, written for an industry newsletter that I imagine depends on wealth management groups to pay their salaries. This was aggressive and bold, and it worked hard to tell the truth, and the truth was outrageous. This is a terrific piece of reporting that shone a much-needed light on some pretty murky practices. It was also nicely written and well organized, with the action moving along at a nice clip. The scene-setting at the top, in somewhat tawdry surroundings, really helped pull the judges into the story.

    Honorable Mention – The Real Deal; Trouble in the land of OZK
    The judges especially liked that this was an exclusive interview with an interesting person. It was an outside-the-box look at a different kind of bank.


    Breaking News, Large division

    Winner – Reuters; U.S.-China trade war
    The trade relationship between the U.S. and China was perhaps the biggest economic story of 2019. Our panel of judges concluded that Reuters’ deadline reporting on China backtracking on almost all aspects of its U.S. trade deal was especially compelling, given the deep use of industry and government sources. Readers were brought inside the diplomatic cables that were “riddled with reversals” and the Reuters team did an excellent job explaining the complicated process of negotiating an agreement only to have much of it fall apart.

    Honorable Mention – The Financial Times; WeWork
    The Financial Times team brilliantly laid out how it all went wrong at WeWork, a onetime tech darling with an iconoclastic chief executive, Adam Neumann. 

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; PG&E files for bankruptcy
    The superb reporting team clearly explained what led once mighty PG&E to become the biggest utility bankruptcy in U.S. history, and why the company chose to take the bankruptcy route.

    Breaking News, Medium division

    Winner – Dallas Morning News; U.S. pilots faulted 737 Max jets
    The judges had a number of strong entries but the Dallas Morning News took an ongoing story of major national and international importance, two crashes involving the 737 Max, and significantly moved it forward. DMN’s work showed the crashes were less about pilot error and more about design problems and lax regulatory vigilance. This story is a fine example of advancing news on a developing story by digging hard and deep.

    Breaking News, Small division

    Winner – Baltimore Business Journal; Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding
    In “Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding,” Baltimore Business News’ Melody Simmons demonstrates how sound reporting can hold powerful people accountable and make an impact on a community. Simmons’ efforts to review tax filings and other documents is a testament to the upfront work required to break this type of news. Additionally, the article was high-impact: It led to the FBI raiding the nonprofit, City Hall firing three staffers associated with the training center, and added to the pressure on Pugh, already under fire over her “Healthy Holly” book deals. The mayor ultimately resigned and was sentenced on Feb. 27, 2020, to three years in prison. Congratulations to Melody and her editors!


    Commentary/Opinion, Large division

    Winner – The New York Times; China-Think
    Li Yuan, a native of China, won for her NYT columns that gave an insightful insider’s view of why most of China’s people oppose the Hong Kong protests. She documented how China’s government uses technology and social media to indoctrinate its 1.4 billion people with group think, which she describes as “a deeply rooted belief in what many call the China Model: economic growth at the cost of individual rights.” The judges were impressed by her courage in staying with this story despite the risk to her safety. Her editors wrote in their cover letter that Ms. Yuan, who lacks the shield of a Western passport, “is regularly called a traitor on Chinese social media, and state news outlets have attacked her in print and online. She moved to Hong Kong after seeing friends imprisoned in Beijing.”

    Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times (CA); Michael Hiltzik opinion/commentary
    Michael Hiltzik received the honorable mention distinction for his Los Angeles Times columns that presented “strong, well-argued commentaries on a range of topics,” as one judge noted. In one column, Mr. Hiltzik strongly opposed the University of California at San Francisco’s pending affiliation with Dignity, a Catholic hospital chain, pointing out the drastic impact that would have on the healthcare that would be available to women and LGBT people. In another column, he wrote that President Trump’s plan to “save” Medicare would actually ruin it. In a third column, he took this stand, reflected in the headline:  The truth about U.S. taxes is that they aren’t high enough. Here’s what one judge had to say: “A convincing mix of fact and opinion with just enough rhetorical flourish to make it a really good read. The tax piece is a good example of using data to tell readers something they should know but may not want to hear.” Another judge pointed out that Mr. Hiltzik’s piece on the Catholic hospitals focused on “an issue relevant to a local audience” while it was of national interest as well. This judge noted that Mr. Hiltzik’s columns show that commentary and opinion writing is alive and well at major regional newspapers.

    Commentary/Opinion, Medium division

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; America’s broken health care system
    Elisabeth Rosenthal deftly uses the medical bills she received to guide readers through the maze of medical bureaucracy and deliver a clear exposition of how and why the nation’s health care system has become so beleaguered, unfair and inefficient. Her analysis of “Medicare for All” combines clever writing and detailed research to illuminate what dramatic healthcare overhaul would mean for jobs and the industry. Overall, her work is informative, timely and a joy to read. 

    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle; Accountability
    Chris Tomlinson of the Houston Chronicle takes issues of great regional concern — like port dredging — and weaves them into conversations about pressing national concern, such as trade protectionism. His writing is lucid, his takes are carefully reasoned and the topics he chooses are of obvious public interest. 

    Commentary/Opinion, Small division

    Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Holding Chicago companies accountable
    Cahill provides readers with sharp, no-nonsense commentary that makes its point clearly and concisely. Details are woven skillfully into the narrative and the use of a corporate regulatory filing as the basis for one column was especially impressive.

    Honorable Mention – STAT; Commentary on drug pricing and development
    An authoritative analysis of relatively complex topics: biotech companies’ credibility, fake cancer cures, drug pricing. The use of footnotes to point readers to supporting material is especially helpful.


    Economics, Large division

    Winner – Bloomberg News; Addicted to debt
    The winner, Bloomberg’s “Addicted to Debt” entry, told each of the judges something new about a fresh type of subprime debt: online installment loans. This felt to us like the kind of revelation we may learn much more about when the next downturn hits. The Bloomberg entry also included a thorough analysis of debt forgiveness plans politicians of both parties are pitching to voters, and a sobering look at the generational shackles student debt places on some families who can’t free themselves, no matter how hard they work. All entries included sharp graphics. Overall, this package illuminated dark corners of an otherwise vibrant economy with crisp storytelling everybody can relate to.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; How Trump’s trade war went from method to madness
    What sold the judges on this entry was its skillful blend of breaking newswriting and expository journalism, giving each new development ample context for the reader to understand its significance. Judges were particularly impressed with the story about how the White House was considering imposing limits on U.S. investors’ portfolio investments in Chinese markets and companies. At first, presidential advisers labeled it “fake news,” before being forced to admit it was true.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; TOPLive
    These three live blogs of major interest-rate announcements are unparalleled in thoroughness, speed and readability. Readers are walked up to the news with strong analysis and graphics that explain what to watch for. A team of reporters then blogs the announcement itself with a succession of short headlines and clearly written single paragraphs of news and analysis—alternated with market reaction and short commentaries from reporters and outsiders. 

    Economics – Medium division and Small division

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Judges praised this deeply reported and engagingly written series for its ambition, comprehensiveness and clarity. In addition to the compelling, on-the-farm reporting, this team made strong use of data, photos and multimedia to give readers a deep and nuanced understanding of the economics of milk from the perspective of Wisconsin’s struggling dairy farms.

    Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; No mercy
    No Mercy was an exemplary series of stories about how the loss of a local hospital affects a rural community.


    Energy/Natural Resources – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Brazil’s deadly dam collapse
    The judges were all struck by the strength of the reporting, which revealed major concerns around safety protocols that could have mitigated the disaster. The coverage of the collapse was widespread, but Journal reporters did the kind of work that had real impacts – contributing to evidence in a case; holding executives accountable for a lack of oversight; and providing fodder for proposed changes to industry practices. The losses suffered by these families demanded a response. This is excellent work.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; Is one of the world’s biggest lawsuits built on a sham?
    This story was a masterful example of feature writing, a compelling yarn. But it’s not just a page-turner: there are real implications here for the energy industry. The story speaks to a culture of corruption that deeply affects how business is done in such a crucial resources market — with incentives to latch on to projects doomed to fail in order to drain government coffers through litigation. The reporters explained how this practice is impacting the Nigerian economy in a major way, enough to cripple funding for schools and healthcare, or even to accomplish what the country set out to do in the first place: eliminate harmful flaring.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; PG&E’s disconnect
    This is an important story. To show that the company was lobbying for a shield against liability for wildfires, even as those fires burned, is extremely troubling. Times reporters provided a deep look at the safety lapses that imperiled people’s homes and threatened lives.

    Energy/Natural Resources – Medium division

    Winner – The Arizona Republic; Arizona’s next water crisis
    This superb series does a great job of telling the story and serves as a strong example of accountability journalism, raising questions about the sustainability of Arizona’s present and future in an age of climate change and water scarcity. The subject affects every reader in a vital way — at the faucet and the wallet. The fear, uncertainty and what it’s like not to have water was palpable through the voices of the residents. The tale brings truth to light, educating citizens as it connects all the dots on power, profits, influence, winners and losers. The graphics and pictures are top notch, using online to breathe more impact to the text. The reader comes away knowing what to look for, who to blame, questions to ask and what to demand. So, it is not just a powerfully reported expose but one with real-world impacts as lawmakers were moved to respond. While nearby water war sagas like the Oglala aquifer and Colorado River diversions have often been told, this series shed new light on one of the most pressing issues for the Sun Belt’s economy and habitability. The judges all rated it No. 1. 

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity and “The World”; Pushing plastic
    Where does our garbage end up? In modern, throwaway society it is an ethical question we should all address: like water use, a huge problem right under our nose. So, this series has great moral impact. But it also zeroes in on the culprits — corporations, regulators and consumers — ie. us. It lays out the impacts. Perhaps nothing since DDT would make Rachel Carson weep more than micro-plastics now permeating our oceans, food chains and drinking water. It paints a powerful connect-the-dots picture of the Third World as a dumping ground for First World. And it names names for corporate interests and lets them speak. The different angles help to tell the story and there are some really great quotes. The story comes full circle with the part written about Malaysia. Overall, this is a very valuable and educational series. ***

    Energy/Natural Resources – Small division

    Winner – Honolulu Civil Beat; Reeling it in
    Through shoe-leather reporting and analysis of federal records, Honolulu Civil Beat crafted an exemplary package of stories that deftly shows how U.S. taxpayer dollars earmarked for conservation are instead being used to promote aggressive fishing practices across Hawaii and U.S territories. The series prompted a federal investigation, underscoring the journalism’s true impact, as well as the benefit to the local population and all taxpayers.

    Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent; Dicey deals kept English Station dirty
    Christopher Peak of the New Haven Independent unraveled a tangle of shady real estate deals surrounding a mothballed power plant in New Haven’s harbor, and revealed a fascinating story hiding in plain sight. Through deft writing and an eye for the absurd (and aided by some clever graphics), Peak brought color and humor to what could have been a hopelessly dry article. The story wasn’t just entertaining, though: His reporting led New Haven’s mayor to call for an investigation into why the plant remains undeveloped.


    Explanatory – Large division

    Winner – Reuters; Hidden injustice
    Powerful reporting reveals the dangers caused by the finely honed practice of hiding the results of court proceedings from the public (and journalists). The Reuters team found that for at least 20 years, judges helped companies hide the truth about the harmful effects of products such as opioids, cars, medical services and more. People died or got hurt using some of these products, such as the 5,000-plus, seat belt-wearing passengers who didn’t survive GM rollover accidents in a 10-year period.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; New red scare
    Peter Waldman combines narrative writing and meticulous investigation in New Red Scare, a three-part series exposing examples of U.S. authorities harassing, demoting and expelling Chinese and Chinese American scientific researchers from universities and in one story, a prestigious U.S. Army intelligence unit.  Set against a backdrop of suspicion and acrimony over intellectual property theft by China, the series takes a shocking tack: uncovering false accusations against prominent scientists. Waldman delivers enough detail for the reader to reach an informed conclusion and enough character development to make us care.  New Red Scare has heroes, victims and villains but ultimately sheds light on a system made rotten by complex world forces.

    Explanatory – Medium division

    Winner – Fortune; Epidemic of fear
    Fry detailed the disastrous rollout in the Philippines of French drug giant Sanofi’s vaccine Dengvaxia to combat dengue fever. Fry took a complex, human story and clearly and objectively explained the impact of the rollout, including a wave of anti-vaccination panic that could have worldwide consequences. Deeply reported and well written, the story is a dramatic and disturbing piece that raises serious policy questions.

    Honorable Mention – E&E News; Dealing with disasters
    This eye-opening story focuses on how FEMA is taking care of so many small disasters and deploying workers to them that the agency is caught short when large disasters, such as Hurricane Harvey, hit. The deeply reported piece explains how and why FEMA comes up short when its resources are needed the most.

    Honorable Mention – Chronicle of Higher Education; How America’s college-closure crisis leaves families devastated
    This well-sourced, well-written story explains the cascading effect of for-profit college closures and how individuals who can least afford it – older students, low-income students and racial minorities – are hit the hardest.

    Explanatory – Small division

    Winner – Marker; The cutthroat battle between S’well and its bougie water bottle copycats
    This well-written piece, combined nitty-gritty reporting and powerful detail, provides a lucid explication of how and why the problem of counterfeit products persists to bedevil entrepreneurs. Judges were impressed by its lively language, strong sourcing and smart graphics. All in all, a terrific example of explanatory journalism.

    Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    Strong digging and analysis gave this entry its power. Judges also appreciated the clarity with which it demonstrated the importance of this relatively obscure agency.

    Honorable Mention – Denver Business Journal; Why Molson Coors had to leave Denver
    This piece gracefully pulled together and illustrated a number of trends and market forces that are driving U.S. businesses away from the notion of a traditional “headquarters.”


    Feature – Large division

    Winner – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    Reuters won the top prize in this category by combining great reporting and multimedia storytelling to shed light on wildcat mining and gold smuggling out of Africa. The team not only sought to quantify the extent of smuggling but pointed to two dangers of this practice. The first danger explored the high health risks to those wildcat miners, and the second exposed the opportunity that jihadis have spotted in the under-regulated gold trade to help finance their operations. 

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Planet Fox
    The judges found The New York Times’ “Planet Fox” to be a compelling examination of how three generations of the Murdoch family turned a news organization into an international, right wing political force, using their platform to help promote and elect preferred candidates and attack those on the other side. The fascinating struggles between the Murdoch sons and their father are woven into the broader roles played by the company’s media outlets. 

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; This is not the way everybody behaves
    This is a deeply reported, often wild, tale of the trials and tribulations of WeWork co-founder and CEO Adam Neumann. Details of his reckless ambition, arrogance and outlandish personal behavior were jarring and alarming, especially for a company that was on the brink of going public. 

    Feature – Medium division

    Winner – E&E News; The most dangerous malware
    The Most Dangerous Malware is a tense and frightening tale of how Russian-launched malware nearly caused catastrophe at a Saudi petrochemical plant.  Dogged reporting across three continents exposed the risk of the rapid adoption of digital technology, a story with potentially huge implications.  What pushed this entry to the top was its superb storytelling on an extremely complex topic.

    Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    This two-part series uncovered how pharmaceutical companies are moving into India to push the same pain drugs that caused the opioid crisis in the U.S.  The reporter spent time in India’s slums to see how pain clinics are popping up, creating thousands of new addicts.  This is great, on-the-ground reporting that raises alarms about a potential catastrophe brewing in the world’s second-largest country.

    Honorable Mention – Report on Business Magazine; A long road
    Extensive reporting went into this effort, including on-the-ground reporting in Guatemala and Northern Ontario, as well as extensive document research. At its heart, this is a very human story about Canadian mining companies who have winked at social responsibility, running roughshod over indigenous communities – all in the pursuit of mining silver.

    Feature – Small division

    Winner – The Counter; The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store
    In “The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store,” reporter Joe Fassler comes to grips with the desperation of longtime regional grocers who, while reluctant to change, must face up to the reality of customers abandoning their brick-and-mortar stores to buy food online. Fassler writes not only of the dilemmas they face, but also of the solutions provided by architect Kevin Kelley, the “supermarket ghostwriter,” who offers them a lifeline. A compelling story beginning to end, it lays out in fascinating detail the concept of grocery shopping for pleasure. It even manages to tug at the heartstrings with the story of a jaded, third-generation grocer, Rich Niemann, who is driven to tears of joy when during the reinvention process Kelley captures the emotional core of his business.

    Honorable Mention – STAT; The medicine hunters
    “The Medicine Hunters” is a devastating dispatch from an extreme edge of America’s health care system. Reporter Eric Boodman documents a startling consequence of the business world’s control over U.S. drug development: that a potentially transformative, lifesaving treatment might only be affordable while it’s still experimental and be priced out of patients’ reach once it’s been approved for sale. Boodman’s moving look at one woman’s impossible choice offers a warning to us all.

    Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Atlanta rising
    In “Atlanta Rising,” reporter J.J. McCorvey delivered a deeply reported, engagingly written examination of how the “reverse Great Migration” of black Americans to the South has played out in the world of entrepreneurship. The piece combines rich character portraits with extensive use of data to capture the transformational effect that shift is having on both Atlanta and the tech industry.


    General Excellence – Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    Winner – Financial Planning
    There’s a lot to admire here but the judges especially appreciated the nice, smooth writing and solid reporting. The presentation is sharp, and the video and audio are integrated into the storytelling. The piece on financial advisors considering striking out as independents is a thoughtful feature with pace and a kind of pragmatic set of conclusions for the professional audience it targets. The judges agreed that the accompanying charts and graphics really made the stories sing.

    General Excellence – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal
    In 2019, the Wall Street Journal gave readers high-profile scoops, dazzling infographics, and in-depth reports on tech’s biggest players. In September, the paper published the year’s definitive account of WeWork founder Adam Neumann’s high-flying lifestyle, replete with details about drug use on private jets, trays of tequila shots and enabling bankers. The paper flexed its investigative chops with stories about Amazon’s questionable third-party sales practices and yet another worrisome Facebook data-grab. An arresting infographic about the Max 737 showed how the plane’s faulty design led to repeated catastrophes and an ongoing crisis for Boeing. The Journal topped off the entry with a first-rate scoop about the $135 billion merger of United Technologies and Raytheon, the year’s big M&A deal. The scope and authority of the work made it an exceptional entry.

    General Excellence – Medium division

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    The judges commend the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for a powerful entry that demonstrated strong work across the board. Their reporters held Foxconn and Wisconsin government officials accountable for failing to live up to their job promises. They unearthed a faulty drug approved by the FDA. They got people to go on the record about the exploitation of a visa loophole to bring Mexican veterinarians to the U.S. to work menial jobs on farms. And their amazing visual storytelling of the mass closures of dairy farms in the state was some of the best work in the country on the devastation of the industry. 

    Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press
    The judges commend the Detroit Free Press for taking on the powerful auto industry in their hometown. Their investigative work unveiled not just that Ford Focus and Fiesta cars had faulty transmissions but that the company knew about it. Their reporters were also on the front lines of covering the GM strike with thorough reporting and gripping photos that helped the nation understand how unique and well supported the strike was.

    General Excellence – Small division

    Winner – Portland Business Journal
    Outstanding work, the kind of journalism that can make important people sit up and take notice. The writers were not afraid to take on one of the iconic companies of its area, Nike, over not only its taxes but also its toxic culture, with new reporting. It also featured illuminating and sensitive coverage of social issues (diversity, suicide) and a probing look at a questionable do-over in awarding a city contract.

    Honorable Mention – American Banker
    The depth of reporting, the obvious expertise with the subject matter and the overall quality of presentation is excellent.


    Government – Large division

    Winner – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Miami Herald, La Posta and 16 other media partners; The bribery division  
    The Bribery Division delivered international results from an impressive collaboration across 17 media entities and 50 journalists on different continents and in 10 countries. The company in question and governments it bribed were already under scrutiny, and this reporting deepened the investigation and showed how the corruption extended to public works projects. The package delivered clear writing about a complicated web of topics, and the stories were accompanied by an interactive graphic. The package shows the power of investigative journalism through thorough and unbiased reporting and writing.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY; Copy. Paste. Legislate.
    Copy. Paste. Legislate. brought together two years of reporting and well-researched data collection to deliver groundbreaking stories about how state-level legislation is made — by businesses and industries advancing their own interests. The accountability reporting tells readers things they don’t already know and explains clearly why they should care about how legislation is made. The package includes visual elements to show readers how the reporting was done, and assembled reams of data readers can search for themselves.

    Government – Medium division

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Hidden Harm is an outstanding investigation that exposed a hidden trove of reports about problems with medical devices. The reporting had an equally extraordinary impact and may well have saved lives. The Kaiser Health News stories prompted the FDA to release the reports and shutter the hidden program altogether. Seldom does the work of one journalist have such impact on the wellbeing of so many people. Judges liked the use of multimedia, especially the video explaining how the reporter got the story; an excellent example of how transparency can help the media build trust in our work.

    Honorable Mention – ProPublica; The TurboTax trap
    ProPublica demonstrated with dogged reporting and pursuit of emails from the IRS – even resorting to suing the agency – that the tax preparation industry, particularly Intuit’s TurboTax, misled the public with bogus offers of free online tax preparation. The series spurred the IRS to reform its rules. Judges particularly liked the story showing readers step-by-step screenshots of how Intuit duped taxpayers searching for free tax preparation to pay for it.

    Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Elaine Chao used her cabinet post to help Mitch McConnell
    Politico deftly used a Freedom of Information Act request and in-depth street reporting to document a cozy pipeline between local governments in Kentucky and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao – whose husband is Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell – that led to $78 million in grants for transportation projects in that state. Politico used documents, emails and interviews to show the connections between McConnell’s staff and a local political operative, Todd Inman, who worked for Chao and was giving preference to the Kentucky projects. Politico documented well this highly unusual conflict of interest case between an influential cabinet member and a powerful legislator.

    Government – Small division

    Winner – Crain’s New York Business; Will Bredderman’s coverage of New York City government        
    Will Bredderman’s reporting package stood out from the competition in this category. The standout piece in his entry, the Black Car Fund’s irresponsible spending is a fine example of the sort of ongoing corruption that would continue undetected were not journalists like Bredderman around to detect it.  Judges were impressed by the details in his reporting, and how solidly the stories were constructed.

    Honorable Mention – Albany Business Review; How Cuomo’s strategy stalled Albany’s nanotech dream
    An ambitious topic and a hard case to make, but this reporting well detailed the ongoing stumbles and dimming ambitions of Albany’s nanotech sector.

    Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    It’s not easy to write something compelling about accounting regulation but Project on Government Oversight managed to do it. Judges also noted the simple-yet-effective use of charts that showed the gap in fines and ambition of the regulator in ways that words never could.


    Health/Science – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); Bodies of evidence
    Extremely well-done investigation that brought to light a major problem and a great example of what journalism is all about.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Martin Shkreli: Business behind bars
    It is a very good story that broke and sparked investigations, something that should make any crusading journalist proud or jealous. It’s obvious the reporting was thorough and the story was not overwritten. It’s a great feature with a lead that painted a vivid picture.

    Health/Science – Medium division

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; UVA lawsuits
    Kaiser Health News showed how devastating unchecked hospital policies can be and the importance of bringing them to light. With their relentless digging, the reporters exposed how the center’s overly aggressive billing and collection policies were ruining people’s lives. Shining a public light on that forced changes to fix the unfair practices, including the CEO’s exit. This piece underscores the best of journalism, uncovering truths to make a difference.

    Honorable Mention – ProPublica; Newark Beth Israel Hospital
     ProPublica’s deep reporting at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center provided a significant public service by uncovering unscrupulous practices that some on that hospital’s staff thought they could pursue in secret.

    Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Turned away
    Turned Away brought light to a critically important practice that seemed to have expanded without curbs until the paper’s reporting brought it to the attention of authorities who were quick to act once they knew.

    Health/Science – Small division

    Winner – STAT; The medicine hunters
    This series takes the reader on an insightful and truly unique journey into the world of rare diseases and the medicines being developed to fight them. Along the way, it becomes clear the patients suffering from such ailments face challenges known and unknown as they navigate the world of specialized medicines and drug trials to develop them — including, most notably, whether they will even be able to afford the drugs they played a part in bringing to market. Using comprehensive reporting and research, combined with the human touch that reaches out through the portraits of those involved in the efforts on all sides, The Medicine Hunters was an unexpected story that was not only a great read, but a thought-provoking piece of journalism that stayed with the judges long after reading it.

    Honorable Mention – The Counter; The bowls at Chipotle and Sweetgreen are supposed to be compostable. They contain cancer-linked “forever chemicals”
    In a reminder that some of the best stories may be hiding in plain sight, just waiting for an intrepid journalist to begin asking the right questions, this remarkable story by the nonprofit newsroom The Counter discovered the so-called “compostable” bowls that have become ubiquitous at fast-casual places like Sweetgreen actually contain toxic chemicals. Marketed to customers as helping to save the environment, the bowls actually were treated with PFAS chemicals, the investigation found. The judges felt this story deserved special recognition for the impact it had on the fast-food marketplace, prompting many affected companies to publicly state they would stop using bowls and other packaging containing PFAS. It even led to potential Congressional legislation. 


    Innovation – Large division

    Winner – The New York Times; Data visualizations
    The New York Times’ data visualizations won the category for their boundary-pushing use of visual storytelling. What unites the pieces, and sets the bar for other news organizations, is how each piece used tangible illustrations to tell otherwise complex stories in a clear and elegant way. “The Dangerous Flaws in Boeing’s Automated System” was a particular standout. Its stellar use of reporting, publicly available information, and animation showed, with precision and clarity, how rushed engineering decisions could cause the worst-case scenario for any flier: an airplane suddenly falling out of the sky. “How Trump Reshaped the Presidency in Over 11,000 Tweets” gave due weight to the impact of the President’s use of social media throughout his term. And “Cities Start to Question an American Idea: A House With a Yard on Every Lot” was a smart look at land use and density in the country’s largest cities. 

    Innovation – Medium division

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    There was no debate among the judges. “Dairyland in Distress,” from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, was the top choice of all of us. We were impressed by the variety of ways that the paper told its readers about a signature business in Wisconsin — the dairy farming industry. In fact, it told its story without any story. Instead, it offered two sets of graphics — one showing the accelerating decline in the number of farms from 2014 to 2019 and the other looking at the reasons behind the steep fall. It gave more than three dozen dairy farmers their own voices on their reasons for getting out of the business. And it offered a clever “game” in which readers could look at the forces working against the farmers.

    Innovation – Small division

    Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Crain’s special project
    The Crain’s team exemplified the power of service journalism at a local level. The objective was to “raise the conversation” around important issues, and reporters and editors on the project delivered.


    International Reporting – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); The war against Huawei
    This is a compelling take on a technology story that continues to make headlines around the world. The U.S. continues to fuel fears about Huawei, its opaque origins, appropriation of technology, and alleged connections with the Chinese state, and the danger of providing Beijing with backdoor access to critical national infrastructure. This article makes a valiant attempt to address those worries head-on in interviews with the founder as well as company insiders and outsiders. It lays out nicely the arguments of Huawei’s supporters and its critics without rushing to judgment. Plenty of governments are yet to make decisions about the supplier of their 5G network gear, so there still is plenty riding on the outcome of this story.

    Honorable Mention – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    This is a very engaging series that clearly has involved planning and critical thinking. The detail is rich and the use of data is impressive in demonstrating that the United Arab Emirates imports more African gold than is officially exported by African nations.

    International Reporting – Medium and small divisions

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney uncovered a trend in India of sweeping importance: the relatively new cultural acceptance of pain medication and the pharmaceutical companies, largely chased away from places like the United States, that are looking to capitalize on the trend. Varney takes the reader to the busy streets and medical offices of New Delhi to provide elegant coverage that’s consequential for American and international audiences. The judges felt it could be a streaming documentary series — hopefully, Netflix takes note. 

    Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How big tech beat Europe’s tough new privacy rules
    Nick Vinocur insightfully reframed tiny Ireland as a powerhouse of global influence over some of the most important devices and media resources of our times. Vinocur’s piece showed how the world’s tech giants gained sway over Ireland and have used that power to undermine privacy protections in Europe, and by extension, the world. No wonder the piece was the talk of the EU tech community.


    Investigative – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times; Bodies of evidence
    As readers, the LA Times entry stood out for its visceral and financial detail, depth and accessibility. As judges, it was the entry we were telling our families about. It is the clear winner in a category of incredibly important work and well deserving of first place.

    Honorable Mention – Reuters; Ambushed at home
    The Reuters series presents in gripping detail systemic corruption so callous and bald faced that Congress was compelled to take sweeping action. It is everything investigative journalism should be. 

    Investigative – Medium division

    Co-Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett’s stories unearthed a Dr. Evil-scale cover-up of hidden FDA data on millions of medical device malfunctions, injuries and deaths. Her coverage forced the administration to open this vital data to both doctors who perform procedures as well as public scrutiny, and in the process, no doubt saved countless lives.

    Co-Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX – Flawed design, failed oversight at Boeing and FAA
    The Times investigation was stunning in its thorough, deeply reported and damning coverage of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft, the flaws the company had been warned about, and the utter failure of the FAA to do its job. For the flying public, the story was breathtaking in displaying how pilots were placed in planes without proper training or even understanding how changes in controls, meant to be helpful, could doom their aircraft.

    Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    A magnificent and impressive package, including a 40-minute documentary, that showed how Long Island real estate agents discriminate against people of color. Careful, methodical and indisputable – this is a story that shouldn’t be missed. Much credit as well for devising methods to capture irrefutable and extraordinarily damning anecdotes.

    Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press; Out of gear
    Reporter Phoebe Wall Howard held Ford Motor Company’s feet to the fire in a series of stories that began with a sentence at the end of an SEC filing, and led to revelations about what the company knew (quite a lot) before it decided to sell Ford Focus and Fiesta cars that slipped gears while in operation. 

    Investigative – Small division

    Winner – A collaboration of Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting and Associated Press; Caregivers and takers
    Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting wrote a gripping account of overworked and underpaid employees in the multibillion-dollar industry that operates residential care facilities for the elderly. The report details 1,400 cases in which U.S. facility operators broke labor laws, with workers making as little as $2 an hour to work around the clock. Reveal makes masterful use of graphics, video, audio and maps to help bring the story to life. Journalist Jennifer Gollan negotiated more than 50 FOIA requests and interviewed reluctant workers who feared the consequences of telling their stories. The overall package is powerful.

    Honorable Mention – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    The story was a powerfully written account of how JPMorgan manufactured false evidence in a private arbitration proceeding against a financial advisor who blew the whistle on investment practices. Judges were impressed with the writer’s ability to weave a strong, personal narrative alongside legal details. The story makes clear that the JPM’s shocking behavior brought no consequences to the bank. The sidebar article offers a strong analysis of the shortcomings of arbitration and whistleblower protections.

    Honorable Mention – ReligionUnplugged.com; Whistleblower alleges $100 billion secret stockpile by Mormon church
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints is among the most secretive and closed religious organizations. Paul Glader of religionunplugged.com got access to an IRS whistleblower complaint that shed new light on an important aspect of the Church’s finances and its links to Ensign Peak Advisors. The story suggests that the Church has funneled some part of the money received from its members into the fund, which has grown from $10 billion to $100 billion over the past 22 years. The complaint made clear that part of the money from the fund went to pay for a mall in Salt Lake City, despite claims to the contrary by the Church. The story was picked up widely by major news outlets across the country.


    Markets – Large division

    Winner – CNN Business; A crack in overnight lending markets
    CNN Business tackled breaking news about the overnight lending markets quickly and impressively, earning the top prize for its clear, engaging and consumer-friendly account of what happened in the repo markets, why it matters and what the turmoil indicates about potential future problems with liquidity and investor confidence.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Muni-bond mess
    The Wall Street Journal brought thorough data analysis and exhaustive reporting to bear on the longstanding dysfunction in the municipal bond markets. The coverage detailed problems with bond pricing, interest rates and ratings, along with an eye-popping look at an obscure Wisconsin agency that has issued billions of dollars in tax-exempt financing for projects across the country, some of which could expose investors to unanticipated levels of risk. The stories have prompted calls for increased oversight of the municipal bond market.

    Markets – Medium and Small divisions

    Winner – Fortune; Wall Street’s contact high
    This profile of Brendan Kennedy, the co-founder of marijuana maker Tilray, expertly explores the complicated path to the company’s 2018 IPO and the challenges Kennedy faces running a company whose product is still federally illegal. The story benefits from the hours the author spent with her subject, offering compelling anecdotes crisply written.


    Media/Entertainment – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); CBS MeToo
    After the firing of the CBS chief executive over claims of sexual misconduct, Meg James spent months checking to see whether the harassment and retaliation were pervasive within the company.  CBS said they were not. James’ reporting found problems in Miami, Dallas and other cities where CBS has bureaus. James used documents, interviews and extraordinary reporting skills to provide great details. James’ first story on Jill Arrington showed an ability to build trust with victims who were reluctant to talk. Excellent work.

    Honorable Mention – Associated Press; Local news deserts
    These are engaging and important stories on what happens to a community when its newspaper dies. With nearly 1,400 cities and towns losing news coverage in America, the Associated Press team examines what has been lost in these growing local news deserts. The stories also chronicle different efforts to resurrect news coverage – many unsuccessful and some successful – and the efforts of private philanthropy to be of assistance. One of the many strengths of these stories is excellent and insightful, on-the-ground coverage.

    Media/Entertainment – Medium and Small divisions

    Winner – A collaboration of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project and the Guardian; America’s rural radio stations are vanishing – and taking the country’s soul with them
    The Guardian article wins best story in the category of Media/entertainment for small- and medium-sized staff.  In clear, accessible language, the story elegantly links the Telecommunication Act of 1996 to the financial collapse of a local radio station in Arizona. Debbie Weingarten goes beyond just explaining how the law led to consolidation of the radio industry; she dives into the cost to communities, which are losing a key source of information and cultural identity as stations are turned into homogenized satellites of corporations. Beautiful pictures also enhance the article’s bold, empathetic storytelling.

    Honorable Mention – The Information; Media and entertainment industry transformation
    The Information’s package of stories deserves honorable mention as demonstrating deep and persistent reporting on the waves made by digital media. Jessica Toonkel and Tom Dotan found sources inside guarded bastions, like Disney and Netflix, to show readers how important decisions are made. The articles delivered good value to The Information’s subscribers, telling them things that the subject companies don’t want told– as when Disney whines: “This story is pure fiction…”


    Newsletter – Large division

    Winner – The Financial Times; Moral Money
    Launched in June, the FT’s Moral Money newsletter showed what creativity and flexibility could produce for readers with an interest in corporate governance and social responsibility, topics that animate investor decisions more and more but are overlooked in the day-to-day tumble of market coverage. The newsletter is packaged well with commentary, extended blurbs, photos, graphics and then roundups of headlines that provide a sweep of ESG developments over a week. Notably, Moral Money is not just a vehicle to promote FT content but to put the publication at the center of the ESG conversation. The newsletter routinely had links to articles that are produced by other publications, including direct competitors like the Wall Street Journal. It’s interactive too; the newsletter’s readers are invited to comment, and writers respond. The FT used the newsletter in September to round up coverage of the U.N.’s General Assembly meeting and focus on climate change. And in another demonstration of the flexible approach to the newsletter, writers took one issue to feature a Q&A with Leo Strine, the Delaware judge with enormous influence on U.S. corporate law. Great imagination, few wasted words and incredibly useful to readers; what a terrific debut.

    Newsletter – Medium division

    Winner – Barron’s; Review & preview
    Barron’s Review & Preview is the clear winner in a category where the entries demonstrated that a newsletter has many meanings. The best ones, though, are those with a good format, design and tone, lively writing, and which offer a good read on multiple subjects both for insiders and novices. Barron’s checks all these boxes.

    Newsletter – Small division

    Winner – Al-Monitor; Middle East lobbying
    This newsletter, covering almost everything imaginable in the golden niche of Middle East political influence, is unique accountability journalism, done by a staff of two, on an issue of great importance that no one else covers at this level of intensity. It breaks a ton of news and it’s all extremely well documented, with good use of the newsletter format. We can’t imagine their typical workday given the amount of time, effort and detail this takes.


    Personal Finance – Large division

    Winner – The New York Post; Earnin series
    The NY Post’s Kevin Dugan took on one of Silicon Valley’s darlings — Earnin — a rapidly growing, privately held company that quickly attained near-unicorn status (meaning a recent startup with a valuation of more than $1 billion). One of Silicon Valley’s largest venture firms, Andressen Horwitz, has a major stake in Earnin. Dugan found that Earnin’s popular cash-advance app resembles payday lending schemes with annual percentage rate loans that have been banned in 15 states. His reporting sparked investigations by regulators in 11 states. This was personal finance reporting with a demonstrable impact.

    Personal Finance – Medium division

    Winner – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; All she wanted was to pay her health insurance
    Solid reporting and a good story well told.

    Personal Finance – Small division

    Winner – Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Watch out for the elder fraud web
    Elder fraud isn’t a new topic, but this was well-reported, conveyed expertise and was full of actionable, practical tips for adult children who don’t know what they need to watch for or do.


    Real Estate – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; The WeWork delusion
    This exhaustively reported investigative series exposed WeWork founder and CEO Adam Neumann’s increasingly eccentric and unethical behavior. The report helped to derail WeWork’s initial public offering, sparring investors from billions of dollars in losses had they bought into the company’s planned stock-market debut.

    Honorable Mention – CNN Business; The internet didn’t shrink 6% real estate commissions. But this lawsuit might
    This story was comprehensive in explaining how technology is giving more knowledge and autonomy to home-buying consumers, which is threatening to disrupt the financial power structure of the real estate industry. It is a thorough, interesting and clearly explained report of the reasons for the shifts in the industry.

    Real Estate – Medium division

    Winner – The Miami Herald; Priced out of paradise
    In the aftermath of the Great Recession a decade ago, few cities have seen housing rents soar as dramatically as Miami. With painstaking diligence, the Miami Herald explores the economic and social factors that made Miami-Dade America’s most expensive market for renters in a four-part series titled, “Priced Out of Paradise.” Consisting of more than a dozen stories and videos as well as an interactive tool, the series “tackles a big-picture real estate topic in a big-picture way” and also explores “the local context of related trends that have much broader implications across the country, including income inequality and class issues,” as one of the judges wrote. The Miami Herald team effectively used the “human-interest elements of storytelling to draw in average readers who might not otherwise be inclined to read a deep study on a business topic.” The Miami Herald journalists deserve special praise for reaching out to experts in high-rent markets in different parts of the world to explain how other metro areas are dealing with rising rental costs. To help readers further, the newspaper developed an “interactive tool that allows users to input their budget to determine where they can afford to rent or buy, and how schools and crime rank from neighborhood to neighborhood. The tool is easy to use, informative in the context of someone’s individual circumstances and broadly applicable for many readers. This gives the package a news-you-can-use advantage when weighed against some other entries,” the judges noted. The Miami Herald team deserves congratulations for an extraordinary achievement.

    Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    This is extraordinary and impactful work. It reflects a deep commitment to being a community watchdog in every measurable way – time, effort and resources. The project involved 25 undercover testers in a three-year investigation. The resulting coverage is rolled out in 16 parts that detail the results, look at the underlying issues from many angles and hold individuals accountable. There is even a 45-minute documentary about the investigation. Among those spurred to action by this deeply reported and well-written series were: Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Attorney General Letitia James, three State Senate committees, the New York Association of Realtors, the National Association of Realtors and the county executives of Nassau and Suffolk.

    Real Estate – Small division

    Winner – McClatchy, Washington bureau; Epstein’s mystery island
    Incredible digging, well-organized and framed, and doesn’t hurt that it’s on one of the biggest stories of 2019.

    Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal; Collection of real estate stories
    The first story by Sichko about the young developer who allegedly stole millions from investors is compelling, deeply researched, and a qualifying entry on its own.

    Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; The standoff at Pope Resources: Deconstructing Dargey; HQ, too
    The Stiles piece, “Deconstructing Dargey,” was especially impressive. The piece offers insights into how a disgraced developer ripped off immigrant investors to enrich himself and put the investors into immigration limbo.


    Retail – Large division

    Winner – NPR; Lives Upended: Workers thrown into turmoil by faraway corporate bosses
    NPR’s Phyllis Fletcher and Will Chase contributed to one of the reports. This is excellent investigative reporting. Alina Selyukh found the issue, investigated the policy, explored how it hurt employees by telling their personal stories, then prompted change by Walmart to a policy fairer to employees.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Fast fashion
    Remarkably comprehensive spade-work and dogged determinism characterizes the storytelling and revelations in this trio of Fast Fashion investigations. Each piece surprises with the reporters’ success at getting elusive sources, such as the garment workers in Los Angeles, on the record to reveal the truth behind all-but-unknown brand names in the transitory world of low-cost, but celebrity driven fashion. The portrait of the family behind the H&M brand surprises with its depiction of seemingly heedless stewardship of a brand that was everywhere for some time and is now evaporated. The deep dive into partially successful and otherwise inadequate efforts to bring accountability into the global garment making industry offers an unforgettable, helpful window in the difficulties in introducing reforms and transparency into this rapidly changing market. A bravura scope of work.

    Retail – Medium division

    Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and BuzzFeed News; The final mile
    ProPublica and BuzzFeed deliver deep, meaningful, fearless reporting on the biggest name in retail. Their work uncovers the human costs of a secretive culture hellbent on delivery speed and efficiency.

    Honorable Mention – Newsday; Changing landscape
    Newsday’s coverage of the evolving retail landscape, from movie theaters to gyms to bridal shops, is a model for marrying on-the-ground color with national context and data.

    Honorable Mention – Fortune; Seven decades of self-destruction
    Fortune delivers new insights on Sears’ troubled past, with short, punchy sidebars.

    Retail – Small division

    Winner – Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Behind the smiles
    The scope of the project, combined with the accounts from employees, was impressive. This is important journalism, especially as Amazon pops up all over the country with warehouses and last-mile delivery centers. The judges found it particularly clever how the reporter circumvented the lack of transparency by having employees request injury data.

    Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Collection of retail stories
    The pieces were well written, engaging and informative.


    Small Business/Management/Career – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Labor squeeze
    This series was compellingly written; it did an excellent job looking at overall market trends impacting small business, manufacturing and employment, grounding it all in very immediate and human stories. The human elements of all three stories pull the complex issues into focus without oversimplifying them. These stories are local, they are global, they are small business, they are representational, and they are as much about manufacturing and trade as about workers and people. We also appreciated the tone of all three features in the package: Ruth Simon did an excellent job avoiding treating the focal points for her stories as quaint, sweet, inspirational, or pitiable—traps a less masterful writer could easily have fallen into. We were pulled into each story, and the whole series stood together as a cohesive whole.

    Honorable Mention – NBC News Investigations; In the hot seat: UPS delivery drivers at risk of heat-related illnesses
    This is an impressive investigation on an important topic, but one that would likely never have come to light if not for these reporters’ efforts. It’s clear that the reporting team took a lot of care in reporting these stories, especially in the face of resistance from UPS, using tactics like records requests and heat trackers—way beyond interviewing drivers—and the added perspectives of government regulations and other data round it out. The team did a great job of articulating the human cost of e-commerce and the strain in the logistics industry, and showing the perspectives of parties involved—workers, UPS, government, health experts and others. The result was very well reported, well written and very impactful.

    Small Business/Management/Career – Medium division

    Winner – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Excellent reporting. The reporting team did a great job telling the first-person stories about what the real business impact of Hurricane Michael was and a great job connecting the judge, the reader, to these people and their plights.

    Small Business/Management/Career – Small division

    Winner – Portland Business Journal; Diversity in the workplace
    Solid reporting and writing on a worthwhile topic.


    Student Journalism – Stories for Professional Media Outlets

    Winner – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; 123 have unexpectedly died in nursing homes, but Arizona still gives them top grades
    These four ASU students did a good job of identifying an important problem. The judges appreciated the human lede and the interviews with affected individuals in Arizona. This is a well-organized and clearly written piece.

    Honorable Mention – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; Arizona charges less than almost anyone else to graze cattle. Public schools miss out on the money.
    These five ASU students identified an egregious situation in which state business interests are harming residents and provided a nice comparison with other states. The story was well done overall.


    Student Journalism – Stories for Student Media Outlets

    Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication; With Venezuela in turmoil, migrants and refugees turn to Peru
    It’s not easy to parachute into an international crisis and come back with a cogent story, but Ethan Millman did just that with his reporting from Peru. The crisis in Venzuela has been well publicized, but this story shines a light onto what has been described as the largest mass migration in the history of the Western Hemisphere. The reporting offers nice sketches of the mostly well-educated refugees seeking to rebuild their lives and gives an overview of the many challenges facing the host country.


    Technology – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Big tech’s hidden costs
    The Journal did an extraordinary job of establishing how rickety the quality standards have become on some of the world’s biggest digital marketplaces. Reporters not only documented problems, they invited companies to fix them and then took a fresh look at the companies’ conduct afterward. Even with the chance for a do-over, problems persisted, to a shocking degree. It takes courage and a big-picture view to spend months digging that deep. But the payoff is landmark coverage of an issue that won’t fade from sight. This is the type of vital watchdog journalism that makes an immediate impact, prompting people who work at big consumer internet companies to address obvious problems they had not bothered to fix or consider before.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Google’s power and peril
    This is an important document exposing the dissonance between public statements and private realities, and it goes deeper on this topic than any prior effort. It is a lucid, comprehensive example of explanatory journalism at its best. The Wall Street Journal’s reporters pull back the curtain on the profoundly important role that Google’s search engine plays in our society — and the ways that the digital sausage gets made. In doing so, they perform a great public service, balancing the ledger between the huge amount that Google knows about us vs. the very little that we know about Google.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; YouTube managers ignored warnings
    For years, YouTube has been one of the noisiest, most visible parts of the Internet — and also one of the most secretive, hard-to-understand businesses. Bloomberg’s reporters dig deep to explore YouTube’s inconsistent, often troubling, approach to the responsibilities of being the world’s largest platform for video content. Undoubtedly, this work of journalism spurred conversations at the company and put more pressure on leadership to take action. By getting such issues out in the open, YouTube and its corporate owner, Google, at last are thinking twice about how to handle deceitful or hateful content. Once again, we see that sunlight can be the best disinfectant.

    Technology – Medium division

    Winner – ProPublica; The extortion economy
    ProPublica’s “The extortion economy” exemplifies the best of watchdog business reporting. Compellingly written, these stories not only trace ransomware attacks to their international sources, they also shed important light on the failure of officials at publicly traded companies to adequately disclose their companies’ victimization by these internet pirates. While it’s been reported that these cases often require exorbitant sums of money to resolve, the ProPublica series illuminates the way insurance companies tend to push clients to pay out, rather than use costly data recovery systems. These stories have already led to executive and legislative action to address lack of corporate transparency and weak regulations.

    Honorable Mention – Forbes Magazine; Bumble’s Sexism Problem
    Forbes’ Angel Au-Yeung snagged an interview with a reclusive and powerful Russian magnate. She then used her interviewing skills and powers of observation to paint us a picture of a booze-fueled, misogynistic work culture accompanied by the snazzy lifestyle and the lack of self-awareness that is prevalent among many tech millionaires/billionaires behind buzzy tech startups. A fantastic story that also produced results. 

    Technology – Small division

    Winner – The Counter; Grubhub’s shadow sites
    Terrific enterprise to expose practices that Grubhub’s own partners didn’t fully understand. The coverage unleashed real-world consequences, with politicians pressuring the company and — most significantly — Grubhub itself, amending its policies.

    Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; HQ, Too; One company, two Americas; The education of Brad Smith
    The Puget Sound Business Journal scooped everyone in predicting where Amazon’s footprint would expand most after the collapse of the New York HQ2 project. Two Americas and Brad Smith were well-researched, ambitious stories in their own right, and especially so for a weekly publication.


    Travel/Transportation – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Boeing’s deadly failure
    There were dozens of stories written about the failures within Boeing that contributed to the tragic crashes of two 737 Max jets. The WSJ’s reporting was among the best. Not only did the reporters successfully explain the almost criminal lack of information provided to pilots on the MCAS system and how to disconnect it, they also used powerful graphics and illustrations to help readers understand how the system failures affected the trajectory of the planes. Photos and stories about the pilots also drove home the human loss associated with the crashes and the devastation left in their wake.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Taken for a ride
    The reporting on this story was fantastic: 450 interviews plus building the database, yeoman’s work for a single reporter. The storytelling kept the judges hooked and included powerful personal stories of vulnerable individuals whose lives were devastated. This is classic journalism in sticking up for those with no voice.  The story structure was also spot on – opening with anecdotes that drew the reader in and that were threaded throughout the stories. People were at the center of this series and illuminated the dark history of the taxi business and the failings of those in government in a memorable way. 

    Travel/Transportation – Medium division

    Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX Crisis – How failures at Boeing and FAA caused 346 deaths
    This series is well reported and sourced. The writing is clear which is no easy task when you are trying to describe something as technically challenging as software systems and how they help pilot (or crash) airplanes. The Seattle Times’ series lays bare how the erosion of procedures designed to analyze and approve safety assessments contributed to the crashes of two 737 MAX airplanes. The series shows how the FAA has, over time, relinquished much of its certification responsibility to Boeing itself. Boeing has been able to exert control over the individuals it has charged with making compliance findings, meaning they are strongly incentivized to make approvals and move projects forward. Although it doesn’t seem anything will change under the current administration, this type of reporting will eventually force the FAA to reconsider the way it’s running its oversight.

    Honorable Mention – Globe and Mail; Blind spots: How Canada’s reliance on U.S. aviation policy kept regulators from seeing the fatal flaws in Boeing’s 737 Max
    Wow. This was a feat of reporting. The story is horrifying and so well done. The Globe and Mail was able to show the systemic issues that caused a delay in response from Canada’s transport authorities and went deeper into Boeing’s role in it. It’s clear who’s responsible backed by deep, thorough reporting and tells the story in a compelling way. What an indictment of Boeing and the regulatory bodies that are supposed to be helping the public but instead appear to be run by the organizations they are supposed to regulate. This thoroughly researched and reported article shines a light into how these bodies acted in the aftermath of the second deadly crash and offers lessons into the need for better oversight and information.

    Travel/Transportation – Small division

    Winner – The Information; Autonomous driving’s ambitious promises
    Amir Efrati and Matt Drange cover an issue that feels relatively new to the transportation space and do so in a way that holds big automakers (even new ones like Tesla) to account. This is excellent shoe-leather reporting where a small paper scoops major media – impressive. This story is on-target for a wider business audience.

    Honorable Mention – Baltimore Business Journal; Navigating Baltimore: A two-part series
    The series told stories of real people and shed light on the challenges of commuting. Navigating Baltimore is really strong – it told the story so thoroughly and from so many different vantage points with compelling visuals and fresh interviews.


    Video – Large division

    Winner – NBC News Investigations; ‘Zone Rouge’: An army of children toils in African mine
    What more networks should be doing: high-quality reporting, that is immersive and character driven. This is truly professional journalism at its finest.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; How Huawei employees helped governments spy on people
    This content is top notch reporting. Excellent writing but the content is king here. The judges would love to see more reporting like this in the United States because there is so much out there that is unknown, from cameras to recordings to listening devices. This was an inspiring story.

    Video – Medium division and Small division

    Winner – Quartz; Because China
    All the judges agreed that this entry is fantastic. They loved the detailed examination of censorship and how conformity is knit into contracts and social media, which is enforceable outside of China. Excellent production. This series was some of the best, most thoughtful video reporting the judges have seen this year and they particularly loved the deep dive into the impacts of Chinese demand for soybeans on Brazil’s indigenous people and environment.

    Honorable Mention – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Considering the topic — insurance — it was interesting. It explained the nuances of what gets covered and why being insured against some portion of your crop over several years can wipe you out. Who knew crop insurance could be so interesting? As someone who had family and friends impacted by Hurricane Michael, one judge found this video particularly special. The hurricane and its effects had very little coverage, and the judges thought this was a powerful and interesting piece that tackled a complex and heartbreaking subject.

  • 2019 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday March 30, 2020

    Congratulations to the 2019 Best in Business contest honorees!

    Submissions came from 183 news organizations across all platforms representing the breadth of business journalism, from international, national and regional news outlets to specialized business publications.

    See judging comments and the list of judges.

    Best in Business past honorees.

    Audio

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Wall Street Journal and Gimlet Media; WeWork trilogy
    Eliot Brown, Maureen Farrell, Kate Linebaugh, Ryan Knutson, Annie Minoff, Rikki Novetsky, Sarah Platt, Willa Rubin, Pia Gadkari, Annie-Rose Strasser, Griffin Tanner and Jarrard Cole

    • Honorable Mention – NPR; Profiles of America in full employment
    Jim Zarroli, Scott Horsley, Alina Selyukh, Uri Berliner, Pallavi Gogoi and Avie Schneider

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker; Bankshot
    John Heltman and Rob Blackwell


    Banking/Finance, Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Covert operation
    Mark Maremont and Leslie Scism

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and 16 media partners; Mauritius Leaks
    Will Fitzgibbon, Antonio Cucho, Amy Wilson-Chapman and Marwen Ben Mustapha

    Banking/Finance, Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; Trump’s taxes
    Heather Vogell and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of American Banker and ProPublica; How Trump’s political appointees thwarted tougher settlements with two big banks
    Kevin Wack, Alan Kline, Jesse Eisinger and Nick Varchaver

    Banking/Finance, Small division

    • Winner – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase Private Client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.         
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – The Real Deal; Trouble in the land of OZK
    David Jeans, Keith Larsen and Hiten Samtani


    Breaking News, Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; U.S.-China trade war        
    David Lawder, Jeff Mason, Michael Martina and Chris Prentice

    • Honorable Mention – The Financial Times; WeWork
    James Fontanella-Khan, Eric Platt, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, Laura Noonan and Elaine Moore

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; PG&E files for bankruptcy
    Mark Chediak, Christopher Martin, Allison McNeely, Katherine Doherty and David Baker

    Breaking News, Medium division

    • Winner – Dallas Morning News; U.S. pilots faulted 737 Max jets
    Dom DiFurio, Cary Aspinwall and Ariana Giorgi

    Breaking News, Small division

    • Winner – Baltimore Business Journal; Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding
    Melody Simmons


    Commentary/Opinion, Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; China-Think
    Li Yuan

    • Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times (CA); Michael Hiltzik opinion/commentary
    Michael Hiltzik

    Commentary/Opinion, Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; America’s broken health care system
    Elisabeth Rosenthal

    • Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle; Accountability
    Chris Tomlinson

    Commentary/Opinion, Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Holding Chicago companies accountable
    Joe Cahill

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; Commentary on drug pricing and development
    Matthew Herper


    Economics, Large division

    • Winner – Bloomberg News; Addicted to debt
    Christopher Maloney, Adam Tempkin, Ben Holland and Shahien Nasiripour

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; How Trump’s trade war went from method to madness
    Jenny Leonard and Shawn Donnan

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; TOPLive
    Chris Anstey, Marcus Ashworth, James Callan, Andrew Cinko, Crystal Chui, Eric Coleman, Mark Cranfield, Enda Curran, Neil Denslow, Andrew Dunn, Tim Farrand, David Finnerty, Tal Barak Harif, Andrew Harrer, Takaaki Iwabu, Ira Jersey, Stephen Jonathan, Alex Jones, Tony Jordan, Luke Kawa, Adrian Kennedy, Geoff King, Maria Kolesnikova, Anny Kuo, Scott Lanman, Carolynn Look, Sara Marley, Yuki Masujima, Steve Matthews, Galen Meyer, Chikako Mogi, Shoko Oda, Marc Perrier, Carl Riccadonna, Emma Ross-Thomas, Kurt Schussler, Arran Scott, Subramaniam Sharma, Piotr Skolimowski, Molly Smith, Yuko Takeo, Eddie van der Walt, Eliza Winger, Foster Wong, Doug Zehr

    Economics – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Rick Barrett and Maria Perez

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; No mercy
    Sarah Jane Tribble


    Energy/Natural Resources – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Brazil’s deadly dam collapse
    Samantha Pearson, Patricia Kowsmann, Luciana Magalhaes and Scott Patterson

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; Is one of the world’s biggest lawsuits built on a sham?
    Kit Chellel, Joe Light and Ruth Olurounbi

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; PG&E’s disconnect
    Ivan Penn, Peter Eavis and James Glanz

    Energy/Natural Resources – Medium division

    • Winner – The Arizona Republic; Arizona’s next water crisis
    Ian James, Rob O’Dell and Mark Henle

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity and “The World”; Pushing plastic
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tik Root and Patrick Winn

    Energy/Natural Resources – Small division

    • Winner – Honolulu Civil Beat; Reeling it in
    Nathan Eagle and Patti Epler

    • Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent; Dicey deals kept English Station dirty
    Christopher Peak


    Explanatory – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Hidden injustice
    Dan Levine, Benjamin Lesser, Jaimi Dowdell, Lisa Girion and Michelle Conlin

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; New red scare
    Peter Waldman

    Explanatory – Medium division

    • Winner – Fortune; Epidemic of fear
    Erika Fry

    • Honorable Mention – E&E News; Dealing with disasters
    Thomas Frank

    • Honorable Mention – Chronicle of Higher Education; How America’s college-closure crisis leaves families devastated
    Michael Vasquez, Dan Bauman, Erica Lusk, Janeen Jones, Jacquelyn Elias and Bridget Bennett

    Explanatory – Small division

    • Winner – Marker; The cutthroat battle between S’well and its bougie water bottle copycats
    Stephanie Clifford and Danielle Sacks

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay

    • Honorable Mention – Denver Business Journal; Why Molson Coors had to leave Denver
    Ed Sealover


    Feature – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Planet Fox
    Jonathan Mahler and Jim Rutenberg

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; This is not the way everybody behaves
    Eliot Brown

    Feature – Medium division

    • Winner – E&E News; The most dangerous malware
    Blake Sobczak

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – Report on Business Magazine; A long road
    Paul Christopher Webster

    Feature – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store
    Joe Fassler

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Atlanta rising
    J.J. McCorvey


    General Excellence – Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    • Winner – Financial Planning
    Scott Wenger, Chelsea Emery, Ann Marsh, Jessica Mathews, Andrew Welsch, Maddy Perkins

    General Excellence – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal
    The Wall Street Journal staff

    General Excellence – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel staff 

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press
    Phoebe Wall Howard, Jamie LaReau, Susan Tompor and Ryan Garza

    General Excellence – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal
    Portland Business Journal staff

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker
    Rob Blackwell, Dean Anason, Alan Kline, Bonnie McGeer, Joe Adler, Paul Davis, Penny Crosman and Suleman Din


    Government – Large division

    • Winner – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, The Miami Herald, La Posta and 16 other media partners; The bribery division  
    Staffs of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, La Posta, McClatchy/Miami Herald and 16 other media partners

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY; Copy. Paste. Legislate.
    Staffs of the Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY

    Government – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; The TurboTax trap
    Justin Elliott, Paul Kiel and Lucas Waldron

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Elaine Chao used her cabinet post to help Mitch McConnell
    Tucker Doherty, Tanya Snyder and Arren Kimbel-Sannit

    Government – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s New York Business; Will Bredderman’s coverage of New York City government        
    Will Bredderman

    • Honorable Mention – Albany Business Review; How Cuomo’s strategy stalled Albany’s nanotech dream
    Chelsea Diana and Liz Young

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay


    Health/Science – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Martin Shkreli: Business behind bars
    Rob Copeland and Bradley Hope

    Health/Science – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; UVA lawsuits
    Jay Hancock and Elizabeth Lucas

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; Newark Beth Israel Hospital
    Caroline Chen

    • Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Turned away
    John Diedrich and Kevin Crowe

    Health/Science – Small division

    • Winner – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – The Counter; The bowls at Chipotle and Sweetgreen are supposed to be compostable. They contain cancer-linked “forever chemicals.”
    Joe Fassler


    Innovation – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; Data visualizations
    Emily Badger, Larry Buchanan, Quoctrung Bui, Keith Collins, Nicholas Confessore, James Glanz, Mika Gröndahl, Maggie Haberman, Michael D. Shear and Karen Yourish

    Innovation – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Erin Caughey, Andrew Mollica and Bill Schulz

    Innovation – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Crain’s special project
    Jason McGregor, Hugh Dellios, Stephen Serio, Pat Nabong and Claire Bushey


    International Reporting – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); The war against Huawei
    Norman Pearlstine, David Pierson, Robyn Dixon, David S. Cloud, Alice Su, Max Hao Lu and Priya Krishnakumar

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    International Reporting – Medium and small divisions

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Big Tech beat Europe’s tough new privacy rules
    Nick Vinocur


    Investigative – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times; Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Ambushed at home
    M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer

    Investigative – Medium division

    • Co-Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Co-Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX – Flawed design, failed oversight at Boeing and FAA
    Dominic Gates and Mike Baker

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press; Out of gear
    Phoebe Wall Howard

    Investigative – Small division

    • Winner – A collaboration of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting and Associated Press; Caregivers and takers
    Jennifer Gollan and Melissa Lewis

    • Honorable Mention – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – ReligionUnplugged.com; Whistleblower alleges $100 billion secret stockpile by Mormon church
    Paul Glader and Emma Penrod


    Markets – Large division

    • Winner – CNN Business; A crack in overnight lending markets
    Matt Egan

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Muni-bond mess
    Heather Gillers, Gunjan Banerji and Tom McGinty

    Markets – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – Fortune; Wall Street’s contact high
    Jen Wieczner


    Media/Entertainment – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); CBS MeToo
    Meg James

    • Honorable Mention – Associated Press; Local news deserts
    David Bauder, David Lieb, Alexandra Olson and Janie Har

    Media/Entertainment – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Economic Hardship Reporting Project and The Guardian; America’s rural radio stations are vanishing – and taking the country’s soul with them
    Debbie Weingarten

    • Honorable Mention – The Information; Media and entertainment industry transformation
    Tom Dotan and Jessica Toonkel


    Newsletter – Large division

    • Winner – The Financial Times; Moral money
    Gillian Tett, Billy Nauman, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson and Patrick Temple-West

    Newsletter – Medium division

    • Winner – Barron’s; Review & preview
    Alex Eule, Nicholas Jasinski, Ben Walsh and Jeffrey Cane

    Newsletter – Small division

    • Winner – Al-Monitor; Middle East lobbying
    Julian Pecquet and Aaron Schaffer


    Personal Finance – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Post; Earnin series
    Kevin Dugan

    Personal Finance – Medium division

    • Winner – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; All she wanted was to pay her health insurance
    Tim Grant

    Personal Finance – Small division

    • Winner – Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Watch out for the elder fraud web
    Miriam Cross


    Real Estate – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; The WeWork delusion
    Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell

    • Honorable Mention – CNN Business; The internet didn’t shrink 6% real estate commissions. But this lawsuit might
    Lydia DePillis and Bronte Lord

    Real Estate – Medium division

    • Winner – The Miami Herald; Priced out of paradise
    Andres Viglucci, Rene Rodriguez, Rob Wile, Jane Wooldridge, Aaron Albright and Taylor Dolven

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    Real Estate – Small division

    • Winner – McClatchy, Washington bureau; Epstein’s mystery island
    Kevin G. Hall and Julie K. Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal; Collection of real estate stories
    Adam Sichko and Meg Garner

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; The standoff at Pope Resources: Deconstructing Dargey; HQ, too
    Marc Stiles and Ashley Stewart


    Retail – Large division

    • Winner – NPR; Lives Upended: Workers thrown into turmoil by faraway corporate bosses
    Alina Selyukh, Jennifer Liberto, Pallavi Gogoi, Uri Berliner and Avie Schneider.

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Fast fashion
    Sapna Maheshwari, Natalie Kitroeff and Elizabeth Paton

    Retail – Medium division

    • Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and BuzzFeed News; The final mile
    Ken Bensinger, Caroline O’Donovan, Patricia Callahan, James Bandler and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Changing landscape
    Tory N. Parrish

    • Honorable Mention – Fortune; Seven decades of self-destruction
    Geoff Colvin and Phil Wahba

    Retail – Small division

    • Winner – Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Behind the smiles
    Will Evans, Rachel de Leon, Byard Duncan, Melissa Lewis, Katharine Mieszkowski and Hannah Young

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Collection of retail stories
    Elizabeth Segran


    Small Business/Management/Career – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Labor squeeze
    Ruth Simon

    • Honorable Mention – NBC News Investigations; In the hot seat: UPS delivery drivers at risk of heat-related illnesses
    Lisa Riordan Seville, Adiel Kaplan, Kenzi Abou-Sabe and Cynthia McFadden

    Small Business/Management/Career – Medium division

    • Winner – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Marcus Stern, Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright and Charlotte Kesl

    Small Business/Management/Career – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal; Diversity in the workplace
    Malia Spencer


    Student Journalism – Stories for Professional Media Outlets

    • Winner – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; 123 have unexpectedly died in nursing homes, but Arizona still gives them top grades
    Ethan Millman, Molly Stellino, Erica Block and Megan Boyanton

    • Honorable Mention – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; Arizona charges less than almost anyone else to graze cattle. Public schools miss out on the money.
    Mackenzie Shuman, Harrison Mantas, Yael Grauer, Molly Duerig and Grayson Schmidt


    Student Journalism – Stories for Student Media Outlets

    • Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication; With Venezuela in turmoil, migrants and refugees turn to Peru
    Ethan Millman


    Technology – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Big tech’s hidden costs
    Kirsten Grind, Gregory Zuckerman, Shane Shifflett, Alexandra Berzon and Justin Scheck

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Google’s power and peril
    Keach Hagey, Vivien Ngo, Kirsten Grind, Sam Schechner, Robert McMillan, John West, Rob Copeland and Katherine Bindley

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; YouTube managers ignored warnings
    Mark Bergen and Lucas Shaw

    Technology – Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; The extortion economy
    Renee Dudley and Jeff Kao

    • Honorable Mention – Forbes Magazine; Bumble’s Sexism Problem
    Angel Au-Yeung

    Technology – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; Grubhub’s shadow sites
    H. Claire Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; HQ, too: One company, two Americas – The education of Brad Smith
    Marc Stiles, Ashley Stewart and Paxtyn Merten


    Travel/Transportation – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Boeing’s deadly failure
    Andrew Tangel, Andy Pasztor, Mark Maremont, Mariano Zafra, Robert Wall, Elliot Bentley, Merrill Sherman, Matina Stevis-Gridneff and Yonathan Menkir Kassa

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Taken for a ride
    Brian M. Rosenthal

    Travel/Transportation – Medium division

    • Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX Crisis – How failures at Boeing and FAA caused 346 deaths
    Dominic Gates, Mike Baker, Steve Miletich and Lewis Kamb

    • Honorable Mention – Globe and Mail; Blind spots: How Canada’s reliance on U.S. aviation policy kept regulators from seeing the fatal flaws in Boeing’s 737 Max
    Grant Robertson and Eric Atkins

    Travel/Transportation – Small division

    • Winner – The Information; Autonomous driving’s ambitious promises
    Amir Efrati and Matt Drange

    • Honorable Mention – Baltimore Business Journal; Navigating Baltimore: A two-part series
    Baltimore Business Journal staff


    Video – Large division

    • Winner – NBC News Investigations; ‘Zone Rouge’: An army of children toils in African mine
    Cynthia McFadden, Christine Romo, Lisa Cavazuti, Bill Angelucci, Sean Keane, Rich Schapiro, Jiachuan Wu, Robin Mucarri, Anna Brand, Shahrzad Elghanayan, Kara Haupt, Dan Nagin, Brandon Barbosa, Richard Greenberg, Robert Dembo, Mark Schone, David Verdi and Adrienne Mong

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; How Huawei employees helped governments spy on people
    Clément Bürge, Josh Chin, Nicholas Bariyo, Joe Parkinson and Sharon Shi

    Video – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Quartz; Because China
    Isabelle Niu, Tony Lin, Nikhil Sonnad, Arielle Ray, Eduardo Araujo, Molly Rubin, Jacob Templin and Emily Watson

    • Honorable Mention – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright, Marcus Stern and Charlotte Kesl

  • SABEW Supports the Free Flow of Information to Cover the Impact of the Coronavirus on the Economy

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Tuesday March 24, 2020

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) issues a warning to federal, state and local authorities not to disrupt the normal flow of economic data to businesses, the public and the media.
     
    Despite the extraordinary disruptions posed by the coronavirus pandemic, accurate information about economic conditions lies at the heart of a functioning, free enterprise system. Government agencies have a responsibility to produce accurate and timely information about unemployment claims, GDP, asset prices and other economic indicators and let journalists and the public digest and interpret them.
     
    Efforts to suppress daily jobless claims information at the state level are alarming. It is an early indication that agencies may have an implicit bias to suppress negative information which has its own risks at this perilous time. A fundamental problem with understanding the impact of coronavirus on the economy is the large element of unpredictability, and suppression of information of any kind simply accelerates uncertainty.
     
    For the sake of a free and open society and our free enterprise system, we urge governments at all levels to provide factual data in a timely way and trust the financial press and the American people to interpret the data and make informed choices about the future of our economy.
  • Technology and Business Reporter at GeekWire

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday January 21, 2020

    Job Description: The journalist in this role will find, report and break stories about influential companies, entrepreneurs, researchers, and leaders in one of the most dynamic and interesting regions of the world — home to tech giants such as Microsoft and Amazon; large engineering centers; major public companies; fast-growing technology startups; cutting-edge health tech ventures; innovative cloud and AI companies; major scientific research institutions; and ambitious global philanthropies. The reporter will cover daily stories, work on in-depth projects and profiles, manage standing editorial features, contribute to podcasts and videos, speak at events, and collaborate with other members of the GeekWire team.

    Job Qualifications: Minimum of three years of daily journalism experience. Track record of impactful stories in communities you’ve covered. Strong writing skills, and ability to convey information in a clear, concise and conversational manner. Able to work a flexible schedule, including nights and weekends. Ability to interact professionally and build working relationships and sources.

    How to Apply: Click here to apply.

  • Younger generations have different interests in personal finance coverage

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday November 19, 2019

    By Erin Schilling, University of Georgia

    Money divides Baby Boomers and Generation Z’ers just as much as it connects them.

    Young people are now using the blasé “OK, Boomer” meme to defend against the “snowflake” snub from older folks, creating a virtual war in which no topic — especially money management — is safe from fire.

    But personal finance gets tricky. Young adults need the advice and knowledge from the older generation to navigate a world in a responsible way, but the changes in the market and the way in which young people consume news has created a disconnect between personal finance experts and recent graduates.

    At a personal finance panel at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing conference in New York, Dan Colarusso, senior vice president of CNBC, noted that young people have to be more flexible with their finances than previous generations because of different challenges with student loans and job opportunities.

    Cooper McGee, a senior multimedia journalism major at the University of South Carolina, has noticed generational differences when it comes to money.

    “We’re against the grain when it comes to managing our money,” said McGee, who was attending the conference. “I think the advice they give is still really relevant to all generations, but we’re a lot more independent. We’d rather look into it ourselves than take advice from financial planners.”

    McGee is working on an article about personal finance at USC, and said his advice probably will be different than what the panelists write for their audiences. He and the panelists agreed that personal finance writers need expertise in the topic.

    Beth Pinsker, a Reuters journalist, is also a certified financial planner, which she said helps in her coverage of personal finance. The other panelists said reporting on this topic is experiential journalism, and it’s helpful for journalists to put into practice the same advice they’re giving their audiences.

    But the differences among generations also affects the way in which the content needs to be presented to reach certain audiences.

    The finance reporters on the panel said some of their most-read articles have specific, digital-geared formats. Colarusso pointed to listicles as an example.

    Laurryn Thomas, a USC senior multimedia journalism also attending the conference, said these are the types of articles she usually reads.

    McGee said he and other college students look for information about personal finances via the internet, but they shop for information instead of going to a specific financial planner or writer.

    Everything with personal finances “depends,” Pinsker said, so seeing an array of different ideas may help the consumer make better decisions. However, there’s also a chance unqualified people are writing finance news, so the consumer has to be careful who they trust.

    The panelists said personal finance reporting should always be about storytelling no matter changes in audience or medium. They also said journalists should strive to make money advice accessible to a diverse crowd.

    “Personal finance is getting more personal,” Colarusso said. “It’s evolving before us, and that lends itself to storytelling.”

    Erin Schilling is a journalism major in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia.

  • Best in Business FAQs

    Posted By sabew on Friday November 15, 2019

    Q: May we enter the same story in a story topic category and a story type category?
    A: Yes. In fact, you can enter the same story in one story topic and one story type category. However, you cannot use the same story in more than one story topic category or more than one story type category.

    Q: How do we submit a series if we are only allowed three elements?
    A: We suggest submitting the best three examples of the series. You may submit more information about the series, including a URL to a page with the rest of the series, in your cover letter.

    You may submit up to five elements in the General Excellence category, however.

    Q: Can you help me understand how General Excellence works.

    A: General excellence is set up to showcase the organization. There are five different areas of coverage you can choose from and you must submit from at least three of the five.

    Q: In a collaboration, does every participating organization have to be a member?

    No. But at least one person in each byline must be a SABEW member for each element you submit.

    Q: In a collaboration, how do I determine which size group to enter? 

    A: Editorial staff size for collaborations must be based on a combination of all the newsrooms.

    Q: When will I find out if I won?
    A: Winners will be notified during the month of March and will be honored at the BIB Awards Celebration on Friday, May 1 at SABEW20 in Toronto, Canada.

    Still can’t find the answer?  SABEW can help. Contact us at [email protected] or 602-496-7862 between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. EST.

    For membership questions, contact Tess McLaughlin, [email protected]g.

  • 2019 State of the Business Journalism Industry survey released

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Saturday November 9, 2019

    SABEW and rbb Communications conducted a Snapshot Survey about the State of Business Journalism Today in late October that engaged 78 members. rbb is an integrated communications agency in Miami, Florida, which generously sponsors the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award contest.

    The survey is designed to capture a “read” of how members feel rather than be scientifically perfect. We asked about digital content manipulation, attacks on the media, the most important skill young journalists need, today’s journalism environment and unionization. The following are the answers from 78 survey participants; 27 of them chose to make comments at the end of the survey.

    Here are the results of the 2018 Snapshot Survey.

    Question 1 Answers
    * Because of “bad actors” and other digital content manipulation, people are facing an onslaught of false or misleading information. Which of the following do you believe to be most true?
    The platforms that are publishing this information, i.e. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, must be held to higher standards and be accountable for policing this content. 31
    It is impossible to stop the flow of misleading information and it is up to the consumer to pay more attention to the source of their news. 12
    News organizations should take a more proactive role and devote more resources to debunking false information and producing media literacy. 35
    78
    Question 2
    * The media continues to be at the center of attacks with regards to its credibility and perceived bias. Which of the following most reflects your feelings on this topic?
    1. The attacks have made me more concerned for my overall safety and I am now paying more attention to my surroundings when working. 31
    2. The questions about bias and “fake news” has made me more aware of the need to source and double check my reporting and the information I receive from sources. 12
    3. It’s had zero effect on me and I continue to do my job the same way as I always have. 35
    78
    Question 3
    * Which of the following is the most important skill young journalists (those with 1-3 years of experience) should be learning?
    1. Mining data for stories. 15
    2. Building relationships with sources. 21
    3. Building their own individual brand by focusing on a beat and an individual marketing plan. 3
    4. Generating and pursuing story ideas. 34
    5. Understanding the business aspects of your news organization. 5
    78
     Question 4
      * In thinking about today’s journalism environment, which of the following do you find the least pleasant?
    The pressure of producing content for any platform (produce an audio story/podcast, write several iterations of a story for a website and social media sites such Facebook and Twitter, shoot video, create graphics, report on-air). 8
    The continued uncertainty and instability in terms of jobs. 19
    Journalists are continually being asked to do more with less, sacrificing depth and nuance in favor of brevity and click-friendly content. 51
    78
    Question 5
    * Which of the following best describes your feelings toward unionization in the journalism industry?
    I fully support news organization unions and feel they are necessary to protect my interests. 57
    The formation of unions is detrimental to the journalism profession and is likely to hasten more news organization closures because profits will be squeezed even more than they already are. 21
    78
    Question 6
    *Any comments about the state of the industry?
    Question 5 is not an either-or question. 1
    I’m not sure if this is me getting older and having worked in the industry longer, but I’ve never been more depressed by media news than I was in the past year or two. The layoffs, closings, drama around purchases, attacks on credibility, push to do dumbed-down stories for clicks, job instability… 2
    The industry has mostly itself to blame for shifting from objective reporting to more-of-less participatory (a.k.a. “advocacy”) journalism. While this latter approach is an acceptable business model (primarily from the entertainment perspective), it hurts us traditional journalists who only care about the numbers, not the politics, of the story. 3
    In some ways, I feel the giant news organizations — NYTimes, WAPO, WSJ — are strong. But it’s the newsrooms in our big and medium-sized cities that are at peril. We need to be more vigilant and relevant than ever as our nation reels under a government and leaders — in both political parties — who exaggerate and manipulate information. 4
    The industry needs to find a way to support the continued production of quality journalism. This requires establishing standards of pay that will make journalism a field that talented young professionals want to enter– not one you can only afford to work in if you have a well-to-do family or spouse behind you. We cannot develop a diverse newsroom and freelance group if we underpay staff and especially freelancers. My company (a website) pays staff OK, but pays freelancers one-tenth of what freelancers used to make writing for print outlets, say 10-15 years ago. It makes it difficult to recommend the field to talented young people. This also means that writers cannot “afford” to spend as much time developing stories and reporting as they could when they were paid better. 5
    Regarding unions: The union effort at my paper has been incredibly disruptive, and the guild has used incredibly misleading statements that would never pass muster for a news story. It’s incredibly sad and disappointing that “journalists” would essentially lie and mislead others in order to get a union passed. 6
    I answered the first two questions with the closest answers I could find to what I think. But the phrasing of the questions and the options provided as answers tells me this survey isn’t interested in finding out the truth. “Fake news” isn’t an accusation, it’s a product, pumped out by far too many of my colleagues at name-brand national media. It’s clearly a one-party industry that has dropped all pretense of objectivity — and, just as clearly, can’t see that fact because of groupthink. We have largely earned this contempt. 7
    Every day I think of leaving, but every day I decide its important to stay. 8
    I’d like more than an either/or option for question 5, because I think it depends on the employer. I see both advantages and disadvantages with unions. 9
    You bet: There is a social breakdown underway – which I call DMR – Digital Mob Rule. Its the underlying societal change driving social which is in process of breaking everything. Balance is gone, depth is at the airport getting ready to leave, and attribution to credible sources was shot at the wall some years back. The pups today are “vics” who don’t see who the “perps” are and have blindly accepted the new corporate “rent your life” business model that predominates in the asset-stripping of individual assets and the “community” response (communism/socialism) which has inculcated at deep levels by the hysterical revisionists in education. (cranky George of UrbanSurvival.com whined in passing. As much of his 2012 book Broken Web is now coming to pass…) 10
    I can’t help but feel like journalism as profession is being devalued because anyone with a camera and YouTube/Instagram account now is considered a writer and part of the ‘working media.’ Some of the content is great, but I feel like it can be detrimental to the industry overall. 11
    Business journalists need to get back to the job of following the business niches they focus on — and learning its ins and outs. They should grease the skids of commerce in those niches by providing value to the B2B or B2C buyers and sellers. Translate the value proposition of the sellers into language the buyers understand — and become the objective source of info that brings together buyers and sellers. And it can be done with zero coverage of what normally goes for “news”. The news buyers want to hear is “how do I get ahead in my profession? How can what a solution provider sells allow me to reach my goals.” Fraud and social justice issues should play a valuable but only minor role in everyday business journalism. A biz journalist can succeed as a moderately paid independent if they learn a particular industry niche well, develop contacts, and can position themselves as an essential info provider and indirectly be “in the middle of a sale”. What I’m advocating is to become a combined industry journalist and analyst — not in Fortune 500 markets, but serving B2B professional niches where pros buy software, services, data analysis, and productivity enhancing tools. Would be happy to develop a podcast program (or other educational tool) for SABEW to provide tips on how I position myself in the telecom industry as a good example of what can be done elsewhere. I have listened to several of the podcasts regarding freelance journalism and I think I’ve developed a more realistic program of personal branding in an industry niche — as opposed to relying on cultivating editors. Calling your own shots and your own editorial niche is more fun and motivating. And i calculated there are something like 4,000 B2B niches out there in the US market that could support a journalist. My journal is Black Swan Telecom Journal (bswan.org). My name is Dan Baker and my email is [email protected] 12
    The gradual evisceration of mid-sized dailies makes me very sad. I feel we’re going to be left with a few national newspapers and specialty pubs for lobbyists/industry, and it is very worrying for civic health. 13
    The way the current administration denigrates facts and normalizes lies makes journalism as important as it has ever been. Yet the resources to hold elected officials accountable to the majority of their constituents shrinks and leaves Americans increasingly vulnerable to exploitation and manipulation by those with power. 14
    If the question about paying reporters more isn’t on the table then journalism as a whole faces an existential threat. A young talented professional who could be a great asset to a newsroom will go to other professions that pay them more competitive wages. 15
    Any statistics from this survey are going to be distorted by the lack of alternate answers available to many of the questions…including a none of the above 16
    It is really bad out there. the ability to do real, good journalism has been violently circumscribed. everywhere i have worked has hired me with the promise of time and space to do investigations, failed to publish most of those investigations when I’ve done them, and demanded daily sums of 500 words on Bill Ackman’s latest equity stake, for some reason. AI can’t come soon enough. 17
    There clearly needs to be more investigative journalism in business coverage. That has clearly gone by the wayside as more of the profitable publications in existence depend on premium subscriptions (so don’t bite the hand that feeds you) while traditional newspapers, struggling to find a profitable business model, seem to be cutting back on exactly this. 18
    Concerned that some readers don’t differentiate between objective news and sponsored. And I see it at the newspaper with management pushing those boundaries. I get google alerts on a story with the name of our paper but it is written by the advertising division. First residential areas that new home buyers should look at, then home sections, now some other sections. there has been talk of getting grants to hire reporters who will write only positive business stories while we can write the objective ones etc. VERY concerning. Slippery slope
    19
    Practically every story is about Trump, or needs to relate back to Trump in some way according to editors. This will ultimately backfire and erode public trust in the media even further. Also, the industry needs much more diversity of thought and background. The fact that practically no professional news organization saw the 2016 election outcome coming underscores how far removed journalists are from the every day reality of Americans. 20
    Your union question isn’t black and white. 21
    I did not want to answer question 1 because all the answers are equally important holistically in the real world. As a researcher, I find that question to be poorly written. 22
    The concentration of advertising revenue in a few digital platforms worries me more than unionization. 23
    I would have rather had a third option on Question 5. I’m pretty ambivalent to unions but the answers offered require a very black-and-white response. I support unions, but I DO NOT believe they are necessary to protect my interests. 24
    God help us all. We are more important than ever. 25
     To thrive, it will be essential to move quickly and pivot to adjust to the vast changes ahead in the industry. At the same time, certain rules continue to apply: Treat people fairly, be passionate about the truth, and engage readers and viewers. Short cuts, layoffs and one poorly thought out new idea after another won’t ring the register. 26
    Too damn many agenda pushers, reporters who really are stenographers. 27
  • Michigan Business Reporter at Bridge Magazine

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday October 23, 2019

    Job Description: Bridge Magazine seeks an enterprising, versatile and knowledgeable reporter to launch a new Michigan Business Watch beat covering business news and insights across the state for our award-winning, nonpartisan, nonprofit publication. This beat will focus on news through a business lens, examining how public policy impacts economic growth climate and frequent tracking of economic data that makes statistical trends relevant to a diverse Michigan business news audience. Bridge is in its eighth year of existence and is fully funded for several more years. Pay is competitive. Benefits are superb. This is not an entry-level position.

    Job Qualifications: Candidates with multiple years covering a business beat in a news or business publication are ideal.

    How to Apply: Click here for more details and how to apply.

  • Associate Editor/Media Relations at Sports Business Journal

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday October 15, 2019

    Job Description: Sports Business Journal is seeking an Associate Editor to join its team and lead coverage of esports, both in SBJ and in our sister publication, The Esports Observer. The ideal candidate will bring ideas and guidance to a team of reporters and work with and manage that group. The Associate Editor will edit stories, plan packages and oversee the direct deployment of resources across various publishing platforms daily and weekly to strengthen SBJ and TEO coverage of this important growth area. Strong journalistic, organizational and communication skills are a must. The position is based in Charlotte, N.C. For a full job description, click here.

    Job Qualifications: Candidates should have a bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and at least three years of journalism experience.

    How to Apply: Click here for the full job description. Send your resume to [email protected]

  • Business Editor at Boston Globe

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday October 1, 2019

    Job Description and Responsibilities: The business editor will be responsible for the Boston Globe’s daily business report for online and print audiences. The editor will oversee a business staff of about a dozen reporters, columnists, and editors. The business editor will respond to breaking news in Boston and beyond, plan the smartest possible coverage of the biggest business stories of the day, and direct ambitious enterprise reporting and projects on the Boston region. The editor will help maintain the daily business news budget.

    Job Qualifications: The successful candidate will be an unflappable multi-tasker with a range of experience in a fast-paced metro newsroom; organizing the daily business report; supervising reporters; helping writers conceive, polish, and elevate their stories; consistently beating the competition; and thinking broadly about what we should be covering, short- and long-term. We’re looking for a collegial team player who will help us produce a steady stream of lively and exclusive stories.

    How to Apply: Click here to apply.

  • The Information’s Matt Drange Wins SABEW’s Birger Award for Young Business Journalists

    Posted By sabew on Friday September 13, 2019

    Matt Drange, a staff reporter for The Information, is the 2019 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists under 30. Additionally, the judging panel chose to honor two finalists: Ellen Huet, reporter for Bloomberg, and Casey Fabris, reporter for The Roanoke Times.

    Drange will receive the award, a $1,500 honorarium and travel stipend to New York made possible by a gift from rbb Communications of Miami. The award commemorates Larry Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998.

    Josh Merkin, vice president of rbb Communications, will present the award to Drange at SABEW’s New York Fall Conference on Nov. 12.

    “In the face of many challenges, journalists continue to operate with courage and deliver quality work that shines light on the most important issues facing our world today,” said Merkin. “We appreciate the opportunity to work with SABEW to honor Larry’s legacy and offer support to the next generation of business journalists.”

    2019 is the sixth year for the competition. Past winners include Alex HeathJillian BermanWilliam AldenCezary Podkul and Mina Kimes.

    Drange, 30, graduated from Columbia University with a master’s degree from the school of journalism in 2012 after receiving his bachelor’s degree in journalism from Humboldt State University in 2011. He turned 30 in March, meeting the award age eligibility requirements.

    Drange has worked for media outlets, such as The Center for Investigative Reporting as a staff reporter covering technology, the business of guns and the environment. As a staff writer for Forbes Magazine, he covered Donald Trump’s business dealings and the technology industry. With The Information, Drange covers money and power in Silicon Valley.

    “I’m humbled to be recognized alongside such stellar journalists, including both past and present honorees. I’ve been fortunate to spend the early part of my career at newsrooms like The Information, which provides the time and resources to pursue stories worth telling,” Drange said. “I’m especially grateful for the support of my mentor and longtime business journalist, Marcy Burstiner, who taught me to report with tenacity and humility.”

    “Matt impressed all the judges with his persistence at digging up great stories. He displayed an incredible sense of how to mine for features on a particular beat and to tell those stories in an interesting way,” said head judge Jon Chesto of The Boston Globe. “His investigative piece on the decline in Big Tech prosecutions by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Northern California was noteworthy in its scope, and he deserves credit for ferreting out a loophole at eBay that allowed assault rifle parts to be sold on the site despite rules supposedly preventing such sales.”

    Chesto continued: “His tale about a saga involving a too-high hedge around Donald Trump’s Beverly Hills mansion was particularly entertaining, and he showed enterprise by explaining the pitfalls surrounding a company that sells gunfire-location technology. The competition was tough this year, but Matt’s the whole deal — a clear writer, an ambitious reporter, an ambitious thinker — which is why the judges selected him to be the new winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award.”

    A total of 31 young journalists submitted entries. The judging team was made up of SABEW members: Jon Chesto, The Boston Globe; James Madore, Newsday; Marty Steffens, University of Missouri-Columbia; Robert Barba, The Wall Street Journal; and Cindy Perman, CNBC.

    About SABEW:
    SABEW is the largest organization of business journalists in the world. For more information, contact Aimée O’Grady at [email protected].

    About rbb Communications:
    rbb is an integrated communications firm and four-time U.S. Agency of the Year. As the Champion of Breakout Brands, rbb inspires companies to create customer passion that delivers bottom-line results. rbb’s family of brands offers media relations, marketing, corporate communications, digital/social media and creative services/advertising. Specialty practices include consumer products/services, travel and leisure, health, sports and entertainment, professional services/B2B and higher education. The firm’s global network extends across more than 50 countries through its partnership in PROI Worldwide, the largest global network of independent public relations agencies. For more information, visit www.rbbcommunications.com or call 305-448-7450.

  • Business News & Enterprise Reporter at Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday September 3, 2019

    Job Description: Provides unique, in-depth cover stories for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution print and digital editions by independently examining local business institutions and trends. The writer must be highly skilled at research and source development and knowledgeable about state and federal laws. He or she must be capable of quick-turn news and longer-term watchdog and enterprise work while maintaining rigorous standards for fairness and accuracy.

    Job Qualifications:

    • Minimum of 5 years of professional journalism experience required, including significant experience on a business or comparable beat
    • Proven record of serving audiences in a fast-paced, productive environment that is shaped by research, audience metrics and audience needs in print and in digital
    • Strong news judgment
    • Keen organizational skills

    How to Apply: Click here to apply.

  • Aug. 15 – Covering the nation’s trade disputes virtual training

    Posted By sabew on Thursday July 25, 2019

    Trade conflicts with China, Canada, Mexico and the European Union have grabbed headlines, but where do these disputes stand now? During SABEW’s next teletraining session we’ll talk about the status of the nation’s trade disputes, how to cover them and what resources journalists can turn to when covering these topics. We’ll also talk about how reporters around the country can localize these national stories and develop regional angles.

    Listen to the recording. 

    Moderator
    Soumaya Keynes, The Economist
    Soumaya Keynes is the U.S. economics editor for The Economist based in Washington, D.C., where she covers the U.S. economy and the Trump administration’s trade policy. She also co-hosts the podcast Trade Talks, a weekly discussion of the economics of trade policy, with Chad Brown of the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Prior to her posting, she was The Economist’s economics correspondent, based in London, where she wrote about topics including the status of women in the economics profession. Prior to joining The Economist, she spent three years at the Institute for Fiscal Studies doing policy-relevant economic research on the British state pension system and public finances, and before that she worked as a policy adviser at HM Treasury.
    @SoumayaKeynes

    Panelists

    Adam Behsudi, Politico
    Adam Behsudi is a trade reporter for Politico. He joined the publication in 2013 to help launch the publication’s trade coverage and the must-read Morning Trade newsletter. He covers a full range of trade topics, including the U.S.-China trade fight, efforts to ratify the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement and turmoil at the World Trade Organization. He also reported on the fight to get the 2015 trade promotion authority legislation passed in Congress. Prior to joining Politico, he covered international trade policy for Inside U.S. Trade, where he tracked down the latest news on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, reporting from negotiating rounds on three continents. Before writing about trade, he covered local politics for the Frederick News-Post and crime for the Asheville Citizen-Times in western North Carolina. In 2018, Adam was awarded a SABEW Best in Business award for economics reporting for a story on the impact of President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the TPP. He also was the recipient of fellowships from the 2018 China-U.S. Journalists Exchange program sponsored by the East-West Center and the 2017 Japan Center for International Exchange journalism program.
    @ABehsudi

    Brett Fortnam, Inside U.S. Trade
    Brett Fortnam is managing editor for Inside U.S. Trade, a news service covering U.S. and international trade policy. During his five years at the publication, Brett has extensively covered U.S. negotiations with China and Europe, the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the inner workings of the World Trade Organization and the completion of (and U.S. withdrawal from) the Trans-Pacific Partnership. He is originally from upstate New York.
    @BrettFortnam

  • July 22 – The business of freelancing: How to chart a course for success virtual training

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Monday June 24, 2019

    Listen to the recording. 

    Independence. Flexibility. The ability to choose the projects you want to focus on. Freelance writing offers many benefits, but it also requires discipline, a business mindset, and the ability to juggle projects and clients. On SABEW’s next training session, we’ll talk about how to run your freelance business like a business, addressing things like the importance of an entrepreneurial mindset, how to successfully develop clients and interact with editors, what the current freelance market is like, and more.

    Moderator

    Howard R. Gold is a columnist with MarketWatch and contributing writer to Poets & Quants, a website focusing on the world’s leading business schools. He was the founding editor of Barrons.com and also has written for Forbes, Money, CJR and USAToday. He won a Gerald R. Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism for his coverage of a Miami savings & loan during the S&L crisis.

     

    Panelists

    Ryan Derousseau is a freelance writer who has been working in investing and
    personal finance for the past decade. Over the past five years, he has worked as a full-time freelancer, serving as a regular contributor to Fortune and MONEY, while also writing for various other publications, including The New York Times, BBC, CNBC, Consumer Reports, Barron’s, and many others. Ryan also authored The Everything Guide to Investing in Cryptocurrencies, which looks at how to protect your finances if you want to bet on the very risky asset class.

     

     

    John Kimelman is a veteran financial journalist who in the past year has
    developeda new identity as a content creator for corporate clients including Korn Ferry, Morgan Stanley, and smaller firms. For 14 years, Kimelman worked as an online editor, columnist and magazine writer for Barron’s, the Dow Jones investment publication. Before that, he worked as a staff editor and writer with American Banker and CNBC.com, among other publications. A native of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, John holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Clark University, a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University, and an MBA from Columbia University. He lives in New York City
    with his wife and younger daughter.

     

     

    Shen Lu is a journalist based in New York. She covers the intersection of business and culture and the people story of the U.S.-China trade war. Her work has appeared in ChinaFile, Columbia Journalism Review, Eater, New York Post, and South China Morning Post, among other publications.

     

     

     

    Rebecca L. Weber is a freelance journalist and writing coach. Rebecca has covered social justice, the environment, travel, and other subjects for publications including CNN, the New York Times, Dwell, and Ebony.com. She is based in Cape Town, South Africa. Rebecca hosts the Writing Coach Podcast at www.rebeccalweber.com/podcast.

    Register for this free training!

  • Transportation Reporter at Jacksonville Business Journal

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday June 12, 2019

    Job Description: Transportation is one of the biggest industries on Florida’s First Coast — and we’re looking for a reporter who can build upon our award-winning coverage of the sector. The job entails digging into the news at a seaport that is fighting to grow, an airport about to begin massive construction and a Class 1 railroad that is reshaping the industry, among other topics.

    Job Qualifications: We need someone who is great at sourcing, enjoys delving into data and has a drive to help business leaders understand and compete in a fast-moving world. The ideal candidate will have a couple of years experience at a daily or weekly: It’d be a huge plus if you have experience covering business, but a good track record on other beats plus an interest in the topic could go far.

    How to Apply: Email JBJ Editor-in-Chief Timothy Gibbons at [email protected]. Include your resume, clips and whatever else you think will demonstrate you have what it takes to help us produce the best local business report in Florida.

  • How to write an award-winning business story – SABEW19

    Posted By David Wilhite on Saturday May 18, 2019

    Andres Guerra Luz, left, a student journalist from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Politico’s Margaret McGill and Hannah Denham, a student journalist from Washington and Lee University, discuss their stories recognized in this year’s Best in Business Awards.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    By Hailey Mensik
    The Cronkite School

    Both student journalists and veteran reporters spoke about the projects that caught the attention of SABEW judges and earned them recognition at this year’s Best in Business Awards.

    Andres Guerra Luz from the Cronkite School won a best in business award as a student journalist for his story on the aftermath of Hurricane Maria and Puerto Rico’s efforts to rebuild through its tourism industry.

    He said that after a semester of pre-reporting from Arizona, being able to actually visit the island and talk with residents gave the story the color and direction it needed to stand out from other coverage.

    “What I was trying to do was capture the whole picture, not just San Juan or some of the bigger areas, but see what’s going on in mountains rural areas people didn’t know about,” Guerra Luz said.

    Another student winner, Hannah Denham from Washington and Lee University, produced an award-winning story out of what moderator Jim Nelson from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel called an “intern’s dream.”

    She received a tip about unfair charges from freeway toll roads and reached out to sources to turn a quick daily. After receiving a scoop several days later, she ran with the story and ended up producing a 15-part investigative series for the Tampa Bay Times on the company contracted to handle toll lanes on Florida freeways.

    Professional journalists too spoke about their award winning business stories, and lauded their publications for supporting their projects and providing the resources needed to tell them.

    Margaret McGill, a technology reporter with Politico, was covering the digital divide affecting rural areas in the country with limited internet access when she found her award-winning story.

    “If we’re going to do something on the digital divide, we have to go to the place, and write about the people who are literally the least connected, the farthest away and have the most problems,” McGill said.

    She used data from the Federal Communications Commission to find that tribals lands in Idaho had some of the lowest broadband connectivity in the nation. She asked her editor to travel there for just a day and speak with those affected.

    Despite covering a niche community, she made the story relatable through vignettes of residents who drive miles just to send an email.

    One of the largest projects to receive an award was from the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. It involved over 250 reporters in 30 different countries.

    The group covered faulty medical implant testing and procedures, which led countries such as Canada and the United Kingdom to look into their practices, 

    The news organization is unique in its collaborative efforts and global reach, said Will Fitzgibbon, senior reporter with the ICIJ.

    “We do not spend 12 months, which is the average length of our project, doing investigations unless there is a certain quantum of journalists and countries involved,” he said.

    Stories produced by the ICIJ have appeared in international papers such as La Monde, The Indian Express and Times of Zambia, among others.

    You can find a list of winners and other highlights from the awards here.

  • Real Estate Business Reporter at Miami Herald Media Company

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday May 14, 2019

    Job Description: We are looking for an aggressive journalist who will deliver exclusive, news-breaking reporting on real estate of interest to business audiences in South Florida via a daily newsletter. That means moving fast on breaking news while producing pieces that capture trends in the Miami region. Topics will span residential and commercial real estate and affiliated sectors including development, accounting, law, accounting, sales, marketing and land use. the job requires 3-5 quick-hit stories per day plus a weekly trend piece that connects the dots, explaining the real-estate business impact of significant reports and trends. The ideal candidate is an idea generator who will proactively self-assign stories that are on the verge of going viral and has a deep knowledge of South Florida real estate.

    Job Qualifications: Minimum 2 years experience in a news organization; real estate coverage experience preferred. Deep familiarity with Miami; local residence strong preferred. Strong writing and reporting skills, excellent news judgment. Unwavering commitment to accurate, ethical journalism. Demonstrated ability to use social media platforms. A self-starter with a collaborative approach and ability to coordinate and work effectively with other newsroom journalists. Demonstrated ability to work comfortably in a job that will be fast-paced, data-driven, shaped constantly by feedback. Must drive a car and ability to work in Doral office.

    How to Apply: Send resume and cover letter to Jane Wooldridge at [email protected]

  • Winners announced for the 5th Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Awards

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday April 23, 2019

    TORONTO, April 22, 2019 — Last week, SABEW Canada announced the winners of the Best in Business Awards, celebrating excellence in Canadian journalism.

    This is the fifth year for the awards, which are sponsored by the Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW). The BIB Awards are the only journalism awards program in Canada that specifically recognizes exemplary works of journalism that relate to business, finance and the economy.

    Thanks to our sponsors, who helped make the event possible: TD Bank, Facebook, Accenture, Fidelity Canada, BusinessWire, Manulife Financial and Longview Communications.

    Audio or visual storytelling
    Gold: WTFinance video series, Prajakta Dhopade (MoneySense)
    Silver: Pot supply, Timothy Moore and Chris Manza (The Globe and Mail)

    Beat reporting, presented by TD Bank
    Gold: Janet McFarland on real estate (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: Naomi Powell on trade (Financial Post)

    Commentary
    Gold: Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)
    Silver: Rita Trichur (Report on Business magazine)

    Breaking news, presented by Accenture
    Gold: NAFTA coverage by Adrian Morrow, Robert Fife, Stephanie Nolen, Barrie McKenna, Eric Atkins, James Bradshaw, Andrew Willis, Tim Kiladze, David Parkinson, Josh O’Kane, Sean Silcoff, Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Rob Carrick, John Ibbitson and Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: USMCA coverage by Kevin Carmichael, Tom Blackwell, Naomi Powell, James McLeod and Emily Jackson (Financial Post) 

    Editorial newsletter
    Gold: Daily briefing (The Logic)
    Silver: Cannabis Professional (The Globe and Mail)

    Feature (long-form), presented by Longview Communications
    Gold: “The unsolved murder of an unusual billionaire,” Matthew Campbell (Bloomberg)
    Silver: “The city that had too much money,” Matthew Campbell and Natalie Obiko Pearson (Bloomberg)

    Feature (short-form)
    Gold: “Toronto website Providr bets it can beat Facebook’s algorithm change” by Susan Krashinsky Robertson and Shane Dingman (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: “How to lose big money in Toronto real estate” by Joe Castaldo (Maclean’s)

    Investigative
    Gold: “Hustle in the oil patch” by Jeffrey Jones, Jeff Lewis, Renata D’Aliesio and Chen Wang (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: “The high cost of low corporate taxes” by Marco Chown Oved, Toby Heaps and Michael Yow (Corporate Knights)

    Personal finance and investing, presented by Fidelity
    Gold: “Go out on top” by Frances Bula (BC Business)
    Silver: “The Year of Fear” by Bryan Borzykowski, Joe Castaldo and John Daly (Report on Business magazine)

    Package
    Gold: Innovation (Financial Post)
    Silver: #MeToo by Armina Ligaya (Canadian Press)

    Profile
    Gold: “Darren Entwistle’s long goodbye” by Christine Dobby (Report on Business magazine)
    Silver: “The Decider” by Luc Rinaldi (Pivot)

    Scoop, presented by BusinessWire
    Gold: “How the government could net $200 billion selling off airports, major highways, utilities and Canada Post” by Zane Schwartz (The Logic)
    Silver: “Oil-sands outage upends global oil market, overshadowing OPEC” by Robert Tuttle and Kevin Orland (Bloomberg)

    Trade article
    Gold: “In the dark” by Daniel Fish (Precedent)
    Silver: “Selling out” by Tristan Bronca (The Medical Post)

    Outstanding Achievement Award
    Claudia Cattaneo (Financial Post)

    As Financial Post editor Nicole MacAdam put it in her nomination letter: “Claudia has been one of the most influential voices in Western Canada for nearly three decades. She is one of those rare journalists who earned the respect of both her peers and the energy industry due to her thorough, balanced reporting and deep understanding of the issues that matter to Albertans. But it wasn’t just her ability to break news that made her a must-read; it was her ability to bring context and analysis to these stories. Claudia was also the ultimate colleague, generously giving of her time to all who asked. Claudia was an editor’s dream right till the day she retired in May 2018: Deeply experienced but with the keenness of a rookie ready for the day—pitching something nearly every day; unflinching reporting, but with a delightful turn of phrase; blunt in her critique but with an acute sense of fairness.”

    CONGRATULATIONS, CLAUDIA!

    Best Young Journalist, presented by Manulife Financial
    Zane Schwartz (The Logic)

    In just four years, Zane has gathered an impressive body of work. As the 2017 Michelle Lang Fellow in journalism at the National Post and Calgary Herald, he ​created the first searchable database of more than five million political donations in every province and territory—a project that won him a Data Journalism Award from the Global Editors Network in 2018. He helped modernize Maclean’s 25-year-old university rankings system, a project that saw him hire and manage 23 freelancers to work on a 400,000-point database. He has been with The Logic since Day 1, where he has had a hand in everything from design to hiring new staff to editing investigations on Canada’s innovation economy and, as a reporter, consistently breaking national news. This prize comes with a trip to the SABEW fall conference in New York City in October.

  • SABEW Canada Announces the Finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday April 2, 2019

    TORONTO, April 2, 2019 – The Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is excited to announce the list of finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published in 2018. For this year’s contest, we expanded the number of categories to 15 (including beat reporting, investigative, commentary, trade article, editorial newsletter and scoop), and the finalists represent the most diverse array of Canadian publications we’ve seen yet, including names both old and new. Their stories shone a spotlight on a wide range of stories, including the legalization of recreational cannabis, real estate fraud, trade wars, mental illness, and even murder.

    SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges (listed below), chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

    The winners were announced at the Best in Business Awards reception on April 17 at Baro in Toronto.

    The finalists for SABEW Canada’s 5th Annual Best in Business are:

    Audio or visual storytelling

    • Pot supply (The Globe and Mail)
    • No strings attached (HuffPost Canada)
    • WTFinance video series (MoneySense)

    Beat reporting

    • David George-Cosh on cannabis (BNN Bloomberg)
    • Janet McFarland on real estate (The Globe and Mail)
    • Naomi Powell on trade (Financial Post)

    Breaking news

    • NAFTA coverage by Adrian Morrow, Robert Fife, Stephanie Nolen, Barrie McKenna, Eric Atkins, James Bradshaw, Andrew Willis, Tim Kiladze, David Parkinson, Josh O’Kane, Sean Silcoff, Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Rob Carrick, John Ibbitson and Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail)
    • USMCA coverage by Kevin Carmichael, Tom Blackwell, Naomi Powell, James McLeod and Emily Jackson (Financial Post)
    • NAFTA coverage by Josh Wingrove, Jennifer Jacobs, Kristine Owram, Eric Martin, Jen Skerritt and Lydia Mulvaney (Bloomberg)

    Commentary

    • Barrie McKenna (The Globe and Mail)
    • Rita Trichur (Report on Business magazine)
    • Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)

    Editorial newsletter

    • Daily briefing (The Logic)
    • Cannabis Professional (The Globe and Mail)

    Feature (long-form)

    • “Conquered by demons” by Kelly Cryderman and Jeffrey Jones (Report on Business magazine)
    • “The city that had too much money” by Matt Campbell and Natalie Obiko Pearson (Bloomberg)
    • “The unsolved murder of an unusual billionaire” by Matt Campbell (Bloomberg)

    Feature (short-form)

    • “How to lose big money in Toronto real estate” by Joe Castaldo (Maclean’s)
    • “Toronto website Providr bets it can beat Facebook’s algorithm change” by Susan Krashinsky Robertson and Shane Dingman (The Globe and Mail)
    • “Weed is serious business for Canada’s go-to pot banker” by Doug Alexander (Bloomberg)

    Investigative

    • “Inside the fall of Fortress” by Janet McFarland (The Globe and Mail)
    • “The high cost of low corporate taxes” by Marco Chown Oved, Toby Heaps and Michael Yow (Corporate Knights)
    • “Hustle in the oil patch” by Jeffrey Jones, Jeff Lewis, Renata D’Aliesio and Chen Wang (The Globe and Mail)

    Package

    • “No strings attached” (HuffPost Canada)
    • Innovation (Financial Post)
    • #MeToo (Canadian Press)

    ­­

    Personal finance and investing

    • “The Year of Fear” by Bryan Borzykowski, Joe Castaldo and John Daly (Report on Business magazine)
    • Mutual funds by Rob Carrick (The Globe and Mail)
    • “Go out on top” by Francis Bula (BCBusiness)

    Profile

    • “Darren Entwistle’s long goodbye” by Christine Dobby (Report on Business magazine)
    • “The Decider” by Luc Rinaldi (Pivot)
    • “The Instigator” by Katie Lamb and Joanna Pachner (Report on Business magazine)

    Scoop

    • “Oil-sands outage upends global oil market, overshadowing OPEC” by Robert Tuttle and Kevin Orland (Bloomberg)
    • “Coca-Cola’s cannabis drink deal with Aurora” by David George-Cosh (BNN Bloomberg)
    • “How the government could net $200 billion selling off airports, major highways, utilities and Canada Post” by Zane Schwartz (The Logic)

    Trade article

    • “Selling out” by Tristan Bronca (The Medical Post)
    • “In the dark” by Daniel Fish (Precedent)
    • “Help your client prepare a will” by Michelle Schriver (Advisor’s Edge)

    Our first-ever award for Best Young Journalist goes to Zane Schwartz of The Logic. In the four years since he graduated from the University of Toronto, Zane has gathered an impressive body of work. As the 2017 Michelle Lang Fellow in journalism at the National Post and Calgary Herald, he ​created the first searchable database of more than five million political donations in every province and territory—a project that won him a Data Journalism Award from the Global Editors Network in 2018. He helped modernize Maclean’s 25-year-old university rankings system, a project that saw him hire and manage 23 freelancers to work on a 400,000-point database. He has been with The Logic since Day 1, where he has had a hand in everything from design to hiring new staff to editing investigations on Canada’s innovation economy. As a reporter, he has consistently broken national news, including Amazon lobbying governments across Canada for billions in contracts after shortlisting Toronto for its HQ2 to revealing the government’s private assessment that there’s no downside to letting an American telecom come north.

    Our inaugural Outstanding Achievement Award goes to the Financial Post’s Claudia Cattaneo, who retired in May 2018. As FP editor Nicole MacAdam put it in her nomination letter: “Claudia has been one of the most influential voices in Western Canada for nearly three decades, through bust, boom and bust. She is one of those rare journalists who earned the respect of both her peers and the energy industry due to her thorough, balanced reporting and deep understanding of the issues that matter to Albertans. But it wasn’t just her ability to break news that made her a must-read; it was her ability to bring context and analysis to these stories. Her columns suffered no fools and offered a clear-eyed view that often punctured the Ottawa bubble. At the same time, she was quick to criticize the oil patch for its high-profile problems, such as corporate governance and handling of the environment file. Bureau reporters who work from home can often be isolated, but Claudia was the ultimate colleague, taking junior reporters under her wing, meeting her Calgary colleagues weekly to discuss story ideas, participating in weekly features pitch meetings by phone, generously giving of her time to all who asked. Claudia was an editor’s dream right till the day she retired in May, 2018: Deeply experienced but with the keenness of a rookie ready for the day—pitching something nearly every day; unflinching reporting, but with a delightful turn of phrase; blunt in her critique but with an acute sense of fairness.”

    Thank you to our judges, without whom we could not do this: Gavin Adamson, Vikram Barhat, Laura Bobak, Greg Bonnell, Bryan Borzykowski, Mark Brown, Dawn Calleja Henry Dubroff, Tim Falconer, Max Fawcett, David Friend, Howard Green, Megan Griffith-Greene, Kevin Hall, Brian Hutchinson, Jason Kirby, Peter Kuitenbrouwer, Steve Ladurantaye, Andree Lau, Katie Lobosco, Nicole MacAdam, James Madore, Garry Marr, Susan Nerberg, Mira Oberman, Matt O’Grady, Joanna Ossinger, Rachel Pulfer, David Scanlan, Anna Sharratt, David Topping, Andrew Wahl, Tom Watson, Jennifer Wells and Renée Williams.

    If you have anything questions about the contents of this press release, please contact SABEW Canada chair Dawn Calleja at [email protected].

  • Canada Best in Business

    Posted By sabew_admin on Tuesday April 2, 2019

    2019 Winners and finalists

    Jeff Sanford Best Young Journalist Award

    Our second annual Best Young Journalist Award (named after former Financial Post and Canadian Business journalist Jeff Sanford) goes to Natalie Wong of Bloomberg News. Soon after joining Bloomberg in 2017, Natalie broke news about the Canadian government’s plan to impose steel tariffs on importers, which moved the loonie and shares of some of the biggest steel companies. Last year, she penned a feature about college kids living in Vancouver mansions amid a luxury housing upheaval, which garnered global attention. It was the most-read Bloomberg Canada story of 2019. She also scooped her competitors on some of the biggest real estate stories in Canada last year, including Oxford’s sale of its Fairmont portfolio and the state of talks between Waterfront and Sidewalk Labs.

    Natalie’s impact extends beyond real estate: She wrote a profile on the co-inventor of BlackBerry for Bloomberg Businessweek magazine and spent days in a courthouse digging up documents essential for the feature, “The Unsolved Murder of an Unusual Billionaire,” which chronicled the mysterious circumstances behind the deaths of Barry and Honey Sherman and won a 2019 Best in Business Canada Award. She also broke news about NBA player Steph Curry’s investment in a Canadian travel startup, landing an exclusive TV interview with him.

    When a commercial property reporter position opened in New York late last year, the U.S. team snatched Natalie up and gave her ownership over one of the biggest real estate markets in the world. She has approached that beat with gusto and has already developed an array of sources that led to scoops about the fallout from WeWork’s botched IPO and the impact of the retail apocalypse on iconic high-streets, among other stories.


    Outstanding Achievement Award

    The winner of our second annual Outstanding Achievement Award is Marina Strauss, who retired from The Globe and Mail last summer. Marina has been among the most important voices in Canadian retailing over the past two decades, gaining the respect of both her peers and industry executives (who often dreaded her phone calls but took them anyway). She was known for her tenacious probing, critical eye and profound knowledge of the sector, bringing analysis and context to her stories, but with an easy-to-understand style that broadened her appeal beyond the business pages. As a beat reporter, she consistently broke news but also delved deep into big stories, providing definitive coverage on the collapse of Sears Canada, early troubles at Target Canada, the ups and downs of Hudson’s Bay Co., tensions between Tim Hortons franchisees and their new Brazilian owner, and so much more. She won Best in Business Awards in both the U.S. and Canada in 2019 for her story, “Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons,” and won best beat reporter at SABEW Canada’s inaugural awards in 2015.

    Beyond her writing, Marina was the model citizen in the office, often collaborating on stories and helping mentor other journalists. Internally at The Globe, she led workshops on writing business stories, developing sources and covering bankruptcies. She loved her work, and her enthusiasm rubbed off on her colleagues. Even after retiring, she took time to prepare her successor for the beat and still provides counsel—a mark of her commitment to her craft.


    Audio or Visual Storytelling

    Scott Gill and James McLeod (Financial Post), “Focals by north”

    Sean Stanleigh, Stephanie Chan, Laura Regehr, Ann Lang and Tara Deschamps (The Globe and Mail), “Industry interrupted”

    Matt Lundy (The Globe and Mail), data visualizations


    Beat Reporting

    Brent Jang, The Globe and Mail (natural gas industry)

    Eric Atkins, The Globe and Mail (transportation)

    Catherine McIntyre, The Logic (the gig economy)


    Breaking News

    The Logic (Amanda Roth and Catherine McIntyre), “Sidewalk Labs and Waterfront Toronto reach a deal”

    The Globe and Mail (Josh O’Kane, Alex Bozikovic, Jeff Gray, Rachelle Younglai and Tom Cardoso), Sidewalk Lab negotiations

    The Globe and Mail (Emma Graney, Jeffrey Jones, Carrie Tait, Kelly Cryderman, Gary Mason, James Bradshaw, Christine Dobby, Andrew Willis, Ian McGugan, David Milstead and David Berman), “Encana to move its headquarters to U.S.”


    Commentary

    Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)

    David Parkinson (The Globe and Mail)

    Rita Trichur (The Globe and Mail)


    Editorial Newsletter

    HuffPost Canada (Daniel Tencer), HuffPost Canada Housing Newsletter

    The Logic (The Logic staff), Daily Briefing

    Financial Post (Yadullah Hussein and Pam Heaven), Posthaste


    Feature (Long-Form)

    Charles Wilkins (Report on Business magazine), “Castaways”

    Zander Sherman (Report on Business magazine), “Forged by fire”

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Jessica Leeder and Lindsay Jones (The Globe and Mail), “Crypto chaos”


    Feature (Short-Form)

    Joe O’Connor (Financial Post), “An historic gold mine in a tiny Ontario town…”

    Danielle Bochove (Bloomberg News), “In planet’s fastest-warming region, jobs come with thaw”

    Sean Silcoff (The Globe and Mail), “Montreal analytics startup uses AI to play a big role
    in NHL playoffs”


    Investigative

    Matthew McClearn, Geoffrey York and Stephanie Nolen (The Globe and Mail),
    “See No Evil”

    Gordon Hoekstra and Kim Bolan (Vancouver Sun), money laundering

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Nathan VanderKlippe and Jessica Leeder
    (The Globe and Mail), “How did Gerald Cotton die?”


    Package

    Geoffrey Morgan and Vanmala Subramaniam (Financial Post), “Rural Alberta (dis)advantage”

    Ryan Stuart (BCBusiness Magazine), “The future of work”

    Chris Fournier, Erik Hertzberg, Natalie Wong, Kevin Orland and Paula Sambo (Bloomberg News), consumer debt


    Personal Finance and Investing

    Victor Ferreira (Financial Post), “The inconvenient truth about responsible investing”

    Tim Shufelt (The Globe and Mail), “The data game”

    Mark Brown, Sandra E. Martin, Julie Cazzin, Chris Richard and Daisy Barette (MoneySense), “Canada’s best dividend stocks 2020”


    Profile

    Kristine Owram and Susan Berfield (Bloomberg News), Bruce Linton

    Steve Kupferman (Pivot), “Toy Story”

    Jason Kirby (Report on Business magazine), “Trash talking”


    Scoop

    Geoffrey Morgan (Financial Post), “Billionaire Koch brothers dump Canada’s
    oil sands leases…”

    Niall McGee and Rachelle Younglai (The Globe and Mail), “Barrick eyes hostile bid…”

    Mark Rendell and Jeffrey Jones (The Globe and Mail), “CannTrust allegedly used fake walls to hide pot…”


    Trade Article

    Kelsey Rolfe (Benefits Canada), “Rise of the machines”

    Daniel Fish (Precedent Magazine), “Paying the partners”

    Leah Golob (Investment executive), “Singles: a growing demographic”

  • Editor at Virginia Business magazine

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday April 2, 2019

    Job Description: The editor will lead a full-time editorial staff of four employees and more than a dozen freelance writers, photographers and illustrators. The editorial staff produces 12 monthly issues of Virginia Business, a daily email newsletter, a weekly commercial real estate newsletter and two annual publications, Hampton Roads Business and the Virginia Maritime Guide.

    Job Qualifications: At least five years of journalism experience.

    How to Apply: Applicants should send a cover letter, resume and published clips to Robert Powell at [email protected]

  • 2019 Best in Business Awards Honorees

    Posted By admin on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Congratulations to our 2019 honorees! Submissions came from 183 news organizations across all platforms representing the breadth of business journalism, from international, national and regional news outlets to specialized business publications.

    Press release

    Judges’ comments

    List of judges

    Previous Best in Business honorees

    Audio

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Wall Street Journal and Gimlet Media; WeWork trilogy
    Eliot Brown, Maureen Farrell, Kate Linebaugh, Ryan Knutson, Annie Minoff, Rikki Novetsky, Sarah Platt, Willa Rubin, Pia Gadkari, Annie-Rose Strasser, Griffin Tanner and Jarrard Cole

    • Honorable Mention – NPR; Profiles of America in full employment
    Jim Zarroli, Scott Horsley, Alina Selyukh, Uri Berliner, Pallavi Gogoi and Avie Schneider

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker; Bankshot
    John Heltman and Rob Blackwell


    Banking/Finance, Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Covert operation
    Mark Maremont and Leslie Scism

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and 16 media partners; Mauritius Leaks
    Will Fitzgibbon, Antonio Cucho, Amy Wilson-Chapman and Marwen Ben Mustapha

    Banking/Finance, Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; Trump’s taxes
    Heather Vogell and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of American Banker and ProPublica; How Trump’s political appointees thwarted tougher settlements with two big banks
    Kevin Wack, Alan Kline, Jesse Eisinger and Nick Varchaver

    Banking/Finance, Small division

    • Winner – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase Private Client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.         
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – The Real Deal; Trouble in the land of OZK
    David Jeans, Keith Larsen and Hiten Samtani


    Breaking News, Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; U.S.-China trade war        
    David Lawder, Jeff Mason, Michael Martina and Chris Prentice

    • Honorable Mention – The Financial Times; WeWork
    James Fontanella-Khan, Eric Platt, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, Laura Noonan and Elaine Moore

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; PG&E files for bankruptcy
    Mark Chediak, Christopher Martin, Allison McNeely, Katherine Doherty and David Baker

    Breaking News, Medium division

    • Winner – Dallas Morning News; U.S. pilots faulted 737 Max jets
    Dom DiFurio, Cary Aspinwall and Ariana Giorgi

    Breaking News, Small division

    • Winner – Baltimore Business Journal; Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding
    Melody Simmons


    Commentary/Opinion, Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; China-Think
    Li Yuan

    • Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times (CA); Michael Hiltzik opinion/commentary
    Michael Hiltzik

    Commentary/Opinion, Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; America’s broken health care system
    Elisabeth Rosenthal

    • Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle; Accountability
    Chris Tomlinson

    Commentary/Opinion, Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Holding Chicago companies accountable
    Joe Cahill

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; Commentary on drug pricing and development
    Matthew Herper


    Economics, Large division

    • Winner – Bloomberg News; Addicted to debt
    Christopher Maloney, Adam Tempkin, Ben Holland and Shahien Nasiripour

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; How Trump’s trade war went from method to madness
    Jenny Leonard and Shawn Donnan

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; TOPLive
    Chris Anstey, Marcus Ashworth, James Callan, Andrew Cinko, Crystal Chui, Eric Coleman, Mark Cranfield, Enda Curran, Neil Denslow, Andrew Dunn, Tim Farrand, David Finnerty, Tal Barak Harif, Andrew Harrer, Takaaki Iwabu, Ira Jersey, Stephen Jonathan, Alex Jones, Tony Jordan, Luke Kawa, Adrian Kennedy, Geoff King, Maria Kolesnikova, Anny Kuo, Scott Lanman, Carolynn Look, Sara Marley, Yuki Masujima, Steve Matthews, Galen Meyer, Chikako Mogi, Shoko Oda, Marc Perrier, Carl Riccadonna, Emma Ross-Thomas, Kurt Schussler, Arran Scott, Subramaniam Sharma, Piotr Skolimowski, Molly Smith, Yuko Takeo, Eddie van der Walt, Eliza Winger, Foster Wong, Doug Zehr

    Economics – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Rick Barrett and Maria Perez

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; No mercy
    Sarah Jane Tribble


    Energy/Natural Resources – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Brazil’s deadly dam collapse
    Samantha Pearson, Patricia Kowsmann, Luciana Magalhaes and Scott Patterson

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; Is one of the world’s biggest lawsuits built on a sham?
    Kit Chellel, Joe Light and Ruth Olurounbi

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; PG&E’s disconnect
    Ivan Penn, Peter Eavis and James Glanz

    Energy/Natural Resources – Medium division

    • Winner – The Arizona Republic; Arizona’s next water crisis
    Ian James, Rob O’Dell and Mark Henle

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity and “The World”; Pushing plastic
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tik Root and Patrick Winn

    Energy/Natural Resources – Small division

    • Winner – Honolulu Civil Beat; Reeling it in
    Nathan Eagle and Patti Epler

    • Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent; Dicey deals kept English Station dirty
    Christopher Peak


    Explanatory – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Hidden injustice
    Dan Levine, Benjamin Lesser, Jaimi Dowdell, Lisa Girion and Michelle Conlin

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; New red scare
    Peter Waldman

    Explanatory – Medium division

    • Winner – Fortune; Epidemic of fear
    Erika Fry

    • Honorable Mention – E&E News; Dealing with disasters
    Thomas Frank

    • Honorable Mention – Chronicle of Higher Education; How America’s college-closure crisis leaves families devastated
    Michael Vasquez, Dan Bauman, Erica Lusk, Janeen Jones, Jacquelyn Elias and Bridget Bennett

    Explanatory – Small division

    • Winner – Marker; The cutthroat battle between S’well and its bougie water bottle copycats
    Stephanie Clifford and Danielle Sacks

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay

    • Honorable Mention – Denver Business Journal; Why Molson Coors had to leave Denver
    Ed Sealover


    Feature – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Planet Fox
    Jonathan Mahler and Jim Rutenberg

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; This is not the way everybody behaves
    Eliot Brown

    Feature – Medium division

    • Winner – E&E News; The most dangerous malware
    Blake Sobczak

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – Report on Business Magazine; A long road
    Paul Christopher Webster

    Feature – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store
    Joe Fassler

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Atlanta rising
    J.J. McCorvey


    General Excellence – Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    • Winner – Financial Planning
    Scott Wenger, Chelsea Emery, Ann Marsh, Jessica Mathews, Andrew Welsch, Maddy Perkins

    General Excellence – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal
    The Wall Street Journal staff

    General Excellence – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel staff 

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press
    Phoebe Wall Howard, Jamie LaReau, Susan Tompor and Ryan Garza

    General Excellence – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal
    Portland Business Journal staff

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker
    Rob Blackwell, Dean Anason, Alan Kline, Bonnie McGeer, Joe Adler, Paul Davis, Penny Crosman and Suleman Din


    Government – Large division

    • Winner – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, The Miami Herald, La Posta and 16 other media partners; The bribery division  
    Staffs of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, La Posta, McClatchy/Miami Herald and 16 other media partners

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY; Copy. Paste. Legislate.
    Staffs of the Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY

    Government – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; The TurboTax trap
    Justin Elliott, Paul Kiel and Lucas Waldron

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Elaine Chao used her cabinet post to help Mitch McConnell
    Tucker Doherty, Tanya Snyder and Arren Kimbel-Sannit

    Government – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s New York Business; Will Bredderman’s coverage of New York City government        
    Will Bredderman

    • Honorable Mention – Albany Business Review; How Cuomo’s strategy stalled Albany’s nanotech dream
    Chelsea Diana and Liz Young

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay


    Health/Science – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Martin Shkreli: Business behind bars
    Rob Copeland and Bradley Hope

    Health/Science – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; UVA lawsuits
    Jay Hancock and Elizabeth Lucas

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; Newark Beth Israel Hospital
    Caroline Chen

    • Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Turned away
    John Diedrich and Kevin Crowe

    Health/Science – Small division

    • Winner – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – The Counter; The bowls at Chipotle and Sweetgreen are supposed to be compostable. They contain cancer-linked “forever chemicals.”
    Joe Fassler


    Innovation – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; Data visualizations
    Emily Badger, Larry Buchanan, Quoctrung Bui, Keith Collins, Nicholas Confessore, James Glanz, Mika Gröndahl, Maggie Haberman, Michael D. Shear and Karen Yourish

    Innovation – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Erin Caughey, Andrew Mollica and Bill Schulz

    Innovation – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Crain’s special project
    Jason McGregor, Hugh Dellios, Stephen Serio, Pat Nabong and Claire Bushey


    International Reporting – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); The war against Huawei
    Norman Pearlstine, David Pierson, Robyn Dixon, David S. Cloud, Alice Su, Max Hao Lu and Priya Krishnakumar

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    International Reporting – Medium and small divisions

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Big Tech beat Europe’s tough new privacy rules
    Nick Vinocur


    Investigative – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times; Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Ambushed at home
    M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer

    Investigative – Medium division

    • Co-Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Co-Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX – Flawed design, failed oversight at Boeing and FAA
    Dominic Gates and Mike Baker

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press; Out of gear
    Phoebe Wall Howard

    Investigative – Small division

    • Winner – A collaboration of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting and Associated Press; Caregivers and takers
    Jennifer Gollan and Melissa Lewis

    • Honorable Mention – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – ReligionUnplugged.com; Whistleblower alleges $100 billion secret stockpile by Mormon church
    Paul Glader and Emma Penrod


    Markets – Large division

    • Winner – CNN Business; A crack in overnight lending markets
    Matt Egan

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Muni-bond mess
    Heather Gillers, Gunjan Banerji and Tom McGinty

    Markets – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – Fortune; Wall Street’s contact high
    Jen Wieczner


    Media/Entertainment – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); CBS MeToo
    Meg James

    • Honorable Mention – Associated Press; Local news deserts
    David Bauder, David Lieb, Alexandra Olson and Janie Har

    Media/Entertainment – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Economic Hardship Reporting Project and The Guardian; America’s rural radio stations are vanishing – and taking the country’s soul with them
    Debbie Weingarten

    • Honorable Mention – The Information; Media and entertainment industry transformation
    Tom Dotan and Jessica Toonkel


    Newsletter – Large division

    • Winner – The Financial Times; Moral money
    Gillian Tett, Billy Nauman, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson and Patrick Temple-West

    Newsletter – Medium division

    • Winner – Barron’s; Review & preview
    Alex Eule, Nicholas Jasinski, Ben Walsh and Jeffrey Cane

    Newsletter – Small division

    • Winner – Al-Monitor; Middle East lobbying
    Julian Pecquet and Aaron Schaffer


    Personal Finance – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Post; Earnin series
    Kevin Dugan

    Personal Finance – Medium division

    • Winner – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; All she wanted was to pay her health insurance
    Tim Grant

    Personal Finance – Small division

    • Winner – Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Watch out for the elder fraud web
    Miriam Cross


    Real Estate – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; The WeWork delusion
    Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell

    • Honorable Mention – CNN Business; The internet didn’t shrink 6% real estate commissions. But this lawsuit might
    Lydia DePillis and Bronte Lord

    Real Estate – Medium division

    • Winner – The Miami Herald; Priced out of paradise
    Andres Viglucci, Rene Rodriguez, Rob Wile, Jane Wooldridge, Aaron Albright and Taylor Dolven

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    Real Estate – Small division

    • Winner – McClatchy, Washington bureau; Epstein’s mystery island
    Kevin G. Hall and Julie K. Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal; Collection of real estate stories
    Adam Sichko and Meg Garner

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; The standoff at Pope Resources: Deconstructing Dargey; HQ, too
    Marc Stiles and Ashley Stewart


    Retail – Large division

    • Winner – NPR; Lives Upended: Workers thrown into turmoil by faraway corporate bosses
    Alina Selyukh, Jennifer Liberto, Pallavi Gogoi, Uri Berliner and Avie Schneider.

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Fast fashion
    Sapna Maheshwari, Natalie Kitroeff and Elizabeth Paton

    Retail – Medium division

    • Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and BuzzFeed News; The final mile
    Ken Bensinger, Caroline O’Donovan, Patricia Callahan, James Bandler and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Changing landscape
    Tory N. Parrish

    • Honorable Mention – Fortune; Seven decades of self-destruction
    Geoff Colvin and Phil Wahba

    Retail – Small division

    • Winner – Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Behind the smiles
    Will Evans, Rachel de Leon, Byard Duncan, Melissa Lewis, Katharine Mieszkowski and Hannah Young

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Collection of retail stories
    Elizabeth Segran


    Small Business/Management/Career – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Labor squeeze
    Ruth Simon

    • Honorable Mention – NBC News Investigations; In the hot seat: UPS delivery drivers at risk of heat-related illnesses
    Lisa Riordan Seville, Adiel Kaplan, Kenzi Abou-Sabe and Cynthia McFadden

    Small Business/Management/Career – Medium division

    • Winner – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Marcus Stern, Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright and Charlotte Kesl

    Small Business/Management/Career – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal; Diversity in the workplace
    Malia Spencer


    Student Journalism – Stories for Professional Media Outlets

    • Winner – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; 123 have unexpectedly died in nursing homes, but Arizona still gives them top grades
    Ethan Millman, Molly Stellino, Erica Block and Megan Boyanton

    • Honorable Mention – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; Arizona charges less than almost anyone else to graze cattle. Public schools miss out on the money.
    Mackenzie Shuman, Harrison Mantas, Yael Grauer, Molly Duerig and Grayson Schmidt


    Student Journalism – Stories for Student Media Outlets

    • Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication; With Venezuela in turmoil, migrants and refugees turn to Peru
    Ethan Millman


    Technology – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Big tech’s hidden costs
    Kirsten Grind, Gregory Zuckerman, Shane Shifflett, Alexandra Berzon and Justin Scheck

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Google’s power and peril
    Keach Hagey, Vivien Ngo, Kirsten Grind, Sam Schechner, Robert McMillan, John West, Rob Copeland and Katherine Bindley

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; YouTube managers ignored warnings
    Mark Bergen and Lucas Shaw

    Technology – Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; The extortion economy
    Renee Dudley and Jeff Kao

    • Honorable Mention – Forbes Magazine; Bumble’s Sexism Problem
    Angel Au-Yeung

    Technology – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; Grubhub’s shadow sites
    H. Claire Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; HQ, too: One company, two Americas – The education of Brad Smith
    Marc Stiles, Ashley Stewart and Paxtyn Merten


    Travel/Transportation – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Boeing’s deadly failure
    Andrew Tangel, Andy Pasztor, Mark Maremont, Mariano Zafra, Robert Wall, Elliot Bentley, Merrill Sherman, Matina Stevis-Gridneff and Yonathan Menkir Kassa

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Taken for a ride
    Brian M. Rosenthal

    Travel/Transportation – Medium division

    • Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX Crisis – How failures at Boeing and FAA caused 346 deaths
    Dominic Gates, Mike Baker, Steve Miletich and Lewis Kamb

    • Honorable Mention – Globe and Mail; Blind spots: How Canada’s reliance on U.S. aviation policy kept regulators from seeing the fatal flaws in Boeing’s 737 Max
    Grant Robertson and Eric Atkins

    Travel/Transportation – Small division

    • Winner – The Information; Autonomous driving’s ambitious promises
    Amir Efrati and Matt Drange

    • Honorable Mention – Baltimore Business Journal; Navigating Baltimore: A two-part series
    Baltimore Business Journal staff


    Video – Large division

    • Winner – NBC News Investigations; ‘Zone Rouge’: An army of children toils in African mine
    Cynthia McFadden, Christine Romo, Lisa Cavazuti, Bill Angelucci, Sean Keane, Rich Schapiro, Jiachuan Wu, Robin Mucarri, Anna Brand, Shahrzad Elghanayan, Kara Haupt, Dan Nagin, Brandon Barbosa, Richard Greenberg, Robert Dembo, Mark Schone, David Verdi and Adrienne Mong

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; How Huawei employees helped governments spy on people
    Clément Bürge, Josh Chin, Nicholas Bariyo, Joe Parkinson and Sharon Shi

    Video – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Quartz; Because China
    Isabelle Niu, Tony Lin, Nikhil Sonnad, Arielle Ray, Eduardo Araujo, Molly Rubin, Jacob Templin and Emily Watson

    • Honorable Mention – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright, Marcus Stern and Charlotte Kesl

  • As we observe Sunshine Week, SABEW expresses outrage over the arrest of two SABEW members covering a CA protest

    Posted By sabew on Thursday March 14, 2019

    The arrest of any member of the working press at any time in any nation is disturbing. When it happens to SABEW members covering a public protest in the capital of the nation’s most populous state, SABEW considers it to be an outrage.

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is offering this statement in support of two SABEW members who were arrested on March 4 while videotaping the protests over the decision not to prosecute police in the death of Stephon Clark. Scott Rodd, a staff writer for the Sacramento Business Journal and Dale Kasler of the Sacramento Bee were arrested along with more than 80 protestors.

    Clark was shot eight times by police in a March 2018 incident that drew national attention. Rodd, who recently moved to Capitol Public Radio, an NPR affiliate, sent SABEW the following statement: “My arrest while covering the protests on March 4 left me deeply concerned about the policies and procedures of Sacramento Police Department when it comes to interacting with the press. I hope the city leans into a constructive conversation about how to improve police training and policies to avoid similar incidents in the future.”

    While the Sacramento District Attorney has said she won’t prosecute those arrested, the fact that a reporter would be arrested, despite carrying credentials has a chilling effect on the media.

    At a time when the press is being attacked from many directions, this is not acceptable conduct. It is also a reminder as we observe Sunshine Week that First Amendment protections are extended not only the press but also to all Americans in matters of free speech and assembly.

  • SABEW welcomes Pallavi Gogoi, chief business editor at NPR, to its board of governors

    Posted By sabew on Thursday February 14, 2019

    Follow Pallavi on Twitter at @pgogoi

    Pallavi Gogoi, chief business editor at NPR, has been appointed to the board of governors of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW). Gogoi leads the network’s coverage of the most essential financial, economic, technology and media stories of the day.

    Gogoi has been appointed to the board seat previously occupied by Marilyn Geewax, former senior business editor for NPR. Geewax is teaching this semester in Beijing at Tsinghua University’s Global Business Journalism Program.  

    “I have always believed strongly in my mission as a journalist, in the pursuit of truth and in strengthening the fabric of democracy,” said Gogoi. “There is no better way to help the cause than to give back. I am thrilled to be joining the board of SABEW, whose work in journalism couldn’t be more important at this time in history.” 

    “We’re very pleased that Pallavi is joining the SABEW board, bringing her own unique and special talents and experiences to our organization. Her employer, NPR, is highly respected for the quality of its excellent work over many decades,” said Mark Hamrick, SABEW president and Bankrate.com senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief.  

    Under Gogoi’s leadership, NPR’s business reporters have cast a spotlight on current events shaping the country and society, including the intense scrutiny on Silicon Valley and the fight for and against free speech, the messaging from the White House and what that means for democracy, the #MeToo movement and its effect on working Americans and the emotional and financial toll on families at the center of the opioid crisis.  

    Her interest in examining the tectonic shifts taking place in the American workforce led her to spearhead a poll asking basic questions about people’s working life. The results were startling — they showed that while jobs are plentiful, they are increasingly unstable for many Americans who receive fewer benefits, work with less permanency and earn uneven pay from month to month. A week-long NPR series examined the rise of the contract workforce in America. 

    Before joining NPR in 2017, Gogoi was a senior editor at CNN Money, where she oversaw a team covering business news, markets and the economy. Prior to that, she was a national business correspondent at The Associated Press, where her work on mortgage robo-signing was the subject of a Senate hearing. At USA Today, she covered the financial crisis and bank bailouts. At Business Week, she wrote high impact stories that led to changes at Walmart, Edelman and The Washington Post. 

    Gogoi grew up in Shillong, a small town nestled in the mountains of Northeast India. She graduated from Delhi University, with a master’s degree in English literature from Hindu College and a bachelor’s degree from SGTB Khalsa College. She is fluent in five languages. 

    SABEW is the world’s largest association dedicated to business and financial journalism. For more information, contact Kathleen Graham, SABEW executive director, at [email protected]. Twitter: @sabew.

  • Business Reporting on Natural Disasters

    Posted By sabew on Monday January 28, 2019

    When covering natural disasters, business journalists have the unique challenge of connecting an audience with the specific impact these events have on local, regional and national businesses, from supply chains to logistics, to major employers, to mom-and-pop shops.

    While some natural disasters like hurricanes are fast moving, others like flooding and wildfires can take longer to cause their full devastation. It will take decades for the full impact of others, like the sea level rise brought on by global warming, to come into focus.

    Join us for a discussion with four journalists to learn of their experience reporting on these matters for various types of business audiences. We’ll hear from Tim Zawacki of S&P Global Market Intelligence; Ellen Chang, freelance journalist for U.S. News & World Report; Jane Wooldridge of the Miami Herald; and David Benda of the Redding, Calif., Record Searchlight.

    Listen to the recording.

  • Panelists Discuss Experiences Covering a Financial Crisis

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday November 8, 2018

    By Amy Scott, Cox-SABEW Fellow

    As journalists cover the ever-evolving stock market, there is a lurking fear of a financial crisis similar to what happened in 2008 happening again, according to a panel of journalists during a the recent conference of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing.

    Jillian Berman, reporter for MarketWatch, Jesse Eisinger, a senior reporter and editor for ProPublica and Louise Story, the editor of newsroom strategy at The Wall Street Journal, were panelists moderated by Howard Gold, MarketWatch columnist and editor of Golden Egg Investing.

    The panelists at the New York conference discussed the successes and failures of the media before and during the market crisis in 2008.

    Story, who was working at The New York Times during the crash, said she was put on the Wall Street beat right after the collapse of Bear Stearns.

    “I think one of the things that was actually helpful to me was coming in with a fresh eye and not having any allegiances or ways of thinking about Wall Street at all,” Story said. “Because I hadn’t been covering it I didn’t have sources, which was hard, but on the other hand it was kind of liberating.”

    Although no one spoke directly about how to spot the next crisis, they offered their insights about the economy’s path. Story and Berman said they are unsure of what will come next, but Berman said she is moving forward with caution.

    “I think we’ve all brought up things that are troubling and that are maybe different and are going differently than how they’ve gone in the past and that raise questions,” Berman said.

    However Eisinger said he is believes the economy is in a stable place.

    “I just don’t see the kind of excesses that we had in 1998 and ‘99 or 2005 and 2006,” Eisinger said. “I see a lot of very expensive markets, but I see a lot of reasons why corporations are going to continue to thrive.”

    Amy Scott is a journalism student at the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication and was recognized as a 2018 Cox-SABEW Fellow.

  • November 19: Behind the lens: How to shoot video for business stories

    Posted By sabew on Wednesday November 7, 2018

    Listen to the audio.

    View the video.

    Nov. Training Presentation.

    High-quality video can bring business stories to life, and journalists are increasingly being asked to shoot segments on their smartphones. SABEW’s next training session will give you an overview of how best to shoot video and audio, even if your equipment is limited. Mitchell Masilun, an Arkansas-based editorial photographer and multimedia specialist, will lead SABEW members through this one-hour webinar. He’ll cover the basic concepts of what makes a good (and bad) video and offer tips and tricks for shooting the best video with the equipment you have. He’ll also review inexpensive gear that can help improve smartphone video. If time permits, he’ll also provide video editing tips.

    Presenter
    Mitchell Masilun is an Arkansas-based editorial photographer, multimedia specialist and educator. He currently is a photojournalist at The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette in Little Rock.

    Previously, Mitch was a multimedia journalist at the Mansfield News Journal in Mansfield, Ohio. He also worked as a staff photographer at Beijing-based True Run Media, publisher of three lifestyle magazines with a combined circulation of more than 70,000. He taught photography courses at The Hutong and Atelier, two Beijing-based culture and art education centers.

    Before moving to China, Mitch worked as a photojournalist in the Chicagoland and Central Ohio areas, and his images were circulated nationwide through the Associated Press, the Chicago Tribune and The Atlanta-Journal Constitution. Mitch’s stills have been published globally by clients that include Fortune 500 companies, embassies, stock libraries, network news stations and international schools. His images have also been published in four books. Some of his photographs can be seen on his website 1world1eye.com.

  • 2018 David J. Morrow Scholarship for Business Journalism Winners

    Posted By David Wilhite on Monday October 1, 2018

    These are the 2018 David J. Morrow Scholarship for Business Journalism winners. For more information about the Morrow scholarships, click here.

    Zoe Nicholson is a senior multimedia journalism student at the University of South Carolina. She is from Greer, SC, where she grew up with her older sister, parents and pets. Zoe worked as an arts and culture staff writer at The Daily Gamecock from 2016 to 2017, and has been a staff member of the university’s magazine, Garnet & Black, since 2016. She currently serves as the online editor of Garnet & Black. She enjoys writing profiles and features, especially about southern arts and entertainment. Currently, Zoe is a communications intern at a Columbia-area land trust, where she is able to fulfil her passion for land conservation. After graduation, Zoe hopes to work as an arts and entertainment journalist or at a regional newspaper.

    Anjali Patel was raised in Greenville, SC, and journalism is the only career she ever wanted to pursue.  She came to the University of South Carolina’s Honors College in 2015 as a broadcast journalism major, with the intention of becoming a sports reporter.  Through her internships with local newspapers and television stations, she has come to love covering a wide variety of topics, and now hopes to land a job as a general assignment television reporter when she graduates in May 2019.  A self-proclaimed lover of local news, Anjali cannot wait to begin her career as a visual storyteller.

    Mary Ramsey is a senior multimedia journalism student at the University of South Carolina’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication. She has minors in political science and history. Originally from Myrtle Beach, SC, she attended an International Baccalaureate high school in Virginia Beach, VA. Ramsey was news editor of USC’s student newspaper, The Daily Gamecock, for over two years during which time she won an award for feature writing from the South Carolina Press Association. She went on to serve as managing editor and is now editor-in-chief. She was a reporting intern for The Sun News during summer 2018, earning bylines in various papers in the McClatchy Carolinas family. After graduation, she wants to cover state government and politics for a daily newspaper. Ramsey is also a member of USC’s chapters of the Epsilon Sigma Alpha service sorority and Omicron Delta Kappa leadership society.

    Hannah Slater is a senior multimedia journalism student at the University of South Carolina. She has an arts studio minor with a focus in photography. Slater’s love for journalism was sparked in high school back home in Raleigh, NC. She’s currently a freelance writer for NBC National News Feed, and she has interned for Ryan Seacrest Studios. Hannah is interested in all facets of journalism, however she has a particular fascination with long-form investigative pieces. Following graduation in December, Hannah hopes to get a job at a news channel in New York City.

  • Freelance Journalism: Getting down to business

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday June 18, 2018

    Flexibility. Working remotely. Being your own boss. Freelance writing offers many benefits, but it requires a business mindset. On SABEW’s next training session, we’ll talk about how to run your freelance business like a true business, addressing things like keeping track of clients, growing revenue, managing invoices, setting up a home office and adopting an entrepreneurial mindset needed to be a successful independent journalist.

    Listen to the recording.

    Moderator

    Ellen Chang is a contributing financial writer for U.S. News & World Report. She is a freelance journalist who is based in Houston and writes articles for Hart Energy and other publications. For the past five years, she covered personal finance, retirement, stocks and the energy sector for TheStreet. Chang focuses her articles on stocks, entrepreneurs, personal finance, energy and cybersecurity. Her byline has appeared in national business publications, including CBS News, Yahoo Finance and MSN Money. Twitter: @EllenYChang

     

    Panelists

    Lyz Lenz has been published in the New York Times, Buzzfeed, Washington Post, The Guardian, ESPN, Marie Claire, Mashable, Salon, and more. Her book “Belabored: Tales of Myth, Medicine, and Motherhood” is forthcoming from Norton. She also has an essay in the anthology “Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture,” edited by Roxane Gay. Lenz holds an MFA in creative writing from Lesley University and is the managing editor at The Rumpus. Twitter: @lyzl

     

     

     

    Michelle Rafter is a Portland, Ore., freelance business journalist covering the future of work, business, tech and transportation for business and consumer publications. She’s a frequent contributor to Workforce.com, Talent Economy, Trucks.com, Best Lawyers and the San Diego Union Tribune. Her bylines have appeared in the AARP, Wall Street Journal, OC Register, MNS Money, NBCNews.com, and many others. She ghostwrites about management and leadership for such clients as The Boston Consulting Group, Great Place to Work and the Bloom Group. Twitter: @MichelleRafter

     

     

     

    John Wasik is a writer, journalist, speaker, message architect and author of 17 books, including Lightning Strikes: Timeless Lessons in Creativity from the Life and Work of Nikola Tesla. Twitter: @johnwasik

  • 2017 Best in Business Honorees with Judges’ Comments

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday March 7, 2018

    AUDIO – All news organizations

    Winner: Marketplace/The Uncertain Hour, for “How One Sentence Helped Set Off the Opioid Crisis”
    Krissy Clark, Caitlin Esch, Nancy Farghalli, Maria Hollenhorst, Lyra Smith, Sitara Nieves, Deborah Clark, Donna Tam, Tony Wagner, Jake Gorski and Daniel Ramirez
    A fascinating, timely and illuminating look at the origins of one of the nation’s most urgent crises: the opioid epidemic. This series, based on an eight-month investigation, added valuable historical context and background. Clearly focused and impressively produced, this series underscores the importance of taking listeners behind the scenes to follow interactions between a government regulator, the Food and Drug Administration, and a large drug company.

    Honorable mention: KUOW, for “Prime(d)”
    Carol Smith, Joshua McNichols, Carolyn Adolph, Posey Gruener and Brendan Sweeney
    A delightful, deeply thoughtful, fascinating, in-depth and often humorous series focusing on Amazon’s decision to have a national competition among cities over where to build its next headquarters. The authors focused on “what happens when Amazon comes to your town,” how Amazon benefits from inviting cities to compete, Amazon’s impact on Seattle, and other important urban issues. The series flowed naturally and consistently held our attention with fresh and original insights.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Large

    Winner: Financial Times, for articles on non-prime and predatory lending
    Ben McLannahan
    Excellent reporting, writing and editing on this three-part series about the dangers of nonprime lending and predatory auto lending to U.S. consumers and the U.S. economy. The additional special report on “The Whistleblowers” demonstrated an excellent use of interviews with colorful details and statistics to show what bank and Wall Street whistle-blowers endure after reporting wrongdoing. The scope and quality of this series shines a light on a dangerous and important area of the banking world that we may have stopped thinking about in this post-financial crisis era but can’t afford to anymore.

    Honorable mention: Reuters, for “Crypto Casino”
    Steve Stecklow, Alexandra Harney, Anna Irrera and Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi
    This series did an excellent job of both reporting and explaining the risks, realities and mysteries surrounding cryptocurrency. While investors and the general public may have been blinded by the light of the parabolic price movements of tokens like Bitcoin, the lack of regulation and transparency in what is supposed to be an asset class defined by its openness demonstrated how murky the market still is around it and the risks it poses to investors.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with Fortune, for “The Billion-Dollar Loophole”
    Peter Elkind
    This deeply sourced project between ProPublica and Fortune, reveals in stunning detail how some individuals, including President Donald Trump, were able to turn a U.S. tax code provision intended to help preserve the environment — a tax break for agreeing not to develop property, known as a “conservation easement” — into an outsized tax deduction for the rich. Judges appreciated the story’s granular focus, and how it exposed the ability of wealthy individuals to exploit government inaction. A memorable accomplishment on a complicated subject, clearly written and compellingly told by ProPublica’s Peter Elkind.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Small

    Winner: TheStreet, for “Big Bank Corporate Governance”
    Brad Keoun
    The judges felt this series offers a thoughtful look at under-reported corporate governance and board issues at banks. By uncovering sweetheart contracts for a Wells Fargo director, a revolving door opening to Citigroup’s board, and secrecy in fixed income reporting at Goldman Sachs, Keoun showed how the largest banks are avoiding transparency.

    Honorable mention: American Banker, for The CFPB leadership battle”
    Kate Berry, Ian McKendry and Rob Blackwell
    This story about a coup at a government agency was a nice scoop for a small publication competing for an inside look against larger entities. It also offered insight about a regulatory body that’s key for many in the business world, particularly in the small-business community.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “CVS-Aetna Deal”
    Dana Mattioli, Sharon Terlep, Anna Wilde Mathews and Laura Stevens
    The package on the CVS-Aetna deal was a true scoop that put the WSJ ahead of the pack on an industry-transforming deal. In addition to the transaction basics, the package included analysis pieces on the industry impact as well as how Amazon’s entry into pharma services helped spur the CVS-Aetna deal. The latter piece, like the main news story, was based on deep inside sources. The Journal’s presentation included graphics illustrating how the new merged company would stack up against competitors.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for Uber coverage
    Mike Isaac and Farhad Manjoo
    An excellent package on an unfolding drama: A main story that delivers the news and its impact, an insider tick-tock of how CEO Kalanick was forced out by investors, and wide-view analysis of how Uber’s issues were symptomatic of wider and more fundamental Silicon Valley problems. The package showed deep reporting and access to inside sources that included former employees and investors.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Medium

    Winner: The Seattle Times, for “Amazon HQ2 announcement”
    Matt Day, Dominic Gates, Mike Rosenberg, Jon Talton, Scott Greenstone, Dan Beekman, Jessica Lee, Joseph O’Sullivan, Mark Nowlin and Kjell Redal
    The coverage of Amazon’s announcement of a second headquarters distinguished itself with a mix of illuminating reporting, insightful analysis and compelling graphics. The package deftly assessed the Amazon stunner from the local perspective of economic development and politics while also conveying the broader implications — beyond Seattle and beyond Amazon. It set the standard for all the HQ2 stories published in its wake.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Small

    Winner: International Business Times, for “Last-Minute Tax Provisions Could Enrich Top Lawmakers”
    David Sirota, Josh Keefe, Alex Kotch and Jay Cassano
    It is not surprising that Washington politicians slip provisions into bills that benefit themselves or particular industries. But usually such goodies are discovered after a bill has passed. The International Business Times scooped others with its story that Republicans had slipped into the conference report of their tax bill a provision that would benefit real estate moguls such as Donald Trump and Senator Bob Corker and that the provision was more generous than either the House or Senate version. Their story landed in real time before the bill received final approval. Corker professed ignorance in an interview with International Business Times and admitted that he hadn’t read the bill before he changed his vote from no to yes. This is exactly what business journalists should be doing holding politicians accountable.

    Honorable mention: Puget Sound Business Journal, for “Port of Seattle CEO resigned amid probe into $4.7M payout”
    Andrew McIntosh
    The Puget Sound Business Journal provided a public service by exposing the unconstitutional payments to workers approved by the local Port Commission, the largest of which went to the CEO himself. Through dogged reporting and public record requests, Puget Sound Business Journal not only revealed the payments but its reporting led to the money being returned to taxpayers. Puget Sound Business Journal even managed to get a draft of the CEO’s performance appraisal through records requests that documented serious problems. The Puget Sound Business Journal resisted the urge to couch its series of breaking stories as gotcha journalism and was careful to present the improvements that the CEO had made.

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business, for “Amazon HQ2 bid revealed: tax breaks, $120 million talent program, transit vision”
    Chad Livengood and Kirk Pinho
    When Amazon announced it intended to build a second headquarters, cities all over the country salivated at the prospect for a boost in employment and infrastructure improvements. But the secrecy surrounding Amazon’s selection process combined with the reluctance of urban centers to disclose their negotiations made it impossible to determine what city Amazon would choose or how cities were wooing the e-commerce giant. Partly through the FOIA, Crain’s Detroit Business got hold of Quicken Loans’ founder Dan Gilbert’s proposal to Amazon to locate in Detroit, which included a massive amount of goodies including tax breaks and a $120 million talent program. The story was picked up throughout the US and Canada, crediting Crain’s with the scoop.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for Keywords Technology Column
    Christopher Mims
    These columns provide a micro and macro take on the tech industry. One column looked at the positive impact of diversity on business and process outcomes. The “worm” has been turning recently about the (mostly) unintended impacts of technology, including the male-dominated culture in tech. This column broadened the argument in many ways, including impacts on shareholders. Although it falls outside the usual commentary realm, we liked the visual aspects included along with the good writing. A new thread on the downside of Facebook was interesting, using an extension of the old TV news maxim, “if it bleeds, it leads” pertaining to social.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Equifax Hack”
    Ron Lieber
    An excellent work in reporting the implications of the Equifax hack, with commentary and consumer insights on what can be done to mitigate damage. It also includes what should be done in the future to make companies like Equifax more responsive to consumers.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Lee Schafer’s columns
    The columnist blends smart business insight and an enjoyable writing style into incisive commentary on some of the nation’s most important companies that call Minneapolis their home — or in Wells Fargo’s case, second home. His piece “Wells Fargo CEO didn’t take ‘run it like you own it’ mantra to heart” gets to the core of the beleaguered bank’s cultural problems that allowed employees to open more than 3 million fake accounts to help hit sales targets. In “Deciding what to do with Yoplait,” he outlines why General Mills should sell its souring yogurt business. And his article “CVS-Aetna deal is about catching up to UnitedHealth” he makes a compelling case for why one of 2017’s biggest announced mergers is no threat to the locally based giant.

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “A Boom with a View”
    Erin Griffith
    An excellently crafted piece commenting on the rise in scandals hitting startups from Theranos to Hampton Creek.

    Honorable mention: The Dallas Morning News, for “Texas business repels a bathroom bill”
    Mitchell Schnurman
    The columnist deserves praise for his series of articles putting forth the case for why business leaders ought to speak up against a state bill that would restrict bathroom use by transgender people. After corporate executives started arguing against it, the bill failed.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Small

    Winner: Albany Business Review, for Mike Hendricks’ columns
    Hendricks’ elegantly written columns demonstrate a deep knowledge of local business and a strong desire to serve his community. He focuses on issues of interest to his readership that are unlikely to be covered elsewhere, and he offers solutions. That said, he doesn’t shy away from broader topics, and uses personal experience to great effect in his piece on health care.

    Honorable mention: The Nation, for Helaine Olen’s columns
    Olen’s strongly opinionated columns demonstrate an excellent grasp of complex topics. She marshals ample evidence, connecting disparate and fast-moving events into a coherent picture, which her engaging prose makes accessible to a broad readership.

     

    ECONOMICS – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh
    The judges unanimously selected this story on immigrant farm labor in a category with significant competition. The LA Times narrative stood out because the reporters were truly in the field for this piece, sharing details of the immigrant experience, from wages to housing. It was thoughtful and extraordinarily descriptive in reporting on a topic widely talked about, but perhaps less understood. We all felt this piece was a good read that made us smarter. Beyond the immigrants at the center of the piece, it captured the broader context of the communities where they work, and the labor market dynamics that supply their jobs.

     

    ECONOMICS – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Trump’s Trade Pullout Roils Rural America”
    Adam Behsudi
    POLITICO’s standout piece relied on vivid writing, exhaustive reporting and cogent analysis to show readers how the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership amounts to a hit on American farmers. The article analyzed trade negotiations between the remaining TPP nations, finding that the United States’ rivals are furiously negotiating with each other to lower tariffs and undercut American farmers. But it went far beyond policy analysis, delving deeply into the lives of people in Eagle Grove, Iowa. The owner of one pork and poultry business making a vast investment there said he is “scared to death,” and others fear the economic ripple effects. The piece laid out clearly and persuasively why rural communities have good cause for concern.

     

    ECONOMICS – Small

    Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Sarasota Drift”
    Barbara Peters-Smith
    A wonderful job of weaving together demographic and income data to tell the story of a widening divide between have and have-nots in a community often associated with retirement. It used data effectively to argue its point, and spotlighted creative approaches to address the problem.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut “
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh
    California utility customers likely had no idea what hit them until the LA Times invested the resources to examine the perverse incentives offered by state regulators. If companies get paid to build power plants, whether needed or not, they’ll build them and send the bills to ratepayers. Deep reporting and excellent writing made this package extremely accessible given the jargon-heavy topic. Charts and interactive graphics spelled it out even more simply. The reporting has actually had an impact, given that authorities are reacting.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Medium

    Winner: The Atlantic, for “The Problem with Rolling Back Regulations”
    Alana Semuels
    This impeccably researched and well-written story uses North Carolina’s rollback of environmental regulations to show what could happen if national and global policies move toward less regulation. Framing such moves as “business-friendly” can stymie debate, but it ultimately hurts homeowners and residents. It makes a compelling case that citizens should be worried about changing climate policies in the Trump administration.

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan
    While much has been written about the Dakota Access Pipeline, another and potentially bigger risk to the environment threatens the drinking water of 40 million people. A growing stream of oil is pumping through aging pipes along and under the Great Lakes. The pipeline company, Enbridge Inc., is seeking to expand through eminent domain. Through clear and sophisticated writing, reporter Egan helps readers understand the possible consequences of allowing Enbridge to move forward.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Small

    Winner: Debtwire, for American Idle: An Offshore Drilling Crisis “
    Alex Plough
    Debtwire drilled in on a topic few people think about — who is on the hook for cleaning up abandoned offshore oil platforms — and managed to hook readers with colorful description while making the case for how and why the issue is a considerable environmental and economic problem. By collaborating with a university research tank to sort through available data, the reporter was able to provide specific examples that spelled out risks to companies and taxpayers. The story provides history and context. It supplements text with excellent graphics to help readers grasp the significance of a previously obscure topic. In short, the combination of clear writing, lavish details and demonstrable impact made this story stand out.

     

    EXPLANATORY – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “Shock Tactics”
    Jason Szep, Peter Eisler, Tim Reid, Lisa Girion, Grant Smith, Linda So, M.B. Pell and Charles Levinson
    Reuters’ comprehensive, multi-part investigation of Taser raised real concerns about the company’s devices. In addition to routinely injuring and even killing people, Reuters showed through document reviews, interviews and number- and data-crunching the cost to police departments and city governments of using the electroshock devices.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Anaheim’s Subsidy Kingdom “
    Daniel Miller, Priya Krishnakumar and Ben Poston
    This rigorously-reported LA Times series shows how Disney spent millions contributing to the PACs behind pro-Disney city council candidates in Anaheim and received $1 billion of incentives in turn. The series uses interviews, data, and an interactive graphic to expose Disney’s complex system of donations, revealing the company’s political influence in Anaheim.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Education Disrupted”
    Natasha Singer
    This three-part series revealed provocative ways tech companies and executives are gaining influence in America’s public schools, creating potential conflicts of interest but not necessarily better results for children or teachers. The package’s strong reporting about the enticing lures to teachers and administrators in cash-strapped school systems raises serious questions about who’s really running the nation’s classrooms.

     

    EXPLANATORY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with NPR, for “Sold for Parts”
    Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes
    As the nation debates White House efforts to overhaul immigration, ProPublica’s Michael Grabell gave his readers an up-close look at horrific working conditions in Ohio, Florida and South Carolina. Companies that have a history of failing to comply with federal workplace safety standards are hiring immigrants to work long hours in the most dangerous jobs; when workers fight for better pay and working conditions, the companies repeatedly use their immigration status against them to quash dissent and avoid paying medical bills. This is an outstanding grouping of stories that are deeply reported and well-written stories.

    Honorable mention: Miami Herald, for “Hotel housekeepers commute”
    Chabeli Herrera and Carl Juste
    This is textbook explanatory reporting. Chabeli Herrera explores income inequality and sky-high housing costs through the commute of a Fontainebleau housekeeper. The smooth, graceful writing benefits from its relative brevity. Graphics and a compelling video enhance the story.

    Honorable mention: Detroit Free Press, “The Fault in No Fault”
    JC Reindl
    A deeply researched series explaining how various bad actors exploited Michigan’s no-fault insurance statute in a way that enriches them but results in sky-high rates for Detroit drivers. Metro reporting at its best.

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan
    Egan is known for his authoritative reporting on the Great Lakes. Here he gives his readers another excellent series, documenting how the nation’s most important source of fresh water could be jeopardized by an aging underground pipeline and a backroom legislative deal. Egan’s work is deeply reported and masterfully presented.

     

    EXPLANTORY – Small

    Winner: McClatchy’s Washington Bureau, “Trump’s footprint across ex-Soviet world”
    David Goldstein, Ben Wieder, Kevin G. Hall, Gabriellle Paluch and Peter Stone
    On one of the most-swarmed stories in years, the McClatchy team unearthed evidence of Trump’s Russia ties that no one else did — including a birthday phone call to an ex-Soviet official that was pried from a sealed British lawsuit. Given the often-bewildering maze of business relationships and foreign associates, it’s amazing that these stories were very readable narratives. An example of painstaking reporting, careful writing and patient editing.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for A Century of Domination: As America’s Carbon Wars Rage, Oil and Gas Industry Influence Grows”
    Jie Jenny Zou, Michael J. Mishak, Jamie Smith Hopkins, Kristen Lombardi, Jim Morris, Chris Young, Sasha Khokha and Tom Dart
    This entry offers an impressive historical sweep as it examines fresh evidence of the pervasive influence of the fossil-fuel industry. One story exposes the industry’s practice of leading free seminars for state and federal judges. The seminars, hosted by an industry-backed risk analyst, are an obvious effort to make courts more skeptical of the scientific evidence underpinning regulations.

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy”
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle, Robert McClure and Brad Wieners
    Authoritative reporting and clear writing bring fresh insights to the well-worn topic of how vigorously the fossil fuel industry fights environmentalists. One story broke news on how the scientists whose study was used by George W. Bush’s EPA to excuse the fracking industry from clean-water standards now disavow those conclusions.

     

    FEATURE – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh
    Through data analysis and extensive on-the-ground reporting, this series illuminates one of the most timely and controversial issues of the day (and rebuts the poorly-informed positions of many of our national leaders). An important story told with exceptionally compelling writing.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Pink Boxes”
    David Pierson
    The best doughnuts are airy but packed with flavor. They can really make your day a little better. The same things could be said about the best feature stories. This history of the ubiquitous pink doughnut box is the epitome of the business feature. While explaining one of the curiosities of everyday life, it delights us with insights into entrepreneurship, economics, immigrant culture, and consumer psychology.

     

    FEATURE – Medium

    Winner: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “The Land Alcoa Dammed”
    Rich Lord, Len Boselovic, Stephanie Strasburg, Zack Tanner, James Hilston and Ed Yozwick
    The judges were impressed with this multimedia package that explored a giant conglomerate’s impact on a small South American nation. The reporters went to great lengths to explore every angle, from Alcoa’s hometown in Pennsylvania to the deals that were made and the ones that are in still in the works in Suriname as Alcoa withdraws its once-formidable presence. The question of what happens to a company town when the company leaves is an important one; this story explores the aftermath from when an entire country is overly dependent on one business. The story was accompanied by beautiful photographs, and a well-presented online package.

    Honorable mention: Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, for Trapped by Heroin”
    Penelope Overton, Dieter Bradbury, Gregory Rec and Brian Robitaille
    For this ambitious project, the reporter entered the closed realm of Maine lobstermen and persuaded these insular workers to open up about a scourge claiming the lives of friends and family members. The lobster industry, it turns out, is particularly susceptible to opioid addiction. The reporter explained the reasons why, interspersing memorable vignettes about down-on-their-luck survivors as well as the unfortunate ones who didn’t make it.

    Honorable mention: The Weather Channel Digital, for “United States of Climate Change”
    Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans, Kevin Hayes and Geoff Hansen
    This series represents strong coverage of a business, political and cultural topic of great interest to all of us. With solid interviews, excellent pictures and clear prose, the series showed great range. While focusing on issues that are particular to each state, such as energy advocates in Vermont or riverfront casinos in Missouri, the series informs its audience of climate change’s high economic stakes.

     

    FEATURE – Small

    Winner: The Real Deal, for “Real Estate’s Diversity Problem”
    Kathryn Brenzel, Rich Bockmann, Elizabeth Kim, Jill Noonan, Damian Ghigliotty and Yoryi De La Rosa
    The Real Deal’s reporting on the lack of diversity in New York City’s commercial real-estate industry was a comprehensive and compelling narrative. Combining statistics from multiple credible sources with dozens of interviews, the reporting demonstrated with clarity how “entrenched discriminatory practices surrounding access to credit, commission-based pay and a clubby, male-dominated culture have raised the barrier to entry.” The article provided data, testimonies and anecdotes necessary for readers to fully comprehend, as one of its experts noted, that “the people involved in building NYC’s skyline bear little resemblance to its 8.5 million inhabitants.”

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Chicago Business, for Can jobs stop Chicago violence?”
    Lisa Bertagnoli and Ann Dwyer
    The story on jobs vs. bullets impressed the judges with its compelling interviews, deep reporting and excellent graphics. Judges praised the authors’ strong use of anecdotes from key interviewees, which drove home the impact and importance of the topic. The interactive map and charts stood out as unique elements to tell the story.

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for “Meet the Woman Who Broke Silicon Valley’s Gender Barrier and Built a $1.5 Billion Tech Company “
    Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks
    This profile of Blackline founder Theresa Tucker is a sparkling read from the moment the reader meets her in an elevator, where her black hoodie practically guarantees the investment bankers will totally ignore her. This story is an unvarnished look at an effective, no-B.S. technologist who built and took public what is now a $1.5 billion company. Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks cracked the code for writing about women executives in an era of #MeToo. The story strikes the right chord between recognizing a true pioneer in bringing gender equality to the Silicon Valley and providing a balanced picture of a 56-year-old technology company CEO who has succeeded against long odds.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Industry/topic-specific publications

    Winner: The Real Deal
    The Real Deal was full of news and we really liked some of the how-things-really-work type reporting. It set a high standard for what is expected.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times
    This entry included five major reports, all of which illuminated, and some of which triggered, major business or economic developments of 2017. Jodi Kantor and Meghan Twohey exposed sexual harassment across three decades by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein aimed at women over whom he could wield serious career power. Weinstein apologized (while denying some allegations), promised to do better, but was soon ousted from the company bearing his name. Emily Steel and Michael S. Schmidt revealed settlements totaling $13 million with women who accused Bill O’Reilly of Fox News of sexual harassment or abusive behavior. O’Reilly denied wrongdoing but departed Fox News within weeks after the story appeared. These stories played a leading role in spurring a wave of coverage of misbehavior by prominent men in multiple industries and significantly transformed the power dynamic in the executive suite. The other stories in this entry: exposure of ride-sharing giant Uber’s use of “Greyballing” and other technological tools to frustrate efforts by government investigators to check up on whether some of its competitive behaviors complied with the law; insight into how the collapse of much of the Wisconsin paper industry helped swing formerly Democratic voters and ultimately the state to Donald Trump; and graphical portrayal of the massive Republican tax cut’s benefits and pain. For its breadth, depth, and impact, the Times’ work was extraordinary.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    An outstanding range of work across news, investigations and explanatory journalism. This was a unanimous winner from a deep field with many competitive candidates. All of the pieces in the entry were strong, and presentation took advantage of smart multimedia as well as print. The investigation about rapes in Mexico was particularly compelling. The coverage served Milwaukee’s audience well with national-level reporting on pertinent local issues, such as the risks of oil transport both through aging pipelines and potential new ones.

    Honorable mention: Houston Chronicle
    Impressive work under highly competitive conditions on the flood stories, including an insightful and original piece about floating-roof oil tanks. The entry also showed breadth outside of that major story, with excellent examples of explanatory journalism as well as high-quality visuals and graphics.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Small

    Winner: STAT: Reporting from the frontiers of health and medicine
    STAT impressed us with the breadth and quality of coverage, a powerful marriage of deep reporting with lively, engaging writing. In a skeptical look at IBM’s claims that its Watson supercomputer would revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, along with a well-timed piece documenting years of sexual harassment at a powerful biotech hedge fund, STAT displayed strong investigative chops and skilled narrative storytelling. Its breaking news entry, written after another in a long line of highly-anticipated Alzheimers drugs came up short in late-stage testing, went well beyond the basics, succinctly putting the development into the wider context so valuable to readers.

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business
    In a category filled with city business publications, Crain’s Detroit stood out with the strength and depth of reporting on a range of issues affecting the region. It revealed in rich detail the big push made by city officials and a local billionaire to lure Amazon to Detroit for the online retailer’s second headquarters, and also the surprising ways in which factories end up contributing to their own workers’ opioid abuse. A piece probing why Michigan has the highest auto-insurance rates in the country tackled a pressing local problem, while another, looking at the economic roots behind the decline of a once prosperous African-American neighborhood, connected readers to their city’s history in a fresh and interesting way.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “One Nation, Divisible”
    Michael M. Phillips, Betsy McKay, Paul Overberg and Sarah Nassauer
    An absolutely fabulous series of strong, powerful storytelling. The series used great reporting through data analysis and exact sourcing to give voice to an economy that is often invisible and thereby neglected by the country and the media. The writing was outstanding and delivered a compelling narrative that was hard to stop reading.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Burned”
    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett and John Diedrich
    This is genuine investigative journalism at its best. Next time someone tells you we don’t need local reporters, point to this series. It exposed the public hazard of barrel refurbishment plans and made a difference.

    Honorable mention: Kansas City Star, for “Business and politics collide in Missouri”
    Lindsay Wise and Steve Vockrodt
    This is quite good — exposing the hypocrisy of a popular politician with a national profile.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Industry Lawsuits Try to Paint Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket”
    Nicholas Kusnetz
    The compelling narrative, starting with questionable characters arriving unannounced in a person’s driveway for reasons unknown, distinguished this entry from the pack. The story neatly wove a novel legal strategy in with the larger fight being waged against climate groups in a way that set the table for the wars to come in this arena.

    Honorable mention: Financial Planning, for “Wells Fargo whistleblowers”
    Ann Marsh, Marc Hochstein and Scott Wenger
    Judges were impressed by the depth of reporting, including the use of documents, and an on-record interview with a former OSHA employee alleging multiple violations that deprived whistleblowers of a chance at justice.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “The Body Trade”
    Brian Grow, John Shiffman, Blake Morrison, Elizabeth Culliford, Reade Levinson, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Zach Goelman
    The Reuters entry shook us on a primitive level as readers. As judges, we found the meticulousness and depth of reporting, the detail in the anecdotes and the sheer number of documents involved impressive. A seamless presentation through words, graphics and images gripped each of us to make this stunning series the clear winner.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Wasted Medicine”
    Marshall Allen
    An expert examination of an outrageous failure of the health care system, in three powerfully interlocking deep dives that looked at waste built into the industry.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity and Reveal, for “The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools”
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Chris Zubak-Skees, Eric Sagara, Fernanda Camarena, Amy Walters and Ike Sriskandarajah
    Before school shootings came back to haunt the news in February, this dogged piece of enterprise, studded with disturbing historic and sociological context and powerful graphics, laid bare a shocking dereliction of duty to our kids — an insidious problem that harms many more children than even these grotesque massacres. Now we have two huge problems to solve.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy “
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle and Brad Wieners
    This team reports how the U.S. government whittled away protections for average Americans to interests of large fossil-fuel corporations. It includes reporting on how a scientific report was tweaked to justify a provision of the Energy Policy Act that bars the Environmental Protection Agency from safeguarding drinking water that may be contaminated by fracking, and how coal mining depleted aquifers. It also reports on how people responsible for the climate misinformation machine now have a seat at the table of President Donald Trump.

    Honorable mention: Kaiser Health News, for Treating Cancer: Hope Vs. Hype”
    Liz Szabo and John Hillkirk
    These eye-opening stories show how some cancer patients, even those with good insurance, are stalling the start of medication because of high co-pays. Those in financial distress die at higher rates. Doctors are not communicating with patients about how long they have to live, causing some to choose aggressive therapy that can cause pointless suffering. The stories are compelling and well-sourced and -written.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Nuclear Negligence “
    Patrick Malone, Peter Cary, R. Jeffrey Smith and Chris Zubak-Skees
    This report illuminates rarely-reported safety weaknesses at corporate contractor run U.S. nuclear weapons sites. The reporting is diligent and employs all tools, including FOIAs, to show that the Los Alamos contractor’s inattention to safety crimped critical aspects of nuclear weapons-related work. Penalties imposed by the government were small compared to the vast amounts they get in contracts.

     

    INNOVATION – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Disneyland Wait Times”
    Hugo Martin, Joe Fox, Priya Krishnakumar, John Schleuss and Ben Poston
    “Disneyland Wait Times” did an excellent job matching data analysis and innovative interactivity with a very practical audience need — giving us the secrets to not standing in lines at the Magic Kingdom. It is a sleek integration of reporting, data and reader tips, which both helps the audience and encourages them to use the interactive tools. We loved the animated gif too!

     

    INNOVATION – Medium

    Winner: GateHouse Media, for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms”
    Emily Le Coz, Lucille Sherman, Mara Corbett and Tyson Bird
    This strong piece of investigative journalism told the story visually and audibly – letting readers see the impact of wind farms and listen to what it may sound like to be near one. This was a new experience for all of us. It was also easy to interpret the data in the story and consume it.

     

    INNOVATION – Small

    Winner: Crain’s Chicago Business, for “The Rebuilders of Chicago’s Southland”
    Jason McGregor, Thomas J. Linder and Ann Dwyer
    We applaud this piece for its use of digital design, aerial video and historical research to depict positive economic change in what for decades was one of the city’s most economically stagnant and negatively portrayed neighborhoods. Maps show the entrance of new businesses, with interspersed text narrative and before/after photos, along with a video portion. The series covers a lot of ground in explaining this rehabilitative metamorphosis to a business readership that no doubt had long written off the area.

     

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Large

    Winner: Associated Press, for “North Korea”
    Eric Talmadge, Tim Sullivan, Hyung-jin Kim and Martha Mendoza
    Timely stories that elegantly contrast the competing ambitions of a country that seeks to sequester its citizens even as it opens limited access to the internet and encourages more consumerism. These pieces go beyond investigative business journalism, offering readers absorbing insights into North Korea’s social structure.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Mexico’s Housing Crisis
    Richard Marosi
    An ambitious 360-degree view of the widespread failure of Mexico’s plan to provide housing for 20 million people. The reporter found original voices to tell the story of Mexico’s housing economy, government corruption and corporate greed. His illustrations of the personal cost to aggrieved homebuyers can’t help but shake the reader.

     

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Welcome to Tomorrow Land”
    Vivienne Walt
    This story was full of surprises. We loved the contrasts between showing how far Estonia has come from Soviet-era backwater with magnificent medieval architecture to rocketing straight into the future with specific, solid examples. Well-written with every sentence used economically to tell us relevant and interesting information. We loved the “startups on the rise” box, with just a sampling of what’s going on. There are some gems: The PM filing his taxes on his iPad from an airport. Genius! We also liked the pullout with SHORT examples of the Estonian government being ahead of the curve. It then throws the story right into the future — it’s not just about what the country has done, it’s about where it’s going.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Culture of Harassment “
    Emily Steel, Michael S. Schmidt, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey, Susan Chira and Catrin Einhorn
    This collection of New York Times’ articles about sexual harassment, including the October story on Harvey Weinstein, helped to spur a national reckoning on the issue and upended the notion that if you’re powerful, you will not be held to account. All three stories submitted involved rigorous reporting and uncovered incidents and settlements that were previously undisclosed. Although many victims were unwilling, the newspaper managed to get a number of women to tell their stories.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut”
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh
    This story asked why electric rates were 50 percent higher in California than the national average and why regulators continued to approve new plants. The answer, naturally, is complex, but the LA Times did a masterful job of explaining the reasons and what could or should be done about them. The writing, data, photos and engaging graphics worked together to create an easy-to-follow package relevant to consumers, government and corporations. In a field of outstanding entries, this was a smart piece that did an exceptional job of telling a multilayered story while keeping it interesting.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Too Broke for Bankruptcy”
    Paul Kiel and Hannah Fresques
    Beautiful combination of strong shoe-leather and data reporting on a fresh and important topic – why some poor people don’t file for bankruptcy protection because they can’t afford a lawyer. Excellent analysis, clearly presented.

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for “Quantity of Care”
    Mike Baker and Justin Mayo
    Compelling, deeply researched and beautifully written and illustrated stories about the dire consequences of emphasizing money over once-selfless medical practices. The project got immediate results, including investigations by the state Department of Health and U.S. Department of Justice, and the resignation of the hospital’s CEO and top neurosurgeon.

    Honorable mention: The Boston Globe, for “FAA”
    Jaimi Dowdell, Kelly Carr, Jenn Abelson, Todd Wallack, Jonathan Saltzman and Scott Allen
    Amazing and frightening story on lax oversight on plane registration at the Federal Aviation Administration that has received little, if any, media attention. A very strong entry.

    Honorable mention: The Des Moines Register, for “TPI Investigation”
    Kevin Hardy and Grant Rodgers
    The Des Moines Register revealed how wind-blade maker TPI failed to protect its workers from toxic chemicals that damaged their skin. Some workers were fired when they reported skin damage and were denied workers compensation benefits by the company. Excellent use of Iowa OSHA documents, unemployment appeals hearing testimony, photos and on-the-record and anonymous interviews with former workers.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Small

    Winner: Boston Business Journal, for “Promises, promises: Massachusetts companies are missing hiring goals even with hefty tax breaks”
    Greg Ryan
    The investigation reveals Massachusetts has awarded over $25 million in job-creation tax credits to businesses that have since fallen short of their hiring promises — more than one third of the companies were granted the tax credits. The story is well-researched and presented fairly.

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces”
    Sabrina Shankman
    InsideClimate News examined the long history of regulatory violations by an energy company planning a major drilling program in the Arctic.

    Honorable mention: Orlando Business Journal, for “The Amazon Effect”
    Sarah Aslam, Veronica Brezina, Matthew Richardson and Craig Douglas
    A fresh look at the impact of huge web-based Amazon using a mix of commercial real estate transaction information, national data from partner business publications and local title and tax records.

     

    MARKETS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Market-Moving Leaks”
    Mike Bird
    Within three months of the Journal’s initial story about potential abuse of the prerelease of UK government economic data, the practice was halted. The newspaper wasn’t the first to notice suspicious trading – there were rumors as early as 2009 – but it highlighted the issue with a statistical analysis and a clear explanation of risks posed by leaked data. Interactive charts clearly showed how widespread advance notice of economic data allowed those in the know to trade on the information.

     

    MARKETS – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Whatever It Takes to Win”
    Jen Wieczner
    A polished, extensively reported story on a subject of significant interest to investors and company executives, as well as a broader readership: activist hedge funds, in this instance Elliott Management. The reporter’s persistence and in-depth reporting forced the reluctant subjects into lifting the curtain on the inner workings of one of Wall Street’s most aggressive operators. The story had all the right elements and was accompanied by interesting graphics. A very enjoyable read.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Ratner-Simmons Sex Allegations “
    Daniel Miller, Amy Kaufman and Victoria Kim
    An unflinching account of sexual misconduct allegations that spanned decades and are now part of a broader cultural reckoning over society’s treatment of women. The reporters skillfully walk the tightrope of ‘he said-she said,’ forcing readers to confront the inherent power imbalance between the abusers and their victims. In the Ratner stories, the reporters dispassionately lay out the accusations juxtaposed with the director’s repeated denials. Patterns begin to emerge: Ratner, through his lawyer, claiming not to recall an incident; Ratner switching seats on an airplane to sit next to a strange woman and then showing nude photos of his girlfriend. The final piece exposes the hypocrisy of Simmons’ lifestyle brand alongside decades of alleged abuse. The reporting is methodical and the writing compelling. The anger and frustration of the many direct, named sources is palpable. In most cases, the reporters verified accounts with multiple sources. The series does not shy away from the uncomfortable reality that in many cases, the victims maintained their relationships with Ratner and Simmons and in some cases sought professional gain from them.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Medium

    Winner: CNNMoney, for Five women accuse journalist and ‘Game Change’ co-author Mark Halperin of sexual harassment “
    Oliver Darcy
    CNNMoney broke news of Halperin’s alleged sexual misconduct while at ABC and followed the news as its impact grew and Halperin responded. Darcy’s stories were clear, well-written and exceptionally well-reported, giving them credibility and impact.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Small

    Winner: Portland Business Journal, for “Portland’s media mania”
    Erik Siemers
    The three stories in this entry brought together detail, character and perspective to capture the subject matter from all angles. Each report delivered not only key facts and figures, but also compelling anecdotes of the people affected by them. A report on the comic-book industry was a highlight because of its creative presentation, worthy of the topic.

    Honorable mention: Investor’s Business Daily, forCan E-sports’ Armchair Gladiators Vanquish Hulking NFL Players?”
    Patrick Seitz
    A comprehensive account of an industry that’s developed enough to merit in-depth reporting, but fresh enough to be news to most readers. There’s plenty of well-organized detail about the players — in other words, the companies — in the world of E-sports.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Student Debt”
    Stacy Cowley, Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Natalie Kitroeff
    The reporting on this important topic was thorough, the writing powerful and the personal stories were compelling. The series put a spotlight on the predatory practices of companies holding student debt, and the fact that the investor in one of those firms actually condemned his own company’s procedures was a testament to the rock-solid reporting.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: The Chronicle of Higher Education, forWelcome Students! Need a Checking Account?”
    Dan Bauman
    A well-reported story that exposes the millions that banks are paying U.S. colleges to market checking accounts and other banking services to students. The piece stands out for its excellent use of data and public records, and for personal stories that bring to life the financial concerns of students, parents and consumer advocates.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Small

    Winner: The Motley Fool, for Matthew Frankel’s columns
    Frankel wins for his in-depth columns looking at the impact of the 2017 federal tax overhaul on average Americans and for his analysis of the implications of the Fed’s swing to raising interest rates for Americans. His prompt take on these shifting policies, and his smart and readable approaches, helps readers make sense of immensely complex topics so they can protect their pocketbooks.

    Honorable mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Money Help for Aging Parents”
    Sandra Block, Mark Solheim and Eileen Ambrose
    Many seniors are unaware of their gradually declining capacity for managing their financial affairs. This piece was packed with solid tips on ways adult children can move into sensitive caregiving modes by advising aging parents on topics ranging from keeping up with the bills and estate planning to constantly being on alert for fraudulent schemes. This package of articles offered good suggestions about where families can turn for reliable advice in such situations.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg News, for “Cashing In on Calamity”
    Prashant Gopal
    The scope of the concept was high; global warming is causing more catastrophes, causing more reconstruction, and here’s what that looks like on the ground. The judges were impressed that it was one reporter doing all the work. Prashant Gopal wove together detailed and compelling individual stories to construct a big and important story, one that will continue into the future.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Puerto Rico seeks aid for tens of thousands of squatters”
    Lorraine Woellert and M. Scott Mahaskey
    A beautifully written and deeply reported story on how Hurricane Maria exposed the open secret of tens of thousands of squatters living illegally in Puerto Rico. Woellert writes persuasively about how the island’s political structure has compounded the problem for many years, and why its leaders now must decide what to do. The terrific photographs bring the story to life.

    Honorable mention: The Arizona Republic, for HOA foreclosures”
    Jessica Boehm and Catherine Reagor
    This solidly reported, multimedia package alerted Arizona homeowners to the risks they face from their homeowners associations. As this extensively researched and well-written project explained, these largely unregulated bodies have broad powers that include the right to seize homes in foreclosure for as little as $1,200 in unpaid dues. A series of engaging videos that included first-person accounts helped to unravel the causes and impact of the most recent wave of foreclosures spurred in part by the recovery in home prices.

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for Amazon coverage
    Mike Rosenberg, Ángel González, Bettina Hansen, Mark Nowlin, Judy Averill, Kjell Redal, Thomas Wilburn and Alan Berner
    As Amazon turns Seattle into a true company town, The Seattle Times documented that transformation with sharp data analysis and graphics, crisp writing and a novel approach to storytelling. The numbers alone are striking – from rising rents to sheer volume of office space – but we found the story that followed one home through the selling process particularly effective in illustrating the speed and craziness of the Seattle housing market.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Small

    Winner: Puget Sound Business Journal, for Marc Stiles package of stories
    Marc Stiles
    A great package with three very different topics – a shady real-estate developer, a neighborhood in turmoil over gentrification, and a profile of the man in charge of building Amazon’s second headquarters. For each, Stiles consistently brought excellent reporting and writing to bear, resulting in stories that were in-depth, nuanced and compulsively readable. His work stood out in a competitive environment for real-estate submissions.

    Honorable mention: The News Tribune (Tacoma), for Fight for your country, lose the bidding war for a house”
    Kate Martin
    Martin highlighted an underreported problem in the real estate market—former soldiers who were unable to successfully use loans from the Department of Veterans Affairs to purchase a home. Martin did a terrific job of detailing the scope of the issue, talking to affected veterans, real estate brokers and lenders about what was going on and why. Martin did this well before more national media became interested in similar cases later in 2017.

     

    RETAIL – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Retail in Crisis”
    Suzanne Kapner, Valerie Bauerlein, Esther Fung and Yaryna Serkez
    The Wall Street Journal staff explores the retail industry’s transformation in vivid detail, first taking readers to a retail-dependent city where store closings are causing waves of economic woes and then exploring the pressures on an old-school retailer struggling to compete in a rapidly-changing world. This entry is topped off with an innovative interactive tracing the slow death of an American mall by tracking tenant life cycles dating to 1995. Excellent work all around in this category’s deepest and most complete entry.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Counterfeit Shoes”
    David Pierson
    Readers got enlightening glimpse into a $460 billion industry: counterfeit goods. Using rapper Kanye West’s luxury sneakers as his hook, Pierson’s deep reporting is complemented by rich storytelling to produce a piece that’s compelling on many levels, from the technology used to produce replicas of these high-priced kicks to the mind-set of buyers who rationalize their decisions to purchase fake goods.

     

    RETAIL – Medium

    Winner: Report on Business Magazine, for Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”
    Marina Strauss
    An in-depth look at the transformation of Tim Hortons after the iconic Canadian brand was acquired by private equity firm 3G Capital. Strong details and storytelling transformed a local story into a bigger business saga. Disgruntled franchisees formed an association and used details from the article in their complaint to the company.

    Honorable mention: BusinessInsider.com, forDefining the Retail Apocalypse”
    Hayley Peterson
    Smart reporting and bright writing differentiated this series from other submissions on the demise of the retail industry. The package provided three angles to the crisis: including engaging pieces on retail job loss, the decline of Sears and the impact of store closings on bond holders.

     

    RETAIL – Small

    Winner: Racked, for “eBay is Playing Catch-Up “
    Chavie Lieber, Christie Hemm Klok and Laura Bullard
    A smart story, written with authority, that tackles an interesting area of the online marketplace and focuses on eBay, a company that the judges hadn’t really thought about for a long time. Lieber provides insight into the strategic decisions the company has made as it struggles to fend off competitors including mighty Amazon.

    Honorable mention: Capital & Main, for a package of retail features
    Jessica Goodheart
    In A Dream and a Microwave: Everytable Serves Healthy Meals to Hungry ‘Hoods, Goodheart writes deftly on a compelling and socially important topic: how to make healthy eating affordable for everyone. Her reporting about a fledgling restaurant chain with a unique business model is comprehensive and rich with voices.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Contracted”
    Lauren Weber
    The package of stories was well-researched and well-done as it toggled between data and real-world examples filled with people and companies. It was written and edited at a high level, making it an enjoyable read on a fairly wonky subject. We also liked the kicker at the end of the main story about bots. The sidebar on the video-game industry was particularly engaging, and a smart story to do to draw in a younger demographic of readers. Altogether, the trio of stories gave a good 360-degree view of an issue certain to become more pressing in the economy.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for Can AT&T Retrain 100,000 People? “
    Aaron Pressman
    This story struck a great balance. It took us inside a single, massive company to examine an interesting change and grappled with an existential crisis many businesses are facing: skills mismatch in an era of technological progress. The outcome is a story that is well-developed and resonant.

    Honorable mention: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Cost of affair, family rift measured in millions”
    Jeffrey Meitrodt
    A deeply reported story that chronicled executive negligence at a prominent Minnesota firm owned by the Barry family, and the turmoil that followed.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Small

    Winner: LinkedIn, for “Managing Business “
    Chip Cutter
    Impressive reporting effort to show a U.S. labor market in the grip of rapid change. One notable conclusion: The changes aren’t all in the same direction. Readers get to watch up close as truckers exploit a driver shortage and employers despair over the opioid crisis. A scoop about a Walmart floor scrubber shows how automation is creeping into American workplaces. The stories make abstract issues concrete, bolstering the musing of experts with compelling, real-world examples.

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for Main Street”
    Leigh Buchanan
    Bright writing and detailed reporting is employed to tell enlightening stories about small business. We especially liked a piece that profiled a family of immigrant hotel entrepreneurs, telling the story of how they grew a small business into a much bigger one and the creative and thoughtful ways they reacted to the devastation of Hurricane Harvey. Her two other articles described a unique solution to the problem of the fading family farm and the surprising source of all those cardboard eclipse glasses last year.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Projects and collaborations

    Winner: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic, for “Arizona owners can lose homes over $50 in back taxes”
    Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark
    This story packs a powerful punch, showing the devastating impact of tax liens on some Arizona homeowners, particularly minorities and the poor. It recounts the experience of one family and then uses data analysis to illustrate the magnitude of the problem. Bravo on the map. The complex process of tax liens and foreclosure is laid out in an understandable fashion that makes readers want to stay with the story until the end. Many sources are featured, including individuals who are going through the worst time of their lives and are therefore reluctant to speak publicly. This is an example of strong community reporting that can lead to change.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for professional publications

    Winner: University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal, for Losing the Fight to Debt”
    Danielle Chemtob
    Excellent journalism and a unique story angle for a topic that’s been covered exhaustively — student debt. Reporter Danielle Chemtob took an in-depth look at the high amount of debt taken on by students at historic black colleges and universities. Though the story included a lot of hard data on rising tuition costs and flat wages, she kept it interesting and personal by speaking to students and school leaders.

    Honorable mention: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Profits of Policing”
    Agnel Philip and Emily Mahoney
    Profits of Policing sheds light on a largely hidden area, exposing shortcoming in the accounting and reporting of seized personal property. Reporters Emily Mahoney and Agnel Philip did an incredible amount of digging for this report. An added bonus: The video of the 76-year-old man, who could lose everything as a result of this personal property seizure program, provided a very personal element to this in-depth investigation.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for student publications

    Winner: Medill News Service, for “Opportunities open up for women truckers, but their numbers remain small”
    Shen Lu
    Touching on two issues of national importance — gender equity in the workplace as well as a trucker shortage — the article told the story of two women struggling to make it in a male-dominated workplace, while putting their experiences into a broader context. The engaging article smartly wove in graphics and photos and mixed the macro and micro for a fascinating business story.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Inside Uber”
    Mike Isaac
    An insightful profile of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick that examined how his personality evolved from his high school years, how his penchant for risk-taking shaped Uber and led to the company’s managerial crisis. This series contained remarkable reporting about Kalanick’s showdown with Apple CEO Tim Cook and use of a technique called “Greyballing” aimed at deceiving local governments about Uber’s activities. In-depth reporting, quality writing and compelling multimedia made this series the clear winner.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Snap IPO”
    David Pierson, James Rufus Koren, Paresh Dave, Joe Fox and Ben Muessig
    The judges were impressed by the breadth and quality of writing on the initial public offering of Snap Inc., particularly the remarkable profile of Snap CEO Evan Spiegel. This series included a clearly written article on shareholder governance and Snap’s attempt to retain control of the company after the IPO. The judges also commend a clever interactive graphic that describes the volatility and price declines of much-publicized tech stock offerings.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Automating Hate”
    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner, Ariana Tobin, Madeleine Varner, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Rob Weychert, Noam Scheiber, Hannes Grassegger and Stefanie Dodt
    A clear winner — well-written, newsworthy, and one that made an impact. This trio of stories takes an inventive, investigative look at the underside of social-media giant Facebook and its not-so-politically correct ways, highlighting how hard it is to make it accountable. The in-depth and original reporting shows how the company’s guidelines for censoring hate speech let controversial posts slip through the cracks while unfairly shutting down more reasonable ones, and it exposes how easy it is for employers to use Facebook’s technology to exclude older workers from job ads. While these stories were written last year, the subject they tackled remains critical in today’s charged political environment.

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “Blockchain Mania!”
    Robert Hackett and Jeff John Roberts
    This piece tackles a complicated and technically challenging subject with aplomb and creates a great explainer that’s also an engaging read.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Saving face: Facebook wants access without rules”
    Jared Bennett and Allan Holmes
    A deep, broad look at a project that an increasingly dominant company has worked hard to avoid scrutiny. The topic has huge potential implications for privacy, technology and the consolidation of power. The story draws its force from crisp writing, good graphics and, above all, impressively thorough reporting.

    Honorable mention: Triangle Business Journal, “How an $850 million deal died for a Durham company”
    Lauren Ohnesorge
    This story goes deep inside a collapsed investment by a German giant in a North Carolina tech company to show how international trade policy hits home in American cities. It was well-written, clearly organized and comprehensively reported, with informative graphics.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, forSelf-Driving Cars”
    Tim Higgins, Jack Nicas, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Mike Spector
    The WSJ stories were our top pick for the deeply reported insight into perhaps the biggest issue facing the transportation industry: self-driving cars. The submitted pieces covered three of the most important players — Tesla, Google and Uber — and raised important concerns about safety, tensions with Detroit and theft of intellectual property. The stories showed impressive sourcing and research and used storytelling elements to bring the stories to life.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “The Last Railroad Tycoon”
    Shawn Tully
    Well-written, engaging and insightful — the story took readers inside the CEO’s attempt to remake a fourth railroad after three previous successes. Hunter Harrison’s gambit lives on after his death and is the biggest story in U.S. railroading in a decade.

    Honorable mention: Quartz, for Uber’s New York subprime leasing program and the drivers it hurt”
    Alison Griswold
    Uber’s turnabout showed the impact of the story. Quartz was effective in highlighting the human element of drivers caught in the rent-to-own trap, helping readers make a more-personal connection. The follow-up with drivers afterward also was a nice touch.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Small

    Winner: The Information, forUber’s Hell”
    Amir Efrati
    The year 2017 became a reckoning for Uber in so many ways, from how it attempted to skirt, or even potentially break, the law in thwarting competitors and regulators to its disgraceful treatment of women in its workplace. The company’s hard-charging CEO thought he could rule Uber as his personal kingdom but discovered otherwise, with his downfall resulting in major drama. The stories broke new ground in nearly every area of controversy at the company – delivering investigative scoops that punched well above its weight. From exposing secret programs to spy on its competitor Lyft to documenting sexual misconduct instances pervasive at the company, The Information’s work was an amazing example of hard-hitting business reporting that never let up and never backed down.

    Honorable mention: Jacksonville Business Journal Reporter, for “Employed & Homeless: As CSX changes plans, dispatchers left in limbo during holidays”
    William Robinson
    This story showed just how vulnerable employees are to the whims of shifting winds at a corporation like CSX. They uprooted their lives and started moving based on the company’s direction that their jobs were being relocated, only to suddenly have the company change its mind. Good solid story and notable that the company kept trying to deny what was happening, requiring the reporter to prove it through dogged reporting involving documents and persuading the employees to go on record.

     

    VIDEO – Large

    Winner: CNBC, forBroken Bonds”
    Leslie Picker, Scott Zamost, Dawn Giel, Chris Mulligan, Jackie Dessel, Alex Herrera, Leroy Jackson and Scott Matthews
    CNBC’s powerful entry gave viewers strong investigative material gleaned from a wide variety of sources. This CNBC piece apparently wasn’t the first reporting on this long running issue, but it detailed the issue with sweep, depth and clarity, tackling an important subject and serious questions about UBS’s actions as crucial concerns grew about the product it was marketing. The look of the video itself was clean and straight forward, but it clearly took deep reporting, meaningful resources and time to craft it.

     

    VIDEO – Small and Medium

    Winner: Quartz in collaboration with Retro Report, for “What Happens Next”
    This series was thorough and polished, plus it was on-topic. The aerial footage! Looks like they used drones to good effect. Impressive production quality and it conveys relevant info. The well-produced videos took us to new and different places, telling us something we didn’t know and relating it to the world we live in. Excellent work.

  • 2017 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday March 7, 2018

    AUDIO – All news organizations

    Winner: Marketplace/The Uncertain Hour, for “How One Sentence Helped Set Off the Opioid Crisis”
    Krissy Clark, Caitlin Esch, Nancy Farghalli, Maria Hollenhorst, Lyra Smith, Sitara Nieves, Deborah Clark, Donna Tam, Tony Wagner, Jake Gorski and Daniel Ramirez

    Honorable mention: KUOW, for “Prime(d)”
    Carol Smith, Joshua McNichols, Carolyn Adolph, Posey Gruener and Brendan Sweeney

    BANKING/FINANCE – Large

    Winner: Financial Times, for articles on non-prime and predatory lending
    Ben McLannahan

    Honorable mention: Reuters, for “Crypto Casino”
    Steve Stecklow, Alexandra Harney, Anna Irrera and Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi

    BANKING/FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with Fortune, for “The Billion-Dollar Loophole”
    Peter Elkind

    BANKING/FINANCE – Small

    Winner: TheStreet, for “Big Bank Corporate Governance”
    Brad Keoun

    Honorable mention: American Banker, for The CFPB leadership battle”
    Kate Berry, Ian McKendry and Rob Blackwell

    BREAKING NEWS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “CVS-Aetna Deal”
    Dana Mattioli, Sharon Terlep, Anna Wilde Mathews and Laura Stevens

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for Uber coverage
    Mike Isaac and Farhad Manjoo

    BREAKING NEWS – Medium

    Winner: The Seattle Times, for “Amazon HQ2 announcement”
    Matt Day, Dominic Gates, Mike Rosenberg, Jon Talton, Scott Greenstone, Dan Beekman, Jessica Lee, Joseph O’Sullivan, Mark Nowlin and Kjell Redal

    BREAKING NEWS – Small

    Winner: International Business Times, for “Last-Minute Tax Provisions Could Enrich Top Lawmakers”
    David Sirota, Josh Keefe, Alex Kotch and Jay Cassano

    Honorable mention: Puget Sound Business Journal, for “Port of Seattle CEO resigned amid probe into $4.7M payout”
    Andrew McIntosh

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business, for “Amazon HQ2 bid revealed: tax breaks, $120 million talent program, transit vision”
    Chad Livengood and Kirk Pinho

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for Keywords Technology Column
    Christopher Mims

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Equifax Hack”
    Ron Lieber

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Lee Schafer’s columns

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “A Boom with a View”
    Erin Griffith

    Honorable mention: The Dallas Morning News, for “Texas business repels a bathroom bill”
    Mitchell Schnurman

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Small

    Winner: Albany Business Review, for Mike Hendricks’ columns

    Honorable mention: The Nation, for Helaine Olen’s columns

    ECONOMICS – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh

    ECONOMICS – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Trump’s Trade Pullout Roils Rural America”
    Adam Behsudi

    ECONOMICS – Small

    Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Sarasota Drift”
    Barbara Peters-Smith

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut “
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Medium

    Winner: The Atlantic, for “The Problem with Rolling Back Regulations”
    Alana Semuels

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Small

    Winner: Debtwire, for American Idle: An Offshore Drilling Crisis “
    Alex Plough

    EXPLANATORY – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “Shock Tactics”
    Jason Szep, Peter Eisler, Tim Reid, Lisa Girion, Grant Smith, Linda So, M.B. Pell and Charles Levinson

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Anaheim’s Subsidy Kingdom “
    Daniel Miller, Priya Krishnakumar and Ben Poston

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Education Disrupted”
    Natasha Singer

    EXPLANATORY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with NPR, for “Sold for Parts”
    Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes

    Honorable mention: Miami Herald, for “Hotel housekeepers commute”
    Chabeli Herrera and Carl Juste

    Honorable mention: Detroit Free Press, “The Fault in No Fault”
    JC Reindl

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan

    EXPLANATORY – Small

    Winner: McClatchy’s Washington Bureau, “Trump’s footprint across ex-Soviet world”
    David Goldstein, Ben Wieder, Kevin G. Hall, Gabriellle Paluch and Peter Stone

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for A Century of Domination: As America’s Carbon Wars Rage, Oil and Gas Industry Influence Grows”
    Jie Jenny Zou, Michael J. Mishak, Jamie Smith Hopkins, Kristen Lombardi, Jim Morris, Chris Young, Sasha Khokha and Tom Dart

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy”
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle, Robert McClure and Brad Wieners

    FEATURE – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Pink Boxes”
    David Pierson

    FEATURE – Medium

    Winner: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “The Land Alcoa Dammed”
    Rich Lord, Len Boselovic, Stephanie Strasburg, Zack Tanner, James Hilston and Ed Yozwick

    Honorable mention: Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, for Trapped by Heroin”
    Penelope Overton, Dieter Bradbury, Gregory Rec and Brian Robitaille

    Honorable mention: The Weather Channel Digital, for “United States of Climate Change”
    Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans, Kevin Hayes and Geoff Hansen

    FEATURE – Small

    Winner: The Real Deal, for “Real Estate’s Diversity Problem”
    Kathryn Brenzel, Rich Bockmann, Elizabeth Kim, Jill Noonan, Damian Ghigliotty and Yoryi De La Rosa

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Chicago Business, for Can jobs stop Chicago violence?”
    Lisa Bertagnoli and Ann Dwyer

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for “Meet the Woman Who Broke Silicon Valley’s Gender Barrier and Built a $1.5 Billion Tech Company “
    Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Industry/topic-specific publications

    Winner: The Real Deal

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Honorable mention: Houston Chronicle

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Small

    Winner: STAT: Reporting from the frontiers of health and medicine

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business

    GOVERNMENT – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “One Nation, Divisible”
    Michael M. Phillips, Betsy McKay, Paul Overberg and Sarah Nassauer

    GOVERNMENT – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Burned”
    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett and John Diedrich

    Honorable mention: Kansas City Star, for “Business and politics collide in Missouri”
    Lindsay Wise and Steve Vockrodt

    GOVERNMENT – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Industry Lawsuits Try to Paint Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket”
    Nicholas Kusnetz

    Honorable mention: Financial Planning, for “Wells Fargo whistleblowers”
    Ann Marsh, Marc Hochstein and Scott Wenger

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “The Body Trade”
    Brian Grow, John Shiffman, Blake Morrison, Elizabeth Culliford, Reade Levinson, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Zach Goelman

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Wasted Medicine”
    Marshall Allen

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity and Reveal, for “The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools”
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Chris Zubak-Skees, Eric Sagara, Fernanda Camarena, Amy Walters and Ike Sriskandarajah

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy “
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle and Brad Wieners

    Honorable mention: Kaiser Health News, for Treating Cancer: Hope Vs. Hype”
    Liz Szabo and John Hillkirk

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Nuclear Negligence “
    Patrick Malone, Peter Cary, R. Jeffrey Smith and Chris Zubak-Skees

    INNOVATION – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Disneyland Wait Times”
    Hugo Martin, Joe Fox, Priya Krishnakumar, John Schleuss and Ben Poston

    INNOVATION – Medium

    Winner: GateHouse Media, for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms”
    Emily Le Coz, Lucille Sherman, Mara Corbett and Tyson Bird

    INNOVATION – Small

    Winner: Crain’s Chicago Business, for “The Rebuilders of Chicago’s Southland”
    Jason McGregor, Thomas J. Linder and Ann Dwyer

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Large

    Winner: Associated Press, for “North Korea”
    Eric Talmadge, Tim Sullivan, Hyung-jin Kim and Martha Mendoza

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Mexico’s Housing Crisis
    Richard Marosi

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Welcome to Tomorrow Land”
    Vivienne Walt

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Culture of Harassment “
    Emily Steel, Michael S. Schmidt, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey, Susan Chira and Catrin Einhorn

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut”
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Too Broke for Bankruptcy”
    Paul Kiel and Hannah Fresques

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for “Quantity of Care”
    Mike Baker and Justin Mayo

    Honorable mention: The Boston Globe, for “FAA”
    Jaimi Dowdell, Kelly Carr, Jenn Abelson, Todd Wallack, Jonathan Saltzman and Scott Allen

    Honorable mention: The Des Moines Register, for “TPI Investigation”
    Kevin Hardy and Grant Rodgers

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Small

    Winner: Boston Business Journal, for “Promises, promises: Massachusetts companies are missing hiring goals even with hefty tax breaks”
    Greg Ryan

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces”
    Sabrina Shankman

    Honorable mention: Orlando Business Journal, for “The Amazon Effect”
    Sarah Aslam, Veronica Brezina, Matthew Richardson and Craig Douglas

    MARKETS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Market-Moving Leaks”
    Mike Bird

     MARKETS – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Whatever It Takes to Win”
    Jen Wieczner

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Ratner-Simmons Sex Allegations “
    Daniel Miller, Amy Kaufman and Victoria Kim

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Medium

    Winner: CNNMoney, for Five women accuse journalist and ‘Game Change’ co-author Mark Halperin of sexual harassment “
    Oliver Darcy

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Small

    Winner: Portland Business Journal, for “Portland’s media mania”
    Erik Siemers

    Honorable mention: Investor’s Business Daily, forCan E-sports’ Armchair Gladiators Vanquish Hulking NFL Players?”
    Patrick Seitz

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Student Debt”
    Stacy Cowley, Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Natalie Kitroeff

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: The Chronicle of Higher Education, forWelcome Students! Need a Checking Account?”
    Dan Bauman

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Small

    Winner: The Motley Fool, for Matthew Frankel’s columns

    Honorable mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Money Help for Aging Parents”
    Sandra Block, Mark Solheim and Eileen Ambrose

    REAL ESTATE – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg News, for “Cashing In on Calamity”
    Prashant Gopal

    REAL ESTATE – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Puerto Rico seeks aid for tens of thousands of squatters”
    Lorraine Woellert and M. Scott Mahaskey

    Honorable mention: The Arizona Republic, for HOA foreclosures”
    Jessica Boehm and Catherine Reagor

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for Amazon coverage
    Mike Rosenberg, Ángel González, Bettina Hansen, Mark Nowlin, Judy Averill, Kjell Redal, Thomas Wilburn and Alan Berner

    REAL ESTATE – Small

    Winner: Puget Sound Business Journal, for Marc Stiles package of stories
    Marc Stiles

    Honorable mention: The News Tribune (Tacoma), for Fight for your country, lose the bidding war for a house”
    Kate Martin

    RETAIL – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Retail in Crisis”
    Suzanne Kapner, Valerie Bauerlein, Esther Fung and Yaryna Serkez

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Counterfeit Shoes”
    David Pierson

    RETAIL – Medium

    Winner: Report on Business Magazine, for Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”
    Marina Strauss

    Honorable mention: BusinessInsider.com, forDefining the Retail Apocalypse”
    Hayley Peterson

    RETAIL – Small

    Winner: Racked, for “eBay is Playing Catch-Up “
    Chavie Lieber, Christie Hemm Klok and Laura Bullard

    Honorable mention: Capital & Main, for a package of retail features
    Jessica Goodheart

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Contracted”
    Lauren Weber

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for Can AT&T Retrain 100,000 People? “
    Aaron Pressman

    Honorable mention: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Cost of affair, family rift measured in millions”
    Jeffrey Meitrodt

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Small

    Winner: LinkedIn, for “Managing Business “
    Chip Cutter

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for Main Street”
    Leigh Buchanan

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Projects and collaborations

    Winner: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic, for “Arizona owners can lose homes over $50 in back taxes”
    Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for professional publications

    Winner: University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal, for Losing the Fight to Debt”
    Danielle Chemtob

    Honorable mention: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Profits of Policing”
    Agnel Philip and Emily Mahoney

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for student publications

    Winner: Medill News Service, for “Opportunities open up for women truckers, but their numbers remain small”
    Shen Lu

    TECHNOLOGY – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Inside Uber”
    Mike Isaac

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Snap IPO”
    David Pierson, James Rufus Koren, Paresh Dave, Joe Fox and Ben Muessig

    TECHNOLOGY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Automating Hate”
    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner, Ariana Tobin, Madeleine Varner, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Rob Weychert, Noam Scheiber, Hannes Grassegger and Stefanie Dodt

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “Blockchain Mania!”
    Robert Hackett and Jeff John Roberts

    TECHNOLOGY – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Saving face: Facebook wants access without rules”
    Jared Bennett and Allan Holmes

    Honorable mention: Triangle Business Journal, “How an $850 million deal died for a Durham company”
    Lauren Ohnesorge

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, forSelf-Driving Cars”
    Tim Higgins, Jack Nicas, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Mike Spector

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “The Last Railroad Tycoon”
    Shawn Tully

    Honorable mention: Quartz, for Uber’s New York subprime leasing program and the drivers it hurt”
    Alison Griswold

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Small

    Winner: The Information, forUber’s Hell”
    Amir Efrati

    Honorable mention: Jacksonville Business Journal Reporter, for “Employed & Homeless: As CSX changes plans, dispatchers left in limbo during holidays”
    William Robinson

    VIDEO – Large

    Winner: CNBC, forBroken Bonds”
    Leslie Picker, Scott Zamost, Dawn Giel, Chris Mulligan, Jackie Dessel, Alex Herrera, Leroy Jackson and Scott Matthews

    VIDEO – Small and Medium

    Winner: Quartz in collaboration with Retro Report, for “What Happens Next”

  • Covering Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Technology

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday February 20, 2018

    Cryptocurrency and blockchain technology stands to be one of the biggest and most compelling financial stories of 2018. While bitcoin’s wild roller-coaster ride draws headlines, there are more than 1,500 other digital currencies on the market today, with companies such as Kodak, Atari and Long Island Iced Tea getting into the cryptocurrency game. Other major companies, such as Intel, IBM, Microsoft Corp. and Cisco Systems are working on developing practical applications for the blockchain technology that is critical to digital currency. Governments around the world, meanwhile, are scrambling to combat fraud, draft regulations and figure out how to collect taxes on millions of digital accounts.

    Join a panel of experts who will discuss the successes, challenges and best practices of leading business journalists in covering cryptocurrency and blockchain technology, and how to make stories compelling and relevant to readers and investors alike.

    Monday, Feb. 26
    2 p.m. EST

    Listen to the recording.

    Instructions: Dial (512) 879-2134. When prompted enter access code 846394#.

    Questions: Callers may submit questions to the panelists at [email protected].

    Panelists:

    Lily Katz, markets reporter, Bloomberg News. Katz is a reporter on the markets team at Bloomberg News in New York, where she has worked for two years. She covers topics including financial technology, insurance, real estate and cryptocurrencies. A Seattle native, Katz received a degree in journalism from the University of Washington in 2015. She has spent the past year diving into bitcoin and blockchain specifically, and has led panels, TV and radio interviews on the budding industry.

     

     

    Laura Shin, host of crypto-focused podcasts. Shin is an independent journalist covering crypto assets (bitcoin, Ethereum, ICOs, tokens) and hosts the crypto-focused podcasts “Unchained: Big Ideas From the Worlds of Blockchain and Cryptocurrency” and “Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto.” Formerly a senior editor at Forbes, she was the first mainstream journalist to cover crypto full-time. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with Honors from Stanford University and has a master of arts from Columbia University’s School of Journalism.

     

     

    Kyle Woodley, senior investing editor, Kiplinger.com. As a writer and columnist, Woodley also specializes in writing about exchange-traded funds. He joined Kiplinger in September 2017 after spending six years at InvestorPlace.com, where he managed the editorial staff. His work has appeared in several outlets, including U.S. News & World Report and MSN Money. He is a graduate of The Ohio State University, where he earned a B.A. in journalism.

     

  • Training: Reporting on Sports Business Slides

    Posted By David Wilhite on Friday June 23, 2017

    Click the link below to download the slides for Covering All the Bases: Reporting on Sports Business.
    June 2017

    Reporting on Sports Business Slides

  • Covering Trump Amid Conflicts of Interest

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Friday April 28, 2017

    By Urvashi Verma
    Medill News Service

    Conflicts of interest and lack of transparency in the Trump administration are challenging journalists to persist in finding and reporting the facts in a climate of hostility and polarization.

    “This presents a unique scenario. The lack of transparency regarding Trump’s businesses has made it difficult to determine who is benefiting from what,” said Lawrence Ingrassia, managing editor of the Los Angeles Times.

    Ingrassia spoke at a lunch session titled “When a Businessman Becomes President: Covering Donald Trump,” at the Society of American Business Editors and Writers spring conference.

    Marilyn Geewax, senior business news editor at National Public Radio, said the lack of transparency is “a real problem” and journalists must emphasize that ethics and trust matter in a democratic society.

    “Build a wall of facts, and sooner or later that wall will stand,” Geewax urged.

    Panelists Marilyn Geewax, Timothy L. O’Brien and Lawrence Ingrassia speaking about covering Donald Trump at the Society of American Business Editors and Writers spring 2017 conference.

     

    Moderator Timothy O’Brien, executive editor of Bloomberg Gadfly, ticked off a list of Trump’s conflicts of interest through his businesses. But he said he didn’t expect Congress or others to take action because Title 18 Section 208 of the U.S. Code exempts the president and vice president from the conflict of interest law.

    “He should be covered on the facts of the matter and his track record and then measuring what he says he’s going to do, to what he does,” O’Brien said.  “I think that is the best standard to judge him.”

    Geewax said Trump may be running afoul of the Emoluments Clause, which prohibits U.S. officials from receiving payments from foreign governments without permission from Congress. Since he became president, several foreign governments have hosted events at the Trump Hotel in Washington, D.C.

    It isn’t clear, though, whether that would be interpreted as receipt of payment.

    Ingrassia urged business journalists to dig into financial and other documents.

    “Business journalist should be deeply engaged in covering what the Trump administration is doing. We have the skill-set,” Ingrassia said.

    Geewax said even minor conflicts, such as Trump getting press coverage while he plays golf at one of his own resorts, are troublesome because they undermine confidence in a corruption-free economy.

    “It is very important that we convey the negative impact that conflicts of interest and lack of transparency have on capitalism,” Geewax said.

  • Cheddar CEO: Millennials, though often overlooked by cable TV, love business news

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Friday April 28, 2017

    By Saundra Wilson
    Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University

    Some people may think business news doesn’t appeal to millennials, but Cheddar TV founder and CEO Jon Steinberg said people in their 20s and 30s love business news.

    Steinberg spoke at a session Friday morning at the spring conference of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

    Steinberg said millennials are curious learners who think about their finances. The inspiration for Cheddar came when Steinberg saw a hole in business coverage geared toward a younger audience.

    “You need a 24/7 network, and it should be focused on technology, entertainment and media and culture,” Steinberg said.

    Cheddar TV focuses on these areas, featuring young anchors, a bright color scheme and some non-traditional reporting techniques, including breaking the fourth wall, Steinberg said.

    Jon Steinberg, Cheddar TV founder and CEO, says he created the company to provide business news for a millennial audience. (Saundra Wilson/ASU Walter Cronkite School)

    The company broadcasts live video eight hours a day. The content is delivered almost exclusively on Over-The-Top platforms, or devices connected to the internet such as mobile phones, smart TVs and gaming consoles.

    “When our content gets jumbled and non-neighborhooded, the consumer gets disoriented,” Steinberg said.

    He said he believes having content in a designated place, similar to cable TV or “neighborhood” gives millennials a consistent place to go where they aren’t distracted by all kinds of other content.

    Gregory Roth, a director of communications for Credential Financial Inc., a Canadian wealth management company, said connecting with a millennial audience is important to his company.

    “The type of audiences that we’re trying to reach most are the people that we’re best able to help throughout their life,” Roth said.

    Steinberg said there are opportunities with the millennial audience and beyond.

    “I have a 6 year old and a 7 year old, and they don’t watch TV through a traditional cable box,” Steinberg said.

    Steinberg said Cheddar plans to lead the way in creating business content for millennials.

    Millennials comprise the nation’s largest generation, surpassing Baby Boomers, according to the Pew Research Center.

    The generation, generally defined as people 18 to 34 years old, is projected to peak in about two decades with more than 80 million people, according to Pew.

    “If you capture the younger demographic first, the older people will follow,” Steinberg said. “Everybody wants to be young.”

  • SABEW Canada’s 3rd Annual Best in Business Award Winners Announced

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday April 21, 2017

    TORONTO, April 20, 2017 /CNW/ – The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Canada would like to congratulate the winners of the third annual Best in Business Canada competition.

    Our awards show, hosted at Baro in Toronto on Wednesday night, saw more than 100 journalists in attendance — our largest crowd ever. The event is the only one of its kind in Canada to honour business journalism.

    In addition to thanking all of our members and attendees for a great night, SABEW Canada would also like to thank the sponsors of Wednesday’s event, including TD Bank, CNW, Accenture, Fidelity Investments Canada, LowestRates.ca, Ivey Business Journal, the Schulich School of Business, Longview Communications, and Le Germain Hotels.

    Below are the winners for each category.

    Beat Reporting
    Financial Post
    Claudia Cattaneo
    Coverage of Canada’s Energy Industry

    Commentary
    Canadian Business
    Deborah Aarts
    The Realist Column

    Feature (Long-form)
    Canadian Business
    Joe Castaldo
    The Last Days of Target

    Feature (Short-form)
    Financial Post
    Claire Brownell
    The End of Meat

    Investigative
    The Globe and Mail
    Kathy Tomlinson
    B.C Housing Investigation

    Multimedia
    Financial Post
    Peter Kuitenbrouwer and Peter J. Thompson
    The Sault Ste. Marie Locks

    Package or Ongoing Series
    Bloomberg News
    Natalie Obiko Pearson, Katia Dmitrieva and Gerrit de Vynck
    Real Estate

    Personal Finance/Investing
    MoneySense
    Julie Cazzin, Mark Brown, Dan Bortolotti, Bryan Borzykowski, David Fielding and David Thomas
    Personal Finance

    Profile
    The Globe and Mail
    James Bradshaw and Christine Dobby
    Blais

    About SABEW
    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is a 53-year-old organization with more than 3,000 members across the globe. Journalists from The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, CNN and other organizations, big and small, are involved in the organization.

    About SABEW Canada
    A group of Canadian journalists launched SABEW Canada, SABEW’s first international chapter, in 2014. We now have more than 200 members, among them reporters and editors from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, MoneySense, Bloomberg, Canadian Press, the Wall Street Journal and more.

    SABEW Canada’s mission statement is simple: We want to define and inspire excellence in business journalism. We do that by hosting educational events with company chief executives, leading business journalists and well-known politicians, among others. We also offer teletraining to members to help improve their skills, and hold networking events where business journalists can make new connections, as well as catch up with colleagues and friends.

    For further information: Dawn Calleja at [email protected] or 416-554-6450.

  • 2016 Best in Business Honorees with Judges’ Comments

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday March 17, 2017

    Airlines/Travel Large Winner

    Associated Press

    Justin Pritchard, Martha Mendoza, Scott Mayerowitz and David Koenig

    Airport Security

    This reporting team used FOIAs and persistent questions to TSA officials to produce this solid package of stories on travel security. The package is meaty, timely, and does a lot of work on an important subject. While critical of airport security and the TSA, stories also give a fair account of the agency’s challenges.

     

    Airlines/Travel Medium Winner

    The San Diego Union-Tribune

    Lori Weisberg, Daniel Wheaton and Phillip Molnar

    Airbnb: Opportunity or Nuisance?

    An excellent in-depth look at how Airbnb can sweep through neighborhoods and change the places where we live. Well done in demonstrating real-world impact.

     

    Airlines/Travel Small Winner

    Honolulu Civil Beat

    Nathan Eagle and Marina Riker

    Dying for Vacation

    Civil Beat made a compelling case that state efforts to post beach warnings and educate travelers were not sufficient to prevent 147 tourists in the last four years from drowning in waters that natives understand are dangerous. The stories identified loopholes in state regulations that allow tour operators to hire incompetent workers. Consider this high-impact lede: ”Married 32 years, Jane and Bob Jones did a lot in life together. They raised a family, served those in need and traveled when they could. They died together, too.” The story on snorkeling as a leading cause of tourist deaths was also very informative and had an arresting video. Overall, excellent reporting, writing and photography throughout.

     

    Audio Winner

    NPR News and Planet Money

    Chris Arnold, Robert Smith, Elizabeth Kulas, Uri Berliner, Neal Carruth, Bryant Urstadt and Alex Goldmark

    Wells Fargo Hustle

    NPR’s reporting on the Wells Fargo account fraud story made for a compelling read as it told the story from the perspective of a young sales staff pressured to meet unrealistic goals. This offered new insights into the scale and scope of the problem and turned the story into a human-interest piece. No one can remain stoic when listening to the interview of the young woman so stressed she describes throwing up under her desk.

     

    Audio Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg News

    Brad Stone, Aki Ito, Pia Gadkari, Magnus Henrikson, Liz Smith, Jordan Robertson, Sarah McBride, Marie Mawad and Spencer Soper

    Decrypted

    Bloomberg’s Decrypted series takes on the challenge of explaining extremely complex topics in a way that makes them accessible to listeners with no formal training in the topics explored.  The conversational nature of the work illustrates how tone can be used to lighten up the discussion of daunting subjects.

     

    Autos/Transportation Medium and Large Winner

    Fortune

    Geoffrey Smith and Roger Parloff

    Hoaxwagen

    One of the most shocking business stories of the year was the revelation that Volkswagen tampered with the emission systems of 11 million cars in order to deceive air-quality regulators. Most major publications covered the basics of the reputation-shattering scandal. Fortune’s Hoaxwagen dug deeper into the fundamental elements of the fraud. The result was a compelling narrative of the company’s history of steamrolling regulars, its ruthless win-at-all-costs culture and even how Germany’s top political leaders served as enablers by blocking or weakening emission regulations.

     

    Autos/Transportation Medium and Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg News

    Eric Newcomer, Selina Wang and Olivia Zaleski

    Uber’s Upending the Transportation Industry

    Uber’s initial success in the tech-driven ride-hailing business created breathless press coverage. But last year, cutthroat competition, high driver turnover and widening losses began to tarnish Uber’s reputation. In a series of stories with fine original reporting, Bloomberg pulled back the curtain on Uber’s darker side such as putting more cars on the road through predatory lending to drivers with poor credit ratings — or luring drivers toward leases that would have some paying double the fair market price for cars. Why would anyone sign a lease like that? Because the terms purportedly make it easier for the drivers to walk away.

     

    Autos/Transportation Small Winner

    Providence Business News

    Mary MacDonald, Eli Sherman, Mark S. Murphy and Mike Mello

    Bridges Too Far Gone

    Whether by luck or foresight, Providence Business News got in front of an issue that is now in the headlines. Its coverage showed the obstacles in replacing a crumbling and dangerous bridge, by going beyond dollars and cents to examine the impact on people living in its shadow. We commend the PBN staff for going deep on a local topic that’s not easy to cover, yet has life-or-death implications. Special kudos for the visuals, particularly the photos of the deteriorating concrete.

     

    Banking/Finance Large Winner

    International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy D.C. Bureau and the Miami Herald

    Panama Papers

    Exceptional journalism on a topic of international importance – secret, offshore companies. This masterful investigation into a complex global subject shed light on a dark and arcane corner of international finance, explaining why it matters. Terrific reporting on what will surely be taught in journalism schools for generations to come.

     

    Banking/Finance Large Honorable Mention

    CNNMoney.com

    Matt Egan

    Wells Fargo’s Broken Culture and the Devastation It Wrought

    This package of stories put flesh and blood on one of the biggest business stories of the year. The telling of the abstraction of a bank’s vile sales practices reveals the human consequences for customers and employees alike. This CNN reporter stuck with it, exposing one of the largest household banking names and the corruption it tried to hide. CNNMoney is to be applauded for its doggedness in running this one to ground.

     

    Banking/Finance Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Stephen Gandel on banking

    These stories demonstrate an array of good reporting skills — a breaking news article on a Wells Fargo executive’s bonus; an analysis of Apple CEO Tim Cook’s compensation changes; and, based on reporting that began in 2012, an article about the SEC’s decision to take a pass on Goldman Sachs’ RMBS conduct.

     

    Banking/Finance Small Winner

    Financial Planning

    Ann Marsh

    Johnny Burris investigation

    It’s no shocker that whistleblowers get into trouble with former employers. But this package sheds a light on the institutional forces working against federal investigators who sided with a JPMorgan Chase whistleblower: They got fired themselves. As a new administration gears up in Washington, it’s worthwhile to recount the struggles of investigators in the previous administration’s Labor Department. “He’s not a whistleblower guy,” one person in the story said of former Labor Department Secretary Tom Perez. The details on the firing of OSHA investigators are backed up with on-the-record takes. The story presses on whistleblower protection (or lack thereof) with good writing, excellent reporting and nice national and political context.

     

    Banking/Finance Small Honorable Mention

    AmericanBanker.com

    Kevin Wack, Dean Anason, Alan Kline and Marc Hochstein

    How Wells Fargo’s Culture Soured

    This package on the Wells Fargo crisis was revealing, deeply sourced, and authoritatively and skillfully written. Diligent reporting and a well-organized narrative provided insights into how Wells Fargo’s account-opening scandal has roots going back many years. Colorful anecdotes kept it fresh – such as former CEO who dressed up in a Yankees uniform at a sales event.

     

    Breaking News Large Winner

    Reuters

    Joseph Menn

    Yahoo Secretly Scanned Customer Emails for U.S. Intelligence

    Menn’s scoop is a rare story that pulls back the veil on how the government’s secret electronic surveillance programs operate in practice. This detailed, comprehensive reporting effort reveals not only how Yahoo came to secretly install special software on its servers, but also how that was received internally and its broader ramifications. The story was widely followed and, ultimately, had a significant impact on Yahoo, contributing to a series of factors that forced it to reduce its sale price.

     

    Breaking News Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg BusinessWeek

    Monte Reel

    Secret Cameras Record Baltimore’s Every Move From Above

    In this compelling story, Reel reveals that Baltimore residents had been under secret aerial surveillance. The program, run by a company which refined its technology in war-torn Iraq, avoided scrutiny because it was funded by a private donor, whose identity was also unmasked by Reel. The story’s flawless execution, from reporting and writing through editing and presentation, draws in readers who otherwise may have been less interested in one city’s policing methods. In its wake, officials in 11 cities launched legislative efforts to bring open debate to the use of police surveillance.

     

    Breaking News Medium Winner

    Charlotte Observer

    Rick Rothacker, Ely Portillo, Katherine Peralta, Deon Roberts and John Arwood

    PayPal Withdraws Plans for Charlotte Expansion Over HB2

    When PayPal announced it was canceling a $3.6 million North Carolina expansion, it cited a state measure to restrict the rights of LGBT individuals. The Charlotte Observer pushed out the news on Twitter and embarked on an ambitious package of stories. The team rounded up a range of perspective and insight on the issue, even managing to get PayPal’s CEO on the phone to explain his decision. The result was a breaking-news package that was smartly written, balanced and forward-looking, giving readers the context they needed to understand potential economic and political ramifications. The steady stream of tweets from the Observer’s business desk also demonstrated that the staff is in touch with how readers are consuming news.

     

    Breaking News Medium Honorable Mention

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    Jacob Barker, Lisa Brown, Bryce Gray, Jim Gallagher and Samantha Liss

    Bayer Buys Monsanto

    Monsanto’s decision to be acquired by German biotech giant Bayer was major news for St. Louis, and the Post-Dispatch responded with deep and thorough coverage of the pending deal. The newspaper’s business desk covered a range of angles, including local job impact, the outlook for Monsanto’s charitable giving, and the likelihood that the deal would burnish the seed giant’s controversial reputation. The coverage was deeply analytical and forward-looking.

     

    Breaking News Small Winner

    Iraq Oil Report

    Ben Lando, Ben Van Heuvelen, Patrick Osgood, Rawaz Tahir, Mohammed Hussein, Rebin Fatah and staff who are anonymous for their security

    Liberating Qayarah

    This package stands out for a successful blend of breaking news on the advance of Iraqi forces against the Islamic State with the human side of the story painted in memorable images such as the kids growing up covered in soot. Excellent sourcing combined with strong storytelling and concise writing left a lasting impression on the judges. In many instances, this small organization did a better job than its larger counterparts in its reporting on this major economic and political story.

     

    Breaking News Small Honorable Mention

    Crain’s New York Business

    Aaron Elstein and Jeremy Smerd

    Trump’s Middle Class Tax Break

    Smart reporting resulted in Crain’s NY Business breaking news on a topic that other news outlets were chasing. The coverage advanced the story of how billionaire Donald Trump got a tax break intended for the middle class – and resulted in a piece that stands out for its sharp but fair writing, and its engaged and approachable storytelling.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Large Winner

    Bloomberg View

    Timothy L. O’Brien

    In these columns, O’Brien explores Donald Trump’s background as a business leader and challenges some of Trump’s mythology about his career. It shows how business journalists can play an essential watchdog function to oversee powerful business leaders. The column “Will a President Trump Still Be the King of Debt?” re-examined a controversial real-estate project and explained the role of an influential ally — not Trump — in key parts of the negotiations. The judges were especially impressed by O’Brien’s column, “I Saw Trump’s Tax Returns. You Should, Too.” Trump unsuccessfully sued O’Brien and, in the legal discovery process, O’Brien saw Trump’s tax returns. While the columnist was still bound by a legal nondisclosure agreement, he managed to convey to readers that the Trump tax controversy is real and that release of Trump’s tax returns would be newsworthy. This was a unique form of reporting that required skill and courage to continue to report on an especially litigious business leader. Businesses have attempted to use litigation or the threat of it to silence the press, and O’Brien’s work shows how journalists can still move forward and inform the public.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Large Honorable Mention

    The New York Times

    James B. Stewart

    Common Sense

    Stewart’s “Common Sense” columns present a compelling and exceptionally detailed analysis of Donald Trump’s tax avoidance schemes in three deeply reported articles. Stewart pushed the news forward by describing the implications of Trump’s tax plans and how they could foster widespread tax avoidance. He also walked readers through a clear and engaging discussion of Trump’s tax loopholes. In summary: Exceptional work that was authoritative, deeply reported and cleanly written.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Peter Coy

    Coy deserves to be honored for three substantive and compelling columns on divergent subjects, showing his broad mastery of an impressively wide range of subject matter. His column on trade provided an impressive overview of the debate and poked holes in long-held beliefs. His column on blockchain technology showed how it could be a significant development in management theory. The column on Alexander Hamilton examined the cultural and political importance of Hamilton, linking Hamilton’s legacy to current issues, particularly economic nationalism, with great historical references. In summary: Coy has a real gift for explaining complex topics, brilliantly citing historical events to give his writing maximum impact.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Medium Winner

    The Atlantic

    Derek Thompson

    Thompson has knack for taking broad economic, political and social trends and turning them into incisive commentary about the state of the nation. Donald Trump’s election victory, for example, was not the result of Hillary Clinton ignoring the working class, but a battle between those supporting “pluralist social democracy” and “white nativist protectionism.” In his article “How America Lost its Mojo,” Thompson dismisses simplistic arguments from the left and right of the political spectrum as to why citizens move locations and jobs less than they used to and are less likely to start their own business. Instead, he offers a far more nuanced, in-depth assessment. And his piece “Total Inequality” offers a robust view on why neither income nor wealth inequality is sufficient to explain the many, at times multigenerational, disadvantages that poorer people suffer.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Medium Honorable Mention

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Lee Schafer

    Schafer’s mini-series on the challenges affecting mining in Minnesota impressed the judges for its knowledge, depth and focus on what recent developments mean for the state’s inhabitants.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Medium Honorable Mention

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Matt Kempner

    Unofficial Business

    Kempner has a knack for snubbing his nose at the big guns of business and politics in Atlanta – such as how taxpayers are on the hook for Georgia Power’s hundreds of millions of dollars in cost overruns on a nuclear plant; Delta’s descent into being a “petty bully” against a local theater; or the effectiveness of Mayor Reed’s program to provide 15 female entrepreneurs a year with free office space.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Small Winner

    Sarasota Herald-Tribune

    Maggie Menderski

    What’s in Store

    Menderski deftly directs her “What’s in Store” column to inform readers about what’s really in store for retailers and consumers in Southwest Florida, based on trends and changes she sees first-hand. Through her thoughtful lens, the Sarasota area becomes a microcosm of the challenges that online shopping presents to developers and brick-and-mortar retailers across the U.S. Menderski puts us on the ground floor of this painful, broad economic shift. Her story about a model store employee reminds us of what we can’t get from an online experience, while a piece about efforts to redevelop shuttered Sears stores offers hope that traditional retailers can remain relevant in this increasingly digital world. In a clear, caring, and surprisingly poetic way, Menderski has produced an important and purposeful body of work.

     

    Economics Large Winner

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jon Hilsenrath and Bob Davis

    The Great Unraveling

    During a surprising and often chaotic presidential election, The Wall Street Journal helped explain the underlying economic reasons for what was playing out in politics. Using data, graphics, economic analysis, and deep reporting, the WSJ showed the links between economic realities and voter frustrations. The reporting walked readers through the economic promises – and showed how they turned out to be so wrong for so many Americans. This is first-rate economics reporting.

     

    Economics Medium Winner

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Adam Belz

    Rising From Poverty

    The series deploys data, graphics, photography, and design very effectively — and sustains that deployment over the course of three deeply reported pieces. The theme is also surprising: Far from being a neglected place without hope and riven by opioids, rural America can be the place with the greatest prospect of social mobility. And surprise is what news is all about.

     

    Economics Small Winner

    PolitiFact

    Louis Jacobson on economics

    PolitiFact presented solid, timely analysis of economic rhetoric during a presidential campaign in which fact and fiction were hard to distinguish. Months before fact-checking candidates became a routine feature on the business page, these stories took both parties’ nominees to task for politicizing economic data. The dissection of Donald Trump’s comments about renegotiating U.S. debt was an insightful example of a complex topic explained in an accessible way, supported by multiple experts.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Large Winner

    The Financial Times

    Tom Burgis, Pilita Clark, Michael Peel, Charlie Bibby and Kari Ruth Pedersen

    Great Land Rush

    This multimedia series on the global rush to buy up land gave its audience a bit of everything — a tale with epic sweep (“from Myanmar to Saskatchewan”), parallax-scrolling web pages, graphics, maps, photos, videos, and a podcast. Even the writing was a visual feast. As the FT recounts, an Ethiopian agribusiness, Saudi Star, transformed the bush into a rice field “the size of 20,000 soccer pitches,” only to discover that “land is like the lion that prowls near Saudi Star’s farm: hard to tame.” We learn about the tycoons who would possess such lands, and the dispossessed who would have them back — peasants who feel connected to the land, in some cases, by the umbilical cords they buried there. To chronicle one of the biggest business stories of our times, three FT reporters crossed six continents and used just about every tool in a digital storyteller’s repertoire. The result is a multimedia tour-de-force that is not only outstanding journalism, it is beautiful.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Medium Winner

    San Antonio Express-News

    Jennifer Hiller

    Mood Turns Black as Oil as a Boom Turns Bust

    This piece explores the unraveling of an industry in the light of rock-bottom oil prices, with amazing breadth and depth. Hiller shows the humbling of companies and countries that are rethinking their oil strategies. It was the clear front-runner in a category with some very strong entries.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Medium Honorable Mention

    Honolulu Star-Advertiser

    Kathryn Mykleseth

    GEMS

    The jury lauded Mykleseth’s reporting on an obscure state loan program for green energy that was set to become a prototype for the entire nation.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Small Winner

    Iraq Oil Report

    Ben Lando, Ben Van Heuvelen, Patrick Osgood, Rawaz Tahir, Mohammed Hussein, Mahmoud Zaki and staff who are anonymous for their security

    ISIS and Iraq’s Oil

    These tenacious reporters are to be credited for turning a swirl of conflicting facts in a war zone into well-sourced, actionable reports. Displaying an impressive grasp of industry and politics, the writers showed how developments in the energy sector would affect the daily lives of those in the region as well as the war against Islamic State. The use of a map helps to clarify the perilous situation for readers. Without the writers’ courage, determination, and insight, this important story might otherwise never have come to light in so intelligible a manner.

     

    Explanatory Large Winner

    Associated Press

    Nicholas Riccardi, Christopher S. Rugaber and Josh Boak

    Divided America

    This is an outstanding example of explanatory journalism. The AP team explored the vast economic divides that fractured the country and ultimately transformed the 2016 presidential election. In three stories, they detail how average isn’t typical in understanding the recovery from the Great Recession, how rural and urban America represent disparate economic realities, and who today’s immigrants really are. Divided America offers context beyond what is typically reported and sheds light on a phenomenon that helps explain the unexpected campaign success of both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. It is the epitome of explanatory journalism – revealing the story behind the story, and ultimately detailing that even the people who live next door can live in different worlds.

     

    Explanatory Large Honorable Mention

    Yahoo Finance

    Rick Newman explanatory features

    This extraordinary work details the business side of Donald Trump. Newman dissects the candidates’ assets and failings in the business world. The package includes an insightful look at the value of the “Trump” brand, which is the top source of revenue for the family business, not real estate. Also of note is the detailing of how Trump University sank itself when the project decided to ramp up the profits at the expense of learning.

     

    Explanatory Large Honorable Mention

    CNBC

    Nikhil Deogun, Jim Ackerman, Mitch Weitzner,  Reid Collins Jr., Meghan Lisson, Amber Mazzola, Patrick Ahearn, Steven T. Banton, Allison E. Stedman, Rich Korn, Justin Solomon, Charlotte Lewis, Alex Herrera, Roberto Leon, Gerry Miller, Jorge Pujol, Raul Jaramillo, Felipe Leon, Mary Murray, Orlando Matos, Odalys Garcia, Paola Larramendi, Margarita Alarcon, Carlos Bustamante, Evelyn Gruber, Veronica Albornoz, Mark Ohlsen, Christie Gripenburg, Elizabeth Kim, Rakeesha Wrigley, George Pierro, Richard Marko, Tom Russo, Angel Perez, Vito Tattoli, Victoria Todis, John Rehm, Jacqueline Dessel, Nick O’Connor, Salvatore Carosone, Lauren Ricci-Horn, Jonathan Altino, Lawrence Beer, Kyle Kinder, Jamie Bland, Julia Jester, Amanda Winograd, Erika Banoun, Annie Bryan, Aidan Kelley, Marlon Ramtahal and Erin Kitzie

    The Profit in Cuba

    Marcus Lemonis profiles everyday Cubans who are the frontier of entrepreneurism in the new Cuba. The documentary profiles entrepreneurs as they navigate obstacles: a clothing designer forced to buy fabric on the black market; a restaurant owner whose license limits him to 50 seats; and an aspiring artisan who isn’t allowed to expand her business. Woven throughout is the story of siblings who, thanks to the new law, have opened a bakery.

     

    Explanatory Medium Winner

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today

    John Fauber, Kristina Fiore and Matt Wynn

    Illness Inflation

    Who wouldn’t be interested in this story? An outstanding example of two media outlets with different audiences collaborating successfully to explain the outrageous practice of creating or exaggerating medical conditions to sell more drugs. Extremely well researched down to the amazing detail that one company admitted in a slide presentation that it created a disease from thin air. The use of graphics and sidebars helped illustrate the tale.

     

    Explanatory Medium Honorable Mention

    The Providence Journal

    Kate Bramson

    Following the People’s Money

    What is it about aging athletes and business? The paper set itself a simple goal: Find out how much Rhode Island’s investment in former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling’s failed business cost taxpayers. With exhaustive research, the paper found the answer and walked readers through the whole sorry scandal. A true explanatory gem. It showed how a strong and clear story idea coupled with dogged investigation could produce an outstanding public service story.

     

    Explanatory Medium Honorable Mention

    Quartz

    Gwynn Guilford

    Everything We Thought We Knew About Free Trade Is Wrong

    Attempting to answer one of the most vexing questions of the Donald Trump economic era: Why has support for free trade collapsed? The Quartz piece shows that while sidebars, multimedia and other story elements can help a story, if the narrative is strong enough and incredibly well written, it can hold its own. The story reached back to the origins of free trade dogma with British political economist David Ricardo and traced how theory lost its way in the real world.

     

    Explanatory Small Winner

    The Desert Sun

    Rosalie Murphy, Robert Hopwood and Christopher Weddle

    Land leasing in Palm Springs

    A series of stories educating readers on how little they understand about their own community. Half of Palm Springs, including hotels, shops, and timeshares worth a total of $2.4 billion, sits atop leased land. Those leases are doomed to expire and revert to Native American control or could fall into the hands of real-estate speculators. The reporter showed enormous enterprise in ferreting out the voluminous public records and other evidence needed to document the story. And the presentation of the package, customized for the internet, is spectacular, with an interactive map, a video feature, and panoramic photographs. The online presentation uses technology to advance the narrative, rather than just adding graphic elements for their own sake. This is everything explanatory journalism should be.

     

    Explanatory Small Honorable Mention

    Crain’s New York Business

    Aaron Elstein, Peter D’Amato and Jeremy Smerd

    Collection of explanatory stories

    Who knew a $1 billion industry was born in 1979, when a chunk of masonry fell and killed a 17-year-old college student, leading New York City authorities to mandate the use of standardized scaffolding? Who knew that every aspect of scaffolds is micromanaged by the city, making them more expensive to take down than to leave standing? Who knew that the carcinogen perchloroethylene, which we all probably thought was banned years ago, is still being used by dry cleaners and devastating the health of workers and nearby residents? Who knew that the hardest thing about ensuring that a restaurant is kosher is verifying that there are no insects in the fruits and vegetables? New York is the biggest media market in the country, if not the world. Yet the reporter was able to deliver compelling stories about slices of city life that would otherwise have been overlooked.

     

    Explanatory Small Honorable Mention

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Henry Meier

    Competitors Raise Stink Over Garlic

    One of the most unusual and surprising stories we’ve read in quite a while. The reporter not only investigates an obscure industry most people have never stopped to give a second thought to — Garlic? Are you kidding?! — but he uncovers a remarkably complex web of connections and conflicts that fuel an unofficial but effective anti-competitive scheme connecting California to New Mexico to China. The backstabbing and double-crossing wouldn’t be out of place in a Raymond Chandler novel. It’s a great reminder that behind every closed door lies an amazing story, just waiting for the right reporter to dig it out. And this story carries even more weight now that trade policy has become a priority for the federal government. It’s an illustration of how policy is established and why it won’t be easy to change.

     

    Feature Large Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Shannon Pettypiece and David Voreacos

    Walmart’s Out-of-Control Crime Problem Is Driving Police Crazy

    A tale of corporate irresponsibility with a new twist – Walmart is skimping on security, burdening local police, and putting employees and shoppers in danger. With telltale lack of cooperation from Walmart, the reporters admirably pieced together data for the story using police call logs and other sources and traveled the country to interview victims.

     

    Feature Large Honorable Mention

    Associated Press

    Hannah Dreier

    Venezuela, Life on the Line

    A story that explains Venezuela’s economic collapse through the human lens of a food line, where hunger and desperation lead to violence and “need has an ugly dog’s face.” A beautiful example of feature writing told at great risk to the reporter.

     

    Feature Large Honorable Mention

    The Wall Street Journal

    Justin Scheck

    Tramadol: The Opioid Crisis for the Rest of the World

    Through impressive on-the-ground reporting in the streets and pastures of Cameroon, Scheck tells the important story of how an unregulated opioid is wreaking havoc in the developing world.

     

    Feature Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Brian O’Keefe

    Bitter Sweets

    We felt that a strong storyline on a complex subject, on-the-ground reporting, and forward-looking elements of this piece stood out. Graphics break down the issues in vivid detail and bring the disparate elements of cultural and business conflicts into a cohesive narrative, giving Bitter Sweets the edge.

     

    Feature Medium Honorable Mention

    Fortune

    Erika Fry

    Hot Mess

    Explanatory reporting with compelling graphics in this detailed anatomy of a culture clash. The analysis of how quick noodles became a half-billion-dollar debacle for Nestle in India

    could serve as a primer for multinational businesses on how to handle and avoid crisis.

     

    Feature Medium Honorable Mention

    Houston Chronicle

    David Hunn

    Behind Apache’s oil find

    How do you find oil hiding in plain sight? This piece told the untold story of one of the largest oil and gas finds in decades. Forward-looking themes and compelling details made this entry stand out.

     

    Feature Small Winner

    Inc. Magazine

    Burt Helm, Jon Fine and Will Yakowicz

    The Stealthy Sales Kings of Amazon

    The rich details in this story about an unexplored topic, combined with skillful writing and a solid narrative structure, brought it over the top for us. It was clear that Helm had spent time on the ground at Pharmapacks getting to know how it ran and what its executives are like. He told us how quickly items move in and out of its warehouse, how much revenue it produces, and how it gets featured on Amazon by picking just the right price. There were also great quotes and information about what products are unexpectedly the biggest sellers.

     

    Feature Small Honorable Mention

    Crain’s New York Business

    Jeff Koyen and Jeremy Smerd

    In Search of the Hot Dog Millionaire

    Koyen used shoe-leather reporting to shed light on an industry whose vendors seem to be on every street corner in New York, but whose business model was not widely known. We learn that food-cart salespeople end up earning very little even if they sell plenty of dogs, because of the city’s outdated and arguably unfair system for approving necessary permits. From Hell’s Kitchen garages to Midtown street corners to the black-market permit hub of Astoria, Queens, readers move through the city to learn the costs, hassles and long hours spent trying to make a living selling hot dogs, bagels and coffee to the masses. The details and storytelling were excellent.

     

    Feature Small Honorable Mention

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

    Janet Bodnar and Kimberly Lankford

    Making a Plan for a Special Needs Child

    Lankford’s story about how families can better manage the costs and available benefits for special-needs children is a great piece of service journalism. It was also eye-opening for readers unaffected by the issue, because the reporter brought us into the lives of specific parents who are trying to make sense of the system and make sure their children get the best possible care over the long-term. Great reporting and insights.

     

    General Excellence Industry/Topic Specific Winner

    Financial Planning

    Financial Planning displayed a commitment to in-depth reporting and dynamic writing that deserves recognition. The publication covered key issues related to the people and companies in its industry and was willing to present uncomfortable truths about them. The stories also showed foresight, especially regarding the potential for changes in rules requiring advisers to act in the best interest of clients.

     

    General Excellence Large Winner

    Los Angeles Times

    The Times entry ticked all the boxes, capped by a groundbreaking investigation of how the pharma house Purdue promised 12-hour relief for its OxyContin painkiller despite knowing for decades that this claim wasn’t supported by its own research. This false claim is at least partially responsible for the surge of addiction, deaths, and overdoses linked to OxyContin and other opioids that is ravaging the United States. The other parts of the entry also were strong, notably its scoop-worthy coverage of the Wells Fargo bogus bank-accounts scandal, and its sharp and timely analysis of Verizon’s acquisition of the struggling Yahoo. The Times also showed it knows how to cover its neighborhood, delivering a fine expose on Hollywood’s sketchy cottage industry of pay-to-play child modeling. In a category with many strong submissions, the Los Angeles Times stood above the rest and did it the old-fashioned way with well-conceived story lines that it brought home through deep reporting and great storytelling.

     

    General Excellence Medium Winner

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    The Star Tribune delivered stories of both national and local importance and stood above other entries for consistently demonstrating a sustained level of excellence. The paper’s investigation of Medtronic’s concealment of a study that cast doubt on one of its flagship medical devices was rigorously documented, balanced, well-presented, and held to account both government officials and the company. The story had national significance, while the paper’s exploration of the nexus between location and social mobility localized a national trend for readers. The paper also delivered on the local level, providing Minneapolis readers with a bread-and-butter consumer watchdog report on the dangers lurking behind the city’s growing ride-sharing culture. The paper’s non-enterprise reporting, including coverage of a Minneapolis-area hotel business deal and corporate infighting at a local hearing-aid manufacturer, was timely and insightful, providing details and context on tight deadline that could easily rival larger news outlets. Across all these efforts, the Star Tribune consistently delivered quality news coverage that is worthy of the general excellence award.

     

    General Excellence Medium Honorable Mention

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    The Journal Sentinel showed exceptional reporting prowess both on a local and national scale. The story “Gaming the City’s Property System” revealed that unscrupulous Milwaukee landlords were milking decrepit rental housing for rental income while refusing to clean up housing-code violations. Then they were dumping the run-down properties in bankruptcy proceedings for the city to repossess, allowing the landlords to escape paying accumulated housing fines. The paper named the landlords, listed the money they owed, and brought the City of Milwaukee to task for turning a blind eye to the situation. In a hard-hitting report, the Journal Sentinel described how drug companies are redefining non-threatening conditions into medical “diseases” so they can sell drugs to treat them. “Binge-eating disorder” is said to afflict seven million Americans. You may be more familiar with it as overeating. Sixteen million Americans are said to be suffering from “intermittent explosive disorder,” better known as losing your temper. This story, with outstanding graphics and sidebars, also highlighted the role being played in this costly game by doctors taking drug-company money. It’s a story every American should read. The paper also produced solid stories on a local merger and a billionaire who paid no state taxes.

     

    General Excellence Small Winner

    Crain’s New York Business

    The quality, range, and impact exhibited by Crain’s New York made it the unrivaled winner in this category. The staff clearly put tremendous time and care into its stories, from the scoop on Donald Trump’s tax break to its more investigative enterprise features, to the benefit of its readers and the public at large. As one judge put it, “These are stories I haven’t read anywhere else and I thought they did an outstanding job.”

     

    General Excellence Small Honorable Mention

    Nashville Business Journal

    The Business Journal, with a lean staff, took on some big issues like income inequality in the city as it expands, while also providing well-researched scoops and analysis for its readers. Its stories appear to be told with the sort of insider knowledge that can only come from reporters who are constantly examining every facet of a city’s business community.

     

    Health/Science Large Winner

    Chicago Tribune

    Sam Roe, Karisa King and Ray Long

    Dangerous Doses

    In the most comprehensive study of its kind, the Tribune tested 255 pharmacies to see how often stores would dispense dangerous drug combinations without warning patients. This piece had it all: investigative reporting, deep sourcing, solid writing and, significantly, the power to force change. A compelling topic well covered. Congratulations.

     

    Health/Science Large Honorable Mention

    Los Angeles Times

    Melody Petersen

    Hospitals’ losing battle with superbugs

    Nice investigative work and hit the issue of hospital-borne superbugs from three very different angles.

     

    Health/Science Medium Winner

    The Sacramento Bee

    Marjie Lundstrom and Phillip Reese

    A Dangerous Mix

    The Bee shone a harsh light on a largely unseen trend toward younger, sometimes dangerous, nursing-home residents. The story zeroed in on an important issue that seemed overlooked in the regular news cycle; the reporters tracked down documents and data to prove out the thesis with hard evidence; they delved deep enough into the subject matter to understand and illuminate the likely causes; and they wove it together with personal narratives to create a compelling and impactful story.

     

    Health/Science Medium Honorable Mention

    Forbes

    Matt Herper

    The God Pill

    Herper introduces us to the God Pill – a treatment from an obscure San Diego pharmaceutical company that seeks to reverse aging. This tale focuses on colorful founder and CEO Osman Kibar. It examines his short-lived foray into poker, detailing how the engineering Ph.D. and billionaire played the game, conquered it, and then promptly quit. From those first words, Herper draws a reader into a story that centers on a fascinating character and concept, providing rich detail and careful balance throughout. Herper explains Samumed’s potential and risk without ever fawning or coming across as unfairly critical. The reader walks away informed and thoroughly entertained.

     

    Health/Science Small Winner

    STAT

    David Armstrong

    Opioid Crisis

    An engaging and groundbreaking series on one of the biggest health issues of our times, the opioid crisis. From the minutiae of the junk food needed to persuade a doctor to the harrowing tale of a young woman who died taking a legal version of a risky drug, the series combined meticulous reporting with powerful writing.

     

    Health/Science Small Honorable Mention

    Project on Government Oversight

    David S. Hilzenrath

    Drug Money

    A revealing look at the myriad ways the industry impacts drug regulation. With rigorous reporting, it shows how the industry has devised a backhanded way to influence the Food and Drug Administration, by sponsoring and participating in patient advocacy groups, and how drug regulation is impacted.

     

    Innovation Large Winner

    BuzzFeed News and BBC

    Heidi Blake, John Templon and Simon Cox

    The Tennis Racket

    “This story shocked the tennis world with tales of massive match-fixing in this multibillion-dollar sport. What made the entry remarkably innovative was that reporters from Buzzfeed News and BBC developed an algorithm that allowed them to perform in-depth data analysis of betting patterns in tens of thousands of tennis matches. The U.K. prime minister called for an independent inquiry into the scam, which demonstrated the story’s impact. This story used complex statistical analysis and good old-fashioned shoe-leather reporting that calls into question the integrity of professional tennis’s highest echelons. The results were presented in an entertaining package (especially for a data-driven project) — the analysis was accessible to the general reader, and the story itself had real impact.” Another judge adds: “Buzzfeed and BBC’s ability to combine traditional journalism, data and an algorithm was by far one of the more unique approaches I have seen. I believe their approach is one every reporter and every news organization should consider; it’s the future of journalism.” We congratulate Buzzfeed News and BBC for their outstanding achievement.

     

    Innovation Small and Medium Winner

    ProPublica and The Texas Tribune

    Neena Satija, Kiah Collier, Al Shaw, Jeff Larson and Ryan Murphy

    Hell and High Water

    This package on Houston’s vulnerability to coastal storms was very innovative, especially the way the maps interacted with the story. Overall, a strong example of public service.

     

    International Large Winner

    Reuters

    Selam Gebrekidan, Stephen Grey and Amina Ismail

    The Migration Machine

    Truly remarkable multimedia reporting on a complex problem with global implications, affecting individuals and nations. By introducing the audience to the individuals affected by the historic migration crisis, we feel the emotions of those who have found new homes, those scarred emotionally and physically, while also sharing a sense of loss for those who have died in transit while hoping to find a better life.

     

    International Large Honorable Mention

    Associated Press

    Hannah Dreier and Joshua Goodman

    Venezuela Undone

    While Venezuela’s economic and human crises are many miles away from the United States, we get a very palpable sense how inflation, the lack of an adequate food supply, and mismanagement by government and the military are taking a very human toll. Excellent reporting from the ground up, including by showing us a few of the personalities involved. One gets a sense that this breakdown in civil society could happen anywhere.

     

    International Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Erika Fry

    Hot Mess

    Hot Mess is a deeply researched, highly compelling account of how a mishandled crisis brought down a brand that Nestle started from scratch 30 years ago, and cost the company half a billion dollars. Fry went to great lengths to untangle the complicated saga by traveling to India to interview government officials and others involved in the matter, as well as to Nestle’s headquarters in Switzerland to interview the company’s CEO. She produced a beautifully written and fascinating business story that provides valuable lessons on crisis management and recovery to other multinationals, especially those operating in developing markets.

     

    International Small Winner

    The Center for Public Integrity

    Erin Quinn, Gordon Witkin, John Dunbar and Patrick Madden

    Rape, Murder, Famine – and $2.1 Million for K Street PR

    The worse a government is, the more it needs K Street, and South Sudan’s government is one of the worst. A United Nations report has identified it as a serial human-rights violator. Quinn dug in and discovered that the impoverished nation spent $2.1 million in 2014 and 2015 on Washington lobbyists and public-relations experts to stave off sanctions. Some went to the firm of Democratic Party fundraiser Tony Podesta, whose brother, John, chaired Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. Quinn enlivened her story by featuring a former Sudanese “Lost Boy” who called the fees received by K Street firms “blood money.” Her story shamed at least one lobbyist to register, as required by federal law. Patrick Madden of WAMU produced a companion radio piece.

     

    Investigative Large Winner

    BuzzFeed News

    Rosalind Adams

    Intake: Locked on the Psych Ward

    In a yearlong investigation, Adams found that Universal Health Services, the nation’s largest chain of psychiatric hospitals, routinely admitted patients and held them against their will until their insurance ran out. Adams interviewed hundreds of people, including several executives, and she dug through numerous internal documents. Ultimately, she brought to light what appears to be a dark money-making practice. In the aftermath, Iowa Sen. Charles Grassley asked the Department of Health to investigate UHS. Raymond James then lowered its rating on the company, citing Adams’ article and the federal investigation. The company’s stock dropped sharply in the aftermath. Business-impact aside, Adams put the patients affected at the forefront of her investigation, sharing personal accounts with care and attention to detail. An incredibly compelling read.

     

    Investigative Large Honorable Mention

    International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy D.C. Bureau and the Miami Herald

    Panama Papers

    The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists produced an impressive collaborative effort to expose a network of law firms and partners actively working to hide billions of dollars in wealth from tax authorities. Their work spawned dozens of investigations and reflected an amazing amount of spadework to uncover hidden connections between professional firms and their wealthy clients. The Panama Papers provided significant fuel to the populist revolt against moneyed elites worldwide.

     

    Investigative Large Honorable Mention

    The Wall Street Journal

    John Carreyrou, Christopher Weaver and Michael Siconolfi

    The Downfall of Theranos

    This team’s dogged coverage of Theranos is a case study in the power of investigative reporting. The Journal’s work exposed as a fraud a Silicon Valley startup that was worth billions, leading directly to actions by regulators to revoke the company’s license and protect consumers. Though its first story casting doubt on the rosy Theranos narrative ran in 2015, the Journal owned the story in 2016, revealing detail after detail, including the awkward fact that Rupert Murdoch lost $100 million of his own money on Theranos.

     

    Investigative Medium Winner

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Cary Spivak and Kevin Crowe

    Landlord Games

    Strong, voluminous and detailed reporting that exposed landlords with a series of code violations – a story with real, consequential impact on the lives of the most vulnerable. Judges appreciated the story’s granular focus and how it exposed both wrongdoing by individuals and government inaction. A memorable accomplishment by dogged, skilled reporters.

     

    Investigative Medium Honorable Mention

    Houston Chronicle

    Mark Collette, Matt Dempsey and Susan Carroll

    Chemical Breakdown

    This ambitious and deeply sourced project by the Houston Chronicle reveals in stunning detail the common occurrence in and around Houston of chemical hazards next to businesses, homes and schools. The reporters had to overcome government intransigence in releasing records — hiding behind fear of terrorism — but eventually were able to document a failure of government to protect the public from potential accidents. It is important work, told in an eight-part series.

     

    Investigative Medium Honorable Mention

    San Jose Mercury News

    Louis Hansen, Michelle Quinn, Karen Casto and Mike Frankel

    The Hidden Workforce Expanding Tesla’s Factory

    This exhaustive six-month investigation and digitally interactive report uncovered apparent violations of visa and labor laws at one of the world’s most sophisticated companies. Judges highlighted Hansen’s dogged reporting and research of Tesla employees’ labor conditions and the companies that help many foreign workers’ visa processes. The story — which involved conducting interviews through translators and obtaining records through state and federal Freedom of Information Act requests — gave voice to the countless foreign workers looking for a better life in America, only to be dashed by apparent injustice.

     

    Investigative Small Winner

    The Investigative Fund and The Nation

    Seth Wessler

    Dying In Private Prisons

    Wessler’s investigative series for The Nation and The Investigative Fund features extensive, solid quantitative reporting in defense of an extremely vulnerable population of people who don’t have anyone else protecting their interests, and resulted in substantial change. The package was beautifully and hauntingly displayed, and the visuals and reporting urged readers to pay attention to this important topic. The evidence of willful neglect at top levels makes it even worse.

     

    Investigative Small Honorable Mention

    ProPublica

    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Surya Mattu, Lauren Kirchner and Terry Parris Jr.

    Machine Bias

    A well-done and a convincing project on the role of algorithms in our lives. The extensive reporting and insightful data analysis uncovered the housing ad problems at Facebook, prompting changes that got a lot of attention.

     

    Investigative Small Honorable Mention

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    John Russell and Greg Andrews

    CEO Behind $500M Proposal Has Mixed Track Record

    This entry included excellent work on a local business story, detailed the checkered past of an executive at an Indianapolis startup that sought to build a $500 million medical complex. Enterprising reporting that lead to real change.

     

    Management/Leadership/Career Medium and Large Winner

    The Atlantic

    Elizabeth Samet, John Paul Rollert and Jerry Useem

    Business Leaders and the Mixed Feelings They Inspire

    The Atlantic did an excellent job of explaining broader management and corporate challenges in a way that was accessible both to newcomers to the topic and experienced managers. The managers among the judges found themselves gaining insights that helped them in their roles.

     

    Management/Leadership/Career Small Winner

    Money Magazine

    Cybele Weisser, Kerri Anne Renzulli, Megan Leonhardt and Elaine Pofeldt

    MONEYcareer

    A great package for those making career decisions, it had substance and presentation, and a highlight was the before-and-after case studies. Plus, the original findings from a study could be helpful to people at most any stage of their career or considering switching fields or jobs. As one judge said, “The career makeover sidebar is hard to look away from once you’ve started. A reminder that first impressions can be professionally defining.”

     

    Management/Leadership/Career Small Honorable Mention

    BBC Capital

    Jennifer Merritt and Ronald Alsop

    Generation Work

    A unique package of stories helpful to many readers. It offered an inclusive perspective on career moves and hiring decisions for LGBTQ individuals and others. “This package was both well-conceived and unusual,” wrote one judge. “Very relevant for our time.”

     

    Markets Medium and Large Winner

    Bloomberg Markets

    Javier Blas and Andy Hoffman

    Inside Vitol: How the World’s Largest Oil Trader Makes Billions

    This reads like a John le Carré spy novel starting with the opening scene of a drone watching over the oil executives’ flight into Benghazi. Authors Blas and Hoffman spent months poring over documents about this largely secretive company and used their reporting to spin a fascinating tale.

     

    Markets Small Winner

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Joe Cahill on Business

    Cahill’s column offers smart, counterintuitive takes on business and investing issues relevant to readers in the Chicago area and beyond. He offered a skeptical take on an IPO, questioned governance in regard to an executive’s compensation in connection with a deal, and spotted insider purchases worthy of further inspection — all without going over the top or dumbing down the issues.

     

    Media/Entertainment Large Co-Winner

    The Wall Street Journal

    Keach Hagey, Joe Flint and Amol Sharma

    The Power Struggle Inside Viacom

    With classic, well-sourced beat reporting and luminous detail, Hagey, Flint and Sharma gave readers unique behind-the-scenes insight into the tumult atop one of America’s foremost media and entertainment companies. The saga — and it can only be called a saga — of media mogul Sumner Redstone and his personal and professional legacy is powerfully engrossing, instructive and, at times, troubling. The Wall Street Journal chronicled this drama of high-stakes shifting loyalties not with breathless voyeurism but with deep reporting and trenchant analysis.

     

    Media/Entertainment Large Co-Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Max Chafkin and Sarah Frier

    Snapchat

    Bloomberg Businessweek’s prescient reporting took readers inside Snapchat long before its highly anticipated IPO. With lively quotes, elegant writing and sweeping analysis, the stories explain what writer Chafkin himself called the media property “everyone wants a piece of but no one quite understands.” More than that, though, the stories are a larger examination of the new influence economy, where personalities can catapult to fame and fortune by racking up “likes,” trailing the often-baffled legacy media behind them. These stories not only take a hard look at the industry’s hottest challenger to Facebook but also explains to the “olds” — in charming, readable language — why Snapchat is so appealing to its young users.

     

    Media/Entertainment Small and Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Peter Elkind with Marty Jones

    Disturbing Decline of Sumner Redstone

    This gripping and clear-eyed account of a complicated corporate saga — and a generational family drama — combines sweeping big-picture perspective with detailed reporting. A very enjoyable and informative read, and one that manages to stand out on a topic that has received extensive coverage.

     

    Personal Finance Large Winner

    The New York Times

    Tara Siegel Bernard and Ron Lieber

    Public Sacrifice

    Bernard and Lieber did a masterful job of weaving together evidence, personal stories and advice — while translating mountains of jargon into plain English — to uncover a personal finance disgrace: the often-awful investments that teachers and employees of religious and other non-profit entities who advance the public good are forced to make through their 403(b) plans. They showed how federal disclosure rules for these accounts are much worse than for 401(k) plans, that fees are often outrageously high, and that employees can get socked with ridiculously high charges if they take their money out of some of these accounts early because they are in annuities from insurers. Their work highlights the “P” in personal finance by providing us with a case study of accountability journalism.

     

    Personal Finance Medium Winner

    Slate

    Helaine Olen

    Ask the Bills

    Ask the Bills column offers practical advice in a sympathetic tone, answering real questions for real people. It stood out from the crowded field for a mix of style, wit and value that cut through the confusion and made life’s most stressful topic, money, more accessible.

     

    Personal Finance Small Winner

    Money Magazine

    Elizabeth O’Brien, Taylor Tepper and Celeste Sloman

    The High Cost of Coping

    A well-reported and well-written look at how mental and emotional problems can not only affect one’s well-being, but also one’s finances. The reporters present practical methods for dealing with such problems within the U.S.’ confusing and often unfair health-care system.

     

    Personal Finance Small Honorable Mention

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

    Janet Bodnar, Jane Bennett Clark, Sandra Block and Kathy Kristof

    Women and Money

    A strong report on the specific financial problems facing women, relying on strong data and interviews with experts and individuals. Well-written, reported and presented.

     

    Real Estate Large Winner

    The New York Times

    Alexandra Stevenson and Matthew Goldstein

    The Housing Trap

    The New York Times work stands out because it shines a light on new kinds of questionable practices that had previously drawn little attention. It’s the kind of aggressive, in-depth reporting — with personal stories and deep digging into documents — that not only informs and warns the public but often brings new information to the regulators and legislators who can do something about it once they’re made aware.   

     

    Real Estate Medium Winner

    ProPublica and The Real Deal

    Cezary Podkul, Marcelo Rochabrun, Derek Kravitz and Will Parker

    The Rent Racket

    A very strong series about New York City’s rent stabilization system that took readers through unlawful evictions and overcharging by landlords, lax enforcement of tax-break laws by the city, and political deal-making in Albany fueled by real-estate industry campaign contributions. A database of tax-subsidized buildings in New York and other graphical and video elements made the story stand out as an exceptional public service.

     

    Real Estate Medium Honorable Mention

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Cary Spivak and Kevin Crowe

    Landlord Games

    A deeply reported series that revealed in startling detail how a number of landlords in Milwaukee argued they lacked the money to pay fines and tax penalties, while collecting rents, neglecting building repairs, and paying cash for more properties at foreclosure auctions.

     

    Real Estate Small Winner

    The Desert Sun

    Rosalie Murphy, Robert Hopwood and Christopher Weddle

    Land leasing in Palm Springs

    This entry was a standout, taking a deep dive into a complex topic about leased land, with engaging writing, clear subsections, and quotes from a wide variety of relevant sources. We were particularly taken with the visual aids, photos, and interactive map. We found the points of view of the many stakeholders (members of the tribe, homeowners, land owners, business owners) were presented objectively.

     

    Real Estate Small Honorable Mention

    Puget Sound Business Journal

    Marc Stiles on real estate

    One of our judges said this entry does exactly what you want a small publication to do — take something local and tie it to a larger national or global trend. We felt we got to know Seattle through these pieces; we weren’t alienated even though we’re all outsiders, while we felt the pieces were also eye-opening for local residents. We noted the engaging writing style, and good visuals and reporting. One judge noted the Yesler Terrace piece tackled an important topic, the tension that arises when developers move in on low-income housing, by putting human faces on the issue.

     

    Retail Large Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    David Ingold and Spencer Soper

    Three stories about Amazon Prime

    An impressive series of stories that exposed Amazon.com’s failure to offer its popular same-day delivery service to predominately black ZIP codes in major cities around the country. The use of complex data to tell an important story is impressive, and the presentation, with detailed but easy-to-understand graphics, is impeccable. The end result was a compelling report that had almost instantaneous impact. Senators immediately called for change, and Amazon quickly expanded its same-day delivery services.

     

    Retail Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Phil Wahba on retail

    Sharp and elegantly written portraits of J.C. Penney CEO Marvin Ellison, as he fights an uphill battle shrewdly and gracefully, and Ulta chief Mary Dillon, the head of a beauty retailer with a $16 billion market cap who grew up blue collar and now needs to raise her brand’s prestige. And, through David Simon, we get a proper education in the state of the American mall in a couple thousand words. The stories’ angles are subtle and judicious, more than they are surprising. It’s also nice to get so close to one of only five African-American CEOs in the Fortune 500 and to a woman at the helm of a singular company like Ulta.

     

    Retail Small Winner

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King and David Bourne

    Designing a Future

    This feature on the University of Oregon’s program that teaches students how to take sports products from concept to the consumer featured clean writing, a depth indicative of good knowledge of subject matter, and good art and layout. It was a good piece, from the standpoint of both craft and presentation.

     

    Small Business Winner

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    Hayleigh Colombo

    E-cigarette Players Fume Over Favored Security Firm

    Demonstrating painstaking commitment to a troubling story, the Indianapolis Business Journal highlighted the connection between new rules for the fast-growing vaping industry in Indiana and one particular security company that benefited from them. Judges were impressed by IBJ’s sustained effort, which connected the dots with diligence and fairness. Over time, this reporting provided readers with a comprehensive account of how government rule-making benefited one small business at the expense of several. It was a model for how steady, tough-minded coverage pays off.

     

    Students – Professional Publications Winner

    Dallas Morning News and University of North Texas

    Dalton LaFerney

    The Rise and Fall of the Frack Master

    The reporter showed significant initiative in diving deeper into this story to find out how the “Frack Master” turned himself into a sought-after TV source. The story does a good job of showing how the subject portrayed himself as an expert while having little relevant industry experience. All in all, a nice job of getting the story behind the story.

     

    Students – Professional Publications Honorable Mention

    The Wall Street Journal and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Sarah E. Chaney

    Bankruptcy Becomes an Option for Some Borrowers Burdened by Student Loans

    A hard news story that breaks new ground, which is a nice achievement for an intern on the bankruptcy beat. Student loan debt is of huge interest right now, so this story is one that could have ramifications. Nicely done.

     

     

    Students – Student Publications Winner

    Washington and Lee University

    Athena Cao, Zebrina Edgerton-Maloy and Logan Hendrix

    Borrowing Trouble

    This examination of payday loans was through, including in-depth financial details from a borrower (the audio was an added bonus) and the differing perspectives of financial regulators, advocates, and payday-loan executives. Excellent use of statistics. This high-impact project was well-organized and clearly written.

     

    Students – Student Publications Honorable Mention

    University of Maryland

    Brittany Britto

    Purple Line: A Divided Rail

    This fascinating look at the potential impact of a new mass-transit line puts readers in the picture with powerful prose and photography. A wise decision to tell the story in chapters about the groups most affected by the line. Robust reporting and masterful writing.

     

    Students – Student Publications Honorable Mention

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Joe Baglio, Elizabeth Fleischer, Elizabeth Harvell, Natalie Hoberman, Lauren Hong, Lauren Thomas, Evanne Timberlake, Justina Vasquez, Hailey Waller and Wei Zhou

    North Carolina Business News Wire

    Every state would benefit from having a business news wire like this one. UNC-Chapel Hill students are filling a real need, particularly in the areas of breaking news and coverage of public companies. This effort is to be commended, and the judges hope other journalism departments/schools will follow UNC-Chapel Hill’s lead.

     

    Technology Large Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Monte Reel and Robert Kolker

    Surveillance: The Private-Sector War on Privacy

    A fascinating read, this entry was beautifully written and expertly reported from all angles. Very thorough reporting on a complex subject affecting all levels of society. This project did an excellent job highlighting the dilemma posed by new technology and the competing interests of privacy versus public safety.

     

    Technology Medium Winner

    Forbes.com

    Matt Drange

    Selling Guns on Facebook a Problem Even Facebook Can’t Solve

    Drange’s comprehensive series is a stellar example of watchdog journalism and beat reporting in the modern journalism world. Drange refused to take Facebook’s vow to stop private gun sales at face value, delving deeply into the social network’s online gun community to show how the company’s policy was playing out in practice. It also showed how Facebook is encountering complicated problems as it becomes a social-media behemoth. Drange’s reporting, including deft use of social media itself, showed how easy it was to sell guns on Facebook, and how difficult it was to stop the activity. When Facebook announced a ban, he checked, and revealed it wasn’t working. He interacted with secret groups of gun owners, shedding light on their tactics to constantly stay ahead of the game, and illuminated a key engineer at Facebook involved in the issue. Peers in the media lauded Drange’s persistent reporting, a senator opened a formal inquiry, and Facebook had to take further action.

     

    Technology Medium Honorable Mention

    Fusion.net

    Kashmir Hill

    How an Internet Mapping Glitch Turned a Random Kansas Farm Into a Digital Hell

    Hill gets a nod for a delightful tech mystery that she helped track down and fix. Residents of a remote farm in Kansas couldn’t figure out why they were accused of criminal activities and harassed by angry people and law enforcement officials for a decade, until Hill decided to investigate. New technology coupled with good old-fashioned reporting skills led her to the offender: an internet mapping glitch! The company, which hadn’t even realized it was responsible for the problem, agreed to take corrective measures that would finally bring respite to the people on the Kansas farm and other places affected by a similar problem.

     

    Technology Small Winner

    The Center for Public Integrity

    Allan Holmes, Ben Wieder, Eleanor Bell Fox, Chris Zubak-Skees and Gordon Witkin

    Broadband Inequality

    An incredibly informative package that shed light on an issue many people may not be aware of. It was also a novel take on technology – the societal and economic impact of the internet, something that doesn’t get as much attention as it should. It was well-researched, the real-person accounts were compelling, and the data was enlightening and, at times, shocking. An outstanding piece overall.

     

    Technology Small Honorable Mention

    Gizmodo

    Michael Nunez

    Facebook’s Identity Crisis

    Gizmodo’s series of stories on alleged bias appearing on Facebook’s news feed and on how Facebook treats its contract news editors stood out for its exceptional original reporting and scope. While we may never know the real impact that the social-media platform had on voters’ perceptions, no one can deny that it played an important role in the 2016 election and will continue to have an impact going forward. Gizmodo surfaced deep concerns and details about bias on the Facebook news feed that resulted in the company’s leadership having to address them publicly and make internal changes to its processes. Since 1 billion people use Facebook and pay attention to its feed, Gizmodo’s reporting impacted much more than the company, and deserves to be rewarded for its journalism.

     

    Video Large Winner

    The Financial Times

    Kathrin Hille, Vanessa Kortekaas, Steve Ager and Russell Birkett

    Frozen Dreams: Russia’s Arctic Obsession

    The Financial Times takes viewers to Russia’s northern arctic coast where residents hope a new shipping lane, opened by global warming, will bring prosperity to this frozen, remote region. Weaving in remarkable imagery, poignant characters, and compelling graphics, the video represents the best of digital video. It is more than informative. It’s illuminating.

     

    Video Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Ashlee Vance

    Hello World

    The series takes viewers deep into unique tech scenes in places other than Silicon Valley: Japan to meet robot inventors, Los Angeles to visit the designer of a flying car, and Russia to meet the “techno oligarchs” building its internet. Host Ashlee Vance has a light touch as he casts the skeptical eye of a journalist on the tech wonders he finds along the way. The entertaining series is big budget, high quality and showcases how vibrant, entertaining and informative web video can be.

     

    Video Small and Medium Winner

    Weather.com and Telemundo Network

    Gregory Gilderman, Neil Katz, Shawn Efran and Marisa Venegas

    The Source and Cosecha de Miseria (Harvest of Misery)

    This story did what great investigations do best – it exposed a supposedly “benevolent” effort as a sham. We felt that it was a brilliantly reported and brilliantly shot piece. We greatly appreciated the combination of extensive research, old-fashioned shoe-leather reporting (including deep in the jungle), and smart interviewing that not only uncovered child labor in Mexico’s coffee industry but revealed that it was also tolerated. The reporters and producers then went the extra step to go back to the original source to present their findings and offer them a chance to respond to the allegations. We also appreciated the tone of the piece. It didn’t make assumptions or shout “Gotcha!” It simply presented the facts in a measured way for maximum impact. This is quality journalism at its best.

  • Training – Digital Bootcamp: Telling Business Stories through Podcasts

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday February 1, 2017

    Monday, Feb. 27

    2 p.m. EST

    Podcasts can extend the reach of your business coverage and open up new ways to involve and educate the audience in your space. But what makes a great podcast? On SABEW’s next teletraining session, you’ll hear a panel of experts discuss strategies for delivering engaging podcasts, learn about proven storytelling techniques and discover how to measure the success of your segments.

    Contributing to this training session is a business reporter who launched his newsroom’s inaugural podcast series just last year; a podcast host with 30 years of broadcasting experience and a talent coach that helps journalists with voice and on-air performance issues.

    Whether you’re already putting together podcasts or are just thinking about it, this training session is for you.

    Listen to the recording.

    Moderator

    Neal Carruth is the General Manager of Podcasting for NPR. He oversees a number of acclaimed podcasts, including Code Switch, Embedded, Hidden Brain, NPR Politics Podcast, Planet Money and Pop Culture Happy Hour. As GM, Neal provides editorial and business support for the public radio network’s growing portfolio of podcasts, strengthening connections to NPR’s newsroom and member stations. He also plays a role in new program development and innovation, helping NPR maintain its dominant position as a leader in on-demand audio programming. Most recently, Neal was NPR’s lead editor for coverage of business and economics.

     

     

    Panelists

    Ron Leuty covers biotech and sports business for the San Francisco Business Times. He has worked as a reporter or editor for more than 25 years, including editor of two startup business journals and business editor of the Prague Post in the Czech Republic. He has covered biotech for the San Francisco Business Times for nine years. He also has covered banking, manufacturing, law and sports business.

     

     

     

    John Wordock is the executive producer for podcasts at The Wall Street Journal. He has 30 years experience in broadcasting and has hosted podcasts for the last decade. Before Dow Jones, he worked at CBS MarketWatch, the AP Radio Network and Bloomberg TV & Radio. He’s won a National Headliner Award, a SABEW Best in Business Award and the Excellence in Financial Journalism Award.

     

     

    Terry Anzur has been a professional multimedia journalist for more than 30 years, reporting and anchoring everywhere from New York to Los Angeles to West Palm Beach. She has taught on-air skills to journalists of all levels, both through positions at the University of Southern California and Pepperdine University and through her company, Terry Anzur Coaching Services.

  • Covering Personal Finance in 2017

    Posted By David Wilhite on Friday January 20, 2017

    Monday, January 23
    2 p.m. EST

    January is the time of the year when money management and personal finance are at the top of many people’s minds. People are eager for advice and information about setting their household budgets, getting debt under control, preparing to buy or sell a house and making preparations for tax season.

    On SABEW’s next one hour teletraining session, hear from a panel of experts as they discuss fresh ways that reporters and editors can tackle these important personal finance topics, and make your coverage stand out from the rest.

    Listen to the Recording

    Moderator

    Jeff Herman is a managing editor for CreditCards.com, where he assigns, edits and sometimes write credit and personal finance stories and blog posts for the main site. He also edits stories for the company’s sites in the U.K. and Canada. Jeff has worked for news websites and newspapers in St. Louis, Tampa and Indianapolis, and was one of the founding editors of the New York Times Editing Center in Gainesville, Florida. He as led teams for websites, a wire service, newspapers and a virtual team of editors.

     

    Panelists

    Simon Constable is a freelance economics and personal finance writer. He has written for The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, TheStreet, Forbes, and U.S. News & World Report, as well as many other well-known publications. He co-authored “The WSJ Guide to the 50 Economic Indicators that Really Matter,” which was an economics category winner in the Small Business Book Awards at Small Business Trends. Constable is also a fellow at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health and the Study of Business Enterprise.

    Susannah Snider is the personal finance editor at U.S. News & World Report. Since 2010, she has reported on a wide range of personal finance topics, from consumer travel to college financial aid, student loans and employment. Snider previously worked as a staff writer at Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Southern California. She has appeared as a personal finance expert on television, radio and in print, including on “Fox & Friends,” “The Tavis Smiley Show” and Fox Business News.

     

    Questions about teletraining? Please contact Mary Jane Pardue at [email protected] or Kimberly Quillen at [email protected]

  • Training – Covering Personal Finance in 2017

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday December 27, 2016

    Monday, Jan. 23
    2 p.m. EST

    January is the time of the year when money management and personal finance are at the top of many people’s minds. Readers are eager for advice and information about setting their household budgets, getting debt under control, preparing to buy or sell a house and making preparations for tax season.

    On SABEW’s next teletraining session, hear from a panel of experts as they discuss fresh ways that reporters and editors can tackle these important personal finance topics, and make your coverage stand out from the rest.

    Listen to the Recording

    Moderator

    Jeff Herman is a managing editor for CreditCards.com, where he assigns and edits credit and personal finance stories and blog posts for the main site. He also edits stories for the company’s sites in the U.K. and Canada. Jeff has worked for news websites and newspapers in St. Louis, Tampa and Indianapolis, and was one of the founding editors of the New York Times Editing Center in Gainesville, Florida.

     

    Panelists

    Simon Constable is a freelance economics and personal finance writer. He has written for The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, TheStreet, Forbes, and U.S. News & World Report, as well as many other well-known publications. He co-authored “The WSJ Guide to the 50 Economic Indicators that Really Matter,” which was an economics category winner in the Small Business Book Awards at Small Business Trends. Constable is also a fellow at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health and the Study of Business Enterprise.

     

    Susannah Snider is the personal finance editor at U.S. News & World Report. Since 2010, she has reported on a wide range of personal finance topics, from consumer travel to college financial aid, student loans and employment. Snider previously worked as a staff writer at Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Southern California. She has appeared as a personal finance expert on television, radio and in print, including on “Fox & Friends,” “The Tavis Smiley Show” and Fox Business News.

  • The Power of Business Journalism

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday November 9, 2016

    SABEW members and friends:

    It isn’t news to you that business journalism is more powerful and relevant than ever, from coverage of the Panama Papers to Brexit, the Wells Fargo scandal to the Mylan EpiPen price hike, China’s economic reforms to the United States’ presidential candidates’ financial records.

    Our work holds corporate titans, elected officials and tax-dodging plutocrats to account. It looks out for investors and consumers. It explains what makes the economy tick, and helps keep markets fair.

    Such a dynamic journalistic specialty demands a membership organization that helps prepare its members both for day-to-day challenges and an evolving media landscape. Your Society of American Business Editors and Writers is doing just that, expanding from a foundation of ethics and excellence in business journalism. Our spring conference in Seattle next year will be dedicated to the future of business news, and our Best in Business contest will go platform agnostic for the first time, rewarding great work, on all platforms.

    What does success look like? SABEW members are better equipped to do their jobs, better connected with the leaders of our field, and better prepared to innovate.

    How can you help make it happen? Attend one of our conferences, volunteer for a committee, and join us for a monthly training session. Or make a long-term impact by investing in better business journalism with a tax-deductible donation to SABEW.

    Your gift is critical because it underwrites resources and training opportunities directed at the current needs of our profession. Please make a donation today to get the 2016 tax deduction. Go to Razoo’s secure site to donate online, go to SABEW’s site for more information or mail a check to:

    SABEW, ℅ Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
    Arizona State University
    555 N. Central Ave., Suite 302
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1248

    Thank you for your support of SABEW. Have a safe and happy holiday season!

    Sincerely,
                           
    Cory Schouten                                             Kathleen Graham
    SABEW president                                        SABEW executive director

  • SABEW - Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication,
    Arizona State University

    555 North Central Ave, Suite 406 E, Phoenix, AZ 85004-1248

    E-mail: [email protected]

    Phone: (602) 496-7862

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