Michael R. Bloomberg receives SABEW’s Distinguished Achievement Award

Posted By admin on Friday October 9, 2015

SABEW President Joanna Ossinger with Michael Bloomberg,  recipient of SABEW's Distinguished Achievement Award

SABEW President Joanna Ossinger with Michael Bloomberg, 2015 Distinguished Achievement Award winner

2015 Distinguished Achievement Award Reception honoring Michael R. Bloomberg Photos

NEW YORK – Michael R. Bloomberg, entrepreneur, politician and philanthropist, received the Society of American Business Editors and Writers’ highest honor, the Distinguished Achievement Award, last night at the opening of SABEW’s annual fall conference in New York.

Bloomberg was selected by SABEW’s Nominating Committee for his outstanding contribution to business journalism in co-founding Bloomberg News with Matthew Winkler in 1990.

“Mike’s investment in people and great journalism is a message that we intend to carry through the conference and the year,” said Kathleen Graham, Executive Director, SABEW.

Upon receiving the award, Bloomberg said, “Matt [Winkler] always says we were in the news business from the day we started and I think that’s fair. We distributed news in those days through numbers, and graphs, and then Matt came along and we added text, and television and radio.”

“For all of the talk of media companies downsizing, there is more business journalism than there was 25 years ago, and I expect that trend to continue,” Bloomberg said. “John Micklethwait came in to take what Matt built, with all the people, and take it in the next direction and try to incorporate all the other delivery devices for news other than just the terminal: Radio, television, the Internet, magazines, and lots of newspapers.”

In presenting the award, Joanna Ossinger, SABEW president and a team leader at Bloomberg, said SABEW past presidents Marty Wolk and Kevin Hall led the selection process for the Distinguished Achievement Award.

Bloomberg is a leading player in both business and general news, growing to more than 2,400 journalists in 150+ bureaus in 73 countries. Bloomberg also was personally responsible for extending the life of a venerable icon of American business journalism, BusinessWeek magazine, now known as Bloomberg Businessweek.

Mike Bloomberg is the founder of Bloomberg LP, a global financial data and media company. In 2001 he left the company to pursue a career in politics and was elected to three terms as the mayor of New York City. After completing his term as mayor in 2013, Bloomberg turned his attention to Bloomberg Philanthropies, a charitable foundation focused on public health, arts and culture, the environment, education and government innovation. Bloomberg returned to run the company he founded at the end of 2014. Bloomberg has been awarded numerous honorary degrees, distinguished leadership awards and named as one of the most influential people in the world. Bloomberg also holds the title of Honorary Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.

About SABEW:
The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is the nation’s largest organization dedicated to financial journalism with more than 3,500 members. SABEW is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit business journalism training organization dedicated to promoting the highest standards of economic coverage.

For additional information – Contact Crystal Beasley, (602)496-7862 or email at c[email protected].

  • SABEW 2017 Board of Governors Candidates

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday April 18, 2017

    SABEW members will be casting ballots this year for candidates running for six seats on the Board of Governors. Each term lasts for three years, ending in the spring of 2020.

    There are seven candidates running for the six available seats. All are members in good standing.

    The incumbent board members running for the board are:

    • Robert Barba, technology editor, American Banker
    • Shobhana Chandra, Economics reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Glenn Hall, U.S. news editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Dean Murphy, Associate editor, The New York Times

    The following three candidates are also running for a seat on the board:

    • Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNNMoney
    • Marilyn Geewax, senior business news editor, National Public Radio
    • James B. Nelson, deputy business editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Robert Barba
    Technology editor
    American Banker
    @Barba_AB
    Robert Barba is the technology editor of American Banker. Prior to his move to the technology beat, Robert served as deputy editor of American Banker‘s deal making and strategy section. He joined American Banker in late 2007 as a community banking reporter, just in time for the financial crisis. Robert played a lead role in covering community banks’ struggle for survival in the years following the downturn. Robert has appeared on Fox Business to discuss bank failures and the Treasury Department’s Troubled Asset Relief Program. Prior to joining American Banker, Robert was a general business reporter at Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers in Stuart, Fla. He began his career as a business desk intern at The Denver Post and Boulder Daily Camera. Robert is based in New York.

    Shobhana Chandra
    Economics reporter
    Bloomberg News
    @ShoChandra
    Shobhana (Sho) Chandra is a Washington-based economics reporter for Bloomberg News, which she joined in 1998. She covers the U.S. economy, from jobs and consumer spending to manufacturing, trade, prices and housing. She previously worked in New Delhi for two of India’s biggest business newspapers, Economic Times and Financial Express, around the time the South Asian economy was opening up to the rest of the world in a bigger way. Sho also is a member of the National Press Club, where she helps with editing the NPC’s Wire and with judging for scholarship awards. Her master’s degrees include MSJ from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, and MA in Economics from Delhi University, India.

    Glenn Hall
    U.S. news editor
    The Wall Street Journal
    @GlennHall
    Glenn Hall is the U.S. editor of the Wall Street Journal, overseeing coverage of the economy, politics, real estate, education, law, crime and general news across America.

     

     

    Dean Murphy
    Associate editor
    The New York Times
    @deanemurphy
    Dean E. Murphy is an award-winning journalist who has been named Associate Editor at The New York Times. He previously served as Business Day Editor since 2013. Prior to his appointment, Murphy had been a deputy editor for seven years on the business and national desks. Before becoming an editor, Murphy worked as a reporter for both The Times and the Los Angeles Times for 20 years. At The Times, he served as the San Francisco bureau chief during the gubernatorial recall, and the election of Arnold Schwarzenegger, and earlier as a political writer covering the first election campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Michael Bloomberg. At the Los Angeles Times, he held a variety of posts, including bureau chief in Warsaw, Poland, in the years after the collapse of communism, and in Johannesburg, South Africa, during the presidency of Nelson Mandela and the transition from apartheid. He also covered civil wars in the former Yugoslavia, Sierra Leone and Angola, and while based in California, the business and politics of water scarcity in the West. Murphy is the author of the critically acclaimed September 11: An Oral History (Doubleday 2002), and the recipient of a variety of awards.

    Rich Barbieri
    Executive editor
    CNNMoney
    Rich Barbieri is the executive editor of CNNMoney, one of the top business and financial news destinations. Barbieri oversees digital coverage and newsgathering for CNN’s worldwide coverage of brands, media, markets, economics, technology, and personal finance. Barbieri manages a team of more than 60 reporters and editors around the world across platforms. He also oversees CNN MoneyStream, CNNMoney’s new personalized business news app. Barbieri previously served as the managing editor at CNNMoney and joined CNN in September 2007. Prior to joining CNN, Barbieri worked for 15 years at American Lawyer Media as a reporter and editor covering law, business and government in New York, Washington and San Francisco. He spent the last five of those years as editor in chief of Legal Times in Washington. Barbieri also worked as New York news editor at the Associated Press and as managing editor of Crain’s New York Business. He won an AP reporting award in 1992 for coverage of California’s first execution in decades, and his newsrooms have won more than 100 editorial and design awards from local and national journalism organizations.

    Marilyn Geewax
    Senior business news editor
    National Public Radio
    @geewaxnpr ‏
    Marilyn Geewax is a senior business news editor at NPR, assigning and editing radio stories. Since the election, she has had a special assignment, heading a team of reporters covering the Trump administration’s conflicts of interest and ethical issues. She regularly discusses those issues on NPR’s mid-day show Here & Now and writes for the NPR web site. Before joining NPR in 2008, Geewax served as the national economics correspondent for Cox Newspapers’ Washington Bureau. Before that, she worked at Cox’s flagship paper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, first as a business reporter and then as a columnist and editorial board member. She got her start as a business reporter for the Akron Beacon Journal. Over the years, she has filed news stories from China, Japan, South Africa and Europe.

    James B. Nelson
    Deputy business editor, PolitiFact Wisconsin reporter
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    @jamesbnelson
    James B. Nelson is a reporter for PolitiFact Wisconsin and Deputy Business Editor for the Journal Sentinel. He’s been an editor for the Journal Sentinel in business news, and before that in local news, since the 1995 merger of the Milwaukee Journal and Milwaukee Sentinel. At the Milwaukee Sentinel, Nelson spent 10 years as a reporter covering City Hall, Milwaukee County government, and state issues, including agriculture, environment, business and Indian treaty rights. Before joining the Sentinel, he worked as a reporter at the Waukesha Freeman, Baraboo News-Republic and Stoughton Courier Hub. An Appleton native, Nelson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he received a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science. He’s a past president of the Milwaukee Press Club, and past president of the Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra board of directors. Nelson also is a part-time instructor at Marquette University

     

  • Technology and the urban experience panel facilitated by Dean Murphy, New York Times

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday August 14, 2015

    Dan DoctoroffNEW YORK- Dean Murphy, Business Editor, New York Times will facilitate a discussion with Dan Doctoroff, CEO of Sidewalk Labs on the growing impact of technology on cities at SABEW’s fall conference, Oct.9.

    New York City based Sidewalk Labs is a Google-funded innovation company striving to tackle some of our most pressing urban issues, including; pollution, energy consumption, transportation and quality of life.

    Before beginning Sidewalk Labs, Doctoroff was CEO and president of Bloomberg L.P and served as deputy mayor for economic development under Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Murphy, an award winning New York Times journalist and SABEW Board member will lead the discussion.

    The conference will be held at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism Oct. 8-9, beginning with an evening event on Thursday and continuing with a deanmurphyheadhsotdaylong program on Friday. The Thursday evening program will feature the McGraw Symposium, a keynote panel on the continuing digital transformation of business journalism sponsored by CUNY’s McGraw Center for Business Journalism.

    Early-bird rates are now available for SABEW’s annual fall conference. Register here.  For a full list of speakers and events, visit our conference page.

    This will be the sixth consecutive year of collaboration between SABEW, a 3,600-member organization of business journalists, and CUNY, one of New York’s premier universities.

    Personal Finance Reporting Workshop ?For the third year, SABEW and the National Foundation for Financial Education (NEFE) will conduct a personal finance workshop on Thursday, October 8, before the start of the SABEW conference. Visit the personal financial reporting workshop page for more information.

    Hotel Information:?SABEW has a block of hotel rooms available at The New Yorker, located at 481 8th Ave, New York, NY 10001. Discounted rates are available until September 7, 2015. Please contact the hotel’s reservations department at 1-800-764-4680 and mention SABEW in order to receive the special rates.

    For more information, contact Crystal Beasley, 602-496-7862 or email [email protected].

    Interested in sponsorship opportunities at the at SABEW’s fall conference? Contact Renee McGivern, SABEW sponsor/exhibitor director at 651-210-0911 or email [email protected].

  • Luminaries of journalism scheduled to open SABEW’s fall conference: CNBC’s Hoffman, Steiger,Winkler,Carroll and Thompson come together to discuss the Future of Journalism

    Posted By admin on Thursday September 19, 2013

    SABEW NYC logo 2013 copySpecial to SABEW

    NEW YORK – Mark Hoffman, president and CEO of CNBC, will join a panel discussion exploring the future of journalism at the annual SABEW Fall Conference Oct. 3.

    Hoffman will join Paul Steiger, Matthew Winkler, Mark Thompson and Kathleen Carroll for the discussion, which will start at 7 p.m., right at the conclusion of a 6 p.m. reception at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.

    Hoffman was named president of CNBC in February 2005. An award-winning broadcast veteran with more than 25 years of experience, Hoffman transformed CNBC into a leading multi-platform global brand.

    “This will be an insightful discussion,” says Warren Watson, SABEW executive director. “This is a star-studded group of experts zeroing in on a seminal issue facing us all.”

    SABEW is making available a special Thursday-evening registration for an opening reception and the media program. The fee is $75. The fall conference continues on Friday with a full day of keynote sessions, panel discussions and skills workshops.

    Currently, the fee for the two-day program is $149.

    Prior to becoming president of CNBC, Hoffman served as president and general manager of WVIT, NBC’s owned-and-operated station in Hartford, Conn.

    Hoffman holds a master’s in Journalism from the University of Missouri.

    He will be joined by:

    • Paul Steiger, long time news leader at The Wall Street Journal and executive chairman of ProPublica’s board of directors
    • Matt Winkler, editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News, which includes 2,000 reporters and editors in 150 bureaus worldwide.
    • Kathleen Carroll, executive editor and senior vice president of The Associated Press. She is responsible for the news content gathered by 2,300 journalists in 100 countries.
    • Mark Thompson, president and CEO of The New York Times Company.  He joined the Times in November 2012 and is responsible for the company’s strategy, operations and business units, and works closely with Chairman Arthur Sulzberger to direct the vision of the company.

    Winkler cofounded Bloomberg News with Michael Bloomberg in 1990. In addition to working as a reporter with news publications including the Wall Street Journal and Forbes magazine, Winkler is co-author of Bloomberg by Bloomberg and author of The Bloomberg Way: A Guide for Reporters and Editors.

    As the head news executive of The Associate Press, Carroll has aided in transforming the AP into a modern news outlet utilizing the multimedia formats currently available as well as streamlining the global news service to provide faster delivery of news.

    Thompson came to The New York Times in November 2012 after serving as director-general of the BBC since 2004. While serving as director-general, Thompson was responsible for leading the company into the digital age with innovative approaches to company organization as well as the introduction of new technology.

    Thursday night’s event will begin with a welcome reception at CUNY Graduate School of Journalism at 6 p.m followed by The Future of Journalism discussion at 7 p.m.

    This will be the fourth year in a row for the collaboration between SABEW, a 3,600-member organization of business journalists, and CUNY, one of New York’s premier universities.

    Kevin Shinkle, acting business editor of The Associated Press, is the conference site chair.

    Shinkle is working with co-site chair Greg David, head of the business journalism program at CUNY, located at 219 West 40th St. in Manhattan.

    Register for the Thursday-night here.

    Register for the two-day conference here.

    SABEW has a block of hotel rooms available at the Comfort Inn Times Square South, 305 W. 39th Street, New York, NY 10018.   To book a room, call 212-268-3040.

    Any questions regarding hotel information can be directed to Lacey Clements, SABEW marketing director, at [email protected] or 602-496-7862.

    For more, contact Warren Watson, SABEW executive director, at 1-602-496-5186 or email him at [email protected].

     

  • 2018 Explanatory; Large

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Sunday July 28, 2019

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock

    • Contributors – Maurice Tamman, Matthew Green, Mari Saito, Sarah Slobin, Maryanne Murray
    • Judges’ Comments – Impressive use of data, graphics, illustrations, video and writing to explain the many ways climate change is impacting our oceans. Comprehensive and compelling, this package delivered story after story.
      In this category, the judges selected two honorable mentions.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: Immigration, Inc.

    • Contributors – Lauren Etter, Michael Smith, Monte Reel
    • Judges’ Comments – Compelling personal stories that left the reader feeling emotionally attached to the subjects. Connecting a rural community in the U.S. with a poverty-stricken region in Guatemala was a novel way to illustrate the co-dependent relationships that exist within the immigration debate. Beautiful photography and presentation.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times: Pregnancy discrimination

    • Contributors – Natalie Kitroeff, Jessica Silver-Greenberg
    • Judges’ Comments – Exceptional reporting that exposed a clear pattern of discrimination against pregnant women. The allegations against XPO Logistics are disturbing and it’s no surprise that the company was on the defensive. Also no surprise that this entire package has forced employers, lawmakers and organizations such as Planned Parenthood to rethink and retool policies.
  • Winners announced for the 5th Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Awards

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday April 23, 2019

    TORONTO, April 22, 2019 — Last week, SABEW Canada announced the winners of the Best in Business Awards, celebrating excellence in Canadian journalism.

    This is the fifth year for the awards, which are sponsored by the Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW). The BIB Awards are the only journalism awards program in Canada that specifically recognizes exemplary works of journalism that relate to business, finance and the economy.

    Thanks to our sponsors, who helped make the event possible: TD Bank, Facebook, Accenture, Fidelity Canada, BusinessWire, Manulife Financial and Longview Communications.

    Audio or visual storytelling
    Gold: WTFinance video series, Prajakta Dhopade (MoneySense)
    Silver: Pot supply, Timothy Moore and Chris Manza (The Globe and Mail)

    Beat reporting, presented by TD Bank
    Gold: Janet McFarland on real estate (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: Naomi Powell on trade (Financial Post)

    Commentary
    Gold: Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)
    Silver: Rita Trichur (Report on Business magazine)

    Breaking news, presented by Accenture
    Gold: NAFTA coverage by Adrian Morrow, Robert Fife, Stephanie Nolen, Barrie McKenna, Eric Atkins, James Bradshaw, Andrew Willis, Tim Kiladze, David Parkinson, Josh O’Kane, Sean Silcoff, Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Rob Carrick, John Ibbitson and Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: USMCA coverage by Kevin Carmichael, Tom Blackwell, Naomi Powell, James McLeod and Emily Jackson (Financial Post) 

    Editorial newsletter
    Gold: Daily briefing (The Logic)
    Silver: Cannabis Professional (The Globe and Mail)

    Feature (long-form), presented by Longview Communications
    Gold: “The unsolved murder of an unusual billionaire,” Matthew Campbell (Bloomberg)
    Silver: “The city that had too much money,” Matthew Campbell and Natalie Obiko Pearson (Bloomberg)

    Feature (short-form)
    Gold: “Toronto website Providr bets it can beat Facebook’s algorithm change” by Susan Krashinsky Robertson and Shane Dingman (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: “How to lose big money in Toronto real estate” by Joe Castaldo (Maclean’s)

    Investigative
    Gold: “Hustle in the oil patch” by Jeffrey Jones, Jeff Lewis, Renata D’Aliesio and Chen Wang (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: “The high cost of low corporate taxes” by Marco Chown Oved, Toby Heaps and Michael Yow (Corporate Knights)

    Personal finance and investing, presented by Fidelity
    Gold: “Go out on top” by Frances Bula (BC Business)
    Silver: “The Year of Fear” by Bryan Borzykowski, Joe Castaldo and John Daly (Report on Business magazine)

    Package
    Gold: Innovation (Financial Post)
    Silver: #MeToo by Armina Ligaya (Canadian Press)

    Profile
    Gold: “Darren Entwistle’s long goodbye” by Christine Dobby (Report on Business magazine)
    Silver: “The Decider” by Luc Rinaldi (Pivot)

    Scoop, presented by BusinessWire
    Gold: “How the government could net $200 billion selling off airports, major highways, utilities and Canada Post” by Zane Schwartz (The Logic)
    Silver: “Oil-sands outage upends global oil market, overshadowing OPEC” by Robert Tuttle and Kevin Orland (Bloomberg)

    Trade article
    Gold: “In the dark” by Daniel Fish (Precedent)
    Silver: “Selling out” by Tristan Bronca (The Medical Post)

    Outstanding Achievement Award
    Claudia Cattaneo (Financial Post)

    As Financial Post editor Nicole MacAdam put it in her nomination letter: “Claudia has been one of the most influential voices in Western Canada for nearly three decades. She is one of those rare journalists who earned the respect of both her peers and the energy industry due to her thorough, balanced reporting and deep understanding of the issues that matter to Albertans. But it wasn’t just her ability to break news that made her a must-read; it was her ability to bring context and analysis to these stories. Claudia was also the ultimate colleague, generously giving of her time to all who asked. Claudia was an editor’s dream right till the day she retired in May 2018: Deeply experienced but with the keenness of a rookie ready for the day—pitching something nearly every day; unflinching reporting, but with a delightful turn of phrase; blunt in her critique but with an acute sense of fairness.”

    CONGRATULATIONS, CLAUDIA!

    Best Young Journalist, presented by Manulife Financial
    Zane Schwartz (The Logic)

    In just four years, Zane has gathered an impressive body of work. As the 2017 Michelle Lang Fellow in journalism at the National Post and Calgary Herald, he ​created the first searchable database of more than five million political donations in every province and territory—a project that won him a Data Journalism Award from the Global Editors Network in 2018. He helped modernize Maclean’s 25-year-old university rankings system, a project that saw him hire and manage 23 freelancers to work on a 400,000-point database. He has been with The Logic since Day 1, where he has had a hand in everything from design to hiring new staff to editing investigations on Canada’s innovation economy and, as a reporter, consistently breaking national news. This prize comes with a trip to the SABEW fall conference in New York City in October.

  • SABEW Canada Announces the Finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday April 2, 2019

    TORONTO, April 2, 2019 – The Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is excited to announce the list of finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published in 2018. For this year’s contest, we expanded the number of categories to 15 (including beat reporting, investigative, commentary, trade article, editorial newsletter and scoop), and the finalists represent the most diverse array of Canadian publications we’ve seen yet, including names both old and new. Their stories shone a spotlight on a wide range of stories, including the legalization of recreational cannabis, real estate fraud, trade wars, mental illness, and even murder.

    SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges (listed below), chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

    The winners were announced at the Best in Business Awards reception on April 17 at Baro in Toronto.

    The finalists for SABEW Canada’s 5th Annual Best in Business are:

    Audio or visual storytelling

    • Pot supply (The Globe and Mail)
    • No strings attached (HuffPost Canada)
    • WTFinance video series (MoneySense)

    Beat reporting

    • David George-Cosh on cannabis (BNN Bloomberg)
    • Janet McFarland on real estate (The Globe and Mail)
    • Naomi Powell on trade (Financial Post)

    Breaking news

    • NAFTA coverage by Adrian Morrow, Robert Fife, Stephanie Nolen, Barrie McKenna, Eric Atkins, James Bradshaw, Andrew Willis, Tim Kiladze, David Parkinson, Josh O’Kane, Sean Silcoff, Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Rob Carrick, John Ibbitson and Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail)
    • USMCA coverage by Kevin Carmichael, Tom Blackwell, Naomi Powell, James McLeod and Emily Jackson (Financial Post)
    • NAFTA coverage by Josh Wingrove, Jennifer Jacobs, Kristine Owram, Eric Martin, Jen Skerritt and Lydia Mulvaney (Bloomberg)

    Commentary

    • Barrie McKenna (The Globe and Mail)
    • Rita Trichur (Report on Business magazine)
    • Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)

    Editorial newsletter

    • Daily briefing (The Logic)
    • Cannabis Professional (The Globe and Mail)

    Feature (long-form)

    • “Conquered by demons” by Kelly Cryderman and Jeffrey Jones (Report on Business magazine)
    • “The city that had too much money” by Matt Campbell and Natalie Obiko Pearson (Bloomberg)
    • “The unsolved murder of an unusual billionaire” by Matt Campbell (Bloomberg)

    Feature (short-form)

    • “How to lose big money in Toronto real estate” by Joe Castaldo (Maclean’s)
    • “Toronto website Providr bets it can beat Facebook’s algorithm change” by Susan Krashinsky Robertson and Shane Dingman (The Globe and Mail)
    • “Weed is serious business for Canada’s go-to pot banker” by Doug Alexander (Bloomberg)

    Investigative

    • “Inside the fall of Fortress” by Janet McFarland (The Globe and Mail)
    • “The high cost of low corporate taxes” by Marco Chown Oved, Toby Heaps and Michael Yow (Corporate Knights)
    • “Hustle in the oil patch” by Jeffrey Jones, Jeff Lewis, Renata D’Aliesio and Chen Wang (The Globe and Mail)

    Package

    • “No strings attached” (HuffPost Canada)
    • Innovation (Financial Post)
    • #MeToo (Canadian Press)

    ­­

    Personal finance and investing

    • “The Year of Fear” by Bryan Borzykowski, Joe Castaldo and John Daly (Report on Business magazine)
    • Mutual funds by Rob Carrick (The Globe and Mail)
    • “Go out on top” by Francis Bula (BCBusiness)

    Profile

    • “Darren Entwistle’s long goodbye” by Christine Dobby (Report on Business magazine)
    • “The Decider” by Luc Rinaldi (Pivot)
    • “The Instigator” by Katie Lamb and Joanna Pachner (Report on Business magazine)

    Scoop

    • “Oil-sands outage upends global oil market, overshadowing OPEC” by Robert Tuttle and Kevin Orland (Bloomberg)
    • “Coca-Cola’s cannabis drink deal with Aurora” by David George-Cosh (BNN Bloomberg)
    • “How the government could net $200 billion selling off airports, major highways, utilities and Canada Post” by Zane Schwartz (The Logic)

    Trade article

    • “Selling out” by Tristan Bronca (The Medical Post)
    • “In the dark” by Daniel Fish (Precedent)
    • “Help your client prepare a will” by Michelle Schriver (Advisor’s Edge)

    Our first-ever award for Best Young Journalist goes to Zane Schwartz of The Logic. In the four years since he graduated from the University of Toronto, Zane has gathered an impressive body of work. As the 2017 Michelle Lang Fellow in journalism at the National Post and Calgary Herald, he ​created the first searchable database of more than five million political donations in every province and territory—a project that won him a Data Journalism Award from the Global Editors Network in 2018. He helped modernize Maclean’s 25-year-old university rankings system, a project that saw him hire and manage 23 freelancers to work on a 400,000-point database. He has been with The Logic since Day 1, where he has had a hand in everything from design to hiring new staff to editing investigations on Canada’s innovation economy. As a reporter, he has consistently broken national news, including Amazon lobbying governments across Canada for billions in contracts after shortlisting Toronto for its HQ2 to revealing the government’s private assessment that there’s no downside to letting an American telecom come north.

    Our inaugural Outstanding Achievement Award goes to the Financial Post’s Claudia Cattaneo, who retired in May 2018. As FP editor Nicole MacAdam put it in her nomination letter: “Claudia has been one of the most influential voices in Western Canada for nearly three decades, through bust, boom and bust. She is one of those rare journalists who earned the respect of both her peers and the energy industry due to her thorough, balanced reporting and deep understanding of the issues that matter to Albertans. But it wasn’t just her ability to break news that made her a must-read; it was her ability to bring context and analysis to these stories. Her columns suffered no fools and offered a clear-eyed view that often punctured the Ottawa bubble. At the same time, she was quick to criticize the oil patch for its high-profile problems, such as corporate governance and handling of the environment file. Bureau reporters who work from home can often be isolated, but Claudia was the ultimate colleague, taking junior reporters under her wing, meeting her Calgary colleagues weekly to discuss story ideas, participating in weekly features pitch meetings by phone, generously giving of her time to all who asked. Claudia was an editor’s dream right till the day she retired in May, 2018: Deeply experienced but with the keenness of a rookie ready for the day—pitching something nearly every day; unflinching reporting, but with a delightful turn of phrase; blunt in her critique but with an acute sense of fairness.”

    Thank you to our judges, without whom we could not do this: Gavin Adamson, Vikram Barhat, Laura Bobak, Greg Bonnell, Bryan Borzykowski, Mark Brown, Dawn Calleja Henry Dubroff, Tim Falconer, Max Fawcett, David Friend, Howard Green, Megan Griffith-Greene, Kevin Hall, Brian Hutchinson, Jason Kirby, Peter Kuitenbrouwer, Steve Ladurantaye, Andree Lau, Katie Lobosco, Nicole MacAdam, James Madore, Garry Marr, Susan Nerberg, Mira Oberman, Matt O’Grady, Joanna Ossinger, Rachel Pulfer, David Scanlan, Anna Sharratt, David Topping, Andrew Wahl, Tom Watson, Jennifer Wells and Renée Williams.

    If you have anything questions about the contents of this press release, please contact SABEW Canada chair Dawn Calleja at [email protected].

  • Explanatory; Large

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock

    • Contributors – Maurice Tamman, Matthew Green, Mari Saito, Sarah Slobin, Maryanne Murray
    • Judges’ Comments – Impressive use of data, graphics, illustrations, video and writing to explain the many ways climate change is impacting our oceans. Comprehensive and compelling, this package delivered story after story.

    In this category, the judges selected two honorable mentions.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: Immigration, Inc.

    • Contributors – Lauren Etter, Michael Smith, Monte Reel
    • Judges’ Comments – Compelling personal stories that left the reader feeling emotionally attached to the subjects. Connecting a rural community in the U.S. with a poverty-stricken region in Guatemala was a novel way to illustrate the co-dependent relationships that exist within the immigration debate. Beautiful photography and presentation.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times: Pregnancy discrimination

    • Contributors – Natalie Kitroeff, Jessica Silver-Greenberg
    • Judges’ Comments – Exceptional reporting that exposed a clear pattern of discrimination against pregnant women. The allegations against XPO Logistics are disturbing and it’s no surprise that the company was on the defensive. Also no surprise that this entire package has forced employers, lawmakers and organizations such as Planned Parenthood to rethink and retool policies.
  • 2018 – 2019 Committees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday May 1, 2018

    (*) indicates Committee Chair
    (**) indicates Vice Chair

    Executive Committee
    Consistent with the requirements of the Society’s constitution and bylaws, the Executive Committee typically meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to discuss business, to make decisions and to lead the organization. These discussions include coordination of plans with the executive director.

    *SABEW President, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com

    SABEW Vice President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    SABEW Secretary/Treasurer, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal (ex-officio member)

    Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    First Amendment Committee
    The First Amendment Committee is dedicated to helping protect press freedoms. We are vigilant in our role as a watchdog over government agencies, working to ensure that journalists – and all citizens – have access to accurate, relevant government-supported data. The committee regularly issues statements in support of press freedom and for sufficient funding of government-collected and issued information. It engages government officials, private economists, watchdogs, other stakeholders and the public on the importance of robust and transparent economic and financial data as well as on the mission of business and financial journalism more broadly.

    *Henry Dubroff, founder and editor, Pacific Coast Business Times

    **James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Bernie Kohn, editor-at-large, Bloomberg BNA

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report

    First Amendment Legal Counsel: Steven D. Zansberg, partner, Ballard Spahr

    Membership Committee
    The membership committee is focused on ensuring SABEW remain a vibrant professional organization that is useful and relevant to future generations of business journalists. It will seek to fulfill its mission by increasing the number of individuals and institutions affiliated with SABEW, improving diversity, and strengthening the connections between existing SABEW members.

    *Xana Antunes, executive editor, Quartz

    Robert Barba, spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Nominations Committee
    *Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Dean Murphy, managing editor for Investigations, The New York Times

    Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Marty Wolk, freelance

    Finance Committee
    The Finance Committee meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to review SABEW’s financial statements and other statements with SABEW staff. The committee also reviews the organization’s annual budget.

    *James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    **James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    Michael Rapoport, reporter, The Wall Street Journal

    Zoe Sagalow, federal tax and data reporter, Tax Notes Today

    Investment Sub-Committee
    This group helps monitor and optimize SABEW’s long-term investments, with the goal of balancing return with preservation of funds to help ensure the Society’s long-term financial success. 

    *James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    Gail Marks Jarvis, syndicated financial columnist, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    SABEW19 Committee

    *Chair – Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    **Vice Chair Newsmakers and Headliners – Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    ASU Representative – Andrew Leckey, chair ASU Walter Cronkite School, president Reynolds Center

    Robert Barba, spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business

    Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press

    Matthew Goldberg, consumer banking reporter, Bankrate

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Bernie Kohn, editor-at-large, Bloomberg BNA

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Ryan Randazzo, reporter, The Arizona Republic

    Jennifer Strong, radio correspondent, The Wall Street Journal

    Training Committee
    The Training Committee supports SABEW’s mission by planning and coordinating near-monthly distance training programs, utilizing moderators and presenters who represent a variety of backgrounds and organizations. As many newsroom budgets shrink, SABEW training programs are an important resource, and offer an added value by promoting the professional development of SABEW members.

    *Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report

    *Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Marty Steffens, SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism, School of Journalism, University of Missouri

    Best in Business Committee
    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    **Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    International Committee
    The International Committee seeks to encourage and expand SABEW’s impact and membership within the global business and economic journalism community.  Business journalists worldwide deal with issues of corporate transparency, reliability of government data, trade conflicts and personal financial wellbeing that directly affect readers, viewers and listeners. SABEW’s dedication to improving financial knowledge and accuracy, commending outstanding coverage and upholding the highest ethical standards has relevance in all countries. Seeking new members for SABEW, the International Committee finds opportunities to share information and training while encouraging business journalists at all experience levels regardless of borders.

    *Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    *Andrew Leckey, chair ASU Walter Cronkite School, president Reynolds Center

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Roseanne Gerin, news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Awards System, Membership Database and Website Committee

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    Renee McGivern, Director of Conference Sponsorships

    Past President Committee
    Grateful for their substantial contributions over many years, this committee engages former presidents of the Society by maintaining communication and involvement with current leadership, encouraging meetings and other activities.

    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

  • 2017 Best in Business Honorees with Judges’ Comments

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday March 7, 2018

    AUDIO – All news organizations

    Winner: Marketplace/The Uncertain Hour, for “How One Sentence Helped Set Off the Opioid Crisis”
    Krissy Clark, Caitlin Esch, Nancy Farghalli, Maria Hollenhorst, Lyra Smith, Sitara Nieves, Deborah Clark, Donna Tam, Tony Wagner, Jake Gorski and Daniel Ramirez
    A fascinating, timely and illuminating look at the origins of one of the nation’s most urgent crises: the opioid epidemic. This series, based on an eight-month investigation, added valuable historical context and background. Clearly focused and impressively produced, this series underscores the importance of taking listeners behind the scenes to follow interactions between a government regulator, the Food and Drug Administration, and a large drug company.

    Honorable mention: KUOW, for “Prime(d)”
    Carol Smith, Joshua McNichols, Carolyn Adolph, Posey Gruener and Brendan Sweeney
    A delightful, deeply thoughtful, fascinating, in-depth and often humorous series focusing on Amazon’s decision to have a national competition among cities over where to build its next headquarters. The authors focused on “what happens when Amazon comes to your town,” how Amazon benefits from inviting cities to compete, Amazon’s impact on Seattle, and other important urban issues. The series flowed naturally and consistently held our attention with fresh and original insights.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Large

    Winner: Financial Times, for articles on non-prime and predatory lending
    Ben McLannahan
    Excellent reporting, writing and editing on this three-part series about the dangers of nonprime lending and predatory auto lending to U.S. consumers and the U.S. economy. The additional special report on “The Whistleblowers” demonstrated an excellent use of interviews with colorful details and statistics to show what bank and Wall Street whistle-blowers endure after reporting wrongdoing. The scope and quality of this series shines a light on a dangerous and important area of the banking world that we may have stopped thinking about in this post-financial crisis era but can’t afford to anymore.

    Honorable mention: Reuters, for “Crypto Casino”
    Steve Stecklow, Alexandra Harney, Anna Irrera and Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi
    This series did an excellent job of both reporting and explaining the risks, realities and mysteries surrounding cryptocurrency. While investors and the general public may have been blinded by the light of the parabolic price movements of tokens like Bitcoin, the lack of regulation and transparency in what is supposed to be an asset class defined by its openness demonstrated how murky the market still is around it and the risks it poses to investors.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with Fortune, for “The Billion-Dollar Loophole”
    Peter Elkind
    This deeply sourced project between ProPublica and Fortune, reveals in stunning detail how some individuals, including President Donald Trump, were able to turn a U.S. tax code provision intended to help preserve the environment — a tax break for agreeing not to develop property, known as a “conservation easement” — into an outsized tax deduction for the rich. Judges appreciated the story’s granular focus, and how it exposed the ability of wealthy individuals to exploit government inaction. A memorable accomplishment on a complicated subject, clearly written and compellingly told by ProPublica’s Peter Elkind.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Small

    Winner: TheStreet, for “Big Bank Corporate Governance”
    Brad Keoun
    The judges felt this series offers a thoughtful look at under-reported corporate governance and board issues at banks. By uncovering sweetheart contracts for a Wells Fargo director, a revolving door opening to Citigroup’s board, and secrecy in fixed income reporting at Goldman Sachs, Keoun showed how the largest banks are avoiding transparency.

    Honorable mention: American Banker, for The CFPB leadership battle”
    Kate Berry, Ian McKendry and Rob Blackwell
    This story about a coup at a government agency was a nice scoop for a small publication competing for an inside look against larger entities. It also offered insight about a regulatory body that’s key for many in the business world, particularly in the small-business community.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “CVS-Aetna Deal”
    Dana Mattioli, Sharon Terlep, Anna Wilde Mathews and Laura Stevens
    The package on the CVS-Aetna deal was a true scoop that put the WSJ ahead of the pack on an industry-transforming deal. In addition to the transaction basics, the package included analysis pieces on the industry impact as well as how Amazon’s entry into pharma services helped spur the CVS-Aetna deal. The latter piece, like the main news story, was based on deep inside sources. The Journal’s presentation included graphics illustrating how the new merged company would stack up against competitors.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for Uber coverage
    Mike Isaac and Farhad Manjoo
    An excellent package on an unfolding drama: A main story that delivers the news and its impact, an insider tick-tock of how CEO Kalanick was forced out by investors, and wide-view analysis of how Uber’s issues were symptomatic of wider and more fundamental Silicon Valley problems. The package showed deep reporting and access to inside sources that included former employees and investors.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Medium

    Winner: The Seattle Times, for “Amazon HQ2 announcement”
    Matt Day, Dominic Gates, Mike Rosenberg, Jon Talton, Scott Greenstone, Dan Beekman, Jessica Lee, Joseph O’Sullivan, Mark Nowlin and Kjell Redal
    The coverage of Amazon’s announcement of a second headquarters distinguished itself with a mix of illuminating reporting, insightful analysis and compelling graphics. The package deftly assessed the Amazon stunner from the local perspective of economic development and politics while also conveying the broader implications — beyond Seattle and beyond Amazon. It set the standard for all the HQ2 stories published in its wake.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Small

    Winner: International Business Times, for “Last-Minute Tax Provisions Could Enrich Top Lawmakers”
    David Sirota, Josh Keefe, Alex Kotch and Jay Cassano
    It is not surprising that Washington politicians slip provisions into bills that benefit themselves or particular industries. But usually such goodies are discovered after a bill has passed. The International Business Times scooped others with its story that Republicans had slipped into the conference report of their tax bill a provision that would benefit real estate moguls such as Donald Trump and Senator Bob Corker and that the provision was more generous than either the House or Senate version. Their story landed in real time before the bill received final approval. Corker professed ignorance in an interview with International Business Times and admitted that he hadn’t read the bill before he changed his vote from no to yes. This is exactly what business journalists should be doing holding politicians accountable.

    Honorable mention: Puget Sound Business Journal, for “Port of Seattle CEO resigned amid probe into $4.7M payout”
    Andrew McIntosh
    The Puget Sound Business Journal provided a public service by exposing the unconstitutional payments to workers approved by the local Port Commission, the largest of which went to the CEO himself. Through dogged reporting and public record requests, Puget Sound Business Journal not only revealed the payments but its reporting led to the money being returned to taxpayers. Puget Sound Business Journal even managed to get a draft of the CEO’s performance appraisal through records requests that documented serious problems. The Puget Sound Business Journal resisted the urge to couch its series of breaking stories as gotcha journalism and was careful to present the improvements that the CEO had made.

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business, for “Amazon HQ2 bid revealed: tax breaks, $120 million talent program, transit vision”
    Chad Livengood and Kirk Pinho
    When Amazon announced it intended to build a second headquarters, cities all over the country salivated at the prospect for a boost in employment and infrastructure improvements. But the secrecy surrounding Amazon’s selection process combined with the reluctance of urban centers to disclose their negotiations made it impossible to determine what city Amazon would choose or how cities were wooing the e-commerce giant. Partly through the FOIA, Crain’s Detroit Business got hold of Quicken Loans’ founder Dan Gilbert’s proposal to Amazon to locate in Detroit, which included a massive amount of goodies including tax breaks and a $120 million talent program. The story was picked up throughout the US and Canada, crediting Crain’s with the scoop.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for Keywords Technology Column
    Christopher Mims
    These columns provide a micro and macro take on the tech industry. One column looked at the positive impact of diversity on business and process outcomes. The “worm” has been turning recently about the (mostly) unintended impacts of technology, including the male-dominated culture in tech. This column broadened the argument in many ways, including impacts on shareholders. Although it falls outside the usual commentary realm, we liked the visual aspects included along with the good writing. A new thread on the downside of Facebook was interesting, using an extension of the old TV news maxim, “if it bleeds, it leads” pertaining to social.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Equifax Hack”
    Ron Lieber
    An excellent work in reporting the implications of the Equifax hack, with commentary and consumer insights on what can be done to mitigate damage. It also includes what should be done in the future to make companies like Equifax more responsive to consumers.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Lee Schafer’s columns
    The columnist blends smart business insight and an enjoyable writing style into incisive commentary on some of the nation’s most important companies that call Minneapolis their home — or in Wells Fargo’s case, second home. His piece “Wells Fargo CEO didn’t take ‘run it like you own it’ mantra to heart” gets to the core of the beleaguered bank’s cultural problems that allowed employees to open more than 3 million fake accounts to help hit sales targets. In “Deciding what to do with Yoplait,” he outlines why General Mills should sell its souring yogurt business. And his article “CVS-Aetna deal is about catching up to UnitedHealth” he makes a compelling case for why one of 2017’s biggest announced mergers is no threat to the locally based giant.

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “A Boom with a View”
    Erin Griffith
    An excellently crafted piece commenting on the rise in scandals hitting startups from Theranos to Hampton Creek.

    Honorable mention: The Dallas Morning News, for “Texas business repels a bathroom bill”
    Mitchell Schnurman
    The columnist deserves praise for his series of articles putting forth the case for why business leaders ought to speak up against a state bill that would restrict bathroom use by transgender people. After corporate executives started arguing against it, the bill failed.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Small

    Winner: Albany Business Review, for Mike Hendricks’ columns
    Hendricks’ elegantly written columns demonstrate a deep knowledge of local business and a strong desire to serve his community. He focuses on issues of interest to his readership that are unlikely to be covered elsewhere, and he offers solutions. That said, he doesn’t shy away from broader topics, and uses personal experience to great effect in his piece on health care.

    Honorable mention: The Nation, for Helaine Olen’s columns
    Olen’s strongly opinionated columns demonstrate an excellent grasp of complex topics. She marshals ample evidence, connecting disparate and fast-moving events into a coherent picture, which her engaging prose makes accessible to a broad readership.

     

    ECONOMICS – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh
    The judges unanimously selected this story on immigrant farm labor in a category with significant competition. The LA Times narrative stood out because the reporters were truly in the field for this piece, sharing details of the immigrant experience, from wages to housing. It was thoughtful and extraordinarily descriptive in reporting on a topic widely talked about, but perhaps less understood. We all felt this piece was a good read that made us smarter. Beyond the immigrants at the center of the piece, it captured the broader context of the communities where they work, and the labor market dynamics that supply their jobs.

     

    ECONOMICS – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Trump’s Trade Pullout Roils Rural America”
    Adam Behsudi
    POLITICO’s standout piece relied on vivid writing, exhaustive reporting and cogent analysis to show readers how the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership amounts to a hit on American farmers. The article analyzed trade negotiations between the remaining TPP nations, finding that the United States’ rivals are furiously negotiating with each other to lower tariffs and undercut American farmers. But it went far beyond policy analysis, delving deeply into the lives of people in Eagle Grove, Iowa. The owner of one pork and poultry business making a vast investment there said he is “scared to death,” and others fear the economic ripple effects. The piece laid out clearly and persuasively why rural communities have good cause for concern.

     

    ECONOMICS – Small

    Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Sarasota Drift”
    Barbara Peters-Smith
    A wonderful job of weaving together demographic and income data to tell the story of a widening divide between have and have-nots in a community often associated with retirement. It used data effectively to argue its point, and spotlighted creative approaches to address the problem.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut “
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh
    California utility customers likely had no idea what hit them until the LA Times invested the resources to examine the perverse incentives offered by state regulators. If companies get paid to build power plants, whether needed or not, they’ll build them and send the bills to ratepayers. Deep reporting and excellent writing made this package extremely accessible given the jargon-heavy topic. Charts and interactive graphics spelled it out even more simply. The reporting has actually had an impact, given that authorities are reacting.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Medium

    Winner: The Atlantic, for “The Problem with Rolling Back Regulations”
    Alana Semuels
    This impeccably researched and well-written story uses North Carolina’s rollback of environmental regulations to show what could happen if national and global policies move toward less regulation. Framing such moves as “business-friendly” can stymie debate, but it ultimately hurts homeowners and residents. It makes a compelling case that citizens should be worried about changing climate policies in the Trump administration.

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan
    While much has been written about the Dakota Access Pipeline, another and potentially bigger risk to the environment threatens the drinking water of 40 million people. A growing stream of oil is pumping through aging pipes along and under the Great Lakes. The pipeline company, Enbridge Inc., is seeking to expand through eminent domain. Through clear and sophisticated writing, reporter Egan helps readers understand the possible consequences of allowing Enbridge to move forward.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Small

    Winner: Debtwire, for American Idle: An Offshore Drilling Crisis “
    Alex Plough
    Debtwire drilled in on a topic few people think about — who is on the hook for cleaning up abandoned offshore oil platforms — and managed to hook readers with colorful description while making the case for how and why the issue is a considerable environmental and economic problem. By collaborating with a university research tank to sort through available data, the reporter was able to provide specific examples that spelled out risks to companies and taxpayers. The story provides history and context. It supplements text with excellent graphics to help readers grasp the significance of a previously obscure topic. In short, the combination of clear writing, lavish details and demonstrable impact made this story stand out.

     

    EXPLANATORY – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “Shock Tactics”
    Jason Szep, Peter Eisler, Tim Reid, Lisa Girion, Grant Smith, Linda So, M.B. Pell and Charles Levinson
    Reuters’ comprehensive, multi-part investigation of Taser raised real concerns about the company’s devices. In addition to routinely injuring and even killing people, Reuters showed through document reviews, interviews and number- and data-crunching the cost to police departments and city governments of using the electroshock devices.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Anaheim’s Subsidy Kingdom “
    Daniel Miller, Priya Krishnakumar and Ben Poston
    This rigorously-reported LA Times series shows how Disney spent millions contributing to the PACs behind pro-Disney city council candidates in Anaheim and received $1 billion of incentives in turn. The series uses interviews, data, and an interactive graphic to expose Disney’s complex system of donations, revealing the company’s political influence in Anaheim.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Education Disrupted”
    Natasha Singer
    This three-part series revealed provocative ways tech companies and executives are gaining influence in America’s public schools, creating potential conflicts of interest but not necessarily better results for children or teachers. The package’s strong reporting about the enticing lures to teachers and administrators in cash-strapped school systems raises serious questions about who’s really running the nation’s classrooms.

     

    EXPLANATORY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with NPR, for “Sold for Parts”
    Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes
    As the nation debates White House efforts to overhaul immigration, ProPublica’s Michael Grabell gave his readers an up-close look at horrific working conditions in Ohio, Florida and South Carolina. Companies that have a history of failing to comply with federal workplace safety standards are hiring immigrants to work long hours in the most dangerous jobs; when workers fight for better pay and working conditions, the companies repeatedly use their immigration status against them to quash dissent and avoid paying medical bills. This is an outstanding grouping of stories that are deeply reported and well-written stories.

    Honorable mention: Miami Herald, for “Hotel housekeepers commute”
    Chabeli Herrera and Carl Juste
    This is textbook explanatory reporting. Chabeli Herrera explores income inequality and sky-high housing costs through the commute of a Fontainebleau housekeeper. The smooth, graceful writing benefits from its relative brevity. Graphics and a compelling video enhance the story.

    Honorable mention: Detroit Free Press, “The Fault in No Fault”
    JC Reindl
    A deeply researched series explaining how various bad actors exploited Michigan’s no-fault insurance statute in a way that enriches them but results in sky-high rates for Detroit drivers. Metro reporting at its best.

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan
    Egan is known for his authoritative reporting on the Great Lakes. Here he gives his readers another excellent series, documenting how the nation’s most important source of fresh water could be jeopardized by an aging underground pipeline and a backroom legislative deal. Egan’s work is deeply reported and masterfully presented.

     

    EXPLANTORY – Small

    Winner: McClatchy’s Washington Bureau, “Trump’s footprint across ex-Soviet world”
    David Goldstein, Ben Wieder, Kevin G. Hall, Gabriellle Paluch and Peter Stone
    On one of the most-swarmed stories in years, the McClatchy team unearthed evidence of Trump’s Russia ties that no one else did — including a birthday phone call to an ex-Soviet official that was pried from a sealed British lawsuit. Given the often-bewildering maze of business relationships and foreign associates, it’s amazing that these stories were very readable narratives. An example of painstaking reporting, careful writing and patient editing.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for A Century of Domination: As America’s Carbon Wars Rage, Oil and Gas Industry Influence Grows”
    Jie Jenny Zou, Michael J. Mishak, Jamie Smith Hopkins, Kristen Lombardi, Jim Morris, Chris Young, Sasha Khokha and Tom Dart
    This entry offers an impressive historical sweep as it examines fresh evidence of the pervasive influence of the fossil-fuel industry. One story exposes the industry’s practice of leading free seminars for state and federal judges. The seminars, hosted by an industry-backed risk analyst, are an obvious effort to make courts more skeptical of the scientific evidence underpinning regulations.

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy”
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle, Robert McClure and Brad Wieners
    Authoritative reporting and clear writing bring fresh insights to the well-worn topic of how vigorously the fossil fuel industry fights environmentalists. One story broke news on how the scientists whose study was used by George W. Bush’s EPA to excuse the fracking industry from clean-water standards now disavow those conclusions.

     

    FEATURE – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh
    Through data analysis and extensive on-the-ground reporting, this series illuminates one of the most timely and controversial issues of the day (and rebuts the poorly-informed positions of many of our national leaders). An important story told with exceptionally compelling writing.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Pink Boxes”
    David Pierson
    The best doughnuts are airy but packed with flavor. They can really make your day a little better. The same things could be said about the best feature stories. This history of the ubiquitous pink doughnut box is the epitome of the business feature. While explaining one of the curiosities of everyday life, it delights us with insights into entrepreneurship, economics, immigrant culture, and consumer psychology.

     

    FEATURE – Medium

    Winner: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “The Land Alcoa Dammed”
    Rich Lord, Len Boselovic, Stephanie Strasburg, Zack Tanner, James Hilston and Ed Yozwick
    The judges were impressed with this multimedia package that explored a giant conglomerate’s impact on a small South American nation. The reporters went to great lengths to explore every angle, from Alcoa’s hometown in Pennsylvania to the deals that were made and the ones that are in still in the works in Suriname as Alcoa withdraws its once-formidable presence. The question of what happens to a company town when the company leaves is an important one; this story explores the aftermath from when an entire country is overly dependent on one business. The story was accompanied by beautiful photographs, and a well-presented online package.

    Honorable mention: Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, for Trapped by Heroin”
    Penelope Overton, Dieter Bradbury, Gregory Rec and Brian Robitaille
    For this ambitious project, the reporter entered the closed realm of Maine lobstermen and persuaded these insular workers to open up about a scourge claiming the lives of friends and family members. The lobster industry, it turns out, is particularly susceptible to opioid addiction. The reporter explained the reasons why, interspersing memorable vignettes about down-on-their-luck survivors as well as the unfortunate ones who didn’t make it.

    Honorable mention: The Weather Channel Digital, for “United States of Climate Change”
    Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans, Kevin Hayes and Geoff Hansen
    This series represents strong coverage of a business, political and cultural topic of great interest to all of us. With solid interviews, excellent pictures and clear prose, the series showed great range. While focusing on issues that are particular to each state, such as energy advocates in Vermont or riverfront casinos in Missouri, the series informs its audience of climate change’s high economic stakes.

     

    FEATURE – Small

    Winner: The Real Deal, for “Real Estate’s Diversity Problem”
    Kathryn Brenzel, Rich Bockmann, Elizabeth Kim, Jill Noonan, Damian Ghigliotty and Yoryi De La Rosa
    The Real Deal’s reporting on the lack of diversity in New York City’s commercial real-estate industry was a comprehensive and compelling narrative. Combining statistics from multiple credible sources with dozens of interviews, the reporting demonstrated with clarity how “entrenched discriminatory practices surrounding access to credit, commission-based pay and a clubby, male-dominated culture have raised the barrier to entry.” The article provided data, testimonies and anecdotes necessary for readers to fully comprehend, as one of its experts noted, that “the people involved in building NYC’s skyline bear little resemblance to its 8.5 million inhabitants.”

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Chicago Business, for Can jobs stop Chicago violence?”
    Lisa Bertagnoli and Ann Dwyer
    The story on jobs vs. bullets impressed the judges with its compelling interviews, deep reporting and excellent graphics. Judges praised the authors’ strong use of anecdotes from key interviewees, which drove home the impact and importance of the topic. The interactive map and charts stood out as unique elements to tell the story.

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for “Meet the Woman Who Broke Silicon Valley’s Gender Barrier and Built a $1.5 Billion Tech Company “
    Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks
    This profile of Blackline founder Theresa Tucker is a sparkling read from the moment the reader meets her in an elevator, where her black hoodie practically guarantees the investment bankers will totally ignore her. This story is an unvarnished look at an effective, no-B.S. technologist who built and took public what is now a $1.5 billion company. Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks cracked the code for writing about women executives in an era of #MeToo. The story strikes the right chord between recognizing a true pioneer in bringing gender equality to the Silicon Valley and providing a balanced picture of a 56-year-old technology company CEO who has succeeded against long odds.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Industry/topic-specific publications

    Winner: The Real Deal
    The Real Deal was full of news and we really liked some of the how-things-really-work type reporting. It set a high standard for what is expected.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times
    This entry included five major reports, all of which illuminated, and some of which triggered, major business or economic developments of 2017. Jodi Kantor and Meghan Twohey exposed sexual harassment across three decades by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein aimed at women over whom he could wield serious career power. Weinstein apologized (while denying some allegations), promised to do better, but was soon ousted from the company bearing his name. Emily Steel and Michael S. Schmidt revealed settlements totaling $13 million with women who accused Bill O’Reilly of Fox News of sexual harassment or abusive behavior. O’Reilly denied wrongdoing but departed Fox News within weeks after the story appeared. These stories played a leading role in spurring a wave of coverage of misbehavior by prominent men in multiple industries and significantly transformed the power dynamic in the executive suite. The other stories in this entry: exposure of ride-sharing giant Uber’s use of “Greyballing” and other technological tools to frustrate efforts by government investigators to check up on whether some of its competitive behaviors complied with the law; insight into how the collapse of much of the Wisconsin paper industry helped swing formerly Democratic voters and ultimately the state to Donald Trump; and graphical portrayal of the massive Republican tax cut’s benefits and pain. For its breadth, depth, and impact, the Times’ work was extraordinary.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    An outstanding range of work across news, investigations and explanatory journalism. This was a unanimous winner from a deep field with many competitive candidates. All of the pieces in the entry were strong, and presentation took advantage of smart multimedia as well as print. The investigation about rapes in Mexico was particularly compelling. The coverage served Milwaukee’s audience well with national-level reporting on pertinent local issues, such as the risks of oil transport both through aging pipelines and potential new ones.

    Honorable mention: Houston Chronicle
    Impressive work under highly competitive conditions on the flood stories, including an insightful and original piece about floating-roof oil tanks. The entry also showed breadth outside of that major story, with excellent examples of explanatory journalism as well as high-quality visuals and graphics.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Small

    Winner: STAT: Reporting from the frontiers of health and medicine
    STAT impressed us with the breadth and quality of coverage, a powerful marriage of deep reporting with lively, engaging writing. In a skeptical look at IBM’s claims that its Watson supercomputer would revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, along with a well-timed piece documenting years of sexual harassment at a powerful biotech hedge fund, STAT displayed strong investigative chops and skilled narrative storytelling. Its breaking news entry, written after another in a long line of highly-anticipated Alzheimers drugs came up short in late-stage testing, went well beyond the basics, succinctly putting the development into the wider context so valuable to readers.

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business
    In a category filled with city business publications, Crain’s Detroit stood out with the strength and depth of reporting on a range of issues affecting the region. It revealed in rich detail the big push made by city officials and a local billionaire to lure Amazon to Detroit for the online retailer’s second headquarters, and also the surprising ways in which factories end up contributing to their own workers’ opioid abuse. A piece probing why Michigan has the highest auto-insurance rates in the country tackled a pressing local problem, while another, looking at the economic roots behind the decline of a once prosperous African-American neighborhood, connected readers to their city’s history in a fresh and interesting way.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “One Nation, Divisible”
    Michael M. Phillips, Betsy McKay, Paul Overberg and Sarah Nassauer
    An absolutely fabulous series of strong, powerful storytelling. The series used great reporting through data analysis and exact sourcing to give voice to an economy that is often invisible and thereby neglected by the country and the media. The writing was outstanding and delivered a compelling narrative that was hard to stop reading.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Burned”
    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett and John Diedrich
    This is genuine investigative journalism at its best. Next time someone tells you we don’t need local reporters, point to this series. It exposed the public hazard of barrel refurbishment plans and made a difference.

    Honorable mention: Kansas City Star, for “Business and politics collide in Missouri”
    Lindsay Wise and Steve Vockrodt
    This is quite good — exposing the hypocrisy of a popular politician with a national profile.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Industry Lawsuits Try to Paint Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket”
    Nicholas Kusnetz
    The compelling narrative, starting with questionable characters arriving unannounced in a person’s driveway for reasons unknown, distinguished this entry from the pack. The story neatly wove a novel legal strategy in with the larger fight being waged against climate groups in a way that set the table for the wars to come in this arena.

    Honorable mention: Financial Planning, for “Wells Fargo whistleblowers”
    Ann Marsh, Marc Hochstein and Scott Wenger
    Judges were impressed by the depth of reporting, including the use of documents, and an on-record interview with a former OSHA employee alleging multiple violations that deprived whistleblowers of a chance at justice.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “The Body Trade”
    Brian Grow, John Shiffman, Blake Morrison, Elizabeth Culliford, Reade Levinson, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Zach Goelman
    The Reuters entry shook us on a primitive level as readers. As judges, we found the meticulousness and depth of reporting, the detail in the anecdotes and the sheer number of documents involved impressive. A seamless presentation through words, graphics and images gripped each of us to make this stunning series the clear winner.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Wasted Medicine”
    Marshall Allen
    An expert examination of an outrageous failure of the health care system, in three powerfully interlocking deep dives that looked at waste built into the industry.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity and Reveal, for “The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools”
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Chris Zubak-Skees, Eric Sagara, Fernanda Camarena, Amy Walters and Ike Sriskandarajah
    Before school shootings came back to haunt the news in February, this dogged piece of enterprise, studded with disturbing historic and sociological context and powerful graphics, laid bare a shocking dereliction of duty to our kids — an insidious problem that harms many more children than even these grotesque massacres. Now we have two huge problems to solve.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy “
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle and Brad Wieners
    This team reports how the U.S. government whittled away protections for average Americans to interests of large fossil-fuel corporations. It includes reporting on how a scientific report was tweaked to justify a provision of the Energy Policy Act that bars the Environmental Protection Agency from safeguarding drinking water that may be contaminated by fracking, and how coal mining depleted aquifers. It also reports on how people responsible for the climate misinformation machine now have a seat at the table of President Donald Trump.

    Honorable mention: Kaiser Health News, for Treating Cancer: Hope Vs. Hype”
    Liz Szabo and John Hillkirk
    These eye-opening stories show how some cancer patients, even those with good insurance, are stalling the start of medication because of high co-pays. Those in financial distress die at higher rates. Doctors are not communicating with patients about how long they have to live, causing some to choose aggressive therapy that can cause pointless suffering. The stories are compelling and well-sourced and -written.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Nuclear Negligence “
    Patrick Malone, Peter Cary, R. Jeffrey Smith and Chris Zubak-Skees
    This report illuminates rarely-reported safety weaknesses at corporate contractor run U.S. nuclear weapons sites. The reporting is diligent and employs all tools, including FOIAs, to show that the Los Alamos contractor’s inattention to safety crimped critical aspects of nuclear weapons-related work. Penalties imposed by the government were small compared to the vast amounts they get in contracts.

     

    INNOVATION – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Disneyland Wait Times”
    Hugo Martin, Joe Fox, Priya Krishnakumar, John Schleuss and Ben Poston
    “Disneyland Wait Times” did an excellent job matching data analysis and innovative interactivity with a very practical audience need — giving us the secrets to not standing in lines at the Magic Kingdom. It is a sleek integration of reporting, data and reader tips, which both helps the audience and encourages them to use the interactive tools. We loved the animated gif too!

     

    INNOVATION – Medium

    Winner: GateHouse Media, for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms”
    Emily Le Coz, Lucille Sherman, Mara Corbett and Tyson Bird
    This strong piece of investigative journalism told the story visually and audibly – letting readers see the impact of wind farms and listen to what it may sound like to be near one. This was a new experience for all of us. It was also easy to interpret the data in the story and consume it.

     

    INNOVATION – Small

    Winner: Crain’s Chicago Business, for “The Rebuilders of Chicago’s Southland”
    Jason McGregor, Thomas J. Linder and Ann Dwyer
    We applaud this piece for its use of digital design, aerial video and historical research to depict positive economic change in what for decades was one of the city’s most economically stagnant and negatively portrayed neighborhoods. Maps show the entrance of new businesses, with interspersed text narrative and before/after photos, along with a video portion. The series covers a lot of ground in explaining this rehabilitative metamorphosis to a business readership that no doubt had long written off the area.

     

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Large

    Winner: Associated Press, for “North Korea”
    Eric Talmadge, Tim Sullivan, Hyung-jin Kim and Martha Mendoza
    Timely stories that elegantly contrast the competing ambitions of a country that seeks to sequester its citizens even as it opens limited access to the internet and encourages more consumerism. These pieces go beyond investigative business journalism, offering readers absorbing insights into North Korea’s social structure.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Mexico’s Housing Crisis
    Richard Marosi
    An ambitious 360-degree view of the widespread failure of Mexico’s plan to provide housing for 20 million people. The reporter found original voices to tell the story of Mexico’s housing economy, government corruption and corporate greed. His illustrations of the personal cost to aggrieved homebuyers can’t help but shake the reader.

     

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Welcome to Tomorrow Land”
    Vivienne Walt
    This story was full of surprises. We loved the contrasts between showing how far Estonia has come from Soviet-era backwater with magnificent medieval architecture to rocketing straight into the future with specific, solid examples. Well-written with every sentence used economically to tell us relevant and interesting information. We loved the “startups on the rise” box, with just a sampling of what’s going on. There are some gems: The PM filing his taxes on his iPad from an airport. Genius! We also liked the pullout with SHORT examples of the Estonian government being ahead of the curve. It then throws the story right into the future — it’s not just about what the country has done, it’s about where it’s going.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Culture of Harassment “
    Emily Steel, Michael S. Schmidt, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey, Susan Chira and Catrin Einhorn
    This collection of New York Times’ articles about sexual harassment, including the October story on Harvey Weinstein, helped to spur a national reckoning on the issue and upended the notion that if you’re powerful, you will not be held to account. All three stories submitted involved rigorous reporting and uncovered incidents and settlements that were previously undisclosed. Although many victims were unwilling, the newspaper managed to get a number of women to tell their stories.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut”
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh
    This story asked why electric rates were 50 percent higher in California than the national average and why regulators continued to approve new plants. The answer, naturally, is complex, but the LA Times did a masterful job of explaining the reasons and what could or should be done about them. The writing, data, photos and engaging graphics worked together to create an easy-to-follow package relevant to consumers, government and corporations. In a field of outstanding entries, this was a smart piece that did an exceptional job of telling a multilayered story while keeping it interesting.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Too Broke for Bankruptcy”
    Paul Kiel and Hannah Fresques
    Beautiful combination of strong shoe-leather and data reporting on a fresh and important topic – why some poor people don’t file for bankruptcy protection because they can’t afford a lawyer. Excellent analysis, clearly presented.

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for “Quantity of Care”
    Mike Baker and Justin Mayo
    Compelling, deeply researched and beautifully written and illustrated stories about the dire consequences of emphasizing money over once-selfless medical practices. The project got immediate results, including investigations by the state Department of Health and U.S. Department of Justice, and the resignation of the hospital’s CEO and top neurosurgeon.

    Honorable mention: The Boston Globe, for “FAA”
    Jaimi Dowdell, Kelly Carr, Jenn Abelson, Todd Wallack, Jonathan Saltzman and Scott Allen
    Amazing and frightening story on lax oversight on plane registration at the Federal Aviation Administration that has received little, if any, media attention. A very strong entry.

    Honorable mention: The Des Moines Register, for “TPI Investigation”
    Kevin Hardy and Grant Rodgers
    The Des Moines Register revealed how wind-blade maker TPI failed to protect its workers from toxic chemicals that damaged their skin. Some workers were fired when they reported skin damage and were denied workers compensation benefits by the company. Excellent use of Iowa OSHA documents, unemployment appeals hearing testimony, photos and on-the-record and anonymous interviews with former workers.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Small

    Winner: Boston Business Journal, for “Promises, promises: Massachusetts companies are missing hiring goals even with hefty tax breaks”
    Greg Ryan
    The investigation reveals Massachusetts has awarded over $25 million in job-creation tax credits to businesses that have since fallen short of their hiring promises — more than one third of the companies were granted the tax credits. The story is well-researched and presented fairly.

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces”
    Sabrina Shankman
    InsideClimate News examined the long history of regulatory violations by an energy company planning a major drilling program in the Arctic.

    Honorable mention: Orlando Business Journal, for “The Amazon Effect”
    Sarah Aslam, Veronica Brezina, Matthew Richardson and Craig Douglas
    A fresh look at the impact of huge web-based Amazon using a mix of commercial real estate transaction information, national data from partner business publications and local title and tax records.

     

    MARKETS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Market-Moving Leaks”
    Mike Bird
    Within three months of the Journal’s initial story about potential abuse of the prerelease of UK government economic data, the practice was halted. The newspaper wasn’t the first to notice suspicious trading – there were rumors as early as 2009 – but it highlighted the issue with a statistical analysis and a clear explanation of risks posed by leaked data. Interactive charts clearly showed how widespread advance notice of economic data allowed those in the know to trade on the information.

     

    MARKETS – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Whatever It Takes to Win”
    Jen Wieczner
    A polished, extensively reported story on a subject of significant interest to investors and company executives, as well as a broader readership: activist hedge funds, in this instance Elliott Management. The reporter’s persistence and in-depth reporting forced the reluctant subjects into lifting the curtain on the inner workings of one of Wall Street’s most aggressive operators. The story had all the right elements and was accompanied by interesting graphics. A very enjoyable read.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Ratner-Simmons Sex Allegations “
    Daniel Miller, Amy Kaufman and Victoria Kim
    An unflinching account of sexual misconduct allegations that spanned decades and are now part of a broader cultural reckoning over society’s treatment of women. The reporters skillfully walk the tightrope of ‘he said-she said,’ forcing readers to confront the inherent power imbalance between the abusers and their victims. In the Ratner stories, the reporters dispassionately lay out the accusations juxtaposed with the director’s repeated denials. Patterns begin to emerge: Ratner, through his lawyer, claiming not to recall an incident; Ratner switching seats on an airplane to sit next to a strange woman and then showing nude photos of his girlfriend. The final piece exposes the hypocrisy of Simmons’ lifestyle brand alongside decades of alleged abuse. The reporting is methodical and the writing compelling. The anger and frustration of the many direct, named sources is palpable. In most cases, the reporters verified accounts with multiple sources. The series does not shy away from the uncomfortable reality that in many cases, the victims maintained their relationships with Ratner and Simmons and in some cases sought professional gain from them.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Medium

    Winner: CNNMoney, for Five women accuse journalist and ‘Game Change’ co-author Mark Halperin of sexual harassment “
    Oliver Darcy
    CNNMoney broke news of Halperin’s alleged sexual misconduct while at ABC and followed the news as its impact grew and Halperin responded. Darcy’s stories were clear, well-written and exceptionally well-reported, giving them credibility and impact.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Small

    Winner: Portland Business Journal, for “Portland’s media mania”
    Erik Siemers
    The three stories in this entry brought together detail, character and perspective to capture the subject matter from all angles. Each report delivered not only key facts and figures, but also compelling anecdotes of the people affected by them. A report on the comic-book industry was a highlight because of its creative presentation, worthy of the topic.

    Honorable mention: Investor’s Business Daily, forCan E-sports’ Armchair Gladiators Vanquish Hulking NFL Players?”
    Patrick Seitz
    A comprehensive account of an industry that’s developed enough to merit in-depth reporting, but fresh enough to be news to most readers. There’s plenty of well-organized detail about the players — in other words, the companies — in the world of E-sports.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Student Debt”
    Stacy Cowley, Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Natalie Kitroeff
    The reporting on this important topic was thorough, the writing powerful and the personal stories were compelling. The series put a spotlight on the predatory practices of companies holding student debt, and the fact that the investor in one of those firms actually condemned his own company’s procedures was a testament to the rock-solid reporting.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: The Chronicle of Higher Education, forWelcome Students! Need a Checking Account?”
    Dan Bauman
    A well-reported story that exposes the millions that banks are paying U.S. colleges to market checking accounts and other banking services to students. The piece stands out for its excellent use of data and public records, and for personal stories that bring to life the financial concerns of students, parents and consumer advocates.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Small

    Winner: The Motley Fool, for Matthew Frankel’s columns
    Frankel wins for his in-depth columns looking at the impact of the 2017 federal tax overhaul on average Americans and for his analysis of the implications of the Fed’s swing to raising interest rates for Americans. His prompt take on these shifting policies, and his smart and readable approaches, helps readers make sense of immensely complex topics so they can protect their pocketbooks.

    Honorable mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Money Help for Aging Parents”
    Sandra Block, Mark Solheim and Eileen Ambrose
    Many seniors are unaware of their gradually declining capacity for managing their financial affairs. This piece was packed with solid tips on ways adult children can move into sensitive caregiving modes by advising aging parents on topics ranging from keeping up with the bills and estate planning to constantly being on alert for fraudulent schemes. This package of articles offered good suggestions about where families can turn for reliable advice in such situations.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg News, for “Cashing In on Calamity”
    Prashant Gopal
    The scope of the concept was high; global warming is causing more catastrophes, causing more reconstruction, and here’s what that looks like on the ground. The judges were impressed that it was one reporter doing all the work. Prashant Gopal wove together detailed and compelling individual stories to construct a big and important story, one that will continue into the future.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Puerto Rico seeks aid for tens of thousands of squatters”
    Lorraine Woellert and M. Scott Mahaskey
    A beautifully written and deeply reported story on how Hurricane Maria exposed the open secret of tens of thousands of squatters living illegally in Puerto Rico. Woellert writes persuasively about how the island’s political structure has compounded the problem for many years, and why its leaders now must decide what to do. The terrific photographs bring the story to life.

    Honorable mention: The Arizona Republic, for HOA foreclosures”
    Jessica Boehm and Catherine Reagor
    This solidly reported, multimedia package alerted Arizona homeowners to the risks they face from their homeowners associations. As this extensively researched and well-written project explained, these largely unregulated bodies have broad powers that include the right to seize homes in foreclosure for as little as $1,200 in unpaid dues. A series of engaging videos that included first-person accounts helped to unravel the causes and impact of the most recent wave of foreclosures spurred in part by the recovery in home prices.

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for Amazon coverage
    Mike Rosenberg, Ángel González, Bettina Hansen, Mark Nowlin, Judy Averill, Kjell Redal, Thomas Wilburn and Alan Berner
    As Amazon turns Seattle into a true company town, The Seattle Times documented that transformation with sharp data analysis and graphics, crisp writing and a novel approach to storytelling. The numbers alone are striking – from rising rents to sheer volume of office space – but we found the story that followed one home through the selling process particularly effective in illustrating the speed and craziness of the Seattle housing market.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Small

    Winner: Puget Sound Business Journal, for Marc Stiles package of stories
    Marc Stiles
    A great package with three very different topics – a shady real-estate developer, a neighborhood in turmoil over gentrification, and a profile of the man in charge of building Amazon’s second headquarters. For each, Stiles consistently brought excellent reporting and writing to bear, resulting in stories that were in-depth, nuanced and compulsively readable. His work stood out in a competitive environment for real-estate submissions.

    Honorable mention: The News Tribune (Tacoma), for Fight for your country, lose the bidding war for a house”
    Kate Martin
    Martin highlighted an underreported problem in the real estate market—former soldiers who were unable to successfully use loans from the Department of Veterans Affairs to purchase a home. Martin did a terrific job of detailing the scope of the issue, talking to affected veterans, real estate brokers and lenders about what was going on and why. Martin did this well before more national media became interested in similar cases later in 2017.

     

    RETAIL – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Retail in Crisis”
    Suzanne Kapner, Valerie Bauerlein, Esther Fung and Yaryna Serkez
    The Wall Street Journal staff explores the retail industry’s transformation in vivid detail, first taking readers to a retail-dependent city where store closings are causing waves of economic woes and then exploring the pressures on an old-school retailer struggling to compete in a rapidly-changing world. This entry is topped off with an innovative interactive tracing the slow death of an American mall by tracking tenant life cycles dating to 1995. Excellent work all around in this category’s deepest and most complete entry.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Counterfeit Shoes”
    David Pierson
    Readers got enlightening glimpse into a $460 billion industry: counterfeit goods. Using rapper Kanye West’s luxury sneakers as his hook, Pierson’s deep reporting is complemented by rich storytelling to produce a piece that’s compelling on many levels, from the technology used to produce replicas of these high-priced kicks to the mind-set of buyers who rationalize their decisions to purchase fake goods.

     

    RETAIL – Medium

    Winner: Report on Business Magazine, for Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”
    Marina Strauss
    An in-depth look at the transformation of Tim Hortons after the iconic Canadian brand was acquired by private equity firm 3G Capital. Strong details and storytelling transformed a local story into a bigger business saga. Disgruntled franchisees formed an association and used details from the article in their complaint to the company.

    Honorable mention: BusinessInsider.com, forDefining the Retail Apocalypse”
    Hayley Peterson
    Smart reporting and bright writing differentiated this series from other submissions on the demise of the retail industry. The package provided three angles to the crisis: including engaging pieces on retail job loss, the decline of Sears and the impact of store closings on bond holders.

     

    RETAIL – Small

    Winner: Racked, for “eBay is Playing Catch-Up “
    Chavie Lieber, Christie Hemm Klok and Laura Bullard
    A smart story, written with authority, that tackles an interesting area of the online marketplace and focuses on eBay, a company that the judges hadn’t really thought about for a long time. Lieber provides insight into the strategic decisions the company has made as it struggles to fend off competitors including mighty Amazon.

    Honorable mention: Capital & Main, for a package of retail features
    Jessica Goodheart
    In A Dream and a Microwave: Everytable Serves Healthy Meals to Hungry ‘Hoods, Goodheart writes deftly on a compelling and socially important topic: how to make healthy eating affordable for everyone. Her reporting about a fledgling restaurant chain with a unique business model is comprehensive and rich with voices.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Contracted”
    Lauren Weber
    The package of stories was well-researched and well-done as it toggled between data and real-world examples filled with people and companies. It was written and edited at a high level, making it an enjoyable read on a fairly wonky subject. We also liked the kicker at the end of the main story about bots. The sidebar on the video-game industry was particularly engaging, and a smart story to do to draw in a younger demographic of readers. Altogether, the trio of stories gave a good 360-degree view of an issue certain to become more pressing in the economy.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for Can AT&T Retrain 100,000 People? “
    Aaron Pressman
    This story struck a great balance. It took us inside a single, massive company to examine an interesting change and grappled with an existential crisis many businesses are facing: skills mismatch in an era of technological progress. The outcome is a story that is well-developed and resonant.

    Honorable mention: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Cost of affair, family rift measured in millions”
    Jeffrey Meitrodt
    A deeply reported story that chronicled executive negligence at a prominent Minnesota firm owned by the Barry family, and the turmoil that followed.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Small

    Winner: LinkedIn, for “Managing Business “
    Chip Cutter
    Impressive reporting effort to show a U.S. labor market in the grip of rapid change. One notable conclusion: The changes aren’t all in the same direction. Readers get to watch up close as truckers exploit a driver shortage and employers despair over the opioid crisis. A scoop about a Walmart floor scrubber shows how automation is creeping into American workplaces. The stories make abstract issues concrete, bolstering the musing of experts with compelling, real-world examples.

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for Main Street”
    Leigh Buchanan
    Bright writing and detailed reporting is employed to tell enlightening stories about small business. We especially liked a piece that profiled a family of immigrant hotel entrepreneurs, telling the story of how they grew a small business into a much bigger one and the creative and thoughtful ways they reacted to the devastation of Hurricane Harvey. Her two other articles described a unique solution to the problem of the fading family farm and the surprising source of all those cardboard eclipse glasses last year.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Projects and collaborations

    Winner: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic, for “Arizona owners can lose homes over $50 in back taxes”
    Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark
    This story packs a powerful punch, showing the devastating impact of tax liens on some Arizona homeowners, particularly minorities and the poor. It recounts the experience of one family and then uses data analysis to illustrate the magnitude of the problem. Bravo on the map. The complex process of tax liens and foreclosure is laid out in an understandable fashion that makes readers want to stay with the story until the end. Many sources are featured, including individuals who are going through the worst time of their lives and are therefore reluctant to speak publicly. This is an example of strong community reporting that can lead to change.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for professional publications

    Winner: University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal, for Losing the Fight to Debt”
    Danielle Chemtob
    Excellent journalism and a unique story angle for a topic that’s been covered exhaustively — student debt. Reporter Danielle Chemtob took an in-depth look at the high amount of debt taken on by students at historic black colleges and universities. Though the story included a lot of hard data on rising tuition costs and flat wages, she kept it interesting and personal by speaking to students and school leaders.

    Honorable mention: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Profits of Policing”
    Agnel Philip and Emily Mahoney
    Profits of Policing sheds light on a largely hidden area, exposing shortcoming in the accounting and reporting of seized personal property. Reporters Emily Mahoney and Agnel Philip did an incredible amount of digging for this report. An added bonus: The video of the 76-year-old man, who could lose everything as a result of this personal property seizure program, provided a very personal element to this in-depth investigation.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for student publications

    Winner: Medill News Service, for “Opportunities open up for women truckers, but their numbers remain small”
    Shen Lu
    Touching on two issues of national importance — gender equity in the workplace as well as a trucker shortage — the article told the story of two women struggling to make it in a male-dominated workplace, while putting their experiences into a broader context. The engaging article smartly wove in graphics and photos and mixed the macro and micro for a fascinating business story.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Inside Uber”
    Mike Isaac
    An insightful profile of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick that examined how his personality evolved from his high school years, how his penchant for risk-taking shaped Uber and led to the company’s managerial crisis. This series contained remarkable reporting about Kalanick’s showdown with Apple CEO Tim Cook and use of a technique called “Greyballing” aimed at deceiving local governments about Uber’s activities. In-depth reporting, quality writing and compelling multimedia made this series the clear winner.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Snap IPO”
    David Pierson, James Rufus Koren, Paresh Dave, Joe Fox and Ben Muessig
    The judges were impressed by the breadth and quality of writing on the initial public offering of Snap Inc., particularly the remarkable profile of Snap CEO Evan Spiegel. This series included a clearly written article on shareholder governance and Snap’s attempt to retain control of the company after the IPO. The judges also commend a clever interactive graphic that describes the volatility and price declines of much-publicized tech stock offerings.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Automating Hate”
    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner, Ariana Tobin, Madeleine Varner, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Rob Weychert, Noam Scheiber, Hannes Grassegger and Stefanie Dodt
    A clear winner — well-written, newsworthy, and one that made an impact. This trio of stories takes an inventive, investigative look at the underside of social-media giant Facebook and its not-so-politically correct ways, highlighting how hard it is to make it accountable. The in-depth and original reporting shows how the company’s guidelines for censoring hate speech let controversial posts slip through the cracks while unfairly shutting down more reasonable ones, and it exposes how easy it is for employers to use Facebook’s technology to exclude older workers from job ads. While these stories were written last year, the subject they tackled remains critical in today’s charged political environment.

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “Blockchain Mania!”
    Robert Hackett and Jeff John Roberts
    This piece tackles a complicated and technically challenging subject with aplomb and creates a great explainer that’s also an engaging read.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Saving face: Facebook wants access without rules”
    Jared Bennett and Allan Holmes
    A deep, broad look at a project that an increasingly dominant company has worked hard to avoid scrutiny. The topic has huge potential implications for privacy, technology and the consolidation of power. The story draws its force from crisp writing, good graphics and, above all, impressively thorough reporting.

    Honorable mention: Triangle Business Journal, “How an $850 million deal died for a Durham company”
    Lauren Ohnesorge
    This story goes deep inside a collapsed investment by a German giant in a North Carolina tech company to show how international trade policy hits home in American cities. It was well-written, clearly organized and comprehensively reported, with informative graphics.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, forSelf-Driving Cars”
    Tim Higgins, Jack Nicas, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Mike Spector
    The WSJ stories were our top pick for the deeply reported insight into perhaps the biggest issue facing the transportation industry: self-driving cars. The submitted pieces covered three of the most important players — Tesla, Google and Uber — and raised important concerns about safety, tensions with Detroit and theft of intellectual property. The stories showed impressive sourcing and research and used storytelling elements to bring the stories to life.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “The Last Railroad Tycoon”
    Shawn Tully
    Well-written, engaging and insightful — the story took readers inside the CEO’s attempt to remake a fourth railroad after three previous successes. Hunter Harrison’s gambit lives on after his death and is the biggest story in U.S. railroading in a decade.

    Honorable mention: Quartz, for Uber’s New York subprime leasing program and the drivers it hurt”
    Alison Griswold
    Uber’s turnabout showed the impact of the story. Quartz was effective in highlighting the human element of drivers caught in the rent-to-own trap, helping readers make a more-personal connection. The follow-up with drivers afterward also was a nice touch.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Small

    Winner: The Information, forUber’s Hell”
    Amir Efrati
    The year 2017 became a reckoning for Uber in so many ways, from how it attempted to skirt, or even potentially break, the law in thwarting competitors and regulators to its disgraceful treatment of women in its workplace. The company’s hard-charging CEO thought he could rule Uber as his personal kingdom but discovered otherwise, with his downfall resulting in major drama. The stories broke new ground in nearly every area of controversy at the company – delivering investigative scoops that punched well above its weight. From exposing secret programs to spy on its competitor Lyft to documenting sexual misconduct instances pervasive at the company, The Information’s work was an amazing example of hard-hitting business reporting that never let up and never backed down.

    Honorable mention: Jacksonville Business Journal Reporter, for “Employed & Homeless: As CSX changes plans, dispatchers left in limbo during holidays”
    William Robinson
    This story showed just how vulnerable employees are to the whims of shifting winds at a corporation like CSX. They uprooted their lives and started moving based on the company’s direction that their jobs were being relocated, only to suddenly have the company change its mind. Good solid story and notable that the company kept trying to deny what was happening, requiring the reporter to prove it through dogged reporting involving documents and persuading the employees to go on record.

     

    VIDEO – Large

    Winner: CNBC, forBroken Bonds”
    Leslie Picker, Scott Zamost, Dawn Giel, Chris Mulligan, Jackie Dessel, Alex Herrera, Leroy Jackson and Scott Matthews
    CNBC’s powerful entry gave viewers strong investigative material gleaned from a wide variety of sources. This CNBC piece apparently wasn’t the first reporting on this long running issue, but it detailed the issue with sweep, depth and clarity, tackling an important subject and serious questions about UBS’s actions as crucial concerns grew about the product it was marketing. The look of the video itself was clean and straight forward, but it clearly took deep reporting, meaningful resources and time to craft it.

     

    VIDEO – Small and Medium

    Winner: Quartz in collaboration with Retro Report, for “What Happens Next”
    This series was thorough and polished, plus it was on-topic. The aerial footage! Looks like they used drones to good effect. Impressive production quality and it conveys relevant info. The well-produced videos took us to new and different places, telling us something we didn’t know and relating it to the world we live in. Excellent work.

  • 2017 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday March 7, 2018

    AUDIO – All news organizations

    Winner: Marketplace/The Uncertain Hour, for “How One Sentence Helped Set Off the Opioid Crisis”
    Krissy Clark, Caitlin Esch, Nancy Farghalli, Maria Hollenhorst, Lyra Smith, Sitara Nieves, Deborah Clark, Donna Tam, Tony Wagner, Jake Gorski and Daniel Ramirez

    Honorable mention: KUOW, for “Prime(d)”
    Carol Smith, Joshua McNichols, Carolyn Adolph, Posey Gruener and Brendan Sweeney

    BANKING/FINANCE – Large

    Winner: Financial Times, for articles on non-prime and predatory lending
    Ben McLannahan

    Honorable mention: Reuters, for “Crypto Casino”
    Steve Stecklow, Alexandra Harney, Anna Irrera and Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi

    BANKING/FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with Fortune, for “The Billion-Dollar Loophole”
    Peter Elkind

    BANKING/FINANCE – Small

    Winner: TheStreet, for “Big Bank Corporate Governance”
    Brad Keoun

    Honorable mention: American Banker, for The CFPB leadership battle”
    Kate Berry, Ian McKendry and Rob Blackwell

    BREAKING NEWS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “CVS-Aetna Deal”
    Dana Mattioli, Sharon Terlep, Anna Wilde Mathews and Laura Stevens

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for Uber coverage
    Mike Isaac and Farhad Manjoo

    BREAKING NEWS – Medium

    Winner: The Seattle Times, for “Amazon HQ2 announcement”
    Matt Day, Dominic Gates, Mike Rosenberg, Jon Talton, Scott Greenstone, Dan Beekman, Jessica Lee, Joseph O’Sullivan, Mark Nowlin and Kjell Redal

    BREAKING NEWS – Small

    Winner: International Business Times, for “Last-Minute Tax Provisions Could Enrich Top Lawmakers”
    David Sirota, Josh Keefe, Alex Kotch and Jay Cassano

    Honorable mention: Puget Sound Business Journal, for “Port of Seattle CEO resigned amid probe into $4.7M payout”
    Andrew McIntosh

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business, for “Amazon HQ2 bid revealed: tax breaks, $120 million talent program, transit vision”
    Chad Livengood and Kirk Pinho

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for Keywords Technology Column
    Christopher Mims

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Equifax Hack”
    Ron Lieber

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Lee Schafer’s columns

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “A Boom with a View”
    Erin Griffith

    Honorable mention: The Dallas Morning News, for “Texas business repels a bathroom bill”
    Mitchell Schnurman

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Small

    Winner: Albany Business Review, for Mike Hendricks’ columns

    Honorable mention: The Nation, for Helaine Olen’s columns

    ECONOMICS – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh

    ECONOMICS – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Trump’s Trade Pullout Roils Rural America”
    Adam Behsudi

    ECONOMICS – Small

    Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Sarasota Drift”
    Barbara Peters-Smith

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut “
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Medium

    Winner: The Atlantic, for “The Problem with Rolling Back Regulations”
    Alana Semuels

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Small

    Winner: Debtwire, for American Idle: An Offshore Drilling Crisis “
    Alex Plough

    EXPLANATORY – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “Shock Tactics”
    Jason Szep, Peter Eisler, Tim Reid, Lisa Girion, Grant Smith, Linda So, M.B. Pell and Charles Levinson

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Anaheim’s Subsidy Kingdom “
    Daniel Miller, Priya Krishnakumar and Ben Poston

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Education Disrupted”
    Natasha Singer

    EXPLANATORY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with NPR, for “Sold for Parts”
    Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes

    Honorable mention: Miami Herald, for “Hotel housekeepers commute”
    Chabeli Herrera and Carl Juste

    Honorable mention: Detroit Free Press, “The Fault in No Fault”
    JC Reindl

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan

    EXPLANATORY – Small

    Winner: McClatchy’s Washington Bureau, “Trump’s footprint across ex-Soviet world”
    David Goldstein, Ben Wieder, Kevin G. Hall, Gabriellle Paluch and Peter Stone

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for A Century of Domination: As America’s Carbon Wars Rage, Oil and Gas Industry Influence Grows”
    Jie Jenny Zou, Michael J. Mishak, Jamie Smith Hopkins, Kristen Lombardi, Jim Morris, Chris Young, Sasha Khokha and Tom Dart

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy”
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle, Robert McClure and Brad Wieners

    FEATURE – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Pink Boxes”
    David Pierson

    FEATURE – Medium

    Winner: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “The Land Alcoa Dammed”
    Rich Lord, Len Boselovic, Stephanie Strasburg, Zack Tanner, James Hilston and Ed Yozwick

    Honorable mention: Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, for Trapped by Heroin”
    Penelope Overton, Dieter Bradbury, Gregory Rec and Brian Robitaille

    Honorable mention: The Weather Channel Digital, for “United States of Climate Change”
    Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans, Kevin Hayes and Geoff Hansen

    FEATURE – Small

    Winner: The Real Deal, for “Real Estate’s Diversity Problem”
    Kathryn Brenzel, Rich Bockmann, Elizabeth Kim, Jill Noonan, Damian Ghigliotty and Yoryi De La Rosa

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Chicago Business, for Can jobs stop Chicago violence?”
    Lisa Bertagnoli and Ann Dwyer

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for “Meet the Woman Who Broke Silicon Valley’s Gender Barrier and Built a $1.5 Billion Tech Company “
    Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Industry/topic-specific publications

    Winner: The Real Deal

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Honorable mention: Houston Chronicle

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Small

    Winner: STAT: Reporting from the frontiers of health and medicine

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business

    GOVERNMENT – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “One Nation, Divisible”
    Michael M. Phillips, Betsy McKay, Paul Overberg and Sarah Nassauer

    GOVERNMENT – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Burned”
    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett and John Diedrich

    Honorable mention: Kansas City Star, for “Business and politics collide in Missouri”
    Lindsay Wise and Steve Vockrodt

    GOVERNMENT – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Industry Lawsuits Try to Paint Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket”
    Nicholas Kusnetz

    Honorable mention: Financial Planning, for “Wells Fargo whistleblowers”
    Ann Marsh, Marc Hochstein and Scott Wenger

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “The Body Trade”
    Brian Grow, John Shiffman, Blake Morrison, Elizabeth Culliford, Reade Levinson, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Zach Goelman

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Wasted Medicine”
    Marshall Allen

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity and Reveal, for “The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools”
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Chris Zubak-Skees, Eric Sagara, Fernanda Camarena, Amy Walters and Ike Sriskandarajah

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy “
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle and Brad Wieners

    Honorable mention: Kaiser Health News, for Treating Cancer: Hope Vs. Hype”
    Liz Szabo and John Hillkirk

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Nuclear Negligence “
    Patrick Malone, Peter Cary, R. Jeffrey Smith and Chris Zubak-Skees

    INNOVATION – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Disneyland Wait Times”
    Hugo Martin, Joe Fox, Priya Krishnakumar, John Schleuss and Ben Poston

    INNOVATION – Medium

    Winner: GateHouse Media, for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms”
    Emily Le Coz, Lucille Sherman, Mara Corbett and Tyson Bird

    INNOVATION – Small

    Winner: Crain’s Chicago Business, for “The Rebuilders of Chicago’s Southland”
    Jason McGregor, Thomas J. Linder and Ann Dwyer

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Large

    Winner: Associated Press, for “North Korea”
    Eric Talmadge, Tim Sullivan, Hyung-jin Kim and Martha Mendoza

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Mexico’s Housing Crisis
    Richard Marosi

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Welcome to Tomorrow Land”
    Vivienne Walt

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Culture of Harassment “
    Emily Steel, Michael S. Schmidt, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey, Susan Chira and Catrin Einhorn

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut”
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Too Broke for Bankruptcy”
    Paul Kiel and Hannah Fresques

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for “Quantity of Care”
    Mike Baker and Justin Mayo

    Honorable mention: The Boston Globe, for “FAA”
    Jaimi Dowdell, Kelly Carr, Jenn Abelson, Todd Wallack, Jonathan Saltzman and Scott Allen

    Honorable mention: The Des Moines Register, for “TPI Investigation”
    Kevin Hardy and Grant Rodgers

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Small

    Winner: Boston Business Journal, for “Promises, promises: Massachusetts companies are missing hiring goals even with hefty tax breaks”
    Greg Ryan

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces”
    Sabrina Shankman

    Honorable mention: Orlando Business Journal, for “The Amazon Effect”
    Sarah Aslam, Veronica Brezina, Matthew Richardson and Craig Douglas

    MARKETS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Market-Moving Leaks”
    Mike Bird

     MARKETS – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Whatever It Takes to Win”
    Jen Wieczner

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Ratner-Simmons Sex Allegations “
    Daniel Miller, Amy Kaufman and Victoria Kim

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Medium

    Winner: CNNMoney, for Five women accuse journalist and ‘Game Change’ co-author Mark Halperin of sexual harassment “
    Oliver Darcy

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Small

    Winner: Portland Business Journal, for “Portland’s media mania”
    Erik Siemers

    Honorable mention: Investor’s Business Daily, forCan E-sports’ Armchair Gladiators Vanquish Hulking NFL Players?”
    Patrick Seitz

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Student Debt”
    Stacy Cowley, Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Natalie Kitroeff

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: The Chronicle of Higher Education, forWelcome Students! Need a Checking Account?”
    Dan Bauman

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Small

    Winner: The Motley Fool, for Matthew Frankel’s columns

    Honorable mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Money Help for Aging Parents”
    Sandra Block, Mark Solheim and Eileen Ambrose

    REAL ESTATE – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg News, for “Cashing In on Calamity”
    Prashant Gopal

    REAL ESTATE – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Puerto Rico seeks aid for tens of thousands of squatters”
    Lorraine Woellert and M. Scott Mahaskey

    Honorable mention: The Arizona Republic, for HOA foreclosures”
    Jessica Boehm and Catherine Reagor

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for Amazon coverage
    Mike Rosenberg, Ángel González, Bettina Hansen, Mark Nowlin, Judy Averill, Kjell Redal, Thomas Wilburn and Alan Berner

    REAL ESTATE – Small

    Winner: Puget Sound Business Journal, for Marc Stiles package of stories
    Marc Stiles

    Honorable mention: The News Tribune (Tacoma), for Fight for your country, lose the bidding war for a house”
    Kate Martin

    RETAIL – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Retail in Crisis”
    Suzanne Kapner, Valerie Bauerlein, Esther Fung and Yaryna Serkez

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Counterfeit Shoes”
    David Pierson

    RETAIL – Medium

    Winner: Report on Business Magazine, for Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”
    Marina Strauss

    Honorable mention: BusinessInsider.com, forDefining the Retail Apocalypse”
    Hayley Peterson

    RETAIL – Small

    Winner: Racked, for “eBay is Playing Catch-Up “
    Chavie Lieber, Christie Hemm Klok and Laura Bullard

    Honorable mention: Capital & Main, for a package of retail features
    Jessica Goodheart

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Contracted”
    Lauren Weber

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for Can AT&T Retrain 100,000 People? “
    Aaron Pressman

    Honorable mention: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Cost of affair, family rift measured in millions”
    Jeffrey Meitrodt

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Small

    Winner: LinkedIn, for “Managing Business “
    Chip Cutter

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for Main Street”
    Leigh Buchanan

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Projects and collaborations

    Winner: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic, for “Arizona owners can lose homes over $50 in back taxes”
    Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for professional publications

    Winner: University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal, for Losing the Fight to Debt”
    Danielle Chemtob

    Honorable mention: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Profits of Policing”
    Agnel Philip and Emily Mahoney

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for student publications

    Winner: Medill News Service, for “Opportunities open up for women truckers, but their numbers remain small”
    Shen Lu

    TECHNOLOGY – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Inside Uber”
    Mike Isaac

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Snap IPO”
    David Pierson, James Rufus Koren, Paresh Dave, Joe Fox and Ben Muessig

    TECHNOLOGY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Automating Hate”
    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner, Ariana Tobin, Madeleine Varner, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Rob Weychert, Noam Scheiber, Hannes Grassegger and Stefanie Dodt

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “Blockchain Mania!”
    Robert Hackett and Jeff John Roberts

    TECHNOLOGY – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Saving face: Facebook wants access without rules”
    Jared Bennett and Allan Holmes

    Honorable mention: Triangle Business Journal, “How an $850 million deal died for a Durham company”
    Lauren Ohnesorge

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, forSelf-Driving Cars”
    Tim Higgins, Jack Nicas, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Mike Spector

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “The Last Railroad Tycoon”
    Shawn Tully

    Honorable mention: Quartz, for Uber’s New York subprime leasing program and the drivers it hurt”
    Alison Griswold

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Small

    Winner: The Information, forUber’s Hell”
    Amir Efrati

    Honorable mention: Jacksonville Business Journal Reporter, for “Employed & Homeless: As CSX changes plans, dispatchers left in limbo during holidays”
    William Robinson

    VIDEO – Large

    Winner: CNBC, forBroken Bonds”
    Leslie Picker, Scott Zamost, Dawn Giel, Chris Mulligan, Jackie Dessel, Alex Herrera, Leroy Jackson and Scott Matthews

    VIDEO – Small and Medium

    Winner: Quartz in collaboration with Retro Report, for “What Happens Next”

  • 2017 – 2018 Committees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday May 1, 2017

    (*) indicates Committee Chair
    (**) indicates Vice Chair

    Executive Committee

    *SABEW President, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com

    SABEW Vice President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    SABEW Secretary/Treasurer, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Amy Gleason, senior director, News, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal (ex-officio member)

     

    First Amendment Committee

    *Marilyn Geewax, former senior business editor, NPR and Cox Institute’s Industry Fellow

    **Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Henry Dubroff, editor-in-chief, Denver Business Journal

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

     

    Nominating Committee

    *Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Xana Antunes, executive editor, Quartz

    Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Marty Wolk, freelance

     

    Finance Committee

    *James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    James B. Nelson, deputy business editor, PolitiFact Wisconsin; reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Michael Rapoport, reporter, The Wall Street Journal

     

    Investment Sub-Committee

    *James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Gail MarksJarvis, syndicated financial columnist, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

     

    Canada Committee

    *Dawn Calleja, senior editor, Report on Business

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    David Hodges, investigative reporter, NBC2

    Jason Kirby, digital managing editor, Maclean’s

    Tracey Lindeman, freelance journalist and editor

    John Shmuel, managing editor and senior writer, LowestRates.ca

     

    SABEWNYC17 Fall Conference Committee

    *Caleb Silver, vice president, content, Investopedia/IAC

    **Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNNMoney

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Greg David, director, Business & Economics Reporting Program, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    Lisa Gibbs, business editor, Associated Press

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Jane Sasseen, executive director, McGraw Center for Business Journalism

     

    SABEW18 Spring Conference Committee

    *Bernie Kohn, managing editor, Bloomberg News

    **Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Shobhana Chandra, economics reporter, Bloomberg News

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Amy Gleason, senior director, News, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief, Bankrate.com

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    James B. Nelson, deputy business editor, PolitiFact Wisconsin; reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Jennifer Nycz-Conner, editor-at-large, Washington Business Journal

    Zoe Sagalow, federal tax and data reporter, Tax Analysts

     

    Training Committee

    *Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report

    *Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Amy Gleason, senior director, News, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Marty Steffens, SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism, School of Journalism, University of Missouri

     

    Membership Committee

    *Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNNMoney

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Gail MarksJarvis, syndicated financial columnist, Chicago Tribune

    Caleb Silver, vice president, content, Investopedia/IAC

     

    Best In Business Committee

    *Joanna Ossinger editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Jeff Nash, managing editor, CNBC.com

    Marty Steffens, SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism, School of Journalism, University of Missouri

     

    International Committee

    *Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    *Andrew Leckey, president/business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU

    Shobhana Chandra, economics reporter, Bloomberg News

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Marty Steffens, SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism, School of Journalism, University of Missouri

     

    Past President Committee

    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

     

    Content Committee

    Suzanne Barlyn, correspondent, Reuters

    Dean Murphy, associate editor, The New York Times

     

    Governance Committee

    *Jim Pensiero, consultant, Gannett Co.

    Brad Foss, deputy business editor, Associated Press

    Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

     

    Personal Finance Workshop Committee

    Crystal Beasley, special projects manager, SABEW

    Claes Bell, banking analyst and mobile editor, Bankrate.com

    Paul Golden, director of media relations, NEFE

    Kathleen Graham, executive director, SABEW

    Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com

    Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Jim Pensiero, consultant, Gannett Co.

    Bobbi Rebell, financial journalist and author, How to Be a Financial Grownup

     

    Sponsorship Committee

    Jonathan Blum, freelance journalist/author

    Suzanne Barlyn, correspondent, Reuters

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Renee McGivern, director of sponsorships, SABEW

    Caleb Silver, vice president, content, Investopedia/IAC

    Allen Wastler, managing editor, CNBC Digital

     

     

  • Journalists need consumer data to regain market share

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Friday April 28, 2017

    By Mindy Tan
    Medill News Service

    At a time when Facebook and Google are claiming 89 cents of every new dollar of digital advertising, journalists must “reclaim” their relationship with users by leveraging consumer data to better package content for them, according to Michael Shane, global head of digital innovation at Bloomberg LP.

    “For most people, the internet is essentially some combination of Google and Facebook, probably with a little Amazon thrown in,” said Shane at the opening keynote address of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers spring conference in Seattle.

    “They have in many sectors, topic areas of publishing, usurped our relationship with the audience. That’s what we have to reclaim,” Shane said.

    Bloomberg's Michael Shane and ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism's Retha Hill talk about innovating in the age of platforms

    Bloomberg’s global digital innovation chief Michael Shane and ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism’s Retha Hill talk about innovating in the age of platforms

    The key to doing this is collecting and understanding audience data.

    At a tactical level, Shane said, reclaiming your audience means first-party data which includes: who they are; where they work; what their role is; how much money they make; where they live; and what they are interested in.

    Rather than trying to compete at scale or trying to compete by pure speed, and both of those are important, I think you’re going to start seeing publications start to build journalism products and also user products that rely on registration, that rely on users telling us who they are, and telling us what they care about,” Shane said.

    Such information, even if anonymous, should be treated as the “holy of holies,” said Shane. “You have to earn it. And that means we have to build experiences that are good enough and special enough to motivate people to give us that information.”

    At The Dallas Morning News, collecting data, such as where their online traffic comes from, helps them decide what content to focus on. So when faced with the choice of banking on a story that went viral or a story that achieved less than a tenth of the clicks but whose readership was mostly local, the answer was simple, said Business Editor Paul O’Donnell.

    “We’re really focused on re-engaging our local audience,” said O’Donnell.  “We talk a lot in our newsroom about the importance of return visitors to our site, who are also the ones with the highest potential to become our subscribers.”

    Packed room at the Opening Keynote - A conversation with Michael Shane: Innovating in the Age of Platforms

    Packed room at the SABEW 2017 spring conference’s opening keynote: A conversation with Michael Shane: Innovating in the Age of Platforms

    A localized organization has an “incredible advantage” at reclaiming their audience because of built-in scarcity, said Shane.

    “Whether you’re in an industry-specific publication or it’s geographical, having those built-in limitations can keep you on the rails and keep you really disciplined and also because you don’t have to worry about being all things to all people,” Shane said.

    “Unlike Google and Facebook, you can build products or plan editorial strategies or editorial features, or sales strategies that are totally and completely tuned for your area and your audience,” he added.

    Audience members asked about the rise of  “quick takes” and other alternative formats that might be shifting the emphasis away from rigorous reporting.

    “Generally, shorter works on the internet, but the key is still to make sure it’s your reporting and it matches your newsroom. Going short just for the sake of short is no good.”

    He boiled it down to three key questions that should be asked: Which part of your audience is this for? How big is the audience and does their size and level of engagement match your goals? Does the reporting match your newsroom?

    Al Lewis, business editor at Houston Chronicle, said his biggest takeaway from the conference session is that resorting to clickbait is a losing strategy.

    “A lot of newspapers, especially as they’ve lost resources, have been drawn in to clickbait,” said Lewis, whose Houston Chronicle is also behind Chron, a site that features such headlines as  “Walking barefoot at gym led to gross foot infection,” with an accompanying photo gallery.

    “Google and Facebook are getting all the advertising so the only future that we have in this business is to build subscribers who pay for quality content because advertising is just going to be pennies per click and Facebook and Google are going to get all the money,” Lewis said.

  • Nominees Announced: SABEW Canada’s 3rd Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By David Wilhite on Friday March 31, 2017

    TORONTO, March 31, 2017 /CNW/ – The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Canada is excited to announce the list of nominees for the 3rd Annual Best In Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published or broadcast in 2016.

    This year, SABEW Canada received a record number of submissions from journalists across the country. The nominees represent some of Canada’s most venerable publications, including the Financial Post, Canadian Business, Bloomberg Canada, The Globe and Mail, the Wall Street Journal and more.

    Their stories shone a spotlight in 2016 on some of the most important issues in the Canadian business landscape  — from runaway house-flipping in Vancouver, Bombardier’s attempts to suppress information, and the failure of retail giant Target’s expansion into Canada.

    “Despite a difficult year in the media industry, we received a record number of submissions this year,” said SABEW Canada’s chairperson, Dawn Calleja. “Selecting finalists was an especially challenging task for our 27 judges, highlighting not only the depth and quality of business journalism in Canada, but also the valuable role it plays. ”

    There are a total of 27 finalists in nine categories this year, selected from well over 100 applicants. Categories include investigative, commentary, investing and personal finance, features, multimedia, beat reporting, package and profile.

    SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges, chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

    The winners will be announced at the Best In Business Awards reception on April 19 at Baro in Toronto. Business journalists interested in attending can register at sabew.org/canada. The cost is $25 for SABEW members and $40 for non-members. Tickets include hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

    Nominees for SABEW Canada’s 3rd Annual Best in Business Awards (in no particular order):

    Beat Reporting

    Bloomberg News – Toronto Bureau
    Gerrit De Vynck
    Technology

    Financial Post
    Claudia Cattaneo
    Energy

    Globe and Mail
    Jacqueline Nelson
    Insurance

    Commentary

    Report on Business Magazine
    Eric Reguly
    International Business

    Report on Business Magazine
    Ian McGugan
    Investing

    Canadian Business
    Deborah Aarts
    The Realist Column

    Feature (Long-form)

    Canadian Business
    Joe Castaldo
    The Last Days of Target

    Report on Business Magazine
    Bruce Livesey
    Company Province, Provincial Company

    Globe and Mail
    Sean Silcoff
    Vision Critical

    Feature (Short-form)

    Bloomberg News – Toronto Bureau
    Gerrit De Vynck
    Bunz

    Financial Post
    Claire Brownell
    The End of Meat

    Bloomberg News – Vancouver Bureau
    Natalie Obiko Pearson
    Trump Brothel

    Investigative

    Globe and Mail
    Kathy Tomlinson
    B.C Housing Investigation

    Ottawa Citizen
    James Bagnall
    Built To Fail

    Financial Post
    Kristine Owram
    How Bombardier Suppresses Information

    Multimedia

    MoneySense
    Romana King, Mark Brown and Prajakta Dhopade
    City or Suburbs: Where can you afford to live?

    Financial Post
    Peter Kuitenbrouwer and Peter J. Thompson
    The Sault Ste. Marie Locks

    Globe and Mail
    Chris Manza, Jeremy Agius, Michael Pereira, Andrew Saikali, Tamsin McMahon, Brent Jang, D’Arcy McGovern, Duncan Hood, Matt Lundy and Rob Carrick
    Real Estate Data

    Package or Ongoing Series

    Bloomberg News – Vancouver Bureau
    Natalie Obiko Pearson, Katia Dmitrieva and Gerrit de Vynck
    Real Estate

    CPA Magazine – CPA Canada
    Susan Smith, Manon Chevalier, Rosalind Stefanac and Peter Carter
    The Immigration Issue

    Globe and Mail
    Rob Carrick, Roma Luciw, Jacqueline Nelson, Brent Jang, David Parkinson, Chris Manza and Matt Lundy
    House Poor

    Personal Finance/Investing

    Globe and Mail
    David Milstead
    Valeant Investing

    Money Sense
    Bryan Borzykowski
    Shocking Tax Tips You’re Missing Out On

    MoneySense
    Julie Cazzin, Mark Brown, Dan Bortolotti, Bryan Borzykowski, David Fielding and David Thomas
    Personal Finance Package

    Profile

    Globe and Mail
    James Bradshaw and Christine Dobby
    Blais

    BCBusiness Magazine
    Frances Bula
    Between a Rock and a Hard Place

    Report on Business Magazine
    Max Fawcett
    The Artist of the Deal

    About SABEW

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is a 50-year-old organization with more than 3,000 members across the globe. Journalists from The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, CNN and other organizations, big and small, are involved in the organization.

    About SABEW Canada

    A group of Canadian journalists launched SABEW Canada, SABEW’s first international chapter, last year. We now have more than 200 members, among them reporters and editors from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, MoneySense, Bloomberg, Canadian Press, the Wall Street Journal and more.

    SABEW Canada’s mission statement is simple: We want to define and inspire excellence in business journalism. We do that by hosting educational events with company chief executives, leading business journalists and well-known politicians, among others. We also offer teletraining to members to help improve their skills, and hold networking events where business journalists can make new connections, as well as catch up with colleagues and friends.

    For further information: Dawn Calleja at [email protected] or 416-554-6450

     

     

  • 2016 Best in Business Honorees with Judges’ Comments

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday March 17, 2017

    Airlines/Travel Large Winner

    Associated Press

    Justin Pritchard, Martha Mendoza, Scott Mayerowitz and David Koenig

    Airport Security

    This reporting team used FOIAs and persistent questions to TSA officials to produce this solid package of stories on travel security. The package is meaty, timely, and does a lot of work on an important subject. While critical of airport security and the TSA, stories also give a fair account of the agency’s challenges.

     

    Airlines/Travel Medium Winner

    The San Diego Union-Tribune

    Lori Weisberg, Daniel Wheaton and Phillip Molnar

    Airbnb: Opportunity or Nuisance?

    An excellent in-depth look at how Airbnb can sweep through neighborhoods and change the places where we live. Well done in demonstrating real-world impact.

     

    Airlines/Travel Small Winner

    Honolulu Civil Beat

    Nathan Eagle and Marina Riker

    Dying for Vacation

    Civil Beat made a compelling case that state efforts to post beach warnings and educate travelers were not sufficient to prevent 147 tourists in the last four years from drowning in waters that natives understand are dangerous. The stories identified loopholes in state regulations that allow tour operators to hire incompetent workers. Consider this high-impact lede: ”Married 32 years, Jane and Bob Jones did a lot in life together. They raised a family, served those in need and traveled when they could. They died together, too.” The story on snorkeling as a leading cause of tourist deaths was also very informative and had an arresting video. Overall, excellent reporting, writing and photography throughout.

     

    Audio Winner

    NPR News and Planet Money

    Chris Arnold, Robert Smith, Elizabeth Kulas, Uri Berliner, Neal Carruth, Bryant Urstadt and Alex Goldmark

    Wells Fargo Hustle

    NPR’s reporting on the Wells Fargo account fraud story made for a compelling read as it told the story from the perspective of a young sales staff pressured to meet unrealistic goals. This offered new insights into the scale and scope of the problem and turned the story into a human-interest piece. No one can remain stoic when listening to the interview of the young woman so stressed she describes throwing up under her desk.

     

    Audio Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg News

    Brad Stone, Aki Ito, Pia Gadkari, Magnus Henrikson, Liz Smith, Jordan Robertson, Sarah McBride, Marie Mawad and Spencer Soper

    Decrypted

    Bloomberg’s Decrypted series takes on the challenge of explaining extremely complex topics in a way that makes them accessible to listeners with no formal training in the topics explored.  The conversational nature of the work illustrates how tone can be used to lighten up the discussion of daunting subjects.

     

    Autos/Transportation Medium and Large Winner

    Fortune

    Geoffrey Smith and Roger Parloff

    Hoaxwagen

    One of the most shocking business stories of the year was the revelation that Volkswagen tampered with the emission systems of 11 million cars in order to deceive air-quality regulators. Most major publications covered the basics of the reputation-shattering scandal. Fortune’s Hoaxwagen dug deeper into the fundamental elements of the fraud. The result was a compelling narrative of the company’s history of steamrolling regulars, its ruthless win-at-all-costs culture and even how Germany’s top political leaders served as enablers by blocking or weakening emission regulations.

     

    Autos/Transportation Medium and Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg News

    Eric Newcomer, Selina Wang and Olivia Zaleski

    Uber’s Upending the Transportation Industry

    Uber’s initial success in the tech-driven ride-hailing business created breathless press coverage. But last year, cutthroat competition, high driver turnover and widening losses began to tarnish Uber’s reputation. In a series of stories with fine original reporting, Bloomberg pulled back the curtain on Uber’s darker side such as putting more cars on the road through predatory lending to drivers with poor credit ratings — or luring drivers toward leases that would have some paying double the fair market price for cars. Why would anyone sign a lease like that? Because the terms purportedly make it easier for the drivers to walk away.

     

    Autos/Transportation Small Winner

    Providence Business News

    Mary MacDonald, Eli Sherman, Mark S. Murphy and Mike Mello

    Bridges Too Far Gone

    Whether by luck or foresight, Providence Business News got in front of an issue that is now in the headlines. Its coverage showed the obstacles in replacing a crumbling and dangerous bridge, by going beyond dollars and cents to examine the impact on people living in its shadow. We commend the PBN staff for going deep on a local topic that’s not easy to cover, yet has life-or-death implications. Special kudos for the visuals, particularly the photos of the deteriorating concrete.

     

    Banking/Finance Large Winner

    International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy D.C. Bureau and the Miami Herald

    Panama Papers

    Exceptional journalism on a topic of international importance – secret, offshore companies. This masterful investigation into a complex global subject shed light on a dark and arcane corner of international finance, explaining why it matters. Terrific reporting on what will surely be taught in journalism schools for generations to come.

     

    Banking/Finance Large Honorable Mention

    CNNMoney.com

    Matt Egan

    Wells Fargo’s Broken Culture and the Devastation It Wrought

    This package of stories put flesh and blood on one of the biggest business stories of the year. The telling of the abstraction of a bank’s vile sales practices reveals the human consequences for customers and employees alike. This CNN reporter stuck with it, exposing one of the largest household banking names and the corruption it tried to hide. CNNMoney is to be applauded for its doggedness in running this one to ground.

     

    Banking/Finance Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Stephen Gandel on banking

    These stories demonstrate an array of good reporting skills — a breaking news article on a Wells Fargo executive’s bonus; an analysis of Apple CEO Tim Cook’s compensation changes; and, based on reporting that began in 2012, an article about the SEC’s decision to take a pass on Goldman Sachs’ RMBS conduct.

     

    Banking/Finance Small Winner

    Financial Planning

    Ann Marsh

    Johnny Burris investigation

    It’s no shocker that whistleblowers get into trouble with former employers. But this package sheds a light on the institutional forces working against federal investigators who sided with a JPMorgan Chase whistleblower: They got fired themselves. As a new administration gears up in Washington, it’s worthwhile to recount the struggles of investigators in the previous administration’s Labor Department. “He’s not a whistleblower guy,” one person in the story said of former Labor Department Secretary Tom Perez. The details on the firing of OSHA investigators are backed up with on-the-record takes. The story presses on whistleblower protection (or lack thereof) with good writing, excellent reporting and nice national and political context.

     

    Banking/Finance Small Honorable Mention

    AmericanBanker.com

    Kevin Wack, Dean Anason, Alan Kline and Marc Hochstein

    How Wells Fargo’s Culture Soured

    This package on the Wells Fargo crisis was revealing, deeply sourced, and authoritatively and skillfully written. Diligent reporting and a well-organized narrative provided insights into how Wells Fargo’s account-opening scandal has roots going back many years. Colorful anecdotes kept it fresh – such as former CEO who dressed up in a Yankees uniform at a sales event.

     

    Breaking News Large Winner

    Reuters

    Joseph Menn

    Yahoo Secretly Scanned Customer Emails for U.S. Intelligence

    Menn’s scoop is a rare story that pulls back the veil on how the government’s secret electronic surveillance programs operate in practice. This detailed, comprehensive reporting effort reveals not only how Yahoo came to secretly install special software on its servers, but also how that was received internally and its broader ramifications. The story was widely followed and, ultimately, had a significant impact on Yahoo, contributing to a series of factors that forced it to reduce its sale price.

     

    Breaking News Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg BusinessWeek

    Monte Reel

    Secret Cameras Record Baltimore’s Every Move From Above

    In this compelling story, Reel reveals that Baltimore residents had been under secret aerial surveillance. The program, run by a company which refined its technology in war-torn Iraq, avoided scrutiny because it was funded by a private donor, whose identity was also unmasked by Reel. The story’s flawless execution, from reporting and writing through editing and presentation, draws in readers who otherwise may have been less interested in one city’s policing methods. In its wake, officials in 11 cities launched legislative efforts to bring open debate to the use of police surveillance.

     

    Breaking News Medium Winner

    Charlotte Observer

    Rick Rothacker, Ely Portillo, Katherine Peralta, Deon Roberts and John Arwood

    PayPal Withdraws Plans for Charlotte Expansion Over HB2

    When PayPal announced it was canceling a $3.6 million North Carolina expansion, it cited a state measure to restrict the rights of LGBT individuals. The Charlotte Observer pushed out the news on Twitter and embarked on an ambitious package of stories. The team rounded up a range of perspective and insight on the issue, even managing to get PayPal’s CEO on the phone to explain his decision. The result was a breaking-news package that was smartly written, balanced and forward-looking, giving readers the context they needed to understand potential economic and political ramifications. The steady stream of tweets from the Observer’s business desk also demonstrated that the staff is in touch with how readers are consuming news.

     

    Breaking News Medium Honorable Mention

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    Jacob Barker, Lisa Brown, Bryce Gray, Jim Gallagher and Samantha Liss

    Bayer Buys Monsanto

    Monsanto’s decision to be acquired by German biotech giant Bayer was major news for St. Louis, and the Post-Dispatch responded with deep and thorough coverage of the pending deal. The newspaper’s business desk covered a range of angles, including local job impact, the outlook for Monsanto’s charitable giving, and the likelihood that the deal would burnish the seed giant’s controversial reputation. The coverage was deeply analytical and forward-looking.

     

    Breaking News Small Winner

    Iraq Oil Report

    Ben Lando, Ben Van Heuvelen, Patrick Osgood, Rawaz Tahir, Mohammed Hussein, Rebin Fatah and staff who are anonymous for their security

    Liberating Qayarah

    This package stands out for a successful blend of breaking news on the advance of Iraqi forces against the Islamic State with the human side of the story painted in memorable images such as the kids growing up covered in soot. Excellent sourcing combined with strong storytelling and concise writing left a lasting impression on the judges. In many instances, this small organization did a better job than its larger counterparts in its reporting on this major economic and political story.

     

    Breaking News Small Honorable Mention

    Crain’s New York Business

    Aaron Elstein and Jeremy Smerd

    Trump’s Middle Class Tax Break

    Smart reporting resulted in Crain’s NY Business breaking news on a topic that other news outlets were chasing. The coverage advanced the story of how billionaire Donald Trump got a tax break intended for the middle class – and resulted in a piece that stands out for its sharp but fair writing, and its engaged and approachable storytelling.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Large Winner

    Bloomberg View

    Timothy L. O’Brien

    In these columns, O’Brien explores Donald Trump’s background as a business leader and challenges some of Trump’s mythology about his career. It shows how business journalists can play an essential watchdog function to oversee powerful business leaders. The column “Will a President Trump Still Be the King of Debt?” re-examined a controversial real-estate project and explained the role of an influential ally — not Trump — in key parts of the negotiations. The judges were especially impressed by O’Brien’s column, “I Saw Trump’s Tax Returns. You Should, Too.” Trump unsuccessfully sued O’Brien and, in the legal discovery process, O’Brien saw Trump’s tax returns. While the columnist was still bound by a legal nondisclosure agreement, he managed to convey to readers that the Trump tax controversy is real and that release of Trump’s tax returns would be newsworthy. This was a unique form of reporting that required skill and courage to continue to report on an especially litigious business leader. Businesses have attempted to use litigation or the threat of it to silence the press, and O’Brien’s work shows how journalists can still move forward and inform the public.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Large Honorable Mention

    The New York Times

    James B. Stewart

    Common Sense

    Stewart’s “Common Sense” columns present a compelling and exceptionally detailed analysis of Donald Trump’s tax avoidance schemes in three deeply reported articles. Stewart pushed the news forward by describing the implications of Trump’s tax plans and how they could foster widespread tax avoidance. He also walked readers through a clear and engaging discussion of Trump’s tax loopholes. In summary: Exceptional work that was authoritative, deeply reported and cleanly written.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Peter Coy

    Coy deserves to be honored for three substantive and compelling columns on divergent subjects, showing his broad mastery of an impressively wide range of subject matter. His column on trade provided an impressive overview of the debate and poked holes in long-held beliefs. His column on blockchain technology showed how it could be a significant development in management theory. The column on Alexander Hamilton examined the cultural and political importance of Hamilton, linking Hamilton’s legacy to current issues, particularly economic nationalism, with great historical references. In summary: Coy has a real gift for explaining complex topics, brilliantly citing historical events to give his writing maximum impact.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Medium Winner

    The Atlantic

    Derek Thompson

    Thompson has knack for taking broad economic, political and social trends and turning them into incisive commentary about the state of the nation. Donald Trump’s election victory, for example, was not the result of Hillary Clinton ignoring the working class, but a battle between those supporting “pluralist social democracy” and “white nativist protectionism.” In his article “How America Lost its Mojo,” Thompson dismisses simplistic arguments from the left and right of the political spectrum as to why citizens move locations and jobs less than they used to and are less likely to start their own business. Instead, he offers a far more nuanced, in-depth assessment. And his piece “Total Inequality” offers a robust view on why neither income nor wealth inequality is sufficient to explain the many, at times multigenerational, disadvantages that poorer people suffer.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Medium Honorable Mention

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Lee Schafer

    Schafer’s mini-series on the challenges affecting mining in Minnesota impressed the judges for its knowledge, depth and focus on what recent developments mean for the state’s inhabitants.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Medium Honorable Mention

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Matt Kempner

    Unofficial Business

    Kempner has a knack for snubbing his nose at the big guns of business and politics in Atlanta – such as how taxpayers are on the hook for Georgia Power’s hundreds of millions of dollars in cost overruns on a nuclear plant; Delta’s descent into being a “petty bully” against a local theater; or the effectiveness of Mayor Reed’s program to provide 15 female entrepreneurs a year with free office space.

     

    Commentary/Opinion Small Winner

    Sarasota Herald-Tribune

    Maggie Menderski

    What’s in Store

    Menderski deftly directs her “What’s in Store” column to inform readers about what’s really in store for retailers and consumers in Southwest Florida, based on trends and changes she sees first-hand. Through her thoughtful lens, the Sarasota area becomes a microcosm of the challenges that online shopping presents to developers and brick-and-mortar retailers across the U.S. Menderski puts us on the ground floor of this painful, broad economic shift. Her story about a model store employee reminds us of what we can’t get from an online experience, while a piece about efforts to redevelop shuttered Sears stores offers hope that traditional retailers can remain relevant in this increasingly digital world. In a clear, caring, and surprisingly poetic way, Menderski has produced an important and purposeful body of work.

     

    Economics Large Winner

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jon Hilsenrath and Bob Davis

    The Great Unraveling

    During a surprising and often chaotic presidential election, The Wall Street Journal helped explain the underlying economic reasons for what was playing out in politics. Using data, graphics, economic analysis, and deep reporting, the WSJ showed the links between economic realities and voter frustrations. The reporting walked readers through the economic promises – and showed how they turned out to be so wrong for so many Americans. This is first-rate economics reporting.

     

    Economics Medium Winner

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Adam Belz

    Rising From Poverty

    The series deploys data, graphics, photography, and design very effectively — and sustains that deployment over the course of three deeply reported pieces. The theme is also surprising: Far from being a neglected place without hope and riven by opioids, rural America can be the place with the greatest prospect of social mobility. And surprise is what news is all about.

     

    Economics Small Winner

    PolitiFact

    Louis Jacobson on economics

    PolitiFact presented solid, timely analysis of economic rhetoric during a presidential campaign in which fact and fiction were hard to distinguish. Months before fact-checking candidates became a routine feature on the business page, these stories took both parties’ nominees to task for politicizing economic data. The dissection of Donald Trump’s comments about renegotiating U.S. debt was an insightful example of a complex topic explained in an accessible way, supported by multiple experts.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Large Winner

    The Financial Times

    Tom Burgis, Pilita Clark, Michael Peel, Charlie Bibby and Kari Ruth Pedersen

    Great Land Rush

    This multimedia series on the global rush to buy up land gave its audience a bit of everything — a tale with epic sweep (“from Myanmar to Saskatchewan”), parallax-scrolling web pages, graphics, maps, photos, videos, and a podcast. Even the writing was a visual feast. As the FT recounts, an Ethiopian agribusiness, Saudi Star, transformed the bush into a rice field “the size of 20,000 soccer pitches,” only to discover that “land is like the lion that prowls near Saudi Star’s farm: hard to tame.” We learn about the tycoons who would possess such lands, and the dispossessed who would have them back — peasants who feel connected to the land, in some cases, by the umbilical cords they buried there. To chronicle one of the biggest business stories of our times, three FT reporters crossed six continents and used just about every tool in a digital storyteller’s repertoire. The result is a multimedia tour-de-force that is not only outstanding journalism, it is beautiful.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Medium Winner

    San Antonio Express-News

    Jennifer Hiller

    Mood Turns Black as Oil as a Boom Turns Bust

    This piece explores the unraveling of an industry in the light of rock-bottom oil prices, with amazing breadth and depth. Hiller shows the humbling of companies and countries that are rethinking their oil strategies. It was the clear front-runner in a category with some very strong entries.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Medium Honorable Mention

    Honolulu Star-Advertiser

    Kathryn Mykleseth

    GEMS

    The jury lauded Mykleseth’s reporting on an obscure state loan program for green energy that was set to become a prototype for the entire nation.

     

    Energy/Natural Resources Small Winner

    Iraq Oil Report

    Ben Lando, Ben Van Heuvelen, Patrick Osgood, Rawaz Tahir, Mohammed Hussein, Mahmoud Zaki and staff who are anonymous for their security

    ISIS and Iraq’s Oil

    These tenacious reporters are to be credited for turning a swirl of conflicting facts in a war zone into well-sourced, actionable reports. Displaying an impressive grasp of industry and politics, the writers showed how developments in the energy sector would affect the daily lives of those in the region as well as the war against Islamic State. The use of a map helps to clarify the perilous situation for readers. Without the writers’ courage, determination, and insight, this important story might otherwise never have come to light in so intelligible a manner.

     

    Explanatory Large Winner

    Associated Press

    Nicholas Riccardi, Christopher S. Rugaber and Josh Boak

    Divided America

    This is an outstanding example of explanatory journalism. The AP team explored the vast economic divides that fractured the country and ultimately transformed the 2016 presidential election. In three stories, they detail how average isn’t typical in understanding the recovery from the Great Recession, how rural and urban America represent disparate economic realities, and who today’s immigrants really are. Divided America offers context beyond what is typically reported and sheds light on a phenomenon that helps explain the unexpected campaign success of both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. It is the epitome of explanatory journalism – revealing the story behind the story, and ultimately detailing that even the people who live next door can live in different worlds.

     

    Explanatory Large Honorable Mention

    Yahoo Finance

    Rick Newman explanatory features

    This extraordinary work details the business side of Donald Trump. Newman dissects the candidates’ assets and failings in the business world. The package includes an insightful look at the value of the “Trump” brand, which is the top source of revenue for the family business, not real estate. Also of note is the detailing of how Trump University sank itself when the project decided to ramp up the profits at the expense of learning.

     

    Explanatory Large Honorable Mention

    CNBC

    Nikhil Deogun, Jim Ackerman, Mitch Weitzner,  Reid Collins Jr., Meghan Lisson, Amber Mazzola, Patrick Ahearn, Steven T. Banton, Allison E. Stedman, Rich Korn, Justin Solomon, Charlotte Lewis, Alex Herrera, Roberto Leon, Gerry Miller, Jorge Pujol, Raul Jaramillo, Felipe Leon, Mary Murray, Orlando Matos, Odalys Garcia, Paola Larramendi, Margarita Alarcon, Carlos Bustamante, Evelyn Gruber, Veronica Albornoz, Mark Ohlsen, Christie Gripenburg, Elizabeth Kim, Rakeesha Wrigley, George Pierro, Richard Marko, Tom Russo, Angel Perez, Vito Tattoli, Victoria Todis, John Rehm, Jacqueline Dessel, Nick O’Connor, Salvatore Carosone, Lauren Ricci-Horn, Jonathan Altino, Lawrence Beer, Kyle Kinder, Jamie Bland, Julia Jester, Amanda Winograd, Erika Banoun, Annie Bryan, Aidan Kelley, Marlon Ramtahal and Erin Kitzie

    The Profit in Cuba

    Marcus Lemonis profiles everyday Cubans who are the frontier of entrepreneurism in the new Cuba. The documentary profiles entrepreneurs as they navigate obstacles: a clothing designer forced to buy fabric on the black market; a restaurant owner whose license limits him to 50 seats; and an aspiring artisan who isn’t allowed to expand her business. Woven throughout is the story of siblings who, thanks to the new law, have opened a bakery.

     

    Explanatory Medium Winner

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today

    John Fauber, Kristina Fiore and Matt Wynn

    Illness Inflation

    Who wouldn’t be interested in this story? An outstanding example of two media outlets with different audiences collaborating successfully to explain the outrageous practice of creating or exaggerating medical conditions to sell more drugs. Extremely well researched down to the amazing detail that one company admitted in a slide presentation that it created a disease from thin air. The use of graphics and sidebars helped illustrate the tale.

     

    Explanatory Medium Honorable Mention

    The Providence Journal

    Kate Bramson

    Following the People’s Money

    What is it about aging athletes and business? The paper set itself a simple goal: Find out how much Rhode Island’s investment in former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling’s failed business cost taxpayers. With exhaustive research, the paper found the answer and walked readers through the whole sorry scandal. A true explanatory gem. It showed how a strong and clear story idea coupled with dogged investigation could produce an outstanding public service story.

     

    Explanatory Medium Honorable Mention

    Quartz

    Gwynn Guilford

    Everything We Thought We Knew About Free Trade Is Wrong

    Attempting to answer one of the most vexing questions of the Donald Trump economic era: Why has support for free trade collapsed? The Quartz piece shows that while sidebars, multimedia and other story elements can help a story, if the narrative is strong enough and incredibly well written, it can hold its own. The story reached back to the origins of free trade dogma with British political economist David Ricardo and traced how theory lost its way in the real world.

     

    Explanatory Small Winner

    The Desert Sun

    Rosalie Murphy, Robert Hopwood and Christopher Weddle

    Land leasing in Palm Springs

    A series of stories educating readers on how little they understand about their own community. Half of Palm Springs, including hotels, shops, and timeshares worth a total of $2.4 billion, sits atop leased land. Those leases are doomed to expire and revert to Native American control or could fall into the hands of real-estate speculators. The reporter showed enormous enterprise in ferreting out the voluminous public records and other evidence needed to document the story. And the presentation of the package, customized for the internet, is spectacular, with an interactive map, a video feature, and panoramic photographs. The online presentation uses technology to advance the narrative, rather than just adding graphic elements for their own sake. This is everything explanatory journalism should be.

     

    Explanatory Small Honorable Mention

    Crain’s New York Business

    Aaron Elstein, Peter D’Amato and Jeremy Smerd

    Collection of explanatory stories

    Who knew a $1 billion industry was born in 1979, when a chunk of masonry fell and killed a 17-year-old college student, leading New York City authorities to mandate the use of standardized scaffolding? Who knew that every aspect of scaffolds is micromanaged by the city, making them more expensive to take down than to leave standing? Who knew that the carcinogen perchloroethylene, which we all probably thought was banned years ago, is still being used by dry cleaners and devastating the health of workers and nearby residents? Who knew that the hardest thing about ensuring that a restaurant is kosher is verifying that there are no insects in the fruits and vegetables? New York is the biggest media market in the country, if not the world. Yet the reporter was able to deliver compelling stories about slices of city life that would otherwise have been overlooked.

     

    Explanatory Small Honorable Mention

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Henry Meier

    Competitors Raise Stink Over Garlic

    One of the most unusual and surprising stories we’ve read in quite a while. The reporter not only investigates an obscure industry most people have never stopped to give a second thought to — Garlic? Are you kidding?! — but he uncovers a remarkably complex web of connections and conflicts that fuel an unofficial but effective anti-competitive scheme connecting California to New Mexico to China. The backstabbing and double-crossing wouldn’t be out of place in a Raymond Chandler novel. It’s a great reminder that behind every closed door lies an amazing story, just waiting for the right reporter to dig it out. And this story carries even more weight now that trade policy has become a priority for the federal government. It’s an illustration of how policy is established and why it won’t be easy to change.

     

    Feature Large Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Shannon Pettypiece and David Voreacos

    Walmart’s Out-of-Control Crime Problem Is Driving Police Crazy

    A tale of corporate irresponsibility with a new twist – Walmart is skimping on security, burdening local police, and putting employees and shoppers in danger. With telltale lack of cooperation from Walmart, the reporters admirably pieced together data for the story using police call logs and other sources and traveled the country to interview victims.

     

    Feature Large Honorable Mention

    Associated Press

    Hannah Dreier

    Venezuela, Life on the Line

    A story that explains Venezuela’s economic collapse through the human lens of a food line, where hunger and desperation lead to violence and “need has an ugly dog’s face.” A beautiful example of feature writing told at great risk to the reporter.

     

    Feature Large Honorable Mention

    The Wall Street Journal

    Justin Scheck

    Tramadol: The Opioid Crisis for the Rest of the World

    Through impressive on-the-ground reporting in the streets and pastures of Cameroon, Scheck tells the important story of how an unregulated opioid is wreaking havoc in the developing world.

     

    Feature Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Brian O’Keefe

    Bitter Sweets

    We felt that a strong storyline on a complex subject, on-the-ground reporting, and forward-looking elements of this piece stood out. Graphics break down the issues in vivid detail and bring the disparate elements of cultural and business conflicts into a cohesive narrative, giving Bitter Sweets the edge.

     

    Feature Medium Honorable Mention

    Fortune

    Erika Fry

    Hot Mess

    Explanatory reporting with compelling graphics in this detailed anatomy of a culture clash. The analysis of how quick noodles became a half-billion-dollar debacle for Nestle in India

    could serve as a primer for multinational businesses on how to handle and avoid crisis.

     

    Feature Medium Honorable Mention

    Houston Chronicle

    David Hunn

    Behind Apache’s oil find

    How do you find oil hiding in plain sight? This piece told the untold story of one of the largest oil and gas finds in decades. Forward-looking themes and compelling details made this entry stand out.

     

    Feature Small Winner

    Inc. Magazine

    Burt Helm, Jon Fine and Will Yakowicz

    The Stealthy Sales Kings of Amazon

    The rich details in this story about an unexplored topic, combined with skillful writing and a solid narrative structure, brought it over the top for us. It was clear that Helm had spent time on the ground at Pharmapacks getting to know how it ran and what its executives are like. He told us how quickly items move in and out of its warehouse, how much revenue it produces, and how it gets featured on Amazon by picking just the right price. There were also great quotes and information about what products are unexpectedly the biggest sellers.

     

    Feature Small Honorable Mention

    Crain’s New York Business

    Jeff Koyen and Jeremy Smerd

    In Search of the Hot Dog Millionaire

    Koyen used shoe-leather reporting to shed light on an industry whose vendors seem to be on every street corner in New York, but whose business model was not widely known. We learn that food-cart salespeople end up earning very little even if they sell plenty of dogs, because of the city’s outdated and arguably unfair system for approving necessary permits. From Hell’s Kitchen garages to Midtown street corners to the black-market permit hub of Astoria, Queens, readers move through the city to learn the costs, hassles and long hours spent trying to make a living selling hot dogs, bagels and coffee to the masses. The details and storytelling were excellent.

     

    Feature Small Honorable Mention

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

    Janet Bodnar and Kimberly Lankford

    Making a Plan for a Special Needs Child

    Lankford’s story about how families can better manage the costs and available benefits for special-needs children is a great piece of service journalism. It was also eye-opening for readers unaffected by the issue, because the reporter brought us into the lives of specific parents who are trying to make sense of the system and make sure their children get the best possible care over the long-term. Great reporting and insights.

     

    General Excellence Industry/Topic Specific Winner

    Financial Planning

    Financial Planning displayed a commitment to in-depth reporting and dynamic writing that deserves recognition. The publication covered key issues related to the people and companies in its industry and was willing to present uncomfortable truths about them. The stories also showed foresight, especially regarding the potential for changes in rules requiring advisers to act in the best interest of clients.

     

    General Excellence Large Winner

    Los Angeles Times

    The Times entry ticked all the boxes, capped by a groundbreaking investigation of how the pharma house Purdue promised 12-hour relief for its OxyContin painkiller despite knowing for decades that this claim wasn’t supported by its own research. This false claim is at least partially responsible for the surge of addiction, deaths, and overdoses linked to OxyContin and other opioids that is ravaging the United States. The other parts of the entry also were strong, notably its scoop-worthy coverage of the Wells Fargo bogus bank-accounts scandal, and its sharp and timely analysis of Verizon’s acquisition of the struggling Yahoo. The Times also showed it knows how to cover its neighborhood, delivering a fine expose on Hollywood’s sketchy cottage industry of pay-to-play child modeling. In a category with many strong submissions, the Los Angeles Times stood above the rest and did it the old-fashioned way with well-conceived story lines that it brought home through deep reporting and great storytelling.

     

    General Excellence Medium Winner

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    The Star Tribune delivered stories of both national and local importance and stood above other entries for consistently demonstrating a sustained level of excellence. The paper’s investigation of Medtronic’s concealment of a study that cast doubt on one of its flagship medical devices was rigorously documented, balanced, well-presented, and held to account both government officials and the company. The story had national significance, while the paper’s exploration of the nexus between location and social mobility localized a national trend for readers. The paper also delivered on the local level, providing Minneapolis readers with a bread-and-butter consumer watchdog report on the dangers lurking behind the city’s growing ride-sharing culture. The paper’s non-enterprise reporting, including coverage of a Minneapolis-area hotel business deal and corporate infighting at a local hearing-aid manufacturer, was timely and insightful, providing details and context on tight deadline that could easily rival larger news outlets. Across all these efforts, the Star Tribune consistently delivered quality news coverage that is worthy of the general excellence award.

     

    General Excellence Medium Honorable Mention

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    The Journal Sentinel showed exceptional reporting prowess both on a local and national scale. The story “Gaming the City’s Property System” revealed that unscrupulous Milwaukee landlords were milking decrepit rental housing for rental income while refusing to clean up housing-code violations. Then they were dumping the run-down properties in bankruptcy proceedings for the city to repossess, allowing the landlords to escape paying accumulated housing fines. The paper named the landlords, listed the money they owed, and brought the City of Milwaukee to task for turning a blind eye to the situation. In a hard-hitting report, the Journal Sentinel described how drug companies are redefining non-threatening conditions into medical “diseases” so they can sell drugs to treat them. “Binge-eating disorder” is said to afflict seven million Americans. You may be more familiar with it as overeating. Sixteen million Americans are said to be suffering from “intermittent explosive disorder,” better known as losing your temper. This story, with outstanding graphics and sidebars, also highlighted the role being played in this costly game by doctors taking drug-company money. It’s a story every American should read. The paper also produced solid stories on a local merger and a billionaire who paid no state taxes.

     

    General Excellence Small Winner

    Crain’s New York Business

    The quality, range, and impact exhibited by Crain’s New York made it the unrivaled winner in this category. The staff clearly put tremendous time and care into its stories, from the scoop on Donald Trump’s tax break to its more investigative enterprise features, to the benefit of its readers and the public at large. As one judge put it, “These are stories I haven’t read anywhere else and I thought they did an outstanding job.”

     

    General Excellence Small Honorable Mention

    Nashville Business Journal

    The Business Journal, with a lean staff, took on some big issues like income inequality in the city as it expands, while also providing well-researched scoops and analysis for its readers. Its stories appear to be told with the sort of insider knowledge that can only come from reporters who are constantly examining every facet of a city’s business community.

     

    Health/Science Large Winner

    Chicago Tribune

    Sam Roe, Karisa King and Ray Long

    Dangerous Doses

    In the most comprehensive study of its kind, the Tribune tested 255 pharmacies to see how often stores would dispense dangerous drug combinations without warning patients. This piece had it all: investigative reporting, deep sourcing, solid writing and, significantly, the power to force change. A compelling topic well covered. Congratulations.

     

    Health/Science Large Honorable Mention

    Los Angeles Times

    Melody Petersen

    Hospitals’ losing battle with superbugs

    Nice investigative work and hit the issue of hospital-borne superbugs from three very different angles.

     

    Health/Science Medium Winner

    The Sacramento Bee

    Marjie Lundstrom and Phillip Reese

    A Dangerous Mix

    The Bee shone a harsh light on a largely unseen trend toward younger, sometimes dangerous, nursing-home residents. The story zeroed in on an important issue that seemed overlooked in the regular news cycle; the reporters tracked down documents and data to prove out the thesis with hard evidence; they delved deep enough into the subject matter to understand and illuminate the likely causes; and they wove it together with personal narratives to create a compelling and impactful story.

     

    Health/Science Medium Honorable Mention

    Forbes

    Matt Herper

    The God Pill

    Herper introduces us to the God Pill – a treatment from an obscure San Diego pharmaceutical company that seeks to reverse aging. This tale focuses on colorful founder and CEO Osman Kibar. It examines his short-lived foray into poker, detailing how the engineering Ph.D. and billionaire played the game, conquered it, and then promptly quit. From those first words, Herper draws a reader into a story that centers on a fascinating character and concept, providing rich detail and careful balance throughout. Herper explains Samumed’s potential and risk without ever fawning or coming across as unfairly critical. The reader walks away informed and thoroughly entertained.

     

    Health/Science Small Winner

    STAT

    David Armstrong

    Opioid Crisis

    An engaging and groundbreaking series on one of the biggest health issues of our times, the opioid crisis. From the minutiae of the junk food needed to persuade a doctor to the harrowing tale of a young woman who died taking a legal version of a risky drug, the series combined meticulous reporting with powerful writing.

     

    Health/Science Small Honorable Mention

    Project on Government Oversight

    David S. Hilzenrath

    Drug Money

    A revealing look at the myriad ways the industry impacts drug regulation. With rigorous reporting, it shows how the industry has devised a backhanded way to influence the Food and Drug Administration, by sponsoring and participating in patient advocacy groups, and how drug regulation is impacted.

     

    Innovation Large Winner

    BuzzFeed News and BBC

    Heidi Blake, John Templon and Simon Cox

    The Tennis Racket

    “This story shocked the tennis world with tales of massive match-fixing in this multibillion-dollar sport. What made the entry remarkably innovative was that reporters from Buzzfeed News and BBC developed an algorithm that allowed them to perform in-depth data analysis of betting patterns in tens of thousands of tennis matches. The U.K. prime minister called for an independent inquiry into the scam, which demonstrated the story’s impact. This story used complex statistical analysis and good old-fashioned shoe-leather reporting that calls into question the integrity of professional tennis’s highest echelons. The results were presented in an entertaining package (especially for a data-driven project) — the analysis was accessible to the general reader, and the story itself had real impact.” Another judge adds: “Buzzfeed and BBC’s ability to combine traditional journalism, data and an algorithm was by far one of the more unique approaches I have seen. I believe their approach is one every reporter and every news organization should consider; it’s the future of journalism.” We congratulate Buzzfeed News and BBC for their outstanding achievement.

     

    Innovation Small and Medium Winner

    ProPublica and The Texas Tribune

    Neena Satija, Kiah Collier, Al Shaw, Jeff Larson and Ryan Murphy

    Hell and High Water

    This package on Houston’s vulnerability to coastal storms was very innovative, especially the way the maps interacted with the story. Overall, a strong example of public service.

     

    International Large Winner

    Reuters

    Selam Gebrekidan, Stephen Grey and Amina Ismail

    The Migration Machine

    Truly remarkable multimedia reporting on a complex problem with global implications, affecting individuals and nations. By introducing the audience to the individuals affected by the historic migration crisis, we feel the emotions of those who have found new homes, those scarred emotionally and physically, while also sharing a sense of loss for those who have died in transit while hoping to find a better life.

     

    International Large Honorable Mention

    Associated Press

    Hannah Dreier and Joshua Goodman

    Venezuela Undone

    While Venezuela’s economic and human crises are many miles away from the United States, we get a very palpable sense how inflation, the lack of an adequate food supply, and mismanagement by government and the military are taking a very human toll. Excellent reporting from the ground up, including by showing us a few of the personalities involved. One gets a sense that this breakdown in civil society could happen anywhere.

     

    International Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Erika Fry

    Hot Mess

    Hot Mess is a deeply researched, highly compelling account of how a mishandled crisis brought down a brand that Nestle started from scratch 30 years ago, and cost the company half a billion dollars. Fry went to great lengths to untangle the complicated saga by traveling to India to interview government officials and others involved in the matter, as well as to Nestle’s headquarters in Switzerland to interview the company’s CEO. She produced a beautifully written and fascinating business story that provides valuable lessons on crisis management and recovery to other multinationals, especially those operating in developing markets.

     

    International Small Winner

    The Center for Public Integrity

    Erin Quinn, Gordon Witkin, John Dunbar and Patrick Madden

    Rape, Murder, Famine – and $2.1 Million for K Street PR

    The worse a government is, the more it needs K Street, and South Sudan’s government is one of the worst. A United Nations report has identified it as a serial human-rights violator. Quinn dug in and discovered that the impoverished nation spent $2.1 million in 2014 and 2015 on Washington lobbyists and public-relations experts to stave off sanctions. Some went to the firm of Democratic Party fundraiser Tony Podesta, whose brother, John, chaired Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. Quinn enlivened her story by featuring a former Sudanese “Lost Boy” who called the fees received by K Street firms “blood money.” Her story shamed at least one lobbyist to register, as required by federal law. Patrick Madden of WAMU produced a companion radio piece.

     

    Investigative Large Winner

    BuzzFeed News

    Rosalind Adams

    Intake: Locked on the Psych Ward

    In a yearlong investigation, Adams found that Universal Health Services, the nation’s largest chain of psychiatric hospitals, routinely admitted patients and held them against their will until their insurance ran out. Adams interviewed hundreds of people, including several executives, and she dug through numerous internal documents. Ultimately, she brought to light what appears to be a dark money-making practice. In the aftermath, Iowa Sen. Charles Grassley asked the Department of Health to investigate UHS. Raymond James then lowered its rating on the company, citing Adams’ article and the federal investigation. The company’s stock dropped sharply in the aftermath. Business-impact aside, Adams put the patients affected at the forefront of her investigation, sharing personal accounts with care and attention to detail. An incredibly compelling read.

     

    Investigative Large Honorable Mention

    International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy D.C. Bureau and the Miami Herald

    Panama Papers

    The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists produced an impressive collaborative effort to expose a network of law firms and partners actively working to hide billions of dollars in wealth from tax authorities. Their work spawned dozens of investigations and reflected an amazing amount of spadework to uncover hidden connections between professional firms and their wealthy clients. The Panama Papers provided significant fuel to the populist revolt against moneyed elites worldwide.

     

    Investigative Large Honorable Mention

    The Wall Street Journal

    John Carreyrou, Christopher Weaver and Michael Siconolfi

    The Downfall of Theranos

    This team’s dogged coverage of Theranos is a case study in the power of investigative reporting. The Journal’s work exposed as a fraud a Silicon Valley startup that was worth billions, leading directly to actions by regulators to revoke the company’s license and protect consumers. Though its first story casting doubt on the rosy Theranos narrative ran in 2015, the Journal owned the story in 2016, revealing detail after detail, including the awkward fact that Rupert Murdoch lost $100 million of his own money on Theranos.

     

    Investigative Medium Winner

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Cary Spivak and Kevin Crowe

    Landlord Games

    Strong, voluminous and detailed reporting that exposed landlords with a series of code violations – a story with real, consequential impact on the lives of the most vulnerable. Judges appreciated the story’s granular focus and how it exposed both wrongdoing by individuals and government inaction. A memorable accomplishment by dogged, skilled reporters.

     

    Investigative Medium Honorable Mention

    Houston Chronicle

    Mark Collette, Matt Dempsey and Susan Carroll

    Chemical Breakdown

    This ambitious and deeply sourced project by the Houston Chronicle reveals in stunning detail the common occurrence in and around Houston of chemical hazards next to businesses, homes and schools. The reporters had to overcome government intransigence in releasing records — hiding behind fear of terrorism — but eventually were able to document a failure of government to protect the public from potential accidents. It is important work, told in an eight-part series.

     

    Investigative Medium Honorable Mention

    San Jose Mercury News

    Louis Hansen, Michelle Quinn, Karen Casto and Mike Frankel

    The Hidden Workforce Expanding Tesla’s Factory

    This exhaustive six-month investigation and digitally interactive report uncovered apparent violations of visa and labor laws at one of the world’s most sophisticated companies. Judges highlighted Hansen’s dogged reporting and research of Tesla employees’ labor conditions and the companies that help many foreign workers’ visa processes. The story — which involved conducting interviews through translators and obtaining records through state and federal Freedom of Information Act requests — gave voice to the countless foreign workers looking for a better life in America, only to be dashed by apparent injustice.

     

    Investigative Small Winner

    The Investigative Fund and The Nation

    Seth Wessler

    Dying In Private Prisons

    Wessler’s investigative series for The Nation and The Investigative Fund features extensive, solid quantitative reporting in defense of an extremely vulnerable population of people who don’t have anyone else protecting their interests, and resulted in substantial change. The package was beautifully and hauntingly displayed, and the visuals and reporting urged readers to pay attention to this important topic. The evidence of willful neglect at top levels makes it even worse.

     

    Investigative Small Honorable Mention

    ProPublica

    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Surya Mattu, Lauren Kirchner and Terry Parris Jr.

    Machine Bias

    A well-done and a convincing project on the role of algorithms in our lives. The extensive reporting and insightful data analysis uncovered the housing ad problems at Facebook, prompting changes that got a lot of attention.

     

    Investigative Small Honorable Mention

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    John Russell and Greg Andrews

    CEO Behind $500M Proposal Has Mixed Track Record

    This entry included excellent work on a local business story, detailed the checkered past of an executive at an Indianapolis startup that sought to build a $500 million medical complex. Enterprising reporting that lead to real change.

     

    Management/Leadership/Career Medium and Large Winner

    The Atlantic

    Elizabeth Samet, John Paul Rollert and Jerry Useem

    Business Leaders and the Mixed Feelings They Inspire

    The Atlantic did an excellent job of explaining broader management and corporate challenges in a way that was accessible both to newcomers to the topic and experienced managers. The managers among the judges found themselves gaining insights that helped them in their roles.

     

    Management/Leadership/Career Small Winner

    Money Magazine

    Cybele Weisser, Kerri Anne Renzulli, Megan Leonhardt and Elaine Pofeldt

    MONEYcareer

    A great package for those making career decisions, it had substance and presentation, and a highlight was the before-and-after case studies. Plus, the original findings from a study could be helpful to people at most any stage of their career or considering switching fields or jobs. As one judge said, “The career makeover sidebar is hard to look away from once you’ve started. A reminder that first impressions can be professionally defining.”

     

    Management/Leadership/Career Small Honorable Mention

    BBC Capital

    Jennifer Merritt and Ronald Alsop

    Generation Work

    A unique package of stories helpful to many readers. It offered an inclusive perspective on career moves and hiring decisions for LGBTQ individuals and others. “This package was both well-conceived and unusual,” wrote one judge. “Very relevant for our time.”

     

    Markets Medium and Large Winner

    Bloomberg Markets

    Javier Blas and Andy Hoffman

    Inside Vitol: How the World’s Largest Oil Trader Makes Billions

    This reads like a John le Carré spy novel starting with the opening scene of a drone watching over the oil executives’ flight into Benghazi. Authors Blas and Hoffman spent months poring over documents about this largely secretive company and used their reporting to spin a fascinating tale.

     

    Markets Small Winner

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Joe Cahill on Business

    Cahill’s column offers smart, counterintuitive takes on business and investing issues relevant to readers in the Chicago area and beyond. He offered a skeptical take on an IPO, questioned governance in regard to an executive’s compensation in connection with a deal, and spotted insider purchases worthy of further inspection — all without going over the top or dumbing down the issues.

     

    Media/Entertainment Large Co-Winner

    The Wall Street Journal

    Keach Hagey, Joe Flint and Amol Sharma

    The Power Struggle Inside Viacom

    With classic, well-sourced beat reporting and luminous detail, Hagey, Flint and Sharma gave readers unique behind-the-scenes insight into the tumult atop one of America’s foremost media and entertainment companies. The saga — and it can only be called a saga — of media mogul Sumner Redstone and his personal and professional legacy is powerfully engrossing, instructive and, at times, troubling. The Wall Street Journal chronicled this drama of high-stakes shifting loyalties not with breathless voyeurism but with deep reporting and trenchant analysis.

     

    Media/Entertainment Large Co-Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Max Chafkin and Sarah Frier

    Snapchat

    Bloomberg Businessweek’s prescient reporting took readers inside Snapchat long before its highly anticipated IPO. With lively quotes, elegant writing and sweeping analysis, the stories explain what writer Chafkin himself called the media property “everyone wants a piece of but no one quite understands.” More than that, though, the stories are a larger examination of the new influence economy, where personalities can catapult to fame and fortune by racking up “likes,” trailing the often-baffled legacy media behind them. These stories not only take a hard look at the industry’s hottest challenger to Facebook but also explains to the “olds” — in charming, readable language — why Snapchat is so appealing to its young users.

     

    Media/Entertainment Small and Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Peter Elkind with Marty Jones

    Disturbing Decline of Sumner Redstone

    This gripping and clear-eyed account of a complicated corporate saga — and a generational family drama — combines sweeping big-picture perspective with detailed reporting. A very enjoyable and informative read, and one that manages to stand out on a topic that has received extensive coverage.

     

    Personal Finance Large Winner

    The New York Times

    Tara Siegel Bernard and Ron Lieber

    Public Sacrifice

    Bernard and Lieber did a masterful job of weaving together evidence, personal stories and advice — while translating mountains of jargon into plain English — to uncover a personal finance disgrace: the often-awful investments that teachers and employees of religious and other non-profit entities who advance the public good are forced to make through their 403(b) plans. They showed how federal disclosure rules for these accounts are much worse than for 401(k) plans, that fees are often outrageously high, and that employees can get socked with ridiculously high charges if they take their money out of some of these accounts early because they are in annuities from insurers. Their work highlights the “P” in personal finance by providing us with a case study of accountability journalism.

     

    Personal Finance Medium Winner

    Slate

    Helaine Olen

    Ask the Bills

    Ask the Bills column offers practical advice in a sympathetic tone, answering real questions for real people. It stood out from the crowded field for a mix of style, wit and value that cut through the confusion and made life’s most stressful topic, money, more accessible.

     

    Personal Finance Small Winner

    Money Magazine

    Elizabeth O’Brien, Taylor Tepper and Celeste Sloman

    The High Cost of Coping

    A well-reported and well-written look at how mental and emotional problems can not only affect one’s well-being, but also one’s finances. The reporters present practical methods for dealing with such problems within the U.S.’ confusing and often unfair health-care system.

     

    Personal Finance Small Honorable Mention

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

    Janet Bodnar, Jane Bennett Clark, Sandra Block and Kathy Kristof

    Women and Money

    A strong report on the specific financial problems facing women, relying on strong data and interviews with experts and individuals. Well-written, reported and presented.

     

    Real Estate Large Winner

    The New York Times

    Alexandra Stevenson and Matthew Goldstein

    The Housing Trap

    The New York Times work stands out because it shines a light on new kinds of questionable practices that had previously drawn little attention. It’s the kind of aggressive, in-depth reporting — with personal stories and deep digging into documents — that not only informs and warns the public but often brings new information to the regulators and legislators who can do something about it once they’re made aware.   

     

    Real Estate Medium Winner

    ProPublica and The Real Deal

    Cezary Podkul, Marcelo Rochabrun, Derek Kravitz and Will Parker

    The Rent Racket

    A very strong series about New York City’s rent stabilization system that took readers through unlawful evictions and overcharging by landlords, lax enforcement of tax-break laws by the city, and political deal-making in Albany fueled by real-estate industry campaign contributions. A database of tax-subsidized buildings in New York and other graphical and video elements made the story stand out as an exceptional public service.

     

    Real Estate Medium Honorable Mention

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Cary Spivak and Kevin Crowe

    Landlord Games

    A deeply reported series that revealed in startling detail how a number of landlords in Milwaukee argued they lacked the money to pay fines and tax penalties, while collecting rents, neglecting building repairs, and paying cash for more properties at foreclosure auctions.

     

    Real Estate Small Winner

    The Desert Sun

    Rosalie Murphy, Robert Hopwood and Christopher Weddle

    Land leasing in Palm Springs

    This entry was a standout, taking a deep dive into a complex topic about leased land, with engaging writing, clear subsections, and quotes from a wide variety of relevant sources. We were particularly taken with the visual aids, photos, and interactive map. We found the points of view of the many stakeholders (members of the tribe, homeowners, land owners, business owners) were presented objectively.

     

    Real Estate Small Honorable Mention

    Puget Sound Business Journal

    Marc Stiles on real estate

    One of our judges said this entry does exactly what you want a small publication to do — take something local and tie it to a larger national or global trend. We felt we got to know Seattle through these pieces; we weren’t alienated even though we’re all outsiders, while we felt the pieces were also eye-opening for local residents. We noted the engaging writing style, and good visuals and reporting. One judge noted the Yesler Terrace piece tackled an important topic, the tension that arises when developers move in on low-income housing, by putting human faces on the issue.

     

    Retail Large Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    David Ingold and Spencer Soper

    Three stories about Amazon Prime

    An impressive series of stories that exposed Amazon.com’s failure to offer its popular same-day delivery service to predominately black ZIP codes in major cities around the country. The use of complex data to tell an important story is impressive, and the presentation, with detailed but easy-to-understand graphics, is impeccable. The end result was a compelling report that had almost instantaneous impact. Senators immediately called for change, and Amazon quickly expanded its same-day delivery services.

     

    Retail Medium Winner

    Fortune

    Phil Wahba on retail

    Sharp and elegantly written portraits of J.C. Penney CEO Marvin Ellison, as he fights an uphill battle shrewdly and gracefully, and Ulta chief Mary Dillon, the head of a beauty retailer with a $16 billion market cap who grew up blue collar and now needs to raise her brand’s prestige. And, through David Simon, we get a proper education in the state of the American mall in a couple thousand words. The stories’ angles are subtle and judicious, more than they are surprising. It’s also nice to get so close to one of only five African-American CEOs in the Fortune 500 and to a woman at the helm of a singular company like Ulta.

     

    Retail Small Winner

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King and David Bourne

    Designing a Future

    This feature on the University of Oregon’s program that teaches students how to take sports products from concept to the consumer featured clean writing, a depth indicative of good knowledge of subject matter, and good art and layout. It was a good piece, from the standpoint of both craft and presentation.

     

    Small Business Winner

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    Hayleigh Colombo

    E-cigarette Players Fume Over Favored Security Firm

    Demonstrating painstaking commitment to a troubling story, the Indianapolis Business Journal highlighted the connection between new rules for the fast-growing vaping industry in Indiana and one particular security company that benefited from them. Judges were impressed by IBJ’s sustained effort, which connected the dots with diligence and fairness. Over time, this reporting provided readers with a comprehensive account of how government rule-making benefited one small business at the expense of several. It was a model for how steady, tough-minded coverage pays off.

     

    Students – Professional Publications Winner

    Dallas Morning News and University of North Texas

    Dalton LaFerney

    The Rise and Fall of the Frack Master

    The reporter showed significant initiative in diving deeper into this story to find out how the “Frack Master” turned himself into a sought-after TV source. The story does a good job of showing how the subject portrayed himself as an expert while having little relevant industry experience. All in all, a nice job of getting the story behind the story.

     

    Students – Professional Publications Honorable Mention

    The Wall Street Journal and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Sarah E. Chaney

    Bankruptcy Becomes an Option for Some Borrowers Burdened by Student Loans

    A hard news story that breaks new ground, which is a nice achievement for an intern on the bankruptcy beat. Student loan debt is of huge interest right now, so this story is one that could have ramifications. Nicely done.

     

     

    Students – Student Publications Winner

    Washington and Lee University

    Athena Cao, Zebrina Edgerton-Maloy and Logan Hendrix

    Borrowing Trouble

    This examination of payday loans was through, including in-depth financial details from a borrower (the audio was an added bonus) and the differing perspectives of financial regulators, advocates, and payday-loan executives. Excellent use of statistics. This high-impact project was well-organized and clearly written.

     

    Students – Student Publications Honorable Mention

    University of Maryland

    Brittany Britto

    Purple Line: A Divided Rail

    This fascinating look at the potential impact of a new mass-transit line puts readers in the picture with powerful prose and photography. A wise decision to tell the story in chapters about the groups most affected by the line. Robust reporting and masterful writing.

     

    Students – Student Publications Honorable Mention

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Joe Baglio, Elizabeth Fleischer, Elizabeth Harvell, Natalie Hoberman, Lauren Hong, Lauren Thomas, Evanne Timberlake, Justina Vasquez, Hailey Waller and Wei Zhou

    North Carolina Business News Wire

    Every state would benefit from having a business news wire like this one. UNC-Chapel Hill students are filling a real need, particularly in the areas of breaking news and coverage of public companies. This effort is to be commended, and the judges hope other journalism departments/schools will follow UNC-Chapel Hill’s lead.

     

    Technology Large Winner

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Monte Reel and Robert Kolker

    Surveillance: The Private-Sector War on Privacy

    A fascinating read, this entry was beautifully written and expertly reported from all angles. Very thorough reporting on a complex subject affecting all levels of society. This project did an excellent job highlighting the dilemma posed by new technology and the competing interests of privacy versus public safety.

     

    Technology Medium Winner

    Forbes.com

    Matt Drange

    Selling Guns on Facebook a Problem Even Facebook Can’t Solve

    Drange’s comprehensive series is a stellar example of watchdog journalism and beat reporting in the modern journalism world. Drange refused to take Facebook’s vow to stop private gun sales at face value, delving deeply into the social network’s online gun community to show how the company’s policy was playing out in practice. It also showed how Facebook is encountering complicated problems as it becomes a social-media behemoth. Drange’s reporting, including deft use of social media itself, showed how easy it was to sell guns on Facebook, and how difficult it was to stop the activity. When Facebook announced a ban, he checked, and revealed it wasn’t working. He interacted with secret groups of gun owners, shedding light on their tactics to constantly stay ahead of the game, and illuminated a key engineer at Facebook involved in the issue. Peers in the media lauded Drange’s persistent reporting, a senator opened a formal inquiry, and Facebook had to take further action.

     

    Technology Medium Honorable Mention

    Fusion.net

    Kashmir Hill

    How an Internet Mapping Glitch Turned a Random Kansas Farm Into a Digital Hell

    Hill gets a nod for a delightful tech mystery that she helped track down and fix. Residents of a remote farm in Kansas couldn’t figure out why they were accused of criminal activities and harassed by angry people and law enforcement officials for a decade, until Hill decided to investigate. New technology coupled with good old-fashioned reporting skills led her to the offender: an internet mapping glitch! The company, which hadn’t even realized it was responsible for the problem, agreed to take corrective measures that would finally bring respite to the people on the Kansas farm and other places affected by a similar problem.

     

    Technology Small Winner

    The Center for Public Integrity

    Allan Holmes, Ben Wieder, Eleanor Bell Fox, Chris Zubak-Skees and Gordon Witkin

    Broadband Inequality

    An incredibly informative package that shed light on an issue many people may not be aware of. It was also a novel take on technology – the societal and economic impact of the internet, something that doesn’t get as much attention as it should. It was well-researched, the real-person accounts were compelling, and the data was enlightening and, at times, shocking. An outstanding piece overall.

     

    Technology Small Honorable Mention

    Gizmodo

    Michael Nunez

    Facebook’s Identity Crisis

    Gizmodo’s series of stories on alleged bias appearing on Facebook’s news feed and on how Facebook treats its contract news editors stood out for its exceptional original reporting and scope. While we may never know the real impact that the social-media platform had on voters’ perceptions, no one can deny that it played an important role in the 2016 election and will continue to have an impact going forward. Gizmodo surfaced deep concerns and details about bias on the Facebook news feed that resulted in the company’s leadership having to address them publicly and make internal changes to its processes. Since 1 billion people use Facebook and pay attention to its feed, Gizmodo’s reporting impacted much more than the company, and deserves to be rewarded for its journalism.

     

    Video Large Winner

    The Financial Times

    Kathrin Hille, Vanessa Kortekaas, Steve Ager and Russell Birkett

    Frozen Dreams: Russia’s Arctic Obsession

    The Financial Times takes viewers to Russia’s northern arctic coast where residents hope a new shipping lane, opened by global warming, will bring prosperity to this frozen, remote region. Weaving in remarkable imagery, poignant characters, and compelling graphics, the video represents the best of digital video. It is more than informative. It’s illuminating.

     

    Video Large Honorable Mention

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Ashlee Vance

    Hello World

    The series takes viewers deep into unique tech scenes in places other than Silicon Valley: Japan to meet robot inventors, Los Angeles to visit the designer of a flying car, and Russia to meet the “techno oligarchs” building its internet. Host Ashlee Vance has a light touch as he casts the skeptical eye of a journalist on the tech wonders he finds along the way. The entertaining series is big budget, high quality and showcases how vibrant, entertaining and informative web video can be.

     

    Video Small and Medium Winner

    Weather.com and Telemundo Network

    Gregory Gilderman, Neil Katz, Shawn Efran and Marisa Venegas

    The Source and Cosecha de Miseria (Harvest of Misery)

    This story did what great investigations do best – it exposed a supposedly “benevolent” effort as a sham. We felt that it was a brilliantly reported and brilliantly shot piece. We greatly appreciated the combination of extensive research, old-fashioned shoe-leather reporting (including deep in the jungle), and smart interviewing that not only uncovered child labor in Mexico’s coffee industry but revealed that it was also tolerated. The reporters and producers then went the extra step to go back to the original source to present their findings and offer them a chance to respond to the allegations. We also appreciated the tone of the piece. It didn’t make assumptions or shout “Gotcha!” It simply presented the facts in a measured way for maximum impact. This is quality journalism at its best.

  • 2016 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday March 17, 2017

    AIRLINES/TRAVEL – Large

    Winner: Associated Press; Justin Pritchard, Martha Mendoza, Scott Mayerowitz and David Koenig; Airport Security

    AIRLINES/TRAVEL – Medium

    Winner: The San Diego Union-Tribune; Lori Weisberg, Daniel Wheaton and Phillip Molnar; Airbnb: Opportunity or Nuisance?

    AIRLINES/TRAVEL – Small

    Winner: Honolulu Civil Beat; Nathan Eagle and Marina Riker; Dying for Vacation

    AUDIO

    Winner: NPR News and Planet Money; Chris Arnold, Robert Smith, Elizabeth Kulas, Uri Berliner, Neal Carruth, Bryant Urstadt and Alex Goldmark; Wells Fargo Hustle

    Honorable Mention: Bloomberg News; Brad Stone, Aki Ito, Pia Gadkari, Magnus Henrikson, Liz Smith, Jordan Robertson, Sarah McBride, Marie Mawad and Spencer Soper; Decrypted

    AUTOS/TRANSPORTATION – Medium and Large

    Winner: Fortune; Geoffrey Smith and Roger Parloff; Hoaxwagen

    Honorable Mention: Bloomberg News; Eric Newcomer, Selina Wang and Olivia Zaleski; Uber’s Upending the Transportation Industry

    AUTOS/TRANSPORTATION – Small

    Winner: Providence Business News; Mary MacDonald, Eli Sherman, Mark S. Murphy and Mike Mello; Bridges Too Far Gone

    BANKING/FINANCE – Large

    Winner: International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy D.C. Bureau and the Miami Herald; Panama Papers

    Honorable Mention: CNNMoney.com; Matt Egan; Wells Fargo’s Broken Culture and the Devastation It Wrought

    BANKING/FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: Fortune; Stephen Gandel on banking

    BANKING/FINANCE – Small

    Winner: Financial Planning; Ann Marsh; Johnny Burris investigation

    Honorable Mention: AmericanBanker.com; Kevin Wack, Dean Anason, Alan Kline and Marc Hochstein; How Wells Fargo’s Culture Soured

    BREAKING NEWS – Large

    Winner: Reuters; Joseph Menn; Yahoo Secretly Scanned Customer Emails for U.S. Intelligence

    Honorable Mention: Bloomberg BusinessWeek; Monte Reel; Secret Cameras Record Baltimore’s Every Move From Above

    BREAKING NEWS – Medium

    Winner: Charlotte Observer; Rick Rothacker, Ely Portillo, Katherine Peralta, Deon Roberts and John Arwood; PayPal Withdraws Plans for Charlotte Expansion Over HB2

    Honorable Mention: St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Jacob Barker, Lisa Brown, Bryce Gray, Jim Gallagher and Samantha Liss; Bayer Buys Monsanto

    BREAKING NEWS – Small

    Winner: Iraq Oil Report; Ben Lando, Ben Van Heuvelen, Patrick Osgood, Rawaz Tahir, Mohammed Hussein, Rebin Fatah and staff who are anonymous for their security; Liberating Qayarah

    Honorable Mention: Crain’s New York Business; Aaron Elstein and Jeremy Smerd; Trump’s Middle Class Tax Break

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg View, Timothy L. O’Brien

    Honorable Mention: The New York Times; James B. Stewart; Common Sense

    Honorable Mention: Bloomberg Businessweek, Peter Coy

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Medium

    Winner: The Atlantic; Derek Thompson

    Honorable Mention: Minneapolis Star Tribune; Lee Schafer

    Honorable Mention: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Matt Kempner; Unofficial Business

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Small

    Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune; Maggie Menderski; What’s in Store

    ECONOMICS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal; Jon Hilsenrath and Bob Davis; The Great Unraveling

    ECONOMICS – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune; Adam Belz; Rising From Poverty

    ECONOMICS – Small

    Winner: PolitiFact; Louis Jacobson on economics

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Large

    Winner: The Financial Times; Tom Burgis, Pilita Clark, Michael Peel, Charlie Bibby and Kari Ruth Pedersen; Great Land Rush

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Medium

    Winner: San Antonio Express-News; Jennifer Hiller; Mood Turns Black as Oil as a Boom Turns Bust

    Honorable Mention: Honolulu Star-Advertiser; Kathryn Mykleseth; GEMS

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Small

    Winner: Iraq Oil Report; Ben Lando, Ben Van Heuvelen, Patrick Osgood, Rawaz Tahir, Mohammed Hussein, Mahmoud Zaki and staff who are anonymous for their security; ISIS and Iraq’s Oil

    EXPLANATORY – Large

    Winner: Associated Press; Nicholas Riccardi, Christopher S. Rugaber and Josh Boak; Divided America

    Honorable Mention: Yahoo Finance; Rick Newman explanatory features

    Honorable Mention: CNBC; Nikhil Deogun, Jim Ackerman, Mitch Weitzner,  Reid Collins Jr., Meghan Lisson, Amber Mazzola, Patrick Ahearn, Steven T. Banton, Allison E. Stedman, Rich Korn, Justin Solomon, Charlotte Lewis, Alex Herrera, Roberto Leon, Gerry Miller, Jorge Pujol, Raul Jaramillo, Felipe Leon, Mary Murray, Orlando Matos, Odalys Garcia, Paola Larramendi, Margarita Alarcon, Carlos Bustamante, Evelyn Gruber, Veronica Albornoz, Mark Ohlsen, Christie Gripenburg, Elizabeth Kim, Rakeesha Wrigley, George Pierro, Richard Marko, Tom Russo, Angel Perez, Vito Tattoli, Victoria Todis, John Rehm, Jacqueline Dessel, Nick O’Connor, Salvatore Carosone, Lauren Ricci-Horn, Jonathan Altino, Lawrence Beer, Kyle Kinder, Jamie Bland, Julia Jester, Amanda Winograd, Erika Banoun, Annie Bryan, Aidan Kelley, Marlon Ramtahal and Erin Kitzie; The Profit in Cuba

    EXPLANATORY – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today; John Fauber, Kristina Fiore and Matt Wynn; Illness Inflation

    Honorable Mention: The Providence Journal; Kate Bramson; Following the People’s Money

    Honorable Mention: Quartz; Gwynn Guilford; Everything We Thought We Knew About Free Trade Is Wrong

    EXPLANATORY – Small

    Winner: The Desert Sun; Rosalie Murphy, Robert Hopwood and Christopher Weddle; Land leasing in Palm Springs

    Honorable Mention: Crain’s New York Business; Aaron Elstein, Peter D’Amato and Jeremy Smerd; Collection of explanatory stories

    Honorable Mention: Los Angeles Business Journal; Henry Meier; Competitors Raise Stink Over Garlic

    FEATURE – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg Businessweek; Shannon Pettypiece and David Voreacos; Walmart’s Out-of-Control Crime Problem Is Driving Police Crazy

    Honorable Mention: Associated Press; Hannah Dreier; Venezuela, Life on the Line

    Honorable Mention: The Wall Street Journal; Justin Scheck; Tramadol: The Opioid Crisis for the Rest of the World

    FEATURE – Medium

    Winner: Fortune; Brian O’Keefe; Bitter Sweets

    Honorable Mention: Fortune; Erika Fry; Hot Mess

    Honorable Mention: Houston Chronicle; David Hunn; Behind Apache’s oil find

    FEATURE – Small

    Winner: Inc. Magazine; Burt Helm, Jon Fine and Will Yakowicz; The Stealthy Sales Kings of Amazon

    Honorable Mention: Crain’s New York Business; Jeff Koyen and Jeremy Smerd; In Search of the Hot Dog Millionaire

    Honorable Mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Janet Bodnar and Kimberly Lankford; Making a Plan for a Special Needs Child

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE INDUSTRY/TOPIC SPECIFIC

    Winner: Financial Planning

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Honorable Mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Small

    Winner: Crain’s New York Business

    Honorable Mention: Nashville Business Journal

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Large

    Winner: Chicago Tribune; Sam Roe, Karisa King and Ray Long; Dangerous Doses

    Honorable Mention: Los Angeles Times; Melody Petersen; Hospitals’ losing battle with superbugs

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Medium

    Winner: The Sacramento Bee; Marjie Lundstrom and Phillip Reese; A Dangerous Mix

    Honorable Mention: Forbes; Matt Herper; The God Pill

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Small

    Winner: STAT; David Armstrong; Opioid Crisis

    Honorable Mention: Project on Government Oversight; David S. Hilzenrath; Drug Money

    INNOVATION – Large

    Winner: BuzzFeed News and BBC; Heidi Blake, John Templon and Simon Cox; The Tennis Racket

    INNOVATION – Small and Medium

    Winner: ProPublica and The Texas Tribune; Neena Satija, Kiah Collier, Al Shaw, Jeff Larson and Ryan Murphy; Hell and High Water

    INTERNATIONAL – Large

    Winner: Reuters; Selam Gebrekidan, Stephen Grey and Amina Ismail; The Migration Machine

    Honorable Mention: Associated Press; Hannah Dreier and Joshua Goodman; Venezuela Undone

    INTERNATIONAL – Medium

    Winner: Fortune; Erika Fry; Hot Mess

    INTERNATIONAL – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity; Erin Quinn, Gordon Witkin, John Dunbar and Patrick Madden; Rape, Murder, Famine – and $2.1 Million for K Street PR

    INVESTIGATIVE – Large

    Winner: BuzzFeed News; Rosalind Adams; Intake: Locked on the Psych Ward

    Honorable Mention: International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy D.C. Bureau and the Miami Herald; Panama Papers

    Honorable Mention: The Wall Street Journal; John Carreyrou, Christopher Weaver and Michael Siconolfi; The Downfall of Theranos

    INVESTIGATIVE – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Cary Spivak and Kevin Crowe; Landlord Games

    Honorable Mention: Houston Chronicle; Mark Collette, Matt Dempsey and Susan Carroll; Chemical Breakdown

    Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News; Louis Hansen, Michelle Quinn, Karen Casto and Mike Frankel; The Hidden Workforce Expanding Tesla’s Factory

    INVESTIGATIVE – Small

    Winner: The Investigative Fund and The Nation; Seth Wessler; Dying In Private Prisons

    Honorable Mention: ProPublica; Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Surya Mattu, Lauren Kirchner and Terry Parris Jr.; Machine Bias

    Honorable Mention: Indianapolis Business Journal; John Russell and Greg Andrews; CEO Behind $500M Proposal Has Mixed Track Record

    MANAGEMENT/LEADERSHIP/CAREER – Medium and Large

    Winner: The Atlantic; Elizabeth Samet, John Paul Rollert and Jerry Useem; Business Leaders and the Mixed Feelings They Inspire

    MANAGEMENT/LEADERSHIP/CAREER – Small

    Winner: Money Magazine; Cybele Weisser, Kerri Anne Renzulli, Megan Leonhardt and Elaine Pofeldt; MONEYcareer

    Honorable Mention: BBC Capital; Jennifer Merritt and Ronald Alsop; Generation Work

    MARKETS – Medium and Large

    Winner: Bloomberg Markets; Javier Blas and Andy Hoffman; Inside Vitol: How the World’s Largest Oil Trader Makes Billions

    MARKETS – Small

    Winner: Crain’s Chicago Business; Joe Cahill on Business

    MEDIA/ENTERTAINMENT – Large

    Co-winner: The Wall Street Journal; Keach Hagey, Joe Flint and Amol Sharma; The Power Struggle Inside Viacom

    Co-winner: Bloomberg Businessweek; Max Chafkin and Sarah Frier; Snapchat

    MEDIA/ENTERTAINMENT – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune; Peter Elkind with Marty Jones; Disturbing Decline of Sumner Redstone

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times; Tara Siegel Bernard and Ron Lieber; Public Sacrifice

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: Slate; Helaine Olen; Ask the Bills

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Small

    Winner: Money Magazine; Elizabeth O’Brien, Taylor Tepper and Celeste Sloman; The High Cost of Coping

    Honorable Mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Janet Bodnar, Jane Bennett Clark, Sandra Block and Kathy Kristof; Women and Money

    REAL ESTATE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times; Alexandra Stevenson and Matthew Goldstein; The Housing Trap

    REAL ESTATE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica and The Real Deal; Cezary Podkul, Marcelo Rochabrun, Derek Kravitz and Will Parker; The Rent Racket

    Honorable Mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Cary Spivak and Kevin Crowe; Landlord Games

    REAL ESTATE – Small

    Winner: The Desert Sun: Rosalie Murphy, Robert Hopwood and Christopher Weddle: Land leasing in Palm Springs

    Honorable Mention: Puget Sound Business Journal; Marc Stiles on real estate

    RETAIL – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg Businessweek; David Ingold and Spencer Soper; Three stories about Amazon Prime

    RETAIL – Medium

    Winner: Fortune; Phil Wahba on retail

    RETAIL – Small

    Winner: Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal; Bill King and David Bourne; Designing a Future

    SMALL BUSINESS

    Winner: Indianapolis Business Journal; Hayleigh Colombo; E-cigarette Players Fume Over Favored Security Firm

    STUDENTS – Professional Publications

    Winner: Dallas Morning News and University of North Texas; Dalton LaFerney; The Rise and Fall of the Frack Master

    Honorable Mention: The Wall Street Journal and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Sarah E. Chaney; Bankruptcy Becomes an Option for Some Borrowers Burdened by Student Loans

    STUDENTS – Student Publications

    Winner: Washington and Lee University; Athena Cao, Zebrina Edgerton-Maloy and Logan Hendrix; Borrowing Trouble

    Honorable Mention: University of Maryland; Brittany Britto; Purple Line: A Divided Rail

    Honorable Mention: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Joe Baglio, Elizabeth Fleischer, Elizabeth Harvell, Natalie Hoberman, Lauren Hong, Lauren Thomas, Evanne Timberlake, Justina Vasquez, Hailey Waller and Wei Zhou; North Carolina Business News Wire

    TECHNOLOGY – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg Businessweek; Monte Reel and Robert Kolker; Surveillance: The Private-Sector War on Privacy 

    TECHNOLOGY – Medium

    Winner: Forbes.com; Matt Drange; Selling Guns on Facebook a Problem Even Facebook Can’t Solve

    Honorable Mention: Fusion.net; Kashmir Hill; How an Internet Mapping Glitch Turned a Random Kansas Farm Into a Digital Hell

    TECHNOLOGY – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity; Allan Holmes, Ben Wieder, Eleanor Bell Fox, Chris Zubak-Skees and Gordon Witkin; Broadband Inequality

    Honorable Mention: Gizmodo; Michael Nunez; Facebook’s Identity Crisis

    VIDEO – Large

    Winner: The Financial Times; Kathrin Hille, Vanessa Kortekaas, Steve Ager and Russell Birkett; Frozen Dreams: Russia’s Arctic Obsession

    Honorable Mention: Bloomberg Businessweek; Ashlee Vance; Hello World

    VIDEO – Small and Medium

    Winner: Weather.com and Telemundo Network; Gregory Gilderman, Neil Katz, Shawn Efran and Marisa Venegas; The Source and Cosecha de Miseria (Harvest of Misery)

  • Labor Secretary defends new overtime regulation

    Posted By sabew on Friday May 20, 2016

    Labor secretary

    “There’s no freedom in working for free,” said Labor Secretary Thomas Perez during a talk Friday moderated by Bernie Kohn, weekend managing editor at Bloomberg News, at the SABEW 2016 annual conference. (Kat Lonsdorf/Medill)

    By Katie Murar
    Medill News Service

    Labor Secretary Thomas Perez claimed the new overtime regulation announced earlier this week will level the playing field for middle class workers.

    “I’m very proud of the new regulation, and it’s going to potentially help millions of workers become the middle class managers that they are,” said Perez, speaking Friday at the SABEW 2016 annual conference in Washington, D.C.

    The Labor Department issued the new regulation on Wednesday, which will require employers to grant time-and-a-half overtime pay when salaried workers earning up to $47,476 a year exceed 40 hours of work in a week. This is more than double the previous threshold of $23,660, which was set in 2004. The rule will take effect on Dec. 1.

    In the discussion moderated by Bernie Kohn, weekend managing editor at Bloomberg News, Perez said two ways that workers will benefit from the regulation is through more money and time.

    “Some workers will see more money if their salary is raised to surpass the threshold, and some people will see the benefit of time” Perez said. “If someone working 70 hours a week right now is making $30,000 a year, that person who is working 30 hours for free will get the gift of time.”

    Michael Lustig, audience member and editor at S&P Global Market Intelligence, said the possibility of fewer work hours will be a benefit for employees.

    “It’s certainly good to hear from the source the desired impact of the regulation,” Lustig said. “The extra time may be extremely beneficial for someone with a family to take care of, and it would be more time to invest in your family or community life, which is certainly a benefit that many recognize as valuable.”

    Addressing the argument of hourly cuts, Perez claimed fewer hours is a good thing and will bring more people into the work force.

    “More people are going to have to be hired to fill in, or the existing workers are going to get more hours,” Perez said.

    On the topic of income inequality, Kohn referenced a new AFL-CIO study that claimed CEOs made 335 times more than the average employee salary last year. In response, Perez claimed the administration is “fighting this battle on many fronts.”

    “In order to level the playing field, we need to increase federal paid leave,” Perez said. “Canada has more women in the work force because they have invested in paid leave. If we had kept pace with Canada over the last 15 years on female labor force participation, we would have 5.5 million more women in the workplace.”

    Kohn also referenced the mass deportation proposals that have been brought up in the recent political election, which Perez described as “ridiculous propositions” that would not become a reality.

    “What will happen next year, and I say this with confidence, is comprehensive immigration reform,” Perez said. “Demonizing the largest growing population in America is dumb politics, and against American values.”

    Perez also addressed the possibility of running for vice president by tamping down the rumors.

    “I have not been approached and I love my day job,” he said.

    Labor Secretary 2

    Labor Secretary Thomas Perez speaks Friday with Bernie Kohn, weekend managing editor at Bloomberg News, during the SABEW 2016 annual conference. (Kat Lonsdorf/Medill)

  • 2015 Best in Business Honoree List

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday March 17, 2016

    DIGITAL BREAKING NEWS – Division 2

    Winner: Jason Del Rey, Kurt Wagner, Kara Swisher, Re/code, for “Jack Dorsey’s Third Act”

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY – Division 1

    Winner: Rob Cox, Reuters Breakingviews, for blog commentary on the firearms industry.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY – Division 2

    Winner: Susan Antilla, TheStreet, for her columns
    Finalist: Rick Newman, Yahoo Finance, for his blog commentary

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY – Division 1

    Winner: Paul Kiel, Annie Waldman and Al Shaw, ProPublica, for “The Color of Debt: How Collection Suits Squeeze Black Neighborhoods”
    Finalist: Jim Morris, The Center for Public Integrity, for “Unequal Risk”

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY – Division 2

    Winner: Eric Markowitz, International Business Times, for a series on profiteering by private prison systems
    Finalist: Gwynn Guilford, Quartz, for “The Enigma Behind America’s Freak, 20-Year Lobster Boom”
    Finalist:Maggie Reardon, CNET, for “Net Neutrality”

    DIGITAL FEATURE – Division 1

    Winner: Lindsay Wise, McClatchy Washington Bureau, for “The Great Plains’ Invisible Water Crisis”

    DIGITAL FEATURE – Division 2

    Winner: Allison Schrager, Quartz, for “Secrets of the Dark Web”
    Finalist: Mike Murphy, Jacob Templin, Quartz, for “IBM’s Path Back to Greatness”

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Division 1

    Winner: Ben Lando, Ben Van Heuvelen, Patrick Osgood, Rawaz Tahir, Jamal Naji, and Iraqi staff in Baghdad and Mosul, Iraq Oil Report
    Finalist: BBC Capital Staff, BBC Capital

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Division 2

    Winner: Quartz Staff, Quartz

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE – Division 1

    Co-Winner: Neela Banerjee, John H. Cushman Jr., David Hasemyer, Lisa Song, InsideClimate News, for “Exxon: The Road Not Taken”
    Co-Winner: Michael Grabell, Howard Berkes, Lena Groeger, ProPublica/NPR, for “Insult to Injury: America’s Vanishing Worker Protections”

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE – Division 2

    Winner: Sapna Maheshwari, BuzzFeed News, for “The Dark, Scammy History of JustFab and Fabletics”

    ENERGY

    Winner: Jonathan Fahey, Holbrook Mohr, Garance Burke, David A. Lieb, Associated Press, for “U.S. Power Grid Vulnerable to Foreign Hacks”
    Finalist: Jennifer Gollan, Emmanuel Martinez, Delaney Hall, Ariane Wu, Adithya Sambamurthy, Rachel de Leon, Robert Salladay, Fernando Diaz and Robert Rosenthal, The Center for Investigative Reporting/Reveal, for “Death in the Bakken”
    Finalist: Neela Banerjee, John H. Cushman Jr., David Hasemyer, Lisa Song, InsideClimate News, for “Exxon: The Road Not Taken”

    GOVERNMENT

    Winner: Raquel Rutledge, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Gasping for Action”
    Finalist: Chad Livengood, Melissa Burden, The Detroit News, for “Big Three Business Tax Credits”
    Finalist: Paul LaRocco, Newsday, for “Nassau County Contracts”

    HEALTH CARE

    Winner: Chad Terhune, Melody Petersen, Los Angeles Times, for “Superbug Scope”
    Finalist: John Crewdson, David Hilzenrath, Michael Smallberg, Lydia Dennett, Charles R. Babcock, Project on Government Oversight, for “Drug Problems: Dangerous Decision-Making at the FDA”
    Finalist: Christopher Weaver, Anna Wilde Mathews, Tom McGinty, The Wall Street Journal, for “Calculated Care”

    INNOVATION

    Winner: Michael Grabell, Howard Berkes, Lena Groeger, ProPublica/NPR, for “Insult to Injury: America’s Vanishing Worker Protections”
    Finalist: Paul Ford, Bloomberg Businessweek, for “What Is Code?”

    International – Commentary

    Winner: Jonathan Braude, The Deal, for “London’s Business”

    International – Explanatory

    Winner: Alessandria Masi, International Business Times, for “Lebanon’s Refugee Economy”

    Finalist: Patrick Winn, Mark Oltmanns, David Case, Rob Harris, Lizzy Tomei, GlobalPost, for “Asia’s Meth Wars”

    International – Feature

    Winner: David Enrich, The Wall Street Journal, “The Unraveling of Tom Hayes”
    Finalist: Mimi Whitefield, Emily Michot, John Yearwood, Miami Herald, “Cuba: An Economy in Transition”

    International – Investigative

    Winner: Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, Martha Mendoza, Esther Htusan, Associated Press, for “Seafood Slaves”
    Finalist: Staff From The Center for Public Integrity’s International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, The Huffington Post and Other Media Partners, The Center for Public Integrity/Huffington Post, for “Evicted and Abandoned: The World Bank’s Broken Promise to the Poor”

    News Agencies – Commentary

    Winner: Matt Levine, Bloomberg View, for “Matt Levine on Wall Street”

    News Agencies – Explanatory

    Winner: Scot Paltrow, Reuters, “How a Small White House Agency Stalls Life-Saving Regulations”
    Finalist: Charles Levinson, Reuters, for “Wall Street’s Way”
    Finalist: Dune Lawrence, Bloomberg News, for “Free Markets with Chinese Characteristics”

    News Agencies – Investigative

    Winner: Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, Martha Mendoza, Esther Htusan, Associated Press, for “Seafood Slaves”

    Personal Finance

    Winner: Ron Lieber, The New York Times, for “Airbnb Horror Story Points to Need for Precautions”
    Finalist: Jared Bennett, Yue Qiu, Chris Zubak-Skees, The Center for Public Integrity, for “Hedge Funds Get Cheap Homes, Homeowners Get the Boot”
    Finalist: Donna Rosato, George Mannes, Alexandra Mondalek, Kate Santichen, Shayla Hunter, Money, for “Coping with Aging’s Costliest Challenge: Dementia”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Breaking News, Division 1

    Winner: Kate Bramson, Paul Grimaldi, Brian MacPherson, Tom Mooney, The Providence Journal, for “PawSox Stadium Site”
    Finalist: Kathy Lynn, Hugh Morley, Linda Moss, Melanie Anzidei, The Record (New Jersey), for “Mercedes Benz Leaves New Jersey for Atlanta”
    Finalist: Ely Portillo, David Perlmutt, Katherine Peralta, The Charlotte Observer, for “Chiquita Closing Charlotte Headquarters”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Breaking News, Division 2

    Winner: Kara Scannell, Philip Stafford and team, The Financial Times, for “Flash Crash Trader”
    Finalist: Evan Ramstad, Adam Belz, John Ewoldt, Kristen Leigh Painter, Lee Schafer, Minneapolis StarTribune, for “Target Layoffs”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Commentary, Division 1

    Winner: Daniel Howes, The Detroit News, for his columns
    Finalist: David Nicklaus, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, for his columns

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Commentary, Division 2

    Winner: Lee Schafer, Minneapolis StarTribune, for his columns on Target
    Finalist: Gary Silverman, The Financial Times, for his columns

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Commentary, Division 3

    Winner: Farhad Manjoo, The New York Times, for his columns on technologyPrint – Daily Newspapers – Explanatory, Division 1
    Winner: Marc Perrusquia, Beth Warren, Yolanda James, Kyle Veazey, Grant Smith, The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, Tennessee), for “Our Financial Mess”
    Finalist: Dan Zehr, Austin American-Statesman, for “Inheriting Inequality”
    Finalist: JD Malone, The Columbus Dispatch, for “A Year on the Farm”

    Print –Daily Newspapers – Explanatory, Division 2

    Winner: Raquel Rutledge, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Gasping for Action”
    Finalist: Jeffrey Meitrodt, Minneapolis StarTribune, for “Tragic Harvest”
    Finalist: Michael Kranish, The Boston Globe, for “Divided Nation”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Explanatory, Division 3

    Winner: Jodi Kantor, David Streitfeld, The New York Times, for “Inside Amazon”
    Finalist: David Benoit, Vipal Monga, Theo Francis, Kirsten Grind, Monica Langley, The Wall Street Journal, for “Activists Invade”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Feature, Division 1

    Winner: Tim Barker, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, for “Sustainable Farming”
    Finalist: Kristen Consillio, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, for “Medevac”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Feature, Division 2

    Winner: Michael Kranish, The Boston Globe, for “Divided Nation”
    Finalist: Molly Young, Andrew Theen, The Oregonian, for “Making It Work”
    Finalist: Mark Davis, The Kansas City Star, for “Sprint Profile”

    Print –Daily Newspapers – Feature, Division 3

    Winner: Ian Urbina, The New York Times, for “The Outlaw Ocean”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – General Excellence, Division 1

    Winner: Barbara Soderlin, Cindy Gonzalez, Russell Hubbard, Steve Jordon, Paige Yowell, Cole Epley, Janice Podsada, Pam Miller-Jenkins, Bob McDonald, Brad Davis, Omaha World-Herald

    Print – Daily Newspapers – General Excellence, Division 2

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Business News Staff, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Print – Daily Newspapers – General Excellence, Division 3

    Winner: Los Angeles Times Business Staff, Los Angeles Times

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Investigative, Division

    Winner: Jessica Floum, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Destroying the Center for Building Hope”
    Finalist: Ian James, Jay Calderon, Robert Hopwood, The Desert Sun (Palm Springs, California), for “Bottled Water From a National Forest in California”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Investigative, Division 2

    Winner: Mike Baker, Daniel Wagner, Ken Lambert, Garland Potts, Jim Neff, The Seattle Times, The Center for Public Integrity, BuzzFeed News, for “The Mobile-Home Trap”
    Finalist: Jeffrey Meitrodt, Minneapolis StarTribune, for “Tragic Harvest”
    Finalist: Cary Spivak, Thomas Content, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “CEO Caught in Ponzi Scheme”

    Print – Daily Newspapers – Investigative, Division 3

    Winner: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Michael Corkery, Robert Gebeloff, The New York Times, for “Beware the Fine Print”

    Print – Magazines – Commentary, Division 2

    Winner: Peter Coy, Bloomberg Businessweek, for his columns
    Finalist: Katherine Reynolds Lewis, Fortune, for her columns

    Print – Magazines – Explanatory, Division 2

    Winner: Peter Elkind, Fortune, for “Sony Hack”
    Finalist: Julie Segal, Institutional Investor, for “Wayback Machine”

    Print – Magazines – Feature, Division 1

    Winner: Stephen Taub, Institutional Investor’s Alpha, for “Game On”
    Finalist: Imogen Rose-Smith, Institutional Investor, for “Made In Brooklyn”

    Print – Magazines – Feature, Division 2

    Winner: Karen Weise, Bloomberg Businessweek, for “Gravity Payments’ CEO Dan Price”
    Finalist: Jason Clenfield, Bloomberg Markets, for “The Passport King”

    Print – Magazines – General Excellence, Division 1

    Winner: Glenn Hunter, Christine Perez, Hilary Lau, Matt Goodman, Lauren DeLozier, Hamilton Hedrick
    Finalist: Jeff Burlingame, 425 Business

    Print – Magazines – General Excellence, Division 2

    Winner: Bloomberg Businessweek Staff, Bloomberg Businessweek

    Print – Magazines – Investigative, Division 2

    Winner: Peter Elkind, Fortune, for “Sony Hack”

    Print – Weeklies/Biweeklies – Breaking News

    Winner: Craig M. Douglas, Greg Ryan, Catherine Carlock, Mary Moore, Boston Business Journal, for “Boston’s Bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics”
    Finalist: Erik Siemers, Portland Business Journal, for “Port of No return”

    Print – Weeklies/Biweeklies – Commentary

    Winner: Joe Cahill, Crain’s Chicago Business, for “Joe Cahill on Business”
    Finalist: Vandana Sinha, Washington Business Journal, for her commentary

    Print – Weeklies/Biweeklies – Explanatory

    Winner: Dave McKinney, Crain’s Chicago Business, for “What Went Wrong?”
    Finalist: Bill King, David Bourne, Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, for “Boxing’s Big Top”
    Finalist: Ron Leuty, James Gardner, Matt Petty, Patrick Chu, San Francisco Business Times, for “Warriors Turnaround Jumper”

    Print – Weeklies/Biweeklies – Feature

    Winner: Elizabeth MacBride, Robert Hordt, Ellie Zhu, Liz Skinner, Matt Ackermann, InvestmentNews, for “Fifty Shades of White”
    Finalist: Justine Coyne, Tim Schooley, Pittsburgh Business Times, for “Why Heinz No Longer Needs Pittsburgh”

    Print – Weeklies/Biweeklies – General Excellence

    Winner: Suzanne Stevens, Erik Siemers, Andy Giegerich, Craig Spencer, Matthew Kish, Elizabeth Hayes, Malia Spencer, Jon Bell, James Cronin, Brandon Sawyer, Steve Burton, Briana Bruijn, Mason Walker, Cathy Cheney, Portland Business Journal

    Print – Weeklies/Biweeklies – Investigative

    Winner: Matthew Kish, Portland Business Journal, for “Shell Game”
    Finalist: Matthew B.H. Ong, The Cancer Letter, for “How Medical Devices Do Harm”

    Radio/TV/Podcast – Feature/Field Report

    Winner: Nikhil Deogun, Lacy O’Toole, Justin Solomon, Brad Quick, Meghan Reeder, Morgan Brennan, Jackie DeAngelis, Phil LeBeau, Mary Thompson, Jane Wells, Jodi Gralnick, Jessica Golden, Chris Mulligan, Carolyn Milmoe, Dan Glozzy, Evan Tyler, Candice Tahi, CNBC, for “Race to Rebuild”

    Radio/TV/Podcast – Series/Investigative

    Winner: Nikhil Deogun, Andrew Ross Sorkin, Mitch Weitzner, Wally Griffith, Deborah Camiel, James Segelstein, Michael Beyman, Patrick Ahearn, Allison E. Stedman, Rich Korn, CNBC, for “White Collar Convicts: Life on the Inside”

    Real Estate

    Winner: Louise Story, Stephanie Saul, The New York Times, for “Towers of Secrecy”
    Finalist: Cezary Podkul, Marcelo Rochabrun, ProPublica, for “The Rent Racket”
    Finalist: Josh Salman, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Shortcut to the American Dream”

    Small Business

    Winner: Joel Warner, International Business Times, for “Marijuana Inc.”

    Social Media

    Winner: Anna Gonzalez, Nina Raja, Lyanne Alfaro, Sandy Maltzman, Steven Kopack, CNBC, for their social-media coverage

    Technology

    Winner: Becky Yerak, Chicago Tribune, for “Orwellian Car Insurance Patents”
    Finalist: Eric Markowitz, International Business Times, for a series on profiteering by private prison systems
    Finalist: Joseph Menn, Reuters, for “Cybersecurity Coverage”

    Student – Stories Written for Professional Publications

    Winner: Will Drabold, Ohio University E.W. Scripps School of Journalism/The Seattle Times, for “Navy Stealthily Targets Real Estate Projects”
    Finalist: Jacob Steimer, University of Missouri-Columbia/The Charlotte Observer, for “Televangelist Makes Millions”
    Finalist: Agnel Philip, Arizona State University, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Brain-Balancing Program for Disabilities, Evidence lacking”

    Student – Stories Written for Student Publications

    Winner: Raquel Blanco, Stevie Borrello, Lynn Chawengwongsa, Shannon Jones, Michael Machado, Kerry Mack, Baruch College, City University of New York, Dollars & Sense, “Cuba in 2015: Entrepreneurism on the Rise”
    Finalist: Agnel Philip, Arizona State University, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Cronkite News, “Phone Call Rates Squeeze Inmate Families, Boost State Prison Revenues”

  • SABEWNYC15 Fall Conference – Speed Networking

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday September 23, 2015

    NY Apple Statuev.3Sit down for one-on-one “lightning round” conversations with journalists, editors and recruiters during SABEW’s Speed Networking session. Students and professionals can seek career advice, brainstorm story ideas and network.

    Mentors:
    Xana Antunes, Editor for New Initiatives, Quartz
    Robert Barba, Deputy Editor, American Banker
    Nikolaj Gammeltoft, Team Leader, Bloomberg LP
    Marilyn Geewax, Senior Business Editor, Business News Desk, NPR
    Mark Hamrick, Washing Bureau Chief, Bankrate
    Danielle Hirshberg, Recruiter, Bloomberg
    Richard G. Jones, Associate Editor, News Administration, New York Times
    Michelle LaRoche, Editor, Development, The Wall Street Journal
    Josh Moss, Upstart Business Journal Editor, American City Business Journals
    Jim Pensiero, Editor, Talent, The Wall Street Journal
    Gary Silverman, National Editor and US Deputy Managing Editor, Financial Times
    Marty Wolk, Assigning Editor, NerdWallet

    Click here for more information on the mentors.

    If you are registered for SABEW Fall Conference, sign up at Mentor Speed Networking. But do it soon, these time slots will fill up quickly!

    Special thanks to Andrew Leckey, President, Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, ASU for organizing the session.

    SABEW Fall Conference special early-bird registration rates have been extended to Sept. 25! Member and nonmember early-bird rates are available only until the end of the day Friday. Purchase your Fall Conference tickets here. For SABEW’s Fall Conference schedule visit the conference page.

    Wednesday, Oct. 7, Michael R. Bloomberg receives SABEW’s Distinguished Achievement Award – Reception and award presentation from 5:30 – 8:00 p.m. at Society Generale, 245 Park Ave, 5th Floor. Tickets are $75 for members and $150 for nonmembers. Tickets can be purchased here and for more information click here.

    Thursday, Oct. 8, SABEW and NEFE Personal Finance Reporting Workshop – Free for members and only $25 for nonmembers. The workshop is from 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at TKP New York Conference Center in Midtown Manhattan. Visit the personal finance reporting workshop page for more information.

    Thursday, Oct. 8, The McGraw Symposium: Accelerating Change at the WSJ, Yahoo Finance and Bloomberg – The second annual McGraw Symposium begins with a 6:00 p.m. reception. The panel discussion is from 7:15 – 8:15 p.m. Speakers include Gerard Baker, The Wall Street Journal; Andy Serwer, Yahoo Finance; and Josh Tyrangiel, Bloomberg LP/Bloomberg Businessweek. Moderated by Jane Sasseen, Executive Director, McGraw Center for Business Journalism.

    Conference information – Contact Crystal Beasley, (602) 496-7862 or email [email protected].
    Sponsorship opportunities – Contact Renee McGivern, (651) 210-0911 or email [email protected].

  • 2014 BIB Winner’s list

    Posted By admin on Monday April 27, 2015

    Here are the 2014 BIB winners and finalists. Winners were announced at the 2014 BIB awards ceremony at SABEW’s spring conference in Chicago, April 25.  

     

    DIGITAL 

    DIGITAL BREAKING NEWS, Division 1

    Finalist- Amanda Levin, The Deal, for “Unsolicited bid puts Cleco on the block.”

    DIGITAL BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Winner- Dan Mangan, CNBC.com, for Affordable Care Act subsidies ruling coverage.

    Dan Mangan at CNBC.com was ready last July when two appeals courts issued split decisions about Obamacare subsidies. Within minutes of the July 22 ruling that ACA subsidies were unconstitutional, Mangan posted the news ahead of most other national outlets. What’s more, his story went well beyond the headline to provide analysis and context. It clearly explained the details of the very complex court decision. It was breaking news at its best.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner- Jesse Eisinger, ProPublica, for “The Trade.”

    Jesse Eisinger’s sweeping critique of the failure of the Justice Department to hold bank executives accountable for the 2008 financial crisis stands above the other entries. Eisinger’s writing is fresh and free of jargon. He offers a powerful analysis of the Obama Administration’s tepid response to financial reform, and a penetrating look at how the industry successfully pushed back against regulators. By combining unique reporting with a deep understanding of how power and influence work in Washington, Eisinger shows how Wall Street and its defenders avoided criminal liability.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner- Walt Mossberg, Re/code, for his technology columns.

    Walt Mossberg produced original and authoritative columns that overtly placed honesty and service to the reader over cheerleading and pandering. That’s a rare and welcome feat, particularly amid today’s (over)saturated tech and gadget coverage, and thus deserving of recognition.

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Finalist- Rob Hotakainen, Takaaki Iwabu, Patrick Davison, Danny Dougherty, Tish Wells, Cheryl Diaz Meyer, McClatchy Washington Bureau, for “US exporters eye Japan.”

    This series amounts to a traditional business story that’s all grown up. The anecdotal approach enables readers to grasp the bigger picture of U.S.trade with Japan piece by piece. The stories are well edited and the images, pull quotes and maps that accompany them are engaging.

    Winner- Matt Drange, Susanne Rust, Andrew Donohue, The Guardian US, The Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Toxic Trail.”

    By following a single waste stream, the story was focused enough to help readers understand the subject. The depth of reporting was impressive. The interactive elements were well placed and expanded on the narrative. The “Six Things to Know” sidebar was additive, rather than repetitive. The follow-up story showed the reporting got the kind of attention it deserved.

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Finalist– Elizabeth Gannes, Re/code, for “I want it and I want it now: The machine behind instant gratification.”

    Winner- Heesun Wee, Kevin Krim, Jeff Nash, CNBC.com, for “How millennials are shaking North Korea’s regime.”

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 1

    Winner- Eleanor Bell, Daniel Wagner, Center for Public Integrity, for “Time is Money.”

    Daniel Wagner and Eleanor Bell of The Center for Public Integrity took a deep dive into the math and mechanics of the prison-payments industry and came up with a compelling report on how financial companies are making big profits as the costs of incarceration increasingly are shifted to inmates’ families. Their report, Time is Money, exemplifies the spirit of public service journalism, showing how some of society’s more vulnerable residents are being squeezed – even though they themselves committed no crime. The center’s package harnessed the power of digital journalism through a top-notch documentary, compelling anecdotes, clear writing and helpful graphics. There’s ample evidence of tough questions and real digging throughout the package, which ultimately leads to a detailed portrait of certain government contracts, the businesses that win them and the people affected. In addition to the documentary, two accompanying reports offered deeper dives for readers who wanted to know more. Talk about impact: The Center for Public Integrity noted that regulators began investigating after their report was published. And six weeks later, Jpay, which performs money transfers for the bulk of U.S. offenders, said it had created a free way to transfer money for the families of 100,000 inmates.

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 2

    Finalist- Nellie Bowles, Re/code, for “Downtown Las Vegas is the great American techtopia.”

    Winner- Lawrence Delevingne, Kevin Krim, Jeff Nash, CNBC.com, for “The life and death of a master of the universe.”

    The judges felt this was a well-crafted, compelling story that not only presented a nuanced and sensitive portrait of prominent Africa investor Bruce Wrobel, but that also shed light on a number of important issues, including the challenges of balancing the need for infrastructure projects in Africa with environmental and cultural concerns. The story broke news, revealing Wrobel’s cause of death for the first time, and also placed Wrobel’s life, career, and suicide in a broader context.  The judges also were impressed with how beautiful photographs, graphics, videos and interactives were integrated into the story-telling, contributing to an immersive and memorable experience.

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner- The Deal Staff, The Deal

    The Deal offers coherent, well-researched news and analysis on the big topics affecting investors, including corporate hacking and the Scottish independence bid. A piece on the reality behind India’s much-hyped “pro-business” prime minister, Narendra Modi brought a nuanced assessment to what might have been the dreaded one-hand/other-hand chestnut. And by pegging a story on small business succession to the death of “American Sniper” Chris Kyle, it turned a potentially dry piece into a readable drama.

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner- Quartz Staff, Quartz

    Judges chose Quartz a second consecutive year in this category for its smart news judgement (i.e. story on absurd number of Greek pharmacists as a window on its wider troubles) and strong journalism with a view (story making the case for paternity leave), as well as appealing presentation that integrated multiple graphics, an interactive visualization of every satellite in the skies, and beautiful photos taken by airline pilots in violation of FAA rules.

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Finalist- Paul Kiel, Chris Arnold, ProPublica, National Public Radio for “The long life of debt.”

    Every health care reporter in the country should read this story. ProPublica did a great service in uncovering a practice where hospitals are going to incredible lengths to recoup money from patients. The profound effect on their lives is well-documented. This series of stories should create some change.

    Winner- Greg Gordon, Lydia Mulvaney, Deb Gruver, Paul Hampton, Tish Wells, Danny Dougherty, McClatchy Washington Bureau, for “Motorola’s lock on emergency communications equipment.”

    This series of stories is investigative journalism at its best. McClatchy uncovered Motorola’s attempts to corner the municipal public safety radio market. The work done by McClatchy was significant in uncovering contracts that were not in the taxpayers’ best interest. Instead, the stories offered strong examples, documents and more to show how Motorola has wielded influence across the country.

    We liked how the findings of the investigation and the life-and-death consequences of the monopoly it exposed were clearly laid out in the first piece and explained further throughout the series.

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Finalist- Adam Feuerstein, TheStreet, for “Galena’s good reviews.”

    Dogged, tightly focused investigation of apparent corporate misconduct; the reporter’s efforts presaged an SEC probe and likely contributed to the firing of a CEO.

    Winner- David Sirota, International Business Times, for “Public Money, Private Profits.”

    Original, tenacious reporting that displayed a mastery of scouring documents, analyzing data and holding public officials accountable. The reporter took a locally inspired topic and turned it into a nationally significant series with demonstrable impact.

    ENERGY 

    Finalist- Abrahm Lustgarten, ProPublica, for Chesapeake Energy coverage.

    These hard-hitting stories presented a fascinating look, based on intensive and enterprising reporting, at Chesapeake Energy, one of the country’s largest oil and gas companies. The stories were well organized, splendidly written, balanced, and thorough. They also were accompanied by clear and interesting art that helped clarify key points and that provided important background and context for non-experts.

    Finalist- Bruce Henderson, The Charlotte Observer, for energy coverage.

    Through a series of stories that continue to this day, The Charlotte Observer thoughtfully and persistently examined the potential impact of a coal-ash spill that put the drinking water for thousands at risk. In doing so, reporter Bruce Henderson revealed the prevalence of coal ash–and its toxic components–in the region and raised questions about the information utilities were allowed to keep hidden. The reporting helped spur a broad debate about how coal-ash is stored and galvanized a move to strengthen regulations of a substance that represents a threat to the environment and human health.

    Winner– Jeffrey Ball, Fortune, for “Mexico Black Gold.”

    It’s not easy to make an energy story sing–and even tougher when the main character is a state-run energy company. But with “The Drama of Mexico’s (Black) Gold,” Jeffrey Ball pulls off just that: a gripping and insightful piece about Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, Mexico’s national oil conglomerate. Through extensive reporting and a memorable cast of characters, Ball builds a compelling narrative of Mexico’s most important company—by far the biggest employer, accounting for more than one-third of the national budget—as it prepares for its biggest challenge in 76 years: the return of foreign oil companies to help exploit Mexico’s vast reserves. In his vivid telling, this business story becomes about much more than executives scrambling to transform a notoriously old-fashioned and inefficient company. It is the tale of a nation deciding to open up its energy markets to the world to stay competitive—and facing a very uncertain future.

    GOVERNMENT 

    Finalist- Ann Marsh, Scott Wenger, Kamrhan Farwell, Financial Planning for ”Could financial planning help stem the rate of military suicides?”

    Financial Planning senior editor Ann Marsh’s investigation into military suicide is an excellent example of journalism as mythbusting. As the entry emphasized: “Despite the prevailing belief that combat trauma drives the epidemic, Financial Planning’s investigation found that more than 80% of suicides in 2012 were among soldiers who did not see combat – and more than half of the suicides that year were among soldiers who never even deployed.”  This type of reporting is essential to understanding the true nature of the problem so that proper services can be provided.

    Finalist- Allan Sloan, Fortune, forPositively Un-American.”

    Allan Sloan’s Fortune cover story “Positively Un-American” explained how a little known part of the corporate tax code is costing the U.S. government dearly. Sloan wrote how companies, using a process known as an inversion, can acquire a smaller foreign company and relocate its headquarters overseas – even if the move is only on paper – and pay lower corporate tax rate of that nation.  As the entry noted: Sloan explained in clear and compelling prose how when corporations don’t pay their portion of taxes, the rest of the taxpayers have to pick up the slack

    Winner- Chloe Sorvino, May Jeong, Geoff Dyer, Victor Mallet, Financial Times, for “The Cost of War.”

    Geoff Dyer and Chloe Sorvino’s package of stories and graphics tells us what the U.S. government could not. How much the 13-year war in Afghanistan actually cost.  Using meticulous research of government documents supported by interviews with budget officials, this reporting team at the Financial Times reached a staggering conclusion: The war has cost more than $1 trillion. Details on the spending were coupled with excellent analysis of the U.S. involvement in the country and the likelihood of more spending to come.

    HEALTH CARE

    Finalist- Rita Price, Ben Sutherly, The Columbus Dispatch, forHome-care Crisis.”

    Finalist- Shannon Pettypiece, Jordan Robertson, Bloomberg News, forHealth Secrets for Sale.”

    Finalist- Nikhil Deogun, Meg Tirrell, Jodi Gralnick, CNBC, forDesperate Measures.”

    Winner- Beth Daley, Shan Wang, Samantha Costanzo, New England Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Unregulated Tests.”

    INNOVATION

    Finalist- Gregor Aisch, Wilson Andrews, Jeremy Ashkenas, Matthew Bloch, Mike Bostock, Shan Carter, Haeyoun Park, Alicia Parlapiano, Archie Tse, The New York Times, for a collection of economic tools and visualizations.

    The New York Times continues to do excellent and pioneering work in data visualization and interactive graphics. It has established itself as the preeminent venue for state-of-the-art economic data visualization. Its offerings in 2014 included tools that allowed users to dissect issues from foreclosed properties in Detroit to vehicle recalls nationally. A particular standout was “Can You Live on the Minimum Wage?, which expertly uses the personal to add perspective to a larger policy debate. Also — and this is much more unusual — it uses visual metaphor in an extremely affecting way. In the interactive, little blocks, each representing a single dollar, appear to “evaporate” off the screen after you key in how much money you spend on housing, utilities, and other living expenses. It actually hurts to watch it happen. Who doesn’t know it’s difficult to live on minimum wage? But when you start entering your finances, and watching your cash evaporate, and then your debt build, it really drives the point home. That’s what this new wave of journalism is all about.

    Finalist- Editorial Staff, Crain’s New York Business, for ”The 200 Most-Connected New Yorkers.”

    There is no shortage of “best-of,” “worst-of” and “most” lists in journalism. What made Crain’s New York’s 200 Most-Connected New Yorkers list standout was its ambitious scope and innovative use of algorithms to ferret out the web of interconnections that help make the powerful powerful. Crain’s New York’s clever use of big data — combining the publication’s resources with a firm that specializes in finding connections — allowed it to sort through 16,000 business and philanthropy leaders to determine those with the most access to influential people. Using billions of data points, the rankings resulted in a few surprises, including some leaders who topped executives with far more media attention. Crain’s New York’s effort hints at intriguing possibilities for how journalists might use such techniques on a wide range of projects tied to the interconnectedness of people.

    Winner- Donnelle Eller, Sharyn Jackson, Christopher Gannon, Des Moines Register, for “Harvest of Change.”

    The Des Moines Register reached into the future with a project on the far edge of innovation. The five-part package Harvest of Change explored the transformation of Iowa farm families. The centerpiece is a 3D, 360-degree video virtual-reality tour of one family’s farm. Optimally engineered for the Oculus Rift (a headset still so new as to have limited reach within the general public), the feature included Mac and Windows versions and was produced by a team from Gannett Digital that included a former Electronic Arts game developer. Turning a story into a virtual reality game to let readers explore a scene — rather than just setting it with prose, video or images — is a fascinating experiment for journalism in an age of basically unlimited technical potential. The Register’s package didn’t look like innovation for the sake of using fancy new features, but rather to help the reader understand a story at a deeper level. The package’s written component showed solid journalism with seamlessly integrated video and images as well as interactive graphics on the data behind the transformation of Iowa’s farms.

    INTERNATIONAL  

    INTERNATIONAL BREAKING NEWS

    Winner- Michael J. de la Merced, Neil Gough, Andrew Jacobs, Karl Russell, The New York Times, for Alibaba coverage.

    The reporters’ preparation, sourcing and writing resulted in a compelling package that humanized the biggest IPO of the year. The articles pulled back the curtain on a company, its historical and present impact in China and the meaning of its public offering – connecting the dots for readers in a refreshing and accessible way.

    INTERNATIONAL COMMENTARY

    Winner- John Gapper, Financial Times, for his columns.

    INTERNATIONAL EXPLANATORY

    Finalist- Peter Spiegel, Financial Times, for “How the Euro was saved.”

    Peter Spiegel elegantly and provocatively took readers behind the scenes to explain how the Euro was saved. Spiegel’s fine storytelling, underpinned by detailed reporting, made a difficult and important topic understandable and interesting.

    Winner- International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, Center for Public Integrity, for “Offshore Secrets.”

    The Center for Public Integrity’s international consortium project is exemplary for its ability to explain a complex subject with ease, for intrepid reporting that placed some of its partners in grave harm, and for its willingness to hold businesses accountable for misdeeds

    INTERNATIONAL FEATURE

    Finalist- The Wall Street Journal Staff, The Wall Street Journal, for “Kowloon Walled City.”

    On the 20th anniversary of the destruction of the famous walled city in Hong Kong, the Wall Street undertook an ambitious project. The purpose was to recreate – through graphics, video, photographs, sound and text – this amazing city. Journal editors found unseen footage and told the story from the perspective of the unique residents – drug dealers, fish ball makers, children and musicians. In essence, a living museum has been created online that sets a new standard for engagement for journalism worldwide. History has been preserved forever.

    Winner- Lily Kuo, Quartz, for “The true implications of China’s North-South Water Transfer Project.”

    Kuo travels through China’s midsection to tell the story of one of history’s most massive water projects.  The goal is to provide water to northern China, where conservation measures are being ignored and consumption is unchecked. The end result, as reported by Kuo, is that China will likely face even greater water challenges in the future because of the short-sighted nature of the current undertaking. Well told and reported. Beautifully photographed and presented. Engaging graphics. This is story telling of the future.

    INTERNATIONAL INVESTIGATIVE

    Finalist- Patricia Kowsmann, Margot Patrick, David Enrich, The Wall Street Journal, for “Fall of Espirito Santo.”

    Espirito Santo was a close runner-up that contained very serious reporting on a matter of massive public interest in Europe, and showed originality in uncovering malfeasance at an institution where few had suspected it. The EuroFin piece in particular was a strong scoop

    Winner- Stephen Grey and team, Reuters, for “Comrade Capitalism.”

    The Comrade Capitalism package boasted a very impressive investigation that combined both document trails and and shoe-leather reporting. The series of stories, efficiently told, showed very clearly how vast sums of money have been siphoned away from everyday Russians by people close to the top echelons of power. It also made good use of graphics. The railways story was particularly strong. All told, the reporting was wide-ranging and deep in scope, across a variety of industries. The reporters faced no easy task in taking on Putin’s friends

    NEWS AGENCIES

    NEWS AGENCIES COMMENTARY

    Winner- Reynolds Holding, Reuters’ Breakingviews, for his columns.

    Breakingviews’ Reynolds Holding explains the difficult legal concepts behind insider trading and offers clear views of the issues with an economy of words.

    NEWS AGENCIES EXPLANATORY

    Winner- Duff Wilson, Deborah Nelson, Bill Tarrant, Alister Doyle, Ryan McNeill, Reuters, for “Water’s Edge.”

    NEWS AGENCIES FEATURE

    Winner- Jeff Plungis, David Voreacos, Bloomberg News, for “Death on the Highway.”

    All three judges agreed this story was a clear winner in this category: Deeply researched and nuanced, the piece deftly weaves a story about one individual family’s tragedy – and one truck driver’s sage – into a in-depth examination of an issue with national implications. The story of is powerful and moving without being maudlin and the reporters did an excellent job of maintaining their objectivity despite a story that seemingly has “good” and “bad” actors. The accompanying graphics were strong and provided compelling visuals without detracting from the narrative. Everyone involved in this piece should be commended.

    NEWS AGENCIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Winner- Michael Riley, Ben Elgin, Dune Lawrence, Carol Matlack, Patrick G. Lee, David Voreacos, Jeff Plungis, Martin Keohan, Mary Childs, Alexis Leondis, Charles Stein, Bloomberg News

    Bloomberg News for a package highlighted by its coverage of a major mutual fund management change, a massive retail hacking invasion and several unexpected elements of highway safety. The judges were impressed by the entry’s “ambition, scope and authority” and noted “the particularly deep reporting throughout.”

    NEWS AGENCIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner- Michael Riley, Ben Elgin, Dune Lawrence, Carol Matlack, Jordan Robertson, Bloomberg News, for “Cyber Wars.”

    PERSONAL FINANCE

    Finalist- Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Michael Corkery, The New York Times, for “Driven into Debt.”

    Reporters found auto lenders exploiting low-income borrowers desperate for auto transportation, in a mini-reprise of the subprime mortgage loan boom/bust that helped trigger the 2008 financial meltdown…in some cases, the borrowers were paying triple-digit annual interest rates. The lenders are the first cog in a system that includes Wall’s Street’s securitization machine, which pools these loans into bonds sold to big institutional investors. A particularly compelling story describes how lenders are using a new technology — “starter interrupt devices” — that shut off the ignition systems of borrowers’ cars automatically when they miss a payment. All told, a telling example of how, these days, our financial system does so much to favor capital over labor.  

    Finalist- Margaret Collins, Carol Hymowitz, Richard Rubin, Bloomberg News, for “The 401(k) Mirage.”

    This entry shows how, despite the claims of their advocates, 401(k) plans have not fully replaced traditional pensions as sources of financial security for retirees. It nails down the extent to which 401(k) participants have turned these retirement plans into short-term piggybanks by withdrawing money from them to ease immediate financial stress. The reporters trudged through history to discover the “true father” of 401(k)s and to show how the original intent of these plans has led to unforeseen consequences.

    Winner- Susan Tompor, Detroit Free Press, for “Surviving Detroit’s bankruptcy.”

    Exemplifies the best that daily local newspapers can provide their readers. With Detroit in bankruptcy, she slogged through complex bankruptcy documents, explained how people expecting pensions and other benefits would be impacted by cuts and prepared individuals to make the hard decisions that would have been overwhelming without her help.

     

    PRINT-DAILY NEWSPAPERS

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 1

    Winner-  Robert Snell, Chad Livengood, David Shepardson, Detroit News, for “Bankruptcy breakthrough: Detroit reaches settlement in dispute with its fiercest holdout creditor.”

    The news of this breakthrough settlement was clearly of vital interest to Detroit and the importance of this one development in the entire complex of the Detroit bankruptcy was made quite clear by the breaking news article. While the legal story was potentially quite dull, the writers did a good job communicating the drama inherent in the situation, making the story a must-read for Detroiters.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Winner- Matthew Garrahan, Tim Bradshaw, Financial Times, for Apple Beats scoop and analysis.

    The scoop on Apple’s biggest acquisition to date was an accomplishment in itself, and the FT followed up with solid reporting and analysis. The reader is left with a clear and balanced picture of why Apple is buying Beats and of the challenge it will face in making the deal work.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 3

    Winner- Shalini Ramachandran, Dana Cimilluca, Brent Kendall, Gautham Nagesh, Rani Molla, Dana Mattioli, Martin Peers, The Wall Street Journal, for Comcast-Time Warner deal coverage.

    Fabulous, muti-faceted coverage driven by the WSJ’s 11 months of anticipation that a cable industry merger bombshell would explode. WSJ reporters seized the opportunity, quickly diving into multiple angles beyond the Comcast-TWC deal itself – everything from a story about how Comcast CEO Brian Roberts bested his mentor, to the regulatory hurdles ahead. A graphic that was Insightful and painstakingly researched added even more dimension to the coverage.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner- Daniel Howes, Detroit News, for his columns.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Finalist- Gillian Tett, Financial Times, for her columns.

    Winner- David Nicklaus, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, for his columns.

    David Nicklaus powerfully made bigger stories relevant at the voter/consumer level. His prose was highly readable and contextualized and didn’t lean on a crutch of common cliches, while his arguments stood out for their original insights and unique subject matter.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 3

    Winner- Eduardo Porter, The New York Times, for his columns.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Finalist- Hugh Bailey, Connecticut Post, for “Ruins Reborn.”

    An ambitious and well-executed series that clearly explains the challenge of brownfield redevelopment. It advances the narrative by exploring successful projects. Crisp writing. Excellent use of graphics, videos and historic photographs in order to provide multiple entry points.

    Finalist- Jeff Adelson, Rebekah Allen, Mark Ballard, Gordon Russell, Richard Thompson, The Advocate, for “Giving away Louisiana.”

    A multi-part series on tax breaks that packs a big punch with snappy writing, detailed reporting and clever illustrations. An inspired example of explanatory journalism that informs civic debate

    Winner- Daniel Howes, Chad Livengood, David Shepardson, Gary Heinlein, Christine Ferretti, Brian J. O’Connor, Detroit News, for “Bankruptcy and Beyond.”

    A compelling in-depth read that, long after the headlines, truly fosters understanding of the circumstances and scope of Detroit’s stunning circumstances. The stories explain a complex, often dry topic even for business journalists – municipal bankruptcy – in a clear, riveting series the judges found a truly excellent read.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Finalist- Adam Belz, Star Tribune, for “Left Behind.”

    Several newspapers submitted commendable packages of stories focusing on the plight of the unemployed and underemployed. This series stood out for its detailed reporting and strong narrative writing.

    Finalist- Jay Greene, Susan Jouflas, Kelly Shea, Mark Watanabe, Seattle Times, for “Amazon’s European Culture Clash.”

    A smart series of stories on the challenges facing a major local employer in its European businesses. From the lead story’s first lines, describing the challenges facing a Parisian bookseller who plies his trade on the banks of the Seine, we were hooked.

    Winner- Lillian Thomas, Sean D. Hamill, Kevin Crowe, Allan James Vestal, Guy Boulton, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “Poor Health.”

    In a competitive field brimming with strong entries, this collaborative effort between the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette stood out. From its genesis to execution, this series surpassed the competition and made our selection for the top prize an easy choice.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 3

    Finalist- Jennifer Levitz, Jon Kamp, Tom Burton, The Wall Street Journal, for “Deadly Medicine.”

    WSJ reporters shone a light on just how badly medical care can be delivered and the consequences of surgeons not re-thinking standards of care. This revealing series had huge impact: Surgeons are no longer using this device for hysterectomies and tumor removal, saving lives.

    Winner- Matt Richtel, Sabrina Tavernise, The New York Times, for “The New Smoke.”

    This powerful series tackled the thicket of health and regulatory issues around e-cigarettes, demystifying and humanizing an industry boom with major public health implications.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 1

    Winner- Sarah Kleiner Varble, The Virginian-Pilot, for “Then the walls closed in.”

    Deftly written after what was clearly a great deal of reporting. Intensely readable — the length was barely noticeable because the narrative was so compelling. The storytelling strategy was unusual — saving the “nut” until the end of the first story — but effective.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 2

    Winner- Adam Belz, Star Tribune, for “Left Behind.”

    A great job mixing strong anecdotes with nuanced data analysis, accessible graphics and intimate photography. Editors were disciplined in keeping the series from sprawling. The team paid special attention to spotlighting differences between this recession and past slumps, backing their reporting with data that demonstrated it’s more severe this time around for key demographic groups.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 3

    Winner- Nathan Bomey, John Gallagher, Mark Stryker, Detroit Free Press, for “How Detroit was Reborn.”

    This is a fascinating, fast-paced story that grips you from the opening sentence and walks you through the complex maze of bankruptcy proceedings without losing you even for one moment. The reporting is spot-on, and the writing vivid and entertaining, making the arcania of the bailout easy to understand. It had just the right amount of color and some nice human touches that made it come alive without allowing it to become trite. And the tick-tock pacing of the story is as riveting as you’ll ever find. Finally, we want to acknowledge the sheer amount of work that went into this story, and to commend the Detroit Free Press for its commitment to long-form features and the value they bring to the human experience.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Finalist- Paul Delean, Lynn Moore, François Shalom, Mick Côté, Steve Faguy, Jeff Heinrich, Tracey Lindeman, Susan Semenak, The Gazette (Montreal Quebec)

    The Montreal Gazette’s entries were well-reported, crisply designed, fun to read and full of flair. The profile of a 95-year-old local business titan was fascinating and surprising — and shows that even a story about industrial valves can be a compelling read when the reporting is thorough and the presentation is sharp. The piece about the investing lessons you can learn from combing your hair was fresh and made us all laugh.

    Winner- Lynn Hicks, Donnelle Eller, Patt Johnson, Joel Aschbrenner, Matthew Patane, Marco Santana, Charles Flesher, The Des Moines Register

    The Des Moines Register’s entries shone with resourceful reporting, sharp writing, keen analysis and creative visual presentation. They brought home the human drama of business with sensitive portrayals of the individuals at the heart of stories,both large and small, global and local. And, like all good journalism, the stories swept out from the particular to the general, enlightening readers on the larger issues raised by the battle against “superweeds,” the crosscurrents of agriculture in China and Iowa, and the tragic murder of a local football coach. The judges felt unanimously that the Register’s submission was far and away the best of all the entries. Future entrants could benefit from studying what made it stand out.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner- Business News Staff, Star Tribune

    The Star Tribune covered an impressive range of stories with a thoroughness that stood out among the entrants. From the deep dive into the botched rollout of Minnesota’s health exchange to the surprising look at the dangers of ATVs and the layoffs at Target, they investigated issues of intense regional interest. The staff also found the local angle in important national stories, such as the booming and erratic elder-care business and the struggle of single parents. The quality of the work was consistently high and would be impressive for a paper of any size.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 3

    Winner- The Wall Street Journal staff, The Wall Street Journal

    Yes, the Wall Street Journal can extensively cover a big story from all angles and explain its significance. Yet these four entries also showcase an energetic and engaging mix of spot-news coverage, enterprise journalism and analysis of what matters most in business, finance and investing. If you are a news consumer who cares about business and the impact of business on people’s lives — for good or for bad — then these entries are your must-read above all others. Secondary and even tertiary inside stories could proudly anchor the business section front of any major metro daily. World-class photo editing and deceptively simple headline-writing work together with a one-two punch in examples like Saudi women being Uber’s most dedicated customer base or an Ebola fever outbreak sending commodity prices soaring. An infographic explaining the market share dynamics of the proposed Comcast-Time Warner Cable is boldly executed and much more visually driven than most others’ attempts at such tale-telling. The people coverage excels, whether it’s a profile or simply an anecdote in a larger story. A reader closes the last page feeling so much smarter about business and finance. And those stock, bond and fund tables at the end actually offer useful information to investors beyond the latest closing prices.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Finalist- Josh Salman, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Selling Hope.”

    Josh Salman delivered a compelling, ambitious project on the predatory behavior in the foreclosure market, relying on extensive databases, court records and on-the-ground reporting about the victims of rescue scams. He named those responsible for selling false hope, detailing the elaborate legal maneuvers that damage both lenders and consumers. The presentation was impressive, featuring an interactive database of schemes in Florida and several insightful graphs.

    Winner- John Russell, Steve Berta, The Indianapolis Star, for “Pets at Risk.”

    The series took a long-overdue look at the dangers and conflicts-of-interest in the fast-growing veterinary drug industry. The Star showed that companies are essentially experimenting on our family dogs with medications that receives little government-sanctioned testing or oversight. The Star documented inappropriate payments to prescribing vets, who act as a sales force for drug companies — subjecting owners to outrageous mark-ups and protecting themselves from legitimate competition from discount retailers. The hypocrisy of drug companies touting the value of companion animals while paying a pittance to bereaved dog owners was especially compelling. It was masterfully written, weaving stories of devastated families with tales of the industry. After poring over the photos of dead dogs, you’ll be much more wary when you visit the vet.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Finalist- Mike Wereschagin, Pittsburgh Tribune-Reviewfor “The Invisible Threat.”

    An ambitious and comprehensive expose of the unseen danger of deteriorating natural gas pipelines in the paper’s local area, and across the country. The stories showed impressive and persistent reporting that in some cases gathered more information than many regulators had. Even more ominous, the series revealed that there are tens of thousands of miles of aging pipeline that don’t appear on any map. The paper did a convincing job illustrating how the fracking boom has exacerbated the situation, by vastly increasing traffic in the most dangerous and least regulated part of the pipeline system. An interactive map gives a powerful overview of the issue.

    Winner- Christine Willmsen, Lewis Kamb, Justin Mayo, Garland Potts, Mark Nowlin, Marcus Yam, Mark Harrison, Jim Neff, The Seattle Times, for “Loaded with lead: How gun ranges poison workers and shooters.”

    Very well done series on a topic I hadn’t seen covered before. Excellent, clear writing. Very good use of FOIA and the legal system to gather information. Obviously this wasn’t a completely fresh topic because many safety and health agencies had been concerned about lead at gun ranges before, but I doubt if anybody has taken such a comprehensive look.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 3

    Finalist- Richard Marosi, Don Bartletti, Los Angeles Times, for “Product of Mexico.”

    The Los Angeles Times produced terrific reporting on the dark side of the human toll behind Mexico’s produce export boom, with the biggest U.S. supermarkets looking the other way in tacit complicity. The package included powerful visuals and text to reveal the exploitation in stunning detail.

    Winner- Danielle Ivory, Rebecca R. Ruiz, Hiroko Tabuchi, Bill Vlasic, Matthew L. Wald, The New York Times, for “Fatal Flaws.”

    The New York Times’ tenacious reporting and smart use of database research produced a memorable series that revealed failings by General Motors, suppliers and U.S. safety regulators on a deadly defect. The reporting included wrenching personal stories of families who had lost loved ones, and myriad red flags that were largely ignored as the death toll mounted. The stories had real impact, focusing the attention of lawmakers, regulators, and the public on the safety debacle, which led to millions of recalls and a personnel shakeup at the automaker.

    PRINT-MAGAZINE

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner- Vitaliy Katsenelson, Institutional Investor, for his columns.

    Vitaliy Katsenelson must have had a rollicking good time putting together these online columns. Although his first language is Russian and his second is Wall Street, he has mastered the art of conversational written English, using jokes, asides, and metaphors to convey serious information. The stock market, he writes, is like a person who was overdosed with Novocaine. For a column on Vladimir Putin he watched only Channel One Russia and read only Pravda for a week, concluding: “Russian TV is so potent that you would not even want to watch anything else.”

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner- Peter Coy, Bloomberg Businessweek, for his columns.

    We appreciate the deep reporting, context and analysis in Coy’s columns. Strong business journalism needs facts and data, but it also needs to be accessible. Not only do these columns have all three in spades, the data is easily digested in the text and in the visuals. Some columns offer advice but fail to explain how to implement it, leaving readers with more work to do. Though Coy’s columns are not advice columns, they educate and inform thoroughly, leaving the reader without the need to do more “homework.”

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Finalist- Frances Denmark, Institutional Investor, for “Life, Death & the Numbers.”

    A deeply reported and wide-ranging story about the trillion-dollar hole facing pension plans as people live longer than expected. Explanation of a complex issue, and possible solutions, was balanced and thorough.

    Winner- Margarida Correia, Lee Conrad, Bank Investment Consultant, for “Dementia.”

    Thoughtful, clear explanation of legal and privacy dilemmas facing investment advisors as clients lose ability to recall, analyze and judge. Timely story told with compassion. Enjoyed the tips for advisors dealing with families, too.

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Finalist- Janet Bodnar, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Starting out/Guide to your money: How millennials can get ahead.”

    Winner- Allan Sloan, Fortune, for “Positively Un-American.”

    Stunning article on companies “leaving” the U.S. and the billions they save in U.S. taxes

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 1

    Finalist– Hiten Samtani, The Real Deal, for “Doubling down on the Prince of Darkness.”

    “Doubling Down on the Prince of Darkness” examined the friendly relationship between New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New York’s high-powered real estate interests — an ethically dubious situation that seems all the clearer when set against the contentious relationship the industry has developed with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. The judges felt the reporter might have gone even further to break ground on how Cuomo and the real estate industry have forged mutually beneficial ties and to explore the potentially long-term consequences. Still, the story is scrupulously evenhanded: It explains that the governor doesn’t always serve the industry’s interests, just as the mayor isn’t always hostile to them. Overall, it builds a persuasive case that Cuomo’s ties to the real estate elite bears close watching.

    Winner- Aaron Timms, Institutional Investor, for “The race to topple Bloomberg.”

    “The Race to Topple Bloomberg” is an exhaustively researched study of the ferocious competition Bloomberg L.P. faces to maintain a leading role in the financial data market. It illuminates from multiple angles the question of “whether subsisting on the terminal alone will be enough to allow Bloomberg to defend its market dominance.”

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 2

    Finalist- Gary Rivlin, The New York Times Magazine/ The Investigative Fund, for “The cold, hard lessons of Mobile Home U.”

    We really enjoyed this one too. What we liked about it was the flat, non-judgmental way it approached some of the ethical knots at the heart of this business. It also had a really broad perspective, and used the business to talk about the large-structural changes in the US economy over time, which was really helpful.

    Finalist- Parmy Olson, Forbes, for “Calling the American Dream.”

    This story was a really colorful, detailed account of not only a landmark deal of 2014, but the characters who made it happen. It also sketched in really helpful backstory on the origins of Whatsapp, not to mention putting its astronomical growth into context. Very well done.

    Winner- Tom Foster, Will Bourne, Inc., for “Along came Lolly.”

    We really love this piece. It does so many things. First off, it fulfills a huge need for traditional business readers: Putting forward ideas about boosting revenue.

    But it does a ton more. It’s got a compelling—and female!—character at the core. It has really big sweep, touching on large-scale economic trends like deindustrialization, inequality and retail supply chain dynamics, among other things.

    And it’s beautifully written:

    “If traditional garment manufacturing is a pretty straightforward assembly-line affair, the seamstresses at Lolly work more like short-order cooks in a diner where the menu changes daily.”

    Just great.

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner- Paul Jackson, Jacob Gaffney, HousingWire

    The judges felt the magazine did a good job of breaking the news into digestible parts and incorporating politics into the subject matter, as well as good diversity throughout. The editors and reporters landed some great interviews, and had a good blend of longer, more indepth pieces with quick, usable information on people in the business. The layout is full, yet approachable. Nice read!

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner- Josh Tyrangiel, Bloomberg Businessweek

    MAGAZINES INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner- David Beal, Sarah Lutman, Twin Cities Business, for “Whose legacy is it?”

    The “Legacy Fund” is by far my favorite story in this category. Its localization is so relevant and its angle is fresh and well defined. The magnitude of research and reporting that was used for this succinctly detailed investigative story is very impressive. And despite the scale of the data in the story’s background, readers are not overwhelmed. Rather, they are drawn into a rich telling of how state funding and appropriations can be carelessly left unchecked so that one organization benefits from money that was supposed to be earmarked for public good. While this sort of mishandling of public dollars is not new, this publication packages this issue in a context suitable for its readers.

    MAGAZINES INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner- Ann Marsh, Scott Wenger, Kamrhan Farwell, Financial Planning, for “Could financial planning help stem the rate of military suicides?”

    Financial Planning’s extraordinary 11-month investigation debunked a tragic myth about military suicide. Rather than resulting from combat trauma, many deaths actually are linked to financial stress. The richly-reported story also showed, with detailed anecdotes, how the Pentagon made the problem worse with policies that blocked distressed soldiers from receiving critical financial help and punished financial planners who tried to provide help anyway. A month after publication, congressional legislation based on the article was drafted and later passed to address the myriad financial problems faced by soldiers and reservists. A very worthy public service. 

    PRINT-WEEKLIES AND BI-WEEKLIES

    WEEKLIES BREAKING NEWS

    Finalist- J.K. Wall, Indianapolis Business Journal, for “IU Health Merging Hospitals.”

    This good old-fashioned scoop helped put important community news before readers in a timely way, while addressing questions and implications of a major change in the local health-care sector.

    Winner- Albert Gallun, Crain’s Chicago Business, for “Poor families use ‘supervouchers’ to rent in city’s priciest buildings.”

    This well-executed scoop had impact and led competitors. By staying with the story, Crain’s helped bring about needed change.

    WEEKLIES COMMENTARY

    Finalist- Joe Cahill, Crain’s Chicago Business, for his columns.

    Winner- Mike Hendricks, The Business Review (Albany,NY), for his columns.

    Mike Hendricks’ columns for the Albany Business Review stood out because they’re full of informed commentary, backed up by on-the-ground reporting. He shows a real understanding of — and concern for — his subjects. The “human element” is always in the foreground. His writing is lively, polished and engaging, and his choice of subjects shows a keen eye for what makes a good commentary.

    WEEKLIES EXPLANATORY

    Finalist- Dennis Domrzalski, Dan Mayfield, Tina Orem, Rachel Sams, Damon Scott, Rachel Baca, Chan Avery, Randy Siner, Albuquerque Business First, for “Reinventing our City.”

    A clearly written and compelling call to arms to save an economy ravaged by cutbacks in federal spending and the failure to develop a thriving private sector. Illuminating numbers and statistics were brought to life by real world examples and thoughtful quotes. An impressive use of resources to involve the community in finding ways to expand the local economy.

    Finalist- E.J. Schultz, Advertising Age, for “Whatever happened to the ad war on drugs?”

    A revealing behind the scenes look at what happened to an iconic ad campaign and the surprising efforts to resuscitate it.

    Winner- Bill King, David Bourne, Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, for “Soccer’s Growing Reach.”

    A financial and sociological exploration of the history of soccer in the U.S. with an eye towards explaining why the sport is poised to finally become a meaningful commercial entity in America. Artfully balanced with colorful scenes of fans, expert commentary and telling data.

    WEEKLIES FEATURE

    Finalist- Kate Kaye, Advertising Age, for “A Data Lab Rat in the Big City: Why trackers couldn’t trap this city dweller.”

    The creativity involved in this piece is a delight, as is the cleverness of its approach. Don’t we all wonder what companies do with all that data they gather on us? The piece nicely answers the question, giving us a few chuckles along the way, and may make readers pause and think about their use of loyalty cards, reward points and online access points.

    Finalist- Bill King, Tom Stinson, Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, for “Man of Steel.”

    This piece is well reported and gracefully written. It can hold a reader’s attention even if the reader is not a sports fan. It puts us inside the room of negotiations with the team owners, for instance, and illustrates the scramble to pull together financing to maintain family control in a rare look at what it’s like to be a pro-ball team owner.

    Winner- Mike Hendricks, The Business Review (Albany,NY), for “The other side of Mohawk Harbor.”

    This piece is wonderfully written, using a narrative approach with a clear thread based on the company’s founders. We come to understand their passion for steel and their commitment to the region. The story also demonstrates a classic conflict motif, pitting two little guys against the push of national developers more interested in ROI and the siren lure of casino gambling than in the community’s sense of self. It nicely portrays the struggle to revive a declining American city and the tension between new development and old-school commerce.

    WEEKLIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Finalist- Matthew Kish, Malia Spencer, Wendy Culverwell, Elizabeth Hayes, Jon Bell, Mason Walker, Andy Giegerich, Brandon Sawyer, Craig Spencer, Cathy Cheney, Steve Burton, Erik Siemers, Suzanne Stevens, Portland Business Journal 

    This publication deserves recognition for reporting on why Portland statistically has tightest market for commercial space in the country, with tech companies banging on the door to move in, and how an endless Superfund cleanup has tied up the best option for changing that.

    Finalist- Staff, Advertising Age

    It gives you the feeling you have to read every story. Consistently in front of trends across old and new media.

    Winner- Greg Andrews and staff, Indianapolis Business Journal

    The IBJ’s innovation and moxie shot it to the top of this very competitive category over publications with significantly more resources. The Interviews special section was an incredible surprise. The interviews were diverse and edgy — nothing puffy here — and they even pulled off doing one in the form of a cartoon. In another issue, the IBJ reported on an innovative hotel plan in the works, early talks by Indiana University to build a consolidated hospital, a public official’s license plate abuse, a young, well-connected tech entrepreneur iced out of a transit system contract, efforts by some executives to unplug while on vacation and the likely effect of the new NFL contract on the Colts’ finances; and for good measure, dared show empty seats at the sacred Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Another issue nailed a story of how a collections agency was being forced into bankruptcy because it wasn’t paying its own debts. Delicious.

    WEEKLIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner- Eric Martin, TradeWinds, for “Service Charge Included.”

    The story is well-executed and in-depth, with a wide range of interviewees and good analysis.

    It covers a significant topic, involving multiple shipping companies – in other words, has breadth. It questions the somewhat obscure practice of related-party payments, examining the potential for self-dealing and conflicts of interest.

    The sums involved aren’t trivial (several public companies pay “hundreds of millions” a year in fees and other charges to private interests associated with company founders who are also top executives or directors at these companies).

    Graphics showing the related-party payments at 10 major shippers are informative and easy to grasp.

    The piece presents both sides of the story – some readers might say too even-handedly. Yet the article is so detailed that readers can decide for themselves whether the arrangements it describes are reasonable and ethical – or not.

    RADIO/TELEVISION

    RADIO/TV BEST SERIES OR INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner- Nikhil Deogun, Mitch Weitzner, Phil LeBeau, Mary Noonan Robichaux, Wally Griffith, Deborah Camiel, Rich Gardella, Meghan Lisson, Jeff Pohlman, Meghan Reeder, James Segelstein, Michael Beyman, Christie Gripenburg, Patrick Ahearn, Rich Korn, Allison E. Stedman, Howard Ellis, Michael Sheehan, Steve Trevisan, Gary Vandenbergh, CNBC, for “Failure to Recall: Investigating GM.”

    In Failure to Recall, CNBC examined General Motors’ inaction on faulty ignition switches in millions of its vehicles despite knowing about the deadly defect for a decade. From compelling victim accounts to evidence of a corporate cover-up, this documentary had it all. Phil LeBeau’s test drive of the 2007 Chevy Cobalt illustrated the problem in a way that only TV can. Failure to Recall rises to the level of award-winning journalism by informing the public, promoting change and improvement, and holding responsible parties accountable.

    RADIO/TV FEATURE OR FIELD REPORT

    Winner- Nikhil Deogun, Mitch Weitzner, Harry Smith, Mary Noonan Robichaux, Na Eng, Meghan Lisson, James Segelstein, Christie Gripenburg, Patrick Ahearn, Allison E. Stedman, Kelly Laudien, Richard Korn, CNBC, for “Marijuana in America: Colorado’s Pot Rush.”

    CNBC’s “Marijuana in America: Colorado Pot Rush” went into great depth and breadth about the legalization of this once banned substance, with a variety of angles and information that no doubt surprised viewers nationwide.

    It wove together myriad strains surrounding the legalization issue often missing from other stories, covering both the economic and social implications. Through interviews with business owners, employees, customers and government officials, it made full use of the visual medium with segments on edible marijuana products, the challenges of dealing with an all-cash industry and the mixed reaction by municipalities about legalization by profiling two neighboring towns with very different policies.

    REAL ESTATE

    Finalist- Alison Fitzgerald, Jared Bennett, Center for Public Integrity, for “Florida’s Foreclosure Crisis.”

    Center for Public Integrity reporters Alison Fitzgerald and Jared Bennett uncover the shocking story of Florida homeowners in foreclosure who become victims of a court system where judges are obsessed with disposing of cases – often with complete disregard for due process – all in the interest of clearing a case backlog. The reporters’ deep reporting through databases, trial transcripts and interviews unravels a broken judicial foreclosure system and tells a sad story of homeowners with nowhere to turn for help. The result led to an initiative to ensure judges follow federal regulations protecting homeowners. Fitzgerald and Bennett are applauded for bringing this important issue to the public.

    Finalist- Daniel J. Sernovitz, Washington Business Journal, for coverage of Washington, D.C. real estate.

    The Washington Business Journal’s Daniel J. Sernovitz sheds light on the intricate state of commercial real estate in Washington. From the glimpse at the collapse of the area’s largest electrical contractor to the chief executive of a commercial real estate data firm who wants to take over the digital world and attempts by the federal government to improve its leasing decisions, Sernovitz offers an insider view of the complicated world that few know about and even fewer understand.

    Winner- Sarah Kleiner Varble, The Virginian-Pilot, for “Then the walls closed in.”

    The Virginian-Pilot’s four-part series, “Then the Walls Closed in,” is the dramatic story of three families whose lives were ruined by Chinese-made toxic drywall in their homes. Real Estate reporter Sarah Kleiner Varble captured the terror and heartbreak the families endured as they slowly discovered the source of their pain was hidden deep inside the one place they trusted as safe. Varble leaves the reader with shock and disbelief not only at the suffering the families endured but the futile efforts they faced when they sought help. It was the clear winner in an extremely tough competition.

    SMALL BUSINESS

    Finalist- Ruth Simon, Tom McGinty, Angus Loten, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan, The Wall Street Journal, for “The imbalance in small-business lending.”

    Winner-Tiffany Hsu, Chris Kirkham, Los Angeles Times, for coverage of California small business.

    SOCIAL MEDIA

    Winner- Scot Mayerowitz, Associated Press

    In judging the Social Media category, we looked for excellence in a body of work and found it in AP’s airline and travel reporter Scott Mayerowitz’s entry. His use of social media was highly interactive, kept his followers informed and used their feedback to develop more work, often big news stories on his beat. Mayerowitz’s posts also were entertaining and added value that went beyond the basic news story. In short, the entry speaks to all the things that social media represents. If you’re looking for a model for journalists effectively using social media, give his work a look.

    STUDENT – PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS

    Finalist- Jennifer Surane, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill for “General Cable getting cheaper beckons activists: Real M&A.” Published by Bloomberg News.

    This comprehensive report on a publicly-traded cable manufacturer had an immediate impact; the company’s stock closed up on the day of publication. The reporter used a wide range of sources, including the Bloomberg terminal, to produce a well-rounded story about General Cable Corp.

    Finalist- Jonathan LaMantia, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill for “Manhattan condos at half price reshape New York’s Harlem.” Published by Bloomberg News.

    This is an excellent example of robust reporting, antidotes and use of statistics. I came away from reading this piece with a real Thursday April 23- Sunday 26understanding of what is driving gentrification in Harlem. The story was well written.

    Winner- Brittany Elena Morris, Arizona State University, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication for “NAFTA is an empty basket for southern Mexico farmers.” Published by the Arizona Daily Star.

    This detailed account of one farmer’s life in Mexico’s Chipas region brings home powerfully to readers the impact of NAFTA 20 years after its implementation. The reporter did a nice job of broadening the story with quotes from experts and trade data. The photograph of the farmer was an added bonus.

    STUDENT – STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

    Finalist- Samantha M. Sabin, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, for “Sugar Baby.”

    Great story with so many different threads. One sign of success is that I wished there had been more content presented, including some multimedia. Nevertheless there was excellent reporting and writing. A unique angle on a huge issue, namely sky-high tuition costs.

    Winner- Daniel Bauman, Webster University, for “The costs and benefits of an elite college chess game.”

    This is a remarkable series of stories overcoming difficult challenges and delivering true impact. The result is a story that deserves a national audience and recognition for the excellent work.

    TECHNOLOGY

    Finalist- Alex Kantrowitz, Advertising Age, for “Digital ad fraud.”

    Taking on an issue that’gs received surprisingly little coverage in the business media, Ad Age’s Alex Kantrowitz decided to dig deep into the very expensive problem of digital advertising fraud. Kantrowitz explains schemes such as injection ads and URL masking and examines why it’s so hard to close the fraudsters down completely. The result is a detailed and immersive series that sheds needed light on the invisible fraud operations that pop a Target ad on a Walmart site, say, or a BMW ad on a site suspected of copyright infringement. We award Ad Age the third prize in the Technology category.

    Finalist- The Wall Street Journal Staff, The Wall Street Journal, for “Open Sesame: Peering inside Alibaba.”

    As Alibaba prepared for what would be the world’s biggest IPO in history, the Wall Street Journal was serving up its own impressive accomplishment. News organizations were saturating the media with coverage of Chinese entrepreneur Jack Ma and his mega successful e-commerce site, but WSJ stood out for all the best journalistic reasons: outstanding explanatory journalism polished with engaging, concise writing; innovative, interactive graphics that lured readers in to click and learn; and investigative reporting that made an impact by revealing potential conflicts of interest that drew the attention of the SEC. We award WSJ the second prize in the Technology category.

    Winner- Jennifer Gollan, Matt Smith, Adithya Sambamurthy, Michael Schiller, Amy Pyle, Robert Salladay, The Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Techsploitation.”

    In its year-long investigative series “Techsploitation,” the Center for Investigative Reporting examined the plight of Indian tech workers seeking jobs through the U.S. government’s H1B visa program. Lured to America by the promise of lucrative tech jobs at top firms, the workers fall prey to deceitful labor brokers who then leave their victims in limbo as they wait for jobs that were supposed to be guaranteed on arrival and then coerce them into signing contracts that threaten – and deliver — super high penalty fees and lawsuits if they quit. CIR used stunning personal stories, deep investigative reporting and even a poignant graphic novel to clearly and vividly document this underworld of worker exploitation and failed regulation, forcing the administration to take notice. We award CIR the first prize in the Technology category.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • SABEW Canada Best in Business Winners Announced!

    Posted By admin on Thursday April 16, 2015

    SABEW & SABEW Canada logos vTORONTO, April 16, 2015. The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Canada would like to congratulate the winners of its first-ever Canadian Best in Business competition.

    Nearly 100 business journalists came to Valdez Restaurant in Toronto to watch the awards presentation and to get together with colleagues. Nine winners were chosen from a pool of 26 finalists, representing a diverse range of outstanding business reporting done in 2014.

    SABEW Canada would also like to thank the sponsors of last night’s event, including TD Bank, the Canadian Securities Institute, Schulich School of Business and CNW Group.

    The winners (in bold) and nominees are listed below.

    Beat reporting

    Marina Strauss, Retail, The Globe and Mail
    Claudia Cattaneo, Energy, Financial Post
    Doug Alexander, Banking, Bloomberg

    Commentary

    Eric RegulyReport on Business
    James Cowan, Canadian Business
    Jason Kirby, Maclean’s

    Long-form feature (2,500 words or more)

    Trevor Cole, “CEO of the Year”, Report on Business magazine
    Jake MacDonald, “The Cost of Freedom”, Report on Business magazine
    Peter Kuitenbrouwer, “Rebirth of Highway H20”, Financial Post

    Short-form feature (2,500 words or less)

    Alistair MacDonald, “The Irvings”, Wall Street Journal
    Greg Quinn, “Trappers”, Bloomberg
    Michael McCullough, “Yes, You Can Build a Pipeline Here,” Canadian Business

    Investigative 

    Grant Robertson, “The Pot Stock Problem”, The Globe and Mail
    Bruce Livesey, “Where our Clothes Come From”, Report on Business magazine
    Stephanie Nolen, “High and Dry”, Report on Business magazine

    Multimedia

    Tavia Grant, Louie Palu, Pawel Dwulit, Christopher Manza, Laura Blenkinsop, Ted Mumford, “No Safe Use”, The Globe and Mail
    Mark Brown, Stefania Di Verdi, Mike Shoss, “Canada’s Best Places to Live 2014”, MoneySense 
    Andrew Barr, Mike Faille, April Fong, Angela Hickman, Peter Kuitenbrouwer, Kevin Libin, Laura Pedersen, John Richardson, Jonathon Rivait, Gigi Suhanic, Erin Valois, Jeff Wasserman, “Rebirth of Highway H20”, Financial Post

    Package or ongoing series

    Edward Greenspon, David Scanlan, Andrew Mayeda, Rebecca Penty, Theophilos Argitis, Jeremy van Loon and Hugo Miller, Energy Super Power, Bloomberg News
    Chester Dawson and Amy Harder, Selling Canada’s Crude, Wall Street Journal
    Sunny Freeman, Zi-Ann Lum and Daniel Tencer, Working Poor, Huffington Post Canada

    Personal finance/Investing

    Rob Carrick, personal finance columnist, The Globe and Mail
    Julie Cazzin, “Looking After Mom and Dad”, MoneySense

    Profile

    Alistair MacDonald, “The Irvings”, Wall Street Journal
    Carol Toller, “Lessons From a Brain Damaged CEO”, Canadian Business
    Trevor Cole, “CEO of the Year”, Report on Business magazine

    About SABEW

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is a 50-year-old organization with more than 3,000 members across the globe. Journalists from the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, CNN and other organizations big and small are involved in the organization.

    A group of Canadian journalists launched SABEW Canada, SABEW’s first international chapter last year. We now have about 200 members, among them reporters and editors from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, MoneySense, Bloomberg, the Wall Street Journal and more.

    SABEW’s mission statement is simple: We want to define and inspire excellence in business journalism. We do that by hosting educational events with company chief executives, leading business journalists and well-known politicians, among others.

    We also offer teletraining to members to help improve their skills, and hold networking events where business journalists can make new connections and catch up with old colleagues and friends.

    For further information, contact Bryan Borzykowski at [email protected] or 416-305-1563.

  • Announcing SABEW Canada’s Best in Business nominees!

    Posted By admin on Wednesday March 25, 2015

    SABEW & SABEW Canada logos vTORONTO – The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Canada is pleased to announce the list of nominees for its first-ever Canadian Best In Business competition, which recognizes outstanding business reporting published or broadcast in 2014.

    The nominees represent some of Canada’s most venerable news organizations, including Canadian Business, Bloomberg Canada, The Globe and Mail, the Wall Street Journal’s Canadian bureau, Maclean’s and more.

    The nominated works reflect a diverse set of issues particular to Canadian business — from pipelines and banks to medical marijuana and the death of the Canadian Wheat Board.

    “We’re delighted to announce the first-ever nominees for the SABEW Canada Best in Business awards,” said Marty Wolk, SABEW president and an assigning editor at NerdWallet, the personal finance website. “We are proud to expand our efforts to recognize and honour the best business and financial journalism in Canada. Congratulations to the nominees!”

    “There’s no other awards contest like this in Canada,” added Bryan Borzykowski, chair of SABEW Canada and a member of SABEW’s board of governors. “This is a chance for business journalists to showcase their work and have it judged by their peers.”

    There are a total of 26 finalists in nine categories, selected from nearly a hundred applicants from publications across the country. Categories include investigative, commentary, investing and personal finance, features, multimedia, beat reporting, package and profile.

    SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges, chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

    The winners will be announced at the Best In Business awards reception on April 15 at Valdez in Toronto. Business journalists interested in attending can register at sabew.org/canada. The cost is $10 for SABEW members and $30 for non-members. Attendance includes hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

     

    Nominees for SABEW Canada’s first annual Best in Business awards (in no particular order):

    Beat reporting

    Claudia Cattaneo, Energy, Financial Post

    Marina Strauss, Retail, The Globe and Mail

    Doug Alexander, Banking, Bloomberg

    Commentary

    Eric Reguly, Report on Business

    James Cowan, Canadian Business

    Jason Kirby, Maclean’s

    Long-form feature (2,500 words or more)

    Jake MacDonald, “The Cost of Freedom”, Report on Business magazine

    Peter Kuitenbrouwer, “Rebirth of Highway H20”, Financial Post

    Trevor Cole, “CEO of the Year”, Report on Business magazine

    Short-form feature (2,500 words or less)

    Alistair MacDonald, “The Irvings”, Wall Street Journal

    Greg Quinn, “Trappers”, Bloomberg

    Michael McCullough, “Yes, You Can Build a Pipeline Here,” Canadian Business

    Investigative

    Bruce Livesey, “Where our Clothes Come From”, Report on Business magazine

    Stephanie Nolen, “High and Dry”, Report on Business magazine

    Grant Robertson, “The Pot Stock Problem”, The Globe and Mail

    Multimedia

    Mark Brown, Stefania Di Verdi, Mike Shoss, “Canada’s Best Places to Live 2014”, MoneySense

    Tavia Grant, “No Safe Use”, The Globe and Mail

    Peter Kuitenbrouwer, “Rebirth of Highway H20”, Financial Post

    Package or ongoing series

    Chester Dawson and Amy Harder, Selling Canada’s Crude, Wall Street Journal

    Edward Greenspon, Andrew Mayeda, Rebecca Penty, Theophilos Argitis, Jeremy van Loon and Hugo Miller, Energy Super Power, Bloomberg

    Sunny Freeman, Zi-Ann Lum and Daniel Tencer, Working Poor, Huffington Post Canada

    Personal finance/Investing

    Julie Cazzin, “Looking After Mom and Dad”, MoneySense

    Rob Carrick, personal finance columnist, The Globe and Mail

    Profile

    Carol Toller, “Lessons From a Brain Damaged CEO”, Canadian Business

    Trevor Cole, “CEO of the Year”, Report on Business magazine

    Alistair MacDonald, “The Irvings”, Wall Street Journal

     

    About SABEW

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is a 50-year-old organization with more than 3,000 members across the globe. Journalists from the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, CNN and other organizations big and small are involved in the organization.

    A group of Canadian journalists launched SABEW Canada, SABEW’s first international chapter last year. We now have about 200 members, among them reporters and editors from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, MoneySense, Bloomberg, the Wall Street Journal and more.

    SABEW’s mission statement is simple: We want to define and inspire excellence in business journalism. We do that by hosting educational events with company chief executives, leading business journalists and well-known politicians, among others.

    We also offer teletraining to members to help improve their skills, and hold networking events where business journalists can make new connections and catch up with old colleagues and friends.

    Our thanks to CNW Group for sponsoring this announcement!

    For more information, contact Bryan Borzykowski at [email protected] or 416-305-1563.

     

    -30-

  • Past March Teletraining: Today’s Journalism: “What it takes to survive and thrive in the business”

    Posted By admin on Monday March 16, 2015

    member_training_header

    March Teletraining, Today’s Journalism : What it takes to survive and thrive in the business

    March 16, 2015

     

    Given budget cuts, rapidly changing technology and the overall upheaval in the news business, what does it take for journalists to survive and even thrive? Our panel will address the mentality needed to navigate change, the importance of being entrepreneurial about your career, and ways to develop your own individual brand. We’ll also discuss strategies for leading change and leading other journalists through change. This promises to be a frank and thought-provoking discussion laced with helpful takeaways.

    Listen to the the call: March 16, 2015

    Playback Dial-in Number: 1-619-326-2753
    Playback Access Code:
    415751

    Take the Survey

    Moderator:
    Becky Bisbee. Becky joined The Seattle Times as business editor in August 2000. She previously served as business editor at The Austin American-Statesman and The Modesto Bee. She has been a member of SABEW since 1990 and served on the board of governors for 10 years.

    Panelists:
    Gregory Favre. Gregory, former executive editor of the Sacramento Bee and vice president of news at The McClatchy Company, is the newly appointed editor of CALmatters. CALMatters will launch this spring as a new, non-partisan, non-profit media venture producing public interest journalism focused on California State politics and government. CALmatters will be supported entirely by philanthropy and will provide the content it produces, free of charge, through existing media organizations and on its own Web site. Gregory is also past president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and the California Society of Newspaper Editors. Most recently, he is a distinguished fellow of journalism values at Poynter Institute, a global leader in journalism. Gregory recommends these three books:

    • “What Great Bosses Know,” by Jill Geisler
    • “First, Break All the Rules,” by Jill Geisler
    • “The Practice of Adaptive Leadership,” by Ronald A. Heifetz and Marty Linsky

    Glenn Hall. Glenn is the U.S. Editor of The Wall Street Journal, where he oversees coverage of economics, politics and regulations, along with crime, courts, education, real estate and general news. Previously he served as editor in chief of MarketWatch, a leading online financial news site that is part of the WSJ Digital Network. His previous roles included managing editor of TheBlaze, editor in chief of TheStreet, chief innovation officer of the Orange County Register and politics and government news chief at Bloomberg. Hall has been a SABEW board member since 2011. Glenn recommends journalists to keep tabs on the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard to stay abreast of innovations in journalism.

    Join groups on Linkedin and follow technology and journalism leaders. This is an easy way to stay on top of the latest trends and expand your network. Some groups to use as a starting point are SABEW (of course!) Linkedin for Journalists, Online News Association, Social media Directors Network and Web Editors.

    In terms of good, old-fashioned books worth reading, I recommend:

    “The First 90 Days” by Michael Watkins, who offers a systematic approach to help people succeed in a new job or role. It’s written for new leadership roles, but I think the approach is useful in any new role.

    “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” by Jonah Berger, a Wharton professor who systemically studied what causes people to share content. Whether you consider yourself socially savvy or a recovering Luddite, this book will help you understand how to better connect with your audience in the digital age. You’ll likely appreciate, as I do, that many of the triggers he reveals are very much aligned with some of the best principles of great journalism.

    Greg McCune. Greg McCune is a former president of SABEW who has been a business journalist, newsroom manager, writer and teacher in his long career. Currently a copy editor at the Associated Press in Chicago and journalism instructor at Northwestern University’s Medill journalism school, he previously held eight different reporting, editing and training roles during a three-decade career with Reuters. They included Midwest General News Editor, Training Editor, Washington Bureau Chief, Chicago Bureau Chief and Canada Chief Correspondent. He began his career as a commodities and agriculture reporter and has covered a host of issues from international trade to commodity markets and statistics. Greg recommends journalists to:

    • Follow the Talking Biz News blog by Chris Roush at UNC. (http://talkingbiznews.com/) Just glance at it once a day to see what is happening in our particular neck of the journalism woods.
    • Follow the Columbia Journalism Review twitter feed. They have wonderful blogs/columns about behind-the-scenes things that happen or new things that might transform what you do.
    • Follow on Twitter a guy named Andy Carvin, who heads a new startup called reported.ly. Andy believes that media corporations are using social media primarily as a PR mechanism for our stories and not even scratching the surface of using it as a reporting tool.

     

    Questions about teletraining? Please contact Mary Jane Pardue at [email protected] or Kimberly Quillen at [email protected].

     

    Presented as a member service by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

  • 2014 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By admin on Tuesday March 10, 2015

    DIGITAL BREAKING NEWS – Division 1

    Finalist- Amanda Levin, The Deal, for “Unsolicited bid puts Cleco on the block.”

    DIGITAL BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Winner- Dan Mangan, CNBC.com, for Affordable Care Act subsidies ruling coverage.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner- Jesse Eisinger, The New York Times for “The Trade.”

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner- Walt Mossberg, Re/code, for his technology columns.

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner- Matt Drange, Susanne Rust, Andrew Donohue, The Guardian US, The Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Toxic Trail.”
    Finalist- Rob Hotakainen, Takaaki Iwabu, Patrick Davison, Danny Dougherty, Tish Wells, Cheryl Diaz Meyer,McClatchy Washington Bureau, for “US exporters eye Japan.”

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner– Heesun Wee, Kevin Krim, Jeff Nash, CNBC.com, for “How millennials are shaking North Korea’s regime.”
    Finalist- Elizabeth Gannes, Re/code, for “I want it and I want it now: The machine behind instant gratification.”

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 1

    Winner- Eleanor Bell, Daniel Wagner, Center for Public Integrity, for “Time is Money.”
    Winner-
    Lawrence Delevingne, Kevin Krim, Jeff Nash, CNBC.com, for “The life and death of a master of the universe.”

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 2

    Winner-Lawrence Delevingne, Kevin Krim, Jeff Nash, CNBC.com, for “The life and death of a master of the universe.”
    Finalist-
    Nellie Bowles, Re/code, for “Downtown Las Vegas is the great American techtopia.”

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner- The Deal Staff, The Deal

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner- Quartz Staff, Quartz

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner- Greg Gordon, Lydia Mulvaney, Deb Gruver, Paul Hampton, Tish Wells, Danny Dougherty.
    Finalist- Paul Kiel, Chris Arnold, ProPublica, for “The long life of debt.”

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner- David Sirota, International Business Times, for “Public Money, Private Profits.”
    Finalist- Adam Feuerstein, TheStreet, for “Galena’s good reviews.”

    ENERGY

    Winner– Jeffrey Ball, Fortune, for “Mexico Black Gold.”
    Finalist- Abrahm Lustgarten, ProPublica, for Chesapeake Energy coverage.
    Finalist- Bruce Henderson, The Charlotte Observer, for energy coverage.

    GOVERNMENT

    Winner- Chloe Sorvino, May Jeong, Geoff Dyer, Victor Mallet, Financial Times, for “The Cost of War.”
    Finalist- Ann Marsh, Scott Wenger, Kamrhan Farwell, Financial Planning for ”Could financial planning help stem the rate of military suicides?”
    Finalist- Allan Sloan, Fortune, forPositively Un-American.”

    HEALTH CARE

    Winner- Beth Daley, Shan Wang, Samantha Costanzo, New England Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Unregulated Tests.”
    Finalist- Rita Price, Ben Sutherly, The Columbus Dispatch, forHome-care Crisis.”
    Finalist- Shannon Pettypiece, Jordan Robertson, Bloomberg News, forHealth Secrets for Sale.”
    Finalist- Nikhil Deogun, Meg Tirrell, Jodi Gralnick, CNBC, forDesperate Measures.”

    INNOVATION

    Winner-Donnelle Eller, Sharyn Jackson, Christopher Gannon, Des Moines Register, for “Harvest of Change.”
    Finalist- Gregor Aisch, Wilson Andrews, Jeremy Ashkenas, Matthew Bloch, Mike Bostock, Shan Carter, Haeyoun Park, Alicia Parlapiano, Archie Tse for a collection of economic tools and visualizations.
    Finalist- Editorial Staff, Crain’s New York Business, for ”The 200 Most-Connected New Yorkers.”

    INTERNATIONAL  

    INTERNATIONAL BREAKING NEWS

    Winner- Michael J. de la Merced, Neil Gough, Andrew Jacobs, Karl Russell, The New York Times, for Alibaba coverage.

    INTERNATIONAL COMMENTARY

    Winner- John Gapper, Financial Times, for his columns.

    INTERNATIONAL EXPLANATORY

    Winner- International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, Center for Public Integrity, for “Offshore Secrets.”
    Finalist- Peter Spiegel, Financial Times, for “How the Euro was saved.”

    INTERNATIONAL FEATURE

    Winner- Lily Kuo, Quartz, for “The true implications of China’s North-South Water Transfer Project.”
    Finalist- The Wall Street Journal Staff, The Wall Street Journal,for “Kowloon Walled City.”

    INTERNATIONAL INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner- Stephen Grey and team, Reuters, for “Comrade Capitalism.”
    Finalist- Patricia Kowsmann, Margot Patrick, David Enrich, The Wall Street Journal, for “Fall of Espirito Santo.”

    NEWS AGENCIES COMMENTARY

    Winner- Reynolds Holding, Reuters’ Breakingviews, for his columns.

    NEWS AGENCIES EXPLANATORY

    Winner- Duff Wilson, Deborah Nelson, Bill Tarrant, Alister Doyle, Ryan McNeill, Reuters, for “Water’s Edge.”

    NEWS AGENCIES FEATURE

    Winner- Jeff Plungis, David Voreacos, Bloomberg News, for “Death on the Highway.”

    NEWS AGENCIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Winner- Michael Riley, Ben Elgin, Dune Lawrence, Carol Matlack, Patrick G. Lee, David Voreacos, Jeff Plungis, Martin Keohan, Mary Childs, Alexis Leondis, Charles Stein, Bloomberg News

    NEWS AGENCIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner- Michael Riley, Ben Elgin, Dune Lawrence, Carol Matlack, Jordan Robertson, Bloomberg News, for “Cyber Wars.”

    PERSONAL FINANCE

    Winner- Susan Tompor, Detroit Free Press, for “Surviving Detroit’s bankruptcy.”
    Finalist- Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Michael Corkery, The New York Times, for “Driven into Debt.”
    Finalist- Margaret Collins, Carol Hymowitz, Richard Rubin, Bloomberg News, for “The 401(k) Mirage.”

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 1

    Winner-  Robert Snell, Chad Livengood, David Shepardson, Detroit News, for “Bankruptcy breakthrough: Detroit reaches settlement in dispute with its fiercest holdout creditor.”

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Winner- Matthew Garrahan, Tim Bradshaw, Financial Times, for Apple Beats scoop and analysis.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 3

    Winner- Shalini Ramachandran, Dana Cimilluca, Brent Kendall, Gautham Nagesh, Rani Molla, Dana Mattioli, Martin Peers, The Wall Street Journal, for Comcast-Time Warner deal coverage.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner- Daniel Howes, Detroit News, for his columns.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Finalist- Gillian Tett, Financial Times, for her columns.

    Winner- David Nicklaus, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, for his columns.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 3

    Winner- Eduardo Porter, The New York Times, for his columns.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner- Daniel Howes, Chad Livengood, David Shepardson, Gary Heinlein, Christine Ferretti, Brian J. O’Connor, Detroit News, for “Bankruptcy and Beyond.”
    Finalist- Hugh Bailey, Connecticut Post, for “Ruins Reborn.”
    Finalist- Jeff Adelson, Rebekah Allen, Mark Ballard, Gordon Russell, Richard Thompson, The Advocate, for “Giving away Louisiana.”

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner- Lillian Thomas, Sean D. Hamill, Kevin Crowe, Allan James Vestal, Guy Boulton, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “Poor Health.”
    Finalist- Adam Belz, Star Tribune, for “Left Behind.”
    Finalist- Jay Greene, Susan Jouflas, Kelly Shea, Mark Watanabe, Seattle Times, for “Amazon’s European Culture Clash.”

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 3

    Winner- Matt Richtel, Sabrina Tavernise, The New York Times, for “The New Smoke.”
    Finalist- Jennifer Levitz, Jon Kamp, Tom Burton, The Wall Street Journal, for “Deadly Medicine.”

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 1

    Winner- Sarah Kleiner Varble, The Virginian-Pilot, for “Then the walls closed in.”

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 2

    Winner- Adam Belz, Star Tribune, for “Left Behind.”

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 3

    Winner- Nathan Bomey, John Gallagher, Mark Stryker, Detroit Free Press, for “How Detroit was Reborn.”

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Finalist- Paul Delean, Lynn Moore, François Shalom, Mick Côté, Steve Faguy, Jeff Heinrich, Tracey Lindeman, Susan Semenak, The Gazette (Montreal Quebec)

    Winner- Lynn Hicks, Donnelle Eller, Patt Johnson, Joel Aschbrenner, Matthew Patane, Marco Santana, Charles Flesher, The Des Moines Register

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner- Business News Staff, Star Tribune

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 3

    Winner- The Wall Street Journal staff, The Wall Street Journal

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner- John Russell, Steve Berta, The Indianapolis Star, for “Pets at Risk.”
    Finalist- Josh Salman, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Selling Hope.”

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner- Christine Willmsen, Lewis Kamb, Justin Mayo, Garland Potts, Mark Nowlin, Marcus Yam, Mark Harrison, Jim Neff, The Seattle Times, for “Loaded with lead: How gun ranges poison workers and shooters.”
    Finalist- Mike Wereschagin, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, for “The Invisible Threat.”

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 3

    Winner- Danielle Ivory, Rebecca R. Ruiz, Hiroko Tabuchi, Bill Vlasic, Matthew L. Wald, The New York Times, for “Fatal Flaws.”
    Finalist- Richard Marosi, Don BartlettiLos Angeles Times,for “Product of Mexico.”

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner- Vitaliy Katsenelson, Institutional Investor, for his columns.

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner- Peter Coy, Bloomberg Businessweek, for his columns.

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner- Margarida Correia, Lee Conrad, Bank Investment Consultant, for “Dementia.”
    Finalist- Frances Denmark, Institutional Investor, for “Life, Death & the Numbers.”

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner- Allan Sloan, Fortune, for “Positively Un-American.”
    Finalist- Janet Bodnar, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Starting out/Guide to your money: How millennials can get ahead.”

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 1

    Winner- Aaron Timms, Institutional Investor, for “The race to topple Bloomberg.”
    Finalist– Hiten Samtani, The Real Deal, for “Doubling down on the Prince of Darkness.”

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 2

    Winner- Tom Foster, Will Bourne, Inc., for “Along came Lolly.”
    Finalist- Gary Rivlin, The New York Times Magazine/ The Investigative Fund, for “The cold, hard lessons of Mobile Home U.”
    Finalist- Parmy Olson, Forbes, for “Calling the American Dream.”

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner- Paul Jackson, Jacob Gaffney, HousingWire

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner- Josh Tyrangiel, Bloomberg Businessweek

    MAGAZINES INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner- David Beal, Sarah Lutman, Twin Cities Business, for “Whose legacy is it?”

    MAGAZINES INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner- Ann Marsh, Scott Wenger, Kamrhan Farwell, Financial Planning, for “Could financial planning help stem the rate of military suicides?”

    WEEKLIES BREAKING NEWS

    Winner- Albert Gallun, Crain’s Chicago Business, for “Poor families use ‘supervouchers’ to rent in city’s priciest buildings.”
    Finalist- J.K. Wall,Indianapolis Business Journal,for “IU Health Merging Hospitals.”

    WEEKLIES COMMENTARY

    Winner- Mike Hendricks, The Business Review (Albany,NY), for his columns.
    Finalist- Joe Cahill, Crain’s Chicago Business, for his columns.

    WEEKLIES EXPLANATORY

    Winner- Bill King, David Bourne, Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, for “Soccer’s Growing Reach.”
    Finalist- Dennis Domrzalski, Dan Mayfield, Tina Orem, Rachel Sams, Damon Scott, Rachel Baca, Chan Avery, Randy Siner, Albuquerque Business First, for “Reinventing our City.”
    Finalist- E.J. Schultz, Advertising Age, for “Whatever happened to the ad war on drugs?”

    WEEKLIES FEATURE

    Winner- Mike Hendricks, The Business Review (Albany,NY), for “The other side of Mohawk Harbor.”
    Finalist- Kate Kaye, Advertising Age, for “A Data Lab Rat in the Big City: Why trackers couldn’t trap this city dweller.”
    Finalist- Bill King, Tom Stinson, Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, for “Man of Steel.”

    WEEKLIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Winner- Greg Andrews and staff, Indianapolis Business Journal
    Finalist- Matthew Kish, Malia Spencer, Wendy Culverwell, Elizabeth Hayes, Jon Bell, Mason Walker, Andy Giegerich, Brandon Sawyer, Craig Spencer, Cathy Cheney, Steve Burton, Erik Siemers, Suzanne Stevens, Portland Business Journal
    Finalist- Staff, Advertising Age

    WEEKLIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner- Eric Martin, TradeWinds, for “Service Charge Included.”

    RADIO/TV BEST SERIES OR INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner- Nikhil Deogun, Mitch Weitzner, Phil LeBeau, Mary Noonan Robichaux, Wally Griffith, Deborah Camiel, Rich Gardella, Meghan Lisson, Jeff Pohlman, Meghan Reeder, James Segelstein, Michael Beyman, Christie Gripenburg, Patrick Ahearn, Rich Korn, Allison E. Stedman, Howard Ellis, Michael Sheehan, Steve Trevisan, Gary Vandenbergh, CNBC, for “Failure to Recall: Investigating GM.”

    RADIO/TV FEATURE OR FIELD REPORT

    Winner- Nikhil Deogun, Mitch Weitzner, Harry Smith, Mary Noonan Robichaux, Na Eng, Meghan Lisson, James Segelstein, Christie Gripenburg, Patrick Ahearn, Allison E. Stedman, Kelly Laudien, Richard Korn, for “Marijuana in America: Colorado’s Pot Rush.”

    REAL ESTATE

    Winner- Sarah Kleiner Varble,The Virginian-Pilot,for “Then the walls closed in.”
    Finalist- Alison Fitzgerald, Jared Bennett, Center for Public Integrity, for “Florida’s Foreclosure Crisis.”
    Finalist- Daniel J. Sernovitz, Washington Business Journal, for coverage of Washington, D.C. real estate.

    SMALL BUSINESS

    Winner-Tiffany Hsu, Chris Kirkham, Los Angeles Times, for coverage of California small business. Finalist- Ruth Simon, Tom McGinty, Angus Loten, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan, The Wall Street Journal, for “The imbalance in small-business lending.”

    SOCIAL MEDIA

    Winner- Scot Mayerowitz, Associated Press

    STUDENT – PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS

    Winner- Brittany Elena Morris, Arizona State University, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication for “NAFTA is an empty basket for southern Mexico farmers.” Published by the Arizona Daily Star.
    Finalist- Jennifer Surane, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill for “General Cable getting cheaper beckons activists: Real M&A.” Published by Bloomberg News.
    Finalist- Jonathan LaMantia, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill for “Manhattan condos at half price reshape New York’s Harlem.” Published by Bloomberg News.

    STUDENT – STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

    Winner- Daniel Bauman, Webster University, for “The costs and benefits of an elite college chess game.”
    Finalist- Samantha M. Sabin, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, for “Sugar Baby.”

    TECHNOLOGY

    Winner- Jennifer Gollan, Matt Smith, Adithya Sambamurthy, Michael Schiller, Amy Pyle, Robert Salladay, The Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Techsploitation.”
    Finalist- Alex Kantrowitz, Advertising Age, for “Digital ad fraud.”
    Finalist- The Wall Street Journal Staff, The Wall Street Journal,for “Open Sesame: Peering inside Alibaba.”

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Past Teletraining: “Cybersecurity and the holiday retail season”

    Posted By admin on Monday November 17, 2014

    member_training_header

    Cybersecurity and the holiday retail season

    November 17, 2014, 2 PM ET

    The holiday shopping season has always been prime season for data breaches. And this year, coming on the heels of a series of high-profile data breaches, promises to be no different. Just in time for the holiday retail season, this SABEW panel will help you break down cybersecurity issues and how to cover them. We’ll look at what retailers are doing to prepare, steps consumers can take to protect themselves, and the outlook for holiday shopping. We’ll also tackle the broader issue of cybersecurity and the range of industries it is impacting. And of course, we’ll be talking story ideas. Whether retail is your beat or you’re a general assignment reporter looking for ideas, this call is for you.

     Listen to the the call: November 17, 2014

    Playback Dial-in Number: 1-619-326-2753
    Playback Access Code: 176734

    Moderator:

    Michael Riley, cybersecurity reporter, Washington bureau, Bloomberg News. Michael covers cybersecurity for Bloomberg News and Bloomberg Businessweek magazine. Before coming to Bloomberg in 2010, he was a national reporter for the Denver Post for eight years, winning recognition for his reporting on violence-plagued Indian reservations and the global environmental destruction caused by gold mining. Michael has won national journalism awards from many organizations, including the Overseas Press Club, the American Bar Association, Columbia University and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

    Panelists:

    Jim Finkle, cybersecurity reporter, Reuters. Jim works in the Reuters Boston bureau covering cyber security, hacking and technology privacy issues. He’s been with Reuters since 2005. He previously covered technology, media and biotechnology for Broadcasting & Cable, the Orange County Register and Bloomberg News out Tokyo, Taipei, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Ana, California.

    Zachary K. Goldman, Executive Director, Center on Law and Security, NYU School of Law. Zachary returned to NYU in 2012 after having served for several years in the U.S. government.  He first served as a policy advisor in the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, where he was the subject matter expert on terrorist financing in the Arabian Peninsula, and also worked on the development of Iran sanctions policy.  He then served as a Special Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and has also worked as an Associate in the litigation department of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP.  Zachary is a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and received his J.D. from New York University School of Law, his Masters in International Relations from the London School of Economics, and his B.A. from Harvard University.

    Danny Yadron, cybersecurity reporter, San Francisco bureau, Wall Street Journal. Danny covers cybersecurity from The Wall Street Journal’s San Francisco bureau. He usually writes about hackers, cybercops and what companies do (and don’t do) to stay safe on the Internet. At the Journal, he also has covered tech policy, a presidential campaign, national politics and the Midwest – his home. Before that, he wrote for McClatchy, the Austin American-Statesman and The Buffalo News.

  • Teletraining: “Cybersecurity and the holiday retail season,” Monday, November 17, 2014, 2PM EST

    Posted By admin on Monday November 10, 2014

    member_training_header

    Cybersecurity and the holiday retail season

    November 17, 2014, 2 PM EST

    The holiday shopping season has always been prime season for data breaches. And this year, coming on the heels of a series of high-profile data breaches, promises to be no different. Just in time for the holiday retail season, this SABEW panel will help you break down cybersecurity issues and how to cover them. We’ll look at what retailers are doing to prepare, steps consumers can take to protect themselves, and the outlook for holiday shopping. We’ll also tackle the broader issue of cybersecurity and the range of industries it is impacting. And of course, we’ll be talking story ideas. Whether retail is your beat or you’re a general assignment reporter looking for ideas, this call is for you.

     Register here

    Moderator:

    Michael Riley, cybersecurity reporter, Washington bureau, Bloomberg News. Michael covers cybersecurity for Bloomberg News and Bloomberg Businessweek magazine. Before coming to Bloomberg in 2010, he was a national reporter for the Denver Post for eight years, winning recognition for his reporting on violence-plagued Indian reservations and the global environmental destruction caused by gold mining. Michael has won national journalism awards from many organizations, including the Overseas Press Club, the American Bar Association, Columbia University and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

    Panelists:

    Jim Finkle, cybersecurity reporter, Reuters. Jim works in the Reuters Boston bureau covering cyber security, hacking and technology privacy issues. He’s been with Reuters since 2005. He previously covered technology, media and biotechnology for Broadcasting & Cable, the Orange County Register and Bloomberg News out Tokyo, Taipei, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Ana, California.

    Zachary K. Goldman, Executive Director, Center on Law and Security, NYU School of Law. Zachary returned to NYU in 2012 after having served for several years in the U.S. government.  He first served as a policy advisor in the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, where he was the subject matter expert on terrorist financing in the Arabian Peninsula, and also worked on the development of Iran sanctions policy.  He then served as a Special Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and has also worked as an Associate in the litigation department of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP.  Zachary is a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and received his J.D. from New York University School of Law, his Masters in International Relations from the London School of Economics, and his B.A. from Harvard University.

    Danny Yadron, cybersecurity reporter, San Francisco bureau, Wall Street Journal. Danny covers cybersecurity from The Wall Street Journal’s San Francisco bureau. He usually writes about hackers, cybercops and what companies do (and don’t do) to stay safe on the Internet. At the Journal, he also has covered tech policy, a presidential campaign, national politics and the Midwest – his home. Before that, he wrote for McClatchy, the Austin American-Statesman and The Buffalo News.

  • 2013 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By admin on Monday April 21, 2014

    Winners in the 19th annual Best in Business competition for work done in 2013. This year, only one winner is named in each category division. In many instance, judges chose to recognize one or two finalists. Awards will be presented March 29 at the 51st annual SABEW conference in Phoenix.

    DIGITAL CATEGORY

    DIGITAL BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Finalist:  CNNMoney Staff, CNNMoney, for “Detroit Files for Bankruptcy.”

    The main story was cleanly written and highlighted how cuts have never been forced upon public pensioners before, and broadened story by noting other cities could get hurt when trying to sell bonds. It also spun forward news, speculating that unions will put up big fight.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner:  Jesse Eisinger, ProPublica, for “The Trade.”

    Eisingers in-depth commentary and meticulous digging is evident. By continuing to put pressure on the banking and financial industries, he is effecting change. Work is lively and accessible.

    Finalist: Rob Cox, Reuters, for “Economics of Gun Safety.”

    Cox brings economic analysis and a viewpoint to a groundbreaking, niche topic. His in-depth reporting and personal connection to the tragedy brings a novel approach to the topic that hits at the heart for so many.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner: Peter Goodman, The Huffington Post, for business and global commentary.

    Substantial experience and depth of knowledge. Goodman offered a sense of knowing China firsthand and applying his experience in a way that was measured and thoughtful.

    Finalist: Bianca Bosker, The Huffington Post, for technology commentary.

    Bosker brings authority to her work. She did some deep reporting and gave us a sense of the work having been done before, offering an opinion on a subject.

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner: T. Christian Miller, Jeff Gerth, ProPublica, for Overdose series on drug dangers.

    Incredible detail and reporting. Authors explained the medical, historical and business angles behind the dangers of acetaminophen in a highly approachable way. Graphics, interactive elements and videos added to the overall experience and depth.

    Finalist: Michael Smallberg, Project on Government Oversight, for SEC Revolving Door.

    All-around solid series that shows the conflicts within an agency that is supposed to watch out for investors. Instead, it appears to watch out more for the industry it is intended to regulate. POGO explained how the conflict of interest manifests itself in the oversight of the financial industry.

    Finalist: Paul Kiel, ProPublica, for Debt Inc.

    Casts light on the shadowy world on installment lending, how some companies push unknown costs onto desperate borrowers, and how they navigate around state laws.  Terrific example of explanatory journalism in the digital age.

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner:  Thomas Mucha, Solana Pyne, David Case, Patrick Winn, Jonah Kessel, GlobalPost, for “Myanmar Emerges.”

    Ambitious and worthy.  In-depth look at how a country with a long, troubled history tries to transition into a nation that promises it citizens both greater political and economic freedom. This year-long series was a real eye-opener and an example of digital storytelling at its finest.

    Finalist: Ritchie King, Sam Williams, David Yanofsky, Quartz, for By Reading this Page You are Minting Bitcoins.”                                                                                                                                             

    A unique approach to explaining one of the many mysteries of the digital currency. Innovative approach to storytelling that shows the great promise of digital journalism.

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 1

    Winner: A.C. Thompson, Jonathan Jones, ProPublica, for “Assisted Living.”

    Report on assisted-living facilities showed in chilling detail how too much focus on money erodes medical care. Thorough reporting, engaging writing, memorable examples of the impact on real people and pointed questioning of an industry that has largely escaped proper scrutiny.

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 2

    Winner:  David Case, Solana Pyne, GlobalPost Staff, GlobalPost, for “Dead Men Working: The World’s Most Dangerous Jobs.”

    The GlobalPost’s descriptive, on-the-ground reporting yields a compelling series that documents in personal ways the toll of the world’s most deadly work. Ambitious, melding multi-media and traditional story-telling.

    Finalist: John Schoen, CNBC.com, for “Pandemic of Pension Woes Plaguing the Nation.”

    Strong reporting and context provides readers with a troubling and detailed look at the nation’s public pensions.  Sources add dimension and character.

    Finalist: Suzy Khimm, msnbc.com, for “Austerity Deals Harsh Blow to Already Stricken Land.”

    The story of how politics affect residents in Harlan, Ky., is wonderfully told through an effective variety of voices. Shows the impact that decisions in Washington can have on everyday lives.

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner: Deal Staff, The Deal.

    Making excellent use of its digital platform, the Deal offered its sophisticated audience in-depth coverage of a broad range of topics, from the political and business climate in Turkey, to the M&A slowdown in Japan, to funding challenges facing U.S. defense contractors to the landscape of public radio in New York. Its breakouts on related topics, stories, industries and companies and people mentioned were a smart and useful approach. Even given its audience, it steered clear of jargon and produced stories that were engaging, well-written and solidly reported.

    Finalist:  Richard Eisenberg, Kerry Hannon, Kevin Haynes, Donna Sapolin, Next Avenue, PBS.

    Strong range of personal finance-related articles targeting over-50 audience. Made good use of digital medium with links and additional information. Provided useful information with clarity and an authoritative voice.

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner: Quartz Staff, Quartz.

    Quartz set itself apart with its deft combination of modern methods and traditional storytelling, and with its commitment to both real-time analysis and longer-form enterprise reporting.

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner: Chris Hamby, The Center for Public Integrity, for “Breathless and Burdened: Dying from Black Lung, Buried by Law and Medicine.

    Resourceful, hard-nosed reporting that undergirded this project, as well as by the clarity and power of the writing. Combined reportorial mastery of technical subjects with concrete, precise, and rich humanity. Outrageous and compelling.

    Finalist: Paul Kiel, ProPublica, for “Debt Inc.”

    Strong look at the latest incarnation of pay-day lending, with incisive reporting on how the lenders have evaded states’ regulatory attempts. Good story-telling and impressive reporting.

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner: Chris Kirkham, The Huffington Post, for stories on the private prison industry.

    In-depth look at the painful, brutal record of a flourishing private-prison company. Kirkham does the hard work of uncovering connections between the company and state officials awarding contracts while exposing the lack of oversight that allows an outfit with a sordid history to thrive.

    INNOVATION CATEGORY

    Winner:  Alex Blumberg, Joshua Davis, Kainaz Amaria, Brian Boyer, Alyson Hurt, Wes Lindamood, Claire O’Neill, David Gilkey, Jeremy Bowers, Danny DeBelius, Adam Cole, Quoctrung Bui, Zoe Chace, Jacob Goldstein, Jess Jiang, Caitlin Kenney, David Kestenbaum, Marianne McCune, Robert Smith, National Public Radio, for “Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.”

    Great example of what Planet Money does best explore complex business topics using micro examples to illuminate a macro issue, and present it in clear, simple, compelling terms that engage even the most passive audience. 

    Finalist: Kevin Quealy, Shan Carter, Archie Tse, Mike Bostock,  Matthew Ericson, Hannah Fairfield, Ford Fessenden, Tom Giratikanon, Josh Keller, Alicia Parlapiano, Tim Wallace, Derek Watkins, Jeremy White, Josh Williams, Karen Yourish, The New York Times, for a collection of business graphics.

    No news organization has embraced interactive graphics like The New York Times, and this compilation clearly highlights the Times industry leadership. None of the parts of the entry stood out as better than the others they were all terrific. And taken as a whole, the depth of knowledge and creativity represented in this entry is staggering.

    Finalist: Ben Eisen, Terrence Horan, Brian Aguilar, Tom Bemis, Laura Mandaro, MarketWatch, for “Mile Wide, Inch Deep: Bond Market Liquidity Dries Up.”

    A key component of successful innovation is a willingness to employ other peoples tools to achieve your own objective. This entry does that with great flair, engaging readers on the potentially dry topic of bond liquidity using Creativist, an interactive digital storytelling platform. It gave readers a top-down, visually compelling and highly accessible overview of the issue.

    INTERNATIONAL CATEGORY

    INTERNATIONAL BREAKING NEWS

    Winner: Staff, The New York Times, for Cyprus financial crisis coverage.

    Astonishingly clear on why it mattered, and a two-paragraph lead that was as good as it gets under deadline pressure.

    INTERNATIONAL COMMENTARY

    Winner: Andy Mukherjee, Peter Thal Larsen, Reuters, for Breakingviews commentary.

    This analysis is like a high-protein snack that quickly makes you smarter about complex global events. Its spare prose bubbles with wit, intelligence and accessibility. Breakingviews consistently assesses the long view and offers readers fresh insights.

    INTERNATIONAL EXPLANATORY

    Winner: Thomas Mucha, Solana Pyne, David Case, Patrick Winn, Jonah Kessel, GlobalPost, for “Myanmar Emerges.”

    This series makes it abundantly clear why Myanmar is an important subject. A clear picture emerges of a struggling democracy with huge problems – the worst child labor in the world. Excellent videos and heartbreaking portraits of youngsters working very tough jobs under horrible conditions makes this a compelling multimedia package.

    Finalist: Steve Stecklow, Babak Dehghanpisheh, Yeganeh Torbati, Reuters, for “Assets of the Ayatollah:”

    This dogged investigation and well-told series offers the first in-depth look at the business dealings of Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. It details his control of a secret organization, Setad, which built a massive financial empire on property seizures from persecuted religious minorities, business people and Iranians living abroad.

    Finalist: Sophia Yan, CNNMoney.com, for “Expats Fight to Navigate American Taxes.”

    Solid series of stories that explain, document and underscore the mind-numbing complexity of U.S. tax laws for Americans living and working abroad. Clear writing, good reporting and thoughtful explanation of a complex issue.

    INTERNATIONAL FEATURE

    Winner: Burt Helm, Dan Ferrara, Eric Schurenberg, Inc., for “When in China.”

    Great read that probed the international business story of our timethe perils and opportunities for U. S. entrepreneurs attempting to navigate the Chinese economy.

    Finalist: Andrew MacAskill, Bibhudatta Pradhan, Bloomberg News, for “India’s Shame.”

    A gripping and detailed account of how portions of Indias economy are heavily dependent on prostitution as a way of lifeputting millions of young girls in peril.

    Finalist: Christine Spolar, Raymond Bonner, Sally Gainsbury, Financial Times, for “Death in Singapore.”

    An eye-opening account of how what looked like an innocent adventure abroad for a U.S. post-graduate student turned into a tragedy for his family and a potentially explosive tale of international intrigue when it comes to advanced technology materials.

    INTERNATIONAL INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner:  Steve Stecklow, Babak Dehghanpisheh, Yeganeh Torbati, Reuters, for “Assets of the Ayatollah”

    This project had it all: Jaw-dropping findings. Powerful examples. Clear explanations and clean writing. Reporting it clearly wasn’t easy. The writers showed impressive resourcefulness, persistence and courage.

    Finalist: Staff, members and media partners, International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, for “Secrecy for Sale.”

    Stunning in its sweep, this project trained a powerful light on the shadowy, multi-trillion-dollar world of offshore tax havens. It was a monumental reporting effort, involving 112 journalists and 42 media partners, and it yielded dramatic results.

    NEWS AGENCIES

    NEWS AGENCIES BREAKING NEWS

    Winner: Tim Higgins, Jeff Green, Carol Hymowitz, Laura Colby, Bryant Urstadt, Bloomberg News, for “Scoop: GM Chooses Barra as First Female CEO.”

    Impressive depth of reporting and clearly a step ahead of the competition. Each story was well written and answered all the key questions while finding new angles on the central news of Mary Barra’s appointment. The overall package did an impressive job of breaking news ahead of general release.

    NEWS AGENCIES COMMENTARY

    Winner: Susan Antilla, Bloomberg View, for her columns.

    Terrific topics. Tough, engaging, enlightening, head-snapping. Well-reasoned arguments. Writes with authority and insight in a simple, declarative style that doesnt wander. No navel-gazing. Sophisticated humor used lightly in a way that advances the argument. Not humor for humors sake.

    NEWS AGENCIES EXPLANATORY

    Winner: Michelle Conlin, Brian Grow, Reuters, for “They Own the House, but Not What Lies Beneath.”

    This story revealed a surprising new player in the “fracking” energy boom: home builders. The exhaustively researched but tightly written piece chronicles how builders are keeping underground mineral rights to home lots they sell, a practice they disclose to homeowners in the fine print of contracts. But the Reuters coverage pulled back the curtain on the growing industry practice.

    Finalist: Scot Paltrow, Kelly Carr, Reuters for “Unaccountable.”

    A surprising and incisive look at the human costs of decades of bad bookkeeping at the Pentagon. The three-part series pulls together an impressive mix of public records and interviews, along with graphics and videos, to illustrate the absurdity of billions wasted on failed attempts to modernize defense-department systems while soldiers are nickel-and-dimed.

    Finalist:Bernard Condon, Paul Wiseman, David McHugh, Elaine Kurtenbach, Nick Harbaugh, The Associated Press, for “Great Reset.”

    The pieces of this ambitious package each explain key concerns about the U.S. and world economies, and work together with a series of graphics to paint a larger picture. The stories didn’t break news, but broke down complex issues and combined them with colorful personal anecdotes.

    NEWS AGENCIES FEATURE

    Winner: Carol Hymowitz, Bloomberg News, for “The End of Retirement.”

    Bloomberg and Hymowitz deserve real credit for a deep and passionate depiction of a major American problem — the lack of personal wealth needed to afford retirement. Beautifully reported, well written and elegantly produced this is a first-rate feature

    Finalist: Scott Mayerowitz, The Associated Press, for “From the Start, Dreamliner Jet Program was Rushed.”

    The AP took a deep dive into the high-flying aerospace business to reveal how ad-hoc and often poorly organized was Boeing construction of its 787. This is a definitive account of an important 2013 story.

    Finalist: Anne D’Innocenzio, The Associated Press, for “No Guarantees When Shopping for ‘Ethically Made’ Clothes.”

    Solid work in a tough category. A marvelously sourced, deeply written account of the complexities hidden inside of even simple clothing and garments. Excellent job.

    NEWS AGENCIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Winner: Staff, Reuters.

    Reuters excelled in a tough field with an entry that showed strength in core business-news reporting and exceptional enterprise journalism that displayed courage, ambition and mastery of new storytelling techniques. Where Reuters clearly excelled was with its two enterprise piecesAssets of the Ayatollah, and Connected China. Both pieces shed light on stories about two of the most importantand opaquenations on Earth: Iran and China. Great journalism married with great design. Reuters broke ground with its insightful piece of what Janet Yellen, now the head of the Federal Reserve, knew about the troubled housing market in California before the subprime bubble burst.

    Finalist: Matthew Winkler, Serena Saitto, Lee Spears, Leslie Picker, Ari Levy, Brian Womack, Michael Smith, David Evans, Jason Harper, Liam Vaughan, Gavin Finch, Ambereen Choudhury, Bloomberg News. 

    Bloomberg had a strong entry in this category, including investigative work on foreign exchange, and explanatory stories on manged futures, and features on the revival of a Detroit Chrysler plant.

    Finalist: Barbara Ortutay, Michael Liedtke, Scott Mayerowitz, Tom Krisher, Dee-Ann Durbin, Jonathan Fahey, Bernard Condon, Paul Wiseman, The Associated Press.

    AP’s entry was good, especially stories on how technology is eliminating some jobs, and the explanatory piece on huge changes in the oil industry.  Solid work on Chevrolet.

    NEWS AGENCIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner: Scot Paltrow and Kelly Carr, Reuters, for “Unaccountable.”

    Exhaustive, clear reporting on a subject of real consequence, the business of government. It expertly mixes the human component of Pentagon mismanagement with the macro problems, as well as the bungled bureaucratic attempts to fix it. Powerful and descriptive writing mixes with stellar presentation, including photography, video and smartly produced infographics.

    PERSONAL FINANCE

    Winner: Kimberly Lankford, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for stories on financial planning for Alzheimer’s disease.

    While Alzheimer’s is a widely known ailment, the enormous financial toll is rarely discussed. Lankford presented the material in an upfront but easy to understand way. It gave different examples of how families are coping. This is true service journalism that educated the reader, and most likely helped people grappling with which way to turn.

    Finalist: Susan Tompor, Detroit Free Press, for series on Detroit bankruptcy effect on city pension recipients.

    An important series of stories that personalizes a city in crisis. Tompor combines data with anecdotes to make the Detroit situation come to life.

    Finalist: Amanda Gengler, Money, for “Future of Your Healthcare.”

    This piece is extremely well-reported, with great art, and it not only outlines problems, but offers advice on how to solve them. It ticked a lot of boxes, and it was an on-trend topic.

    PRINT-DAILY NEWSPAPERS

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 1

    Winner: Getahn Ward, The Tennessean, for “Convention Center Redevelopment.”

    This well-written, well-rounded story packed a lot of important information into a breaking news story. It hit all the big points that readers in this community would want to know — the size and shape of the project, the potential tenants and the financing. The reporter broke the story in a competitive market, forcing rivals to source the paper for much of the day and the mayor to issue the lease that evening.

    Finalist: Maria Aspan, Jeff Horwitz, American Banker, for “Chase Halts Card Debt Sales Ahead of Crackdown.”

    The American Banker article was very strong, requiring digging through court documents and sourcing with high-level industry insiders. Comparing the change in court filings was a creative and enterprising way to get at the story.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Winner: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Staff, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, for “Atlanta Braves Move to Suburbs.”

    When the Braves announced the shocking and unexpected news that the team would move to the suburbs, the AJC provided a thorough first-day report. Most impressive was its tick-tock of how the top-secret deal came together, a story that one would not expect to gel until later. It was a comprehensive package, including residents’ and officials’ reactions, as well as looking at the experience of other organizations that have moved to the suburbs. Coverage was enhanced by strong graphics. Commentary on the deal was sharp and provocative.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 3

    Winner: Ivan Penn, Drew Harwell, Robert Trigaux, Barbara Behrendt, Jeff Harrington, Tampa Bay Times, for “Duke Pulls Plug.”

    Bold with its coverage of Duke Energys decision to close the area nuclear plant.  The team clearly knew the issues, which gave them the ability to both break the news and spin a good story with a sharp point of view.   The reporting also did a good job connecting the news with the impact on the local economy and community.

    Finalist: Terry Maxon, The Dallas Morning News business staff, The Dallas Morning News, for  American-U.S. Airways merger coverage.

    The Dallas Morning News wins points for being fast on the news with a solid, authoritative take, and then live blogging every angle. The Morning News rounded out coverage with smart sidebars, including the impact on consumers.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 4

    Winner:  E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times, for “Wells Fargo Sales Schemes.”

    Solid consumer protection reporting and good document research and inside the company reporting. Would have liked a clear explanation of the cost to consumers and/or taxpayers. But a very good story.

    Finalist: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Ben Protess, Peter Eavis, The New York Times, for “JP Morgan Settlement.”

    Solid job on a highly competitive story. The package is complete, with context of how JPM manufactured mortgages and how the SEC and Justice pursued the bank.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner: Tim Steller,  Arizona Daily Star, for his columns.

    Tight and well-reported focus on the local community, with local voices making his point.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner: David Nicklaus, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, for his columns.

    David Nicklaus writes an impressive example of a destination business column, both commanding and concise. It takes an impressive depth of understanding to present complex topics in such sure and accessible terms. We admired his ambitious targets, sharp writing and well-focused arguments.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 3

    Winner (Tie): Gary Silverman, Financial Times, for his columns.

    Silverman demonstrates how form is as important as content in commentary. He engages the reader with off-the-wall thoughts, literary references and eloquent writing. In doing so, he lures people into thinking about issues — such as monetary policy, gay marriage and taxes — that they otherwise might have found repellant. Excellent work!

    Winner (Tie): Brier Dudley, The Seattle Times, for his columns.

    Dudley is doing a great service to the people of Seattle. With original reporting and a strong sense of fairness, he exposes cases of greed, hypocrisy and misinformation that have a direct effect on the lives and livelihoods of his audience — and that probably aren’t being covered anyplace else. Local, activist, set-the-record-straight journalism at its best.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 4

    Winner: David Lazarus, Los Angeles Times, for his columns.

    Lazarus has the ability to hone in on bold and original subject matter. He used the flexibility of his column to boldly explore unique angles to important topics and expose them to much-needed public scrutiny. Lazarus makes the large and seemingly abstract subject of U.S. healthcare accessible by focusing on issues that directly impact readers.

    Finalist: James Stewart, The New York Times, for his columns.

    Mr. Stewart trained his keen analytical eye on the boards of large institutions like Hewlett-Packard and the New York City Opera , explaining and exposing governance and management failings in a way that few other journalists can.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner: Marc Perrusquia, The Commercial Appeal, for “Southern Transplants.”

    Judges were impressed with this series on the transplant business in Memphis. Its a well-told story with nice writing.

    Finalist: Laurence Hammack, David Ress, Roanoke Times, for “Understanding Obamacare.”

    Well-done, public service/explanatory reporting on a very important topic; they were also on top of the healthcare.gov problems even before the roll out.

    Finalist: Kevin Wack, American Banker, for “How Big Banks Killed a Plan to Speed Up Money Transfers.”

    Nice regulatory reporting. Exceptionally clear writing and very good that a trade journal would take on the big banks.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner: Bernard Wolfson, Orange County Register,  for “Obamacare in Orange County.”

    In a category where so many people dug in so deeply, this was executed in a very simple way. So much has been written on the political aspect, but I don’t know that I have read anything this helpful on this topic. Dispassionate, simply presented.

    Finalist: Dan Haar, The Hartford Courant, for “America’s Rifle: Rise Of The AR-15.”

    This series stood apart from the emotional debate over the Newtown school shooting to look at the pre-eminence of the AR-15 rifle in terms of Connecticut’s history, culture and meaning to the innovation economy, and they deserve a lot of credit for being able to do that.

    Finalist: Rick Romell, Allan James Vestal, Bill Schulz, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “A Time to Build.”

    Sheer ambition: Not many newspapers this size would have taken on something like this. Deeply reported, with exhaustive use of demographic data and lots of humanity. It was pro-Milwaukee but not in a way that felt rah-rah.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 3

    Winner: Nathan Bomey, John Gallagher and Free Press Staff, Detroit Free Press, for “How Detroit Went Broke.”

    A revelatory piece of in-depth reporting. The reporters gave us a great read, informative graphics and a new perspective on the unprecedented bankruptcy.

    Finalist: Ivan Penn, Tampa Bay Times, for “Nuclear Myths.”

    Ivan Penn turned conventional wisdom on its head with this piece, which in turn changed policy in Florida.

    Finalist: Sean Silcoff, Jacquie McNish and Steve Ladurantaye, Globe and Mail, for “Inside the Fall of Blackberry.”

    A great example of explanatory business reporting that took us inside the fall of this once-dominant company.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 4

    Winner: Gretchen Morgenson, David Kocieniewski, Robert Gebeloff, The New York Times, for “House Edge.”

     Normally any feature that starts out talking about aluminum turns quickly into a room-emptier. But the writers showcased remarkable reporting and writing skill set to describe and analyze a scheme by Goldman Sachs for driving up the cost of beverage cans. The story immediately connected the thesis to the reader’s pocketbook. Impact? Government investigations came almost immediately.

    Finalist: Jenny Strasburg, Tom McGinty, John Carryrou, Michael Rothfeld, James Sterngold, Chad Bray, Susan Pulliam, The Wall Street Journal, for “Capital Offenses: Insider Trading at SAC Capital.”

    No financial story has proved more fascinating recently than the federal probe into the giant, secretive hedge fund SAC Capital. Continuing its legacy of insider trading coverage that dates back to stories about Ivan Boesky and Dennis Levine in the 1980s, The Journal launched an impressive multi-platform assault on SAC — putting scoops on its website, “explainers” in the paper and videos on air.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 1

    Winner: Victor Epstein, Mark Marturello, Katie Kunert, The DesMoines Register, for “Insurance Heavyweights.”

    Great enterprise with a clear thesis that identifies a trend and backs it up with examples. Strong sidebars about specific companies, charts that underline the thesis and a diversity of voices from the industry. Very impressive and ambitious package lots of detail and analysis.

    Finalist: Paul Edward Parker, Providence Journal, for “This Changes Everything.”

    Interesting features about how technology changes all aspects of our lives. Great work online with some good videos and polls to engage readers and encourage them to follow the whole series. Enjoyed the hiking and food trucks stories especially.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 2

    Winner: Barbara Soderlin, Omaha World-Herald, for “Finding a Recipe for Success.”

    Great series. Compelling and informative for all those looking to start their own businesses. The stories took readers through various steps for opening a business, including the important impact it has on family life. The writer nicely balanced the business details with human interest reporting.

    Finalist: David Markiewicz, Atlanta Journal Constitution, for ” The Inventor.”

    A story you couldn’t stop reading. The inventor was successful on many counts, but not financially. The story showed the roller-coaster ride of emotions and breaks and setbacks, and the impact on his family.

    Finalist: Rick Romell, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “An Immigrant’s Story”

    Rich background in outline the journey of a Siberian immigrant who made good, first as a software entrepreneur and then as a gelato maker.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 3

    Winner: Nathan VanderKlippe, Globe and Mail, for Keystone pipeline project.

    Highly readable and relevant project whose ambitions are as big as the proposed pipeline itself. The reporter consistently delivers on those ambitions with insights gleaned by simply spending time with people living and working along the pipelines trail. No one side wins out in this one, no one hero or villain emerges; instead, a complex issue is explained well and brought to life.

    Finalist: Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, OH), for “Slavic Village, Devastated by the National Housing Crisis, is Battling Back.”

    Exquisitely detailed exploration of the slow comeback of a neighborhood in Cleveland that was epicenter of the foreclosure crisis. An interesting and compelling read even for people not from or familiar with the area.

    Finalist: Ronald. J. Hansen, The Arizona Republic, for “Income Tax Turns 100.”

    With fun-telling graphics and tidbits, took potentially dry topic of income tax 100 birthday and recounted history in lively anecdote-filled story. An article you just had to share as you read.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 4

    Winner: Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times, for “Tougher Workplace.”

    Alana Semuels obviously worked overtime herself to produce this very readable and extremely well-organized series on overworked Americans. Writing on an important topic, Semuels strikes a balanced tone. She is fair to employers while giving voice to Americans who feel as if they have become human machines on the job.

    Finalist: Walter Hamilton, Shan Li,  Los Angeles Times, for “Five Years After Meltdown Family.”

    Shows the long-term human cost of the financial crisis for ordinary people. Full of color and anecdotes, it focuses on appealing central character and family. It is sympathetic without going overboard, and the authors resist the temptation to sermonize. This economy of writing heightens the impact of the story.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner: Editorial Staff, American Banker

    American Banker provides innovative finance coverage on everything from leveraged loans to force-placed insurance. It’s not always easy to make articles on banking fascinating, but the writers at American Banker manage to do it consistently in issue after issue. We loved articles like Lessons from a Terrible Thursday at JPMorgan, Too Big to Jail, Taxpayers Lose as GSE Plan Dies and the expansive coverage on the unbanked. Journalists write with authority and institutional knowledge on a variety of policy issues from the fate of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to the impact of Dodd-Frank on the industry — often with angles that won’t be found anywhere else. Bravo!

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner (TIE): Business News Staff, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Any new resident of or visitor to Milwaukee who reads the Journal Sentinel’s business section will quickly know what the town is all about, how its economy fits into the region, state and nation, which industries are thriving and which aren’t, where the city’s been and where it’s going. The large Business Section is impressively filled with staff stories supplemented by well-chosen wires and syndicated columns.

    Winner (TIE): Business News Staff, The Columbus Dispatch

    The staff showed consistently good quality work, with a solid contingent of enterprise pieces. We were particularly impressed with an investigative piece — on a scam in which some apartment dwellers in the city are getting jacked-up utilities bills. Other stories looked at craft brewers, Frontier Air, food safety, the city’s growing tech sector, and the plight of folks after an aluminum-smelting plant closing. The Dispatch business section served its audience well.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 3

    Winner: Business News Staff, The Dallas Morning News

    Strong investigative reporting on the police pension fund’s investment in luxury homes and the disparity between Parkland Hospital’s wealth and its treatment of patients. That, plus the thorough coverage of the American Airlines merger made the Dallas paper the winner. The News showcased first-rate investigative work and comprehensive local reporting.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 4

    Winner: Business News Staff, The New York Times

    The Times was in a class by itself. No other entry matched the breadth of coverage it offered. Stories exhibited rich detail and sophistication. The section showed a deep commitment to foreign coverage. There were multiple columnists, a book review, letters and special features.

    Finalist: Business News Staff, Los Angeles Times

    A worthy honoree. In particular, the papers investigation on Wells Fargo sales quotas featured on the front page exhibited great enterprise in exposing questionable behavior from a bank that had largely avoided scrutiny.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner: Michael Braga, Anthony Cormier, The Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Breaking the Banks.”

    What the Herald-Tribune did so well is tell stories that spanned a number of saucy topics: insider deals, theft, nepotism, death threats, drug lords, careless lenders and a slate of other unsettling yet enticing elements. The variety of stories from news to profiles kept the package interesting, as did the stories about the “good guys” who maintained their integrity and ethical business standards. A comprehensive, intriguing package that showcased the breadth and depth of what business journalism can be.

    Finalist: Kate Berry, Jeff Horwitz, American Banker, for “Housing Group Taps Dubious Data, HUD Ties to Demand Millions from Banks”

    Packed with points of tension that make it appealing to a wide array of readers: minorities, fair housing advocates, lawyers, bankers, politicians and civic leaders, and others. This is a thoroughly engaging piece of work.

    Finalist: Kate Berry, American Banker, for “Buried in Fine Print: $57B of FHA Loans Big Banks May Have to Eat.”

    This story points to a caution that every business reporter should heed: If you want to know more, look beyond the numbers and read the footnotes on financial reports. The reporter really dug into the forensics of financial statements and provided an excellent example of the type of discipline more business journalists need.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner: Ellen Gabler, Mark Johnson, John Fauber, Allan James Vestal, Kristyna Wentz-Graff, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, for “Deadly Delays.”

    Rare investigative reporting project that led literally to life and death outcomes. Very thorough, well told, a compelling narrative on delays in processing newborn screening tests that combined outstanding use of rich data and interactive features. Demonstrated a commitment beyond time and resources.

    Finalist: Dan Gearino, Columbus Dispatch: for “Shocking Cost.”

    This entry distinguished itself by helping to bring to a stop an unconscionable practice. One of the higher goals in any investigative journalism project – the exposure helped to end the evictions, with legislation introduced to bring the middlemen under regulation.

    Finalist: Marjie Lundstrom, Sam Stanton, Manny Crisostomo, Sharon Okada, The Sacramento Bee, for “The Carissa Carpenter Saga.”

    Richly mined tale, including obtaining of details of history of activity, and quotes from interviews and e-mails. Distinguished itself from other investigations into corrupt commercial activity/ con-artists/ poinzi schemes by contributing to its halt. There should be a category for before-the-horse-has-bolted journalism.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 3

    Winner: Grant Robertson, Jacquie McNish, Globe and Mail, for “Lac-Mégantic.”

    The Globe and Mail wasn’t the only news organization to probe what went wrong last July when a train carrying oil derailed and exploded, killing 47 people in the small Quebec town of Lac-Mégantic. But the Globe and Mail dug deeper and found out more, drawing on dozens of interviews as well as company and government documents obtained through access-to-information laws.

    Finalist: Luis Fabregas, Andrew Conte, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, for “Donor Dilemma.”

    In a nearly year-long investigation, the newspaper discovered that many organ procurement organizations aren’t nearly as altruistic as the people who donate their organs upon death. They pored over the records of all 51 organizations for which detailed financial data was available, finding that their top executives averaged $320,000 a year in pay.

    Finalist: Megan Woolhouse, Beth Healy, The Boston Globe, for “Deloitte.”

    Boston Globe reporters Woolhouse and Healy broke news repeatedly over the course of four months in a dogged investigation of the problem-plagued launch of an unemployment system built by Deloitte Consulting.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 4

    Winner: Alison Young, John Hillkirk, USA TODAY, for “Supplement Shell Game, The People Behind Risky Pills.”

    A story that uncovered the world of criminals-turned-entrepreneurs who lace supplements with harmful chemicals, market them to the public and perpetually escape the grips of the law. This series likely saved lives and, hey, what could be more important than that? The interactive graphic alone showed tremendous research and focus.

    PRINT-MAGAZINE CATEGORY

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner: Dale Kurschner, Twin Cities Business, for What about Partners?”

    Kurschner speaks to his audience, making them better informed about their area, using numbers and clear statements to make his points.

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner: Dan Primack, Fortune, for his columns.

    Commentary should be deeply reported and sharply written, marshaling new evidence to convey a clear viewpoint that helps readers figure out what to think about the topic at hand. The originality of Primack’s ideas compels him into fresh, authoritative reporting; he has a strong ability to explain complex issues. His writing is lively, and we’re never left wondering where he stands. The columns speak in a well-read, well-informed voice.

    Finalist: Paul Barrett, Bloomberg Businessweek, for “Gun Control.”

    Barrett took on the intensely emotional issue of gun control. This kind of reporting isn’t just good explanatory journalism, but it puts the issues into context and helps readers understand what’s at stake no matter which side they are on.

    Finalist: Peter Coy, Bloomberg Businessweek, for his columns.

    Coy takes us below the surface of subjects and shows us the financial angles we might not have thought of. He takes you below ground and shows you the roots of things that are going on beneath the headlines. His reporting is original, and the writing is clear.

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner: Adam Pincus, The Real Deal, for “Empire State Building: A Buyer’s Manual.”

    A clear and concise presentation about an iconic piece of real estate in Manhattan. A different approach than a typical narrative. The two-page spread uses a striking illustration, photos and charts to show the reader some history about the major players owners as well as tenants.

    Finalist: Jeff Horwitz, Maria Aspan, American Banker, for “The Bank Doctor.”

    The powerful consultancy employs a whos who among regulators and private sector bankers. Rich in detail, well organized, enhanced theme of the story in a reader-friendly design. We were especially impressed for the infographic detailing Promontory’s connections.

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner: Peter Elkind, Doris Burke, Fortune, for “Amazon’s War on Taxes.”

    Deftly tells the story of how Amazon.com managed to avoid collecting state sales taxes for so many years by taking advantage of an old court ruling and employing some fairly hard-nosed tactics. Writers tell what could be a dry tax story with flair and color.

    Finalist: Amanda Gengler, Money Magazine, for “Future of Your Healthcare.”

    Deeply reported yet easily digestible, providing an unvarnished view for consumers of what to expect with the rollout of the largest overhaul of health insurance in a generation. Gave readers a prescient look of the future of health care in which more of the cost and responsibility is placed on the consumer. The three-part series, which kicked off in June, set the stage for many of the issues that became front-page news in the fall.

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 1

    Finalist: Stephanie Forshee, Auto Dealer Monthly, for “Inside Job: Special Report on Embezzlement.”

    Takes a colorful look at embezzlement at auto dealerships, building on a prison letter from the perpetrator of one of the largest and longest-running dealer ripoffs. The report paints a social picture that starts to explain why many cases go undetected and remain hushed.

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 2

    Winner: Jeff Howe, Money Magazine, for “Paying for Finn.”

    Grabbed me almost immediately. It was our unanimous choice before we even got on the phone.

    Finalist: Julie Segal, Institutional Investor, for “Is Alpha Dead?”

    A strong submission that’s as accessible to an individual investor as it is to a Peter Lynch. A topic that appears to have been hiding in plain view.

    Finalist: Jeffrey Goldberg, Bloomberg Business Week, for “Drowning Kiribati.”

    All the world’s problems seem to have visited an obscure cluster of islands in the Pacific. A fascinating, original account of the plight of the “Saudi Arabia of fish.”

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner: Staff, The Real Deal

    The Real Deal hits its target-audience in the New York real estate industry dead-on, while its edgy, creative and highly informative content bridges the gap to general readers. The cover stories draw you in through their smartly designed presentation and then deliver the goods.

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner: Josh Tyrangiel, editor, Bloomberg Businessweek

    Superb mix of timely stories, smart analysis and lively writing. The deep-dive issue on the 5th anniversary of Lehman’s collapse was a business junky’s dream. The foreign coverage had some nice surprises, like Adam Higginbotham’s tale of the confidence man who swindled the Iraqi government out of millions with his phony bomb detectors. But most unexpected were the magazine’s attitude and sense of fun.

    FInalist: Andy Serwer, managing editor, Fortune

    Fortune is complete and consistent. The issue with the spycatcher was fantastic beginning to end.

    MAGAZINES INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner: Cam Simpson, Bloomberg Businessweek, for “Stranded.”

    When Apple launched its iPhone 5 in fall of 2012, the heat was on suppliers to get the devices on the shelves. According to Bloomberg Businessweek reporter Cam Simpson, the company “had planned… the most aggressive production-and-launch schedule ever attempted by Apple.” But in that rush to satisfy Apple customers, Simpson found in reporting this investigative piece, there were some who paid a very steep price: the 1,500 workers from Nepal who paid job brokers to be flown to Malaysia to assemble cameras for the new smartphones. When the work was moved to a different factory, the workers became stranded in a legal limbo for two months, unpaid, unable to go home and frightened of starving to death. With his vivid, harrowing report, Simpson exposed a darker side of the electronics supply chain. His work forced Apple — and the U.S. government – to take notice and work to stop the brokers who demand payments from factory job recruits. After reading this tale of exploitation, you’ll never look at your iPhone the same way.

    Finalist: Michael Smith, Alex Webb, Tim Culpan, Bloomberg Markets, for “Tungsten’s Tainted Trail.”

    Turning the world’s supply chain for tungsten upside down, this story has the perfect mix of drama and danger. But, most important, it displays the hallmark of a good investigative piece — impact. Diligent, deep reporting led Bloomberg Markets to uncover an illegal activity that thrives “because no one outside the nation has bothered to notice” it. Following this six-month investigation, now some companies have stopped buying tungsten from Columbia. In addition, the European Union changed its laws to prevent companies from buying minerals that fund conflict in Columbia.

    PRINT-WEEKLIES AND BI-WEEKLIES CATEGORY

    WEEKLIES BREAKING NEWS

    Winner: James Rufus Koren, Los Angeles Business Journal, for “Amazon Expands Delivery Service.”

    Demonstrated great reporting instincts, and scored an intriguing story with intense regional interest and national relevance. His article on Amazon’s delivery service expansion was detailed, thorough, and an engaging read.

    Finalist: Matthew Kish, Portland Business Journal, for “Welcome to Swooshville.”

    Impressive reporting on Nike’s land deals.  Result: a high-impact package of articles and graphics that brought the reader into the corporate behemoth’s empire. The series provided a comprehensive look at Nike’s sprawling corporate campus that was both visually appealing and highly informative.

    WEEKLIES COMMENTARY

    Winner: Bruce Kelly, Investment News, for his columns.

    A seasoned journalist who combines sophisticated research with plain talk that’s easy to follow. No one wonders what he means when he says an individual has “fudged documents.” He’s a champion of the individual investor, calling on the securities industry to silence brokers who should no longer be giving advice.

    Finalist: Joe Cahill, Crains Chicago Business, for his columns.

    Good reporting and willing to take the powerful to task.

    WEEKLIES EXPLANATORY

    Winner: Adam Sichko, Albany Business Review, for “A Way of Life Under Fire.”

    Great read and a fresh approach to the gun-control issue. Very well reported. Full of human texture. Excellent illumination as well of the overarching theme of the decline of U.S. manufacturing.

    Finalist: Staff, Crains New York Business, for “Sandy One Year Later.”

    Enormous breadth of coverage — every conceivable aspect. Well reported and presented in digestible pieces. Each section was packed with information.

    Finalist: Alby Gallun, Micah Maidenberg, Crains Chicago Business, for “Reckless Abandon.”

    Smart approach. Personalized the crisis of urban decay and provided an illuminating example of a national issue. Presentation helped make this a story you wanted to read.

    WEEKLIES FEATURE

    Winner: Meribah Knight, Crains Chicago Business, for “A Business of Life and Death.”

    How does a family-owned company catering to lower-income consumers respond to a surge in business? The answer is just the starting point for this extensively reported story of a local funeral home and its efforts to cope with a surging murder rate in Chicago.

    Finalist: Aaron Elstein, Glenn Coleman, Crains New York, for “Capturing the Seggermans.”

    This story about four siblings and a family tax-evasion scheme is a compelling read. E-mail excerpts at the start spell out the conspiracy, and interviews with family members and others flesh out the details. The report skillfully explains how the case was tied into a broader crackdown on tax cheats.

    Finalist: Bill King, Tom Stinson, Brandon McClung, Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, for “Staying True.”

    Sports Business Journal’s decision to give Jerry Reinsdorf a Lifetime Achievement Award provided an opportunity to tell the definitive tale about him. The weekly rose to the challenge, as the story and related sidebars add up to a package that any sports publication would surely be proud to have.

    WEEKLIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Winner: Staff, Crains New York Business

    New York sets the bar high for financial coverage and Crains NY rises above the challenge.  Issues are full of surprises, both local and national in scope. One issue told you about food vendors who profit from pint-sized locations, turn the page and its how much A-Rods return cost the Yanks.  And, then its local, local, local with a piece on how Queens homeowners foot the bill for sidewalk damage, and snappy commentary on a variety of issues.  Clearly, well deserving of overall excellence.

    Finalist:  Staff, Street and Smiths Sports Business Journal

    Thank goodness someone is keeping a close eye on the multi-billion-dollar business of sports. And thank goodness for Street and Smiths, who keep track of ad rates from FoxSports as well as the fine point of business sponsorship of sporting events. Particular kudos on covering sports industry security ramifications following the Boston Marathon bombing, and a thorough special section on 75th anniversary of the NCAA.

    Finalist: Staff, Albany Business Review

    Local coverage done right with articles of interest to a wider community, such strong best of lists. Of note were two outstanding articles, one on how immigrant businessmen are contributing to the local economy despite federal red tape in getting a green card, and a stellar profile on the town of Ilion in a post-Newtown world. The article profiles the mixed feelings of those who work for Remington arms amid anti-gun sentiment in the state.

    WEEKLIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner: Alfred Lee, Los Angeles Business Journal, for “EB-5 Inquiry.”

    The stuff that makes (or should make) local journalism what it is. It’s clear-cut, watchdog-style, impactful journalism. This story is clearly written, and reporter Alfred Lee shows that great investigative stories don’t have to be pages long and full of flowery prose.

    Finalist: Chris Bragg, Erik Engquist, Glenn Coleman, Crains New York, for “State Pol’s Radio Silence.”

    Another work that local watchdog journalism is alive and well. Reporter Chris Bragg examined legal documents and tax returns to break the story that a Brooklyn Assemblyman who failed to disclose advertising payments to a firm he owned. The story prompted New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to launch an investigation into the matter.

    Finalist: Lynne Marke, Crains Chicago Business, for “Futures Shock.”

    Marek takes a comprehensive look at five years of enforcement action by day-to-day regulators by CME and the National Futures Association. The story is well done, full of rich detail and first-hand accounts from market participants.

    RADIO/TELEVISION CATEGORY

    RADIO/TV BEST SEGMENT OR INTERVIEW

    Winner: Elise Hu, Uri Berliner, Neal Carruth, National Public Radio, for “Health Care Website Launch.”

    NPR reporter Elise Hu’s coverage of the national healthcare rollout was smart, enterprising and emotional. Day after day, Hu broke news on a story that every news outlet in the country was covering. She told us things we hadn’t heard elsewhere, such as delving into the role of federal IT know-how. She spoke with energy and intensity and presented herself like the expert on the subject that she clearly is.

    RADIO/TV BEST SERIES OR INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner: Patrick Madden, Julie Patel, Meymo Lyons, American University School of Communication, WAMU 88.5 News, for “Deals For Developers.”

    Lots of ground covered, great interviews with lots of players and lots of tough questions asked. Good use of numbers to show connections between developers and politicians. Writing is strong and clear with a good emotional bent, sharing stories of the people affected by the misuse of the subsidies. Best example of strong, impactful local journalism.    This is local accountability journalism at its best.

    RADIO/TV BEST SHOW

    Winner: Nik Deogun, Tyler Mathisen, Susie Gharib, Richard Carolan, Rebecca White, CNBC, for Nightly Business Report.

    RADIO/TV FEATURE OR FIELD REPORT

    Winner: Tyler Mathisen, Mitch Weitzner, Mary Noonan Robichaux,  James Segelstein, Na Eng, Jeanine Ibrahim, Patrick Ahearn, Steven T. Banton, John Werner, Meghan Lisson, CNBC, for “Death: It’s a Living.”

    CNBC takes a topic that most of us would prefer to ignore and makes it compelling and even humorous. From raffling a free cremation at a senior lifestyle expo, to a woman wanting to make sure her final resting place has no obstructed views, Story hooks us and then takes us on a balanced view of the highs and lows of the death industry.

    Finalist: Willem Marx, Dan Przygoda, Amy Marino, Bloomberg TV, for “Blackstone Expanding Rental-Home Empire.”

    The financial press often writes about the housing market’s recovery and how Wall Street firms have played a strong role in the market bouncing back. What made Bloomberg TV’s story on Blackstone’s expansion into the rental market compelling was that it dove under the surface to make a connection between this recovery and the plight of families forced to pay rents higher than mortgages they could hardly afford.

    REAL ESTATE

    Winner: Drew Harwell, Tampa Bay Times, for “Florida Land Rush.”

    The Times broke new ground with its block-by-block analysis of the role of seven investment companies in buying foreclosed homes and turning them into rentals. Using a variety of public records, Harwell documented the way these seven companies snapped up available properties so quickly, preventing first-time and other home buyers from purchasing residential property. Harwell compellingly put a face to the problem. This let readers quickly grasp what these real estate deals meant to communities–and people–in the Tampa Bay area.

    Finalist: Heather Perlberg, John Gittelsohn, Bloomberg, for “Wall Street Becomes America’s Landlord.”

    High-level reporting and clear, concise writing made Wall Street’s new role as local landlord understandable to the reader. The national sweep of these Bloomberg stories, along with the local details these reporters uncovered, set this entry apart.

    Finalist: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Ben Protess, The New York Times, for “Foreclosure/Mortgage Abuse.”

    The New York Times showed that the mortgage crisis continues to provide opportunities for deep dives six years after the meltdown. Well-written and reported work.  Impressive.

    SMALL BUSINESS

    Winner: Caroline McMillan, The Charlotte Observer.

    Lively writing and solid reporting, packed with sound and useful advice. McMillan’s stories ranged from small businesses hit by the Affordable Care Act, the saga of an appliance dealer working his way out of a great recession bankruptcy and how a social media site is helping small businesses to the impact of last year’s federal government shutdown on small businesses and tips for such enterprises to grow by earning seals of approval from certification networks.

    Finalist: David Markiewicz, Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

    A terrific read about a colorful, never-say-die entrepreneur who fell in love with his zany invention, the HotDog Ez Bun Steamer, and pursued his dream until it almost killed his tiny company.

    Finalist: Jessica Bruder, Inc. Magazine.

    A revealing journey deep into one of the darkest and seldom openly discussed sides of entrepreneurship: how failure can lead founders, whose emotions rise and fall with the vicissitudes of the company, to depression and even suicide.

    SOCIAL MEDIA

    Winner: Hanna Ingber, The New York Times.

    The New York Times stood out in this category because of its effective use of social media across all social platforms. Each medium – Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn — are also used to report as well as inform, a new form of traditional shoe leather used with ease. Facebook was used to share a graphic, LinkedIn was used for a career chat, Twitter was used to cultivate conversation, which then made its way into newspaper stories. Each use was platform-specific.

    Finalist: Janet Stauble, Bankrate.

    The team at Bankrate used multiple platforms to share content, and was able to create a level of engagement that makes them worthy of an honorable mention. The team asked relevant money questions on platforms such as Facebook, and created charts that were widely shared. A bonus, each member of the social media team is identified in a background photo on the publications Twitter account, which then allows followers to identify the voice of the brand.

    STUDENT – PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS

    Winner: Caitlin McCabe, University of North Carolina/Charlotte Observer, for “Nearly 13,000 N.C. Jobless Stuck in Backlogged Benefits.”

    North Carolinas s jobless-benefits program that is affecting thousands of people. It was timely article and demonstrated a good use of statistics. But the reporter went beyond the numbers with victim interviews that kept the readers interest. Excellent reporting, strong context and clear writing.

    Finalist: Brandon Brown, Arizona State University/Arizona Daily Republic, for “Superior Hopes Magma’s Makeover will help transform a Copper Town into a Tourist Destination.”

    A wonderful example of a fine feature story and compelling video. The multimedia package brings to life the struggles of an old copper town thats trying to remake itself. The article was comprehensive and the writing lively.

    Finalist: Nick Shchetko, University of North Carolina/Minyanville, for, “How Much will Google Glass Cost? The Price of Production Offers Some Clues,”

    The reporter excels at research and went beyond the call to get information required to answer the question of how much Google Glass could cost the average consumer. The result was an innovative story that surely was devoured by tech geeks.

    STUDENT – STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

    Winner: Chad Garland, Andrew Knochel, Arizona State University/ News 21, for “Scoundrels, Thieves and Rip-off Artists’ Prey on Veterans.”

    Clean, thorough, comprehensive presentation of what was clearly a hefty amount of data and interviews. The use of uncovering of significant information was stunning.  A tremendous job.

    Finalist: Caitlyn McCabe, University of North Carolina/ Synapses, for “The Cost of a Scandal.”

    Well written, thoroughly researched with a good amount of background.

    Finalist: Marie J. French, University of Missouri/The Columbia MIssourian, for “Families, Child Care Providers.”

    Important piece with “news you can use” applications. Use of interviews took the reporting past pure numbers and gave the problems a human face.

    TECHNOLOGY

    Winner: Nicole Perlroth, David Barboza, David Sanger, Michael Schmidt, The New York Times, for “China Hacking.”

    When it found itself the victim of a high-profile hack, The New York Times did what it does so well: reported the hell out of it. Combining superlative reporting and fantastic storytelling.

    Finalist: Jacquie McNish, Sean Silcoff, Steve Ladurantaye, Iain Marlow, Tim Kiladze, Boyd Erman, Globe and Mail,  for “BlackBerry Fall”

    The judges were extremely impressed with the strong reporting and terrific writing throughout the Globe & Mail’s package on BlackBerry’s woes. The main piece was so rich with detail that the reader didn’t want it to end. The authors also did a great job covering virtually every aspect of  the story through executive profiles, stories from customers and a glimpse of what the future may hold for the embattled company

    Finalist:  Tony Romm, Politico, for “Silicon Valley Dives Into DC.”

    Excellent package of stories on technology lobbying, with the strongest article on Google’s lobbying efforts, in particular to the Federal Trade Commission.  That article showed, through interviews and a listing of the notables Google has hired, the reach of its lobbying operations.  The package also included some fresh ways to cover what could have otherwise been a ho-hum story:  When Apple offered an interview with its CEO, Politico also spoke to other tech executives to put those comments in context.

     

  • 2013 BiB Winners’ List

    Posted By admin on Thursday February 27, 2014

    Best in Business 2013 Winners List

    Winners in the 19th annual Best in Business competition for work done in 2013. This year, only one winner is named in each category division. In many instance, judges chose to recognize one or two finalists. Awards will be presented March 29 at the 51st annual SABEW conference in Phoenix.

    DIGITAL CATEGORY

    DIGITAL BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Finalist:  CNNMoney Staff, CNNMoney, for “Detroit Files for Bankruptcy.”

    The main story was cleanly written and highlighted how cuts have never been forced upon public pensioners before, and broadened story by noting other cities could get hurt when trying to sell bonds. It also spun forward news, speculating that unions will put up big fight.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner:  Jesse Eisinger, ProPublica, for “The Trade.”

    Eisingers in-depth commentary and meticulous digging is evident. By continuing to put pressure on the banking and financial industries, he is effecting change. Work is lively and accessible.

    Finalist: Rob Cox, Reuters, for “Economics of Gun Safety.”

    Cox brings economic analysis and a viewpoint to a groundbreaking, niche topic. His in-depth reporting and personal connection to the tragedy brings a novel approach to the topic that hits at the heart for so many.

    DIGITAL COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner: Peter Goodman, The Huffington Post, for business and global commentary.

    Substantial experience and depth of knowledge. Goodman offered a sense of knowing China firsthand and applying his experience in a way that was measured and thoughtful.

    Finalist: Bianca Bosker, The Huffington Post, for technology commentary.

    Bosker brings authority to her work. She did some deep reporting and gave us a sense of the work having been done before, offering an opinion on a subject.

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner: T. Christian Miller, Jeff Gerth, ProPublica, for Overdose series on drug dangers.

    Incredible detail and reporting. Authors explained the medical, historical and business angles behind the dangers of acetaminophen in a highly approachable way. Graphics, interactive elements and videos added to the overall experience and depth.

    Finalist: Michael Smallberg, Project on Government Oversight, for SEC Revolving Door.

    All-around solid series that shows the conflicts within an agency that is supposed to watch out for investors. Instead, it appears to watch out more for the industry it is intended to regulate. POGO explained how the conflict of interest manifests itself in the oversight of the financial industry.

    Finalist: Paul Kiel, ProPublica, for Debt Inc.

    Casts light on the shadowy world on installment lending, how some companies push unknown costs onto desperate borrowers, and how they navigate around state laws.  Terrific example of explanatory journalism in the digital age.

    DIGITAL EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner:  Thomas Mucha, Solana Pyne, David Case, Patrick Winn, Jonah Kessel, GlobalPost, for “Myanmar Emerges.”

    Ambitious and worthy.  In-depth look at how a country with a long, troubled history tries to transition into a nation that promises it citizens both greater political and economic freedom. This year-long series was a real eye-opener and an example of digital storytelling at its finest.

    Finalist: Ritchie King, Sam Williams, David Yanofsky, Quartz, for By Reading this Page You are Minting Bitcoins.”                                                                                                                                             

    A unique approach to explaining one of the many mysteries of the digital currency. Innovative approach to storytelling that shows the great promise of digital journalism.

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 1

    Winner: A.C. Thompson, Jonathan Jones, ProPublica, for “Assisted Living.”

    Report on assisted-living facilities showed in chilling detail how too much focus on money erodes medical care. Thorough reporting, engaging writing, memorable examples of the impact on real people and pointed questioning of an industry that has largely escaped proper scrutiny.

    DIGITAL FEATURE, Division 2

    Winner:  David Case, Solana Pyne, GlobalPost Staff, GlobalPost, for “Dead Men Working: The World’s Most Dangerous Jobs.”

    The GlobalPost’s descriptive, on-the-ground reporting yields a compelling series that documents in personal ways the toll of the world’s most deadly work. Ambitious, melding multi-media and traditional story-telling.

    Finalist: John Schoen, CNBC.com, for “Pandemic of Pension Woes Plaguing the Nation.”

    Strong reporting and context provides readers with a troubling and detailed look at the nation’s public pensions.  Sources add dimension and character.

    Finalist: Suzy Khimm, msnbc.com, for “Austerity Deals Harsh Blow to Already Stricken Land.”

    The story of how politics affect residents in Harlan, Ky., is wonderfully told through an effective variety of voices. Shows the impact that decisions in Washington can have on everyday lives.

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner: Deal Staff, The Deal.

    Making excellent use of its digital platform, the Deal offered its sophisticated audience in-depth coverage of a broad range of topics, from the political and business climate in Turkey, to the M&A slowdown in Japan, to funding challenges facing U.S. defense contractors to the landscape of public radio in New York. Its breakouts on related topics, stories, industries and companies and people mentioned were a smart and useful approach. Even given its audience, it steered clear of jargon and produced stories that were engaging, well-written and solidly reported.

    Finalist:  Richard Eisenberg, Kerry Hannon, Kevin Haynes, Donna Sapolin, Next Avenue, PBS.

    Strong range of personal finance-related articles targeting over-50 audience. Made good use of digital medium with links and additional information. Provided useful information with clarity and an authoritative voice.

    DIGITAL GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner: Quartz Staff, Quartz.

    Quartz set itself apart with its deft combination of modern methods and traditional storytelling, and with its commitment to both real-time analysis and longer-form enterprise reporting.

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner: Chris Hamby, The Center for Public Integrity, for “Breathless and Burdened: Dying from Black Lung, Buried by Law and Medicine.

    Resourceful, hard-nosed reporting that undergirded this project, as well as by the clarity and power of the writing. Combined reportorial mastery of technical subjects with concrete, precise, and rich humanity. Outrageous and compelling.

    Finalist: Paul Kiel, ProPublica, for “Debt Inc.”

    Strong look at the latest incarnation of pay-day lending, with incisive reporting on how the lenders have evaded states’ regulatory attempts. Good story-telling and impressive reporting.

    DIGITAL INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner: Chris Kirkham, The Huffington Post, for stories on the private prison industry.

    In-depth look at the painful, brutal record of a flourishing private-prison company. Kirkham does the hard work of uncovering connections between the company and state officials awarding contracts while exposing the lack of oversight that allows an outfit with a sordid history to thrive.

    INNOVATION CATEGORY

    Winner:  Alex Blumberg, Joshua Davis, Kainaz Amaria, Brian Boyer, Alyson Hurt, Wes Lindamood, Claire O’Neill, David Gilkey, Jeremy Bowers, Danny DeBelius, Adam Cole, Quoctrung Bui, Zoe Chace, Jacob Goldstein, Jess Jiang, Caitlin Kenney, David Kestenbaum, Marianne McCune, Robert Smith, National Public Radio, for “Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.”

    Great example of what Planet Money does best explore complex business topics using micro examples to illuminate a macro issue, and present it in clear, simple, compelling terms that engage even the most passive audience. 

    Finalist: Kevin Quealy, Shan Carter, Archie Tse, Mike Bostock,  Matthew Ericson, Hannah Fairfield, Ford Fessenden, Tom Giratikanon, Josh Keller, Alicia Parlapiano, Tim Wallace, Derek Watkins, Jeremy White, Josh Williams, Karen Yourish, The New York Times, for a collection of business graphics.

    No news organization has embraced interactive graphics like The New York Times, and this compilation clearly highlights the Times industry leadership. None of the parts of the entry stood out as better than the others they were all terrific. And taken as a whole, the depth of knowledge and creativity represented in this entry is staggering.

    Finalist: Ben Eisen, Terrence Horan, Brian Aguilar, Tom Bemis, Laura Mandaro, MarketWatch, for “Mile Wide, Inch Deep: Bond Market Liquidity Dries Up.”

    A key component of successful innovation is a willingness to employ other peoples tools to achieve your own objective. This entry does that with great flair, engaging readers on the potentially dry topic of bond liquidity using Creativist, an interactive digital storytelling platform. It gave readers a top-down, visually compelling and highly accessible overview of the issue.

    INTERNATIONAL CATEGORY

    INTERNATIONAL BREAKING NEWS

    Winner: Staff, The New York Times, for Cyprus financial crisis coverage.

    Astonishingly clear on why it mattered, and a two-paragraph lead that was as good as it gets under deadline pressure.

    INTERNATIONAL COMMENTARY

    Winner: Andy Mukherjee, Peter Thal Larsen, Reuters, for Breakingviews commentary.

    This analysis is like a high-protein snack that quickly makes you smarter about complex global events. Its spare prose bubbles with wit, intelligence and accessibility. Breakingviews consistently assesses the long view and offers readers fresh insights.

    INTERNATIONAL EXPLANATORY

    Winner: Thomas Mucha, Solana Pyne, David Case, Patrick Winn, Jonah Kessel, GlobalPost, for “Myanmar Emerges.”

    This series makes it abundantly clear why Myanmar is an important subject. A clear picture emerges of a struggling democracy with huge problems – the worst child labor in the world. Excellent videos and heartbreaking portraits of youngsters working very tough jobs under horrible conditions makes this a compelling multimedia package.

    Finalist: Steve Stecklow, Babak Dehghanpisheh, Yeganeh Torbati, Reuters, for “Assets of the Ayatollah:”

    This dogged investigation and well-told series offers the first in-depth look at the business dealings of Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. It details his control of a secret organization, Setad, which built a massive financial empire on property seizures from persecuted religious minorities, business people and Iranians living abroad.

    Finalist: Sophia Yan, CNNMoney.com, for “Expats Fight to Navigate American Taxes.”

    Solid series of stories that explain, document and underscore the mind-numbing complexity of U.S. tax laws for Americans living and working abroad. Clear writing, good reporting and thoughtful explanation of a complex issue.

    INTERNATIONAL FEATURE

    Winner: Burt Helm, Dan Ferrara, Eric Schurenberg, Inc., for “When in China.”

    Great read that probed the international business story of our timethe perils and opportunities for U. S. entrepreneurs attempting to navigate the Chinese economy.

    Finalist: Andrew MacAskill, Bibhudatta Pradhan, Bloomberg News, for “India’s Shame.”

    A gripping and detailed account of how portions of Indias economy are heavily dependent on prostitution as a way of lifeputting millions of young girls in peril.

    Finalist: Christine Spolar, Raymond Bonner, Sally Gainsbury, Financial Times, for “Death in Singapore.”

    An eye-opening account of how what looked like an innocent adventure abroad for a U.S. post-graduate student turned into a tragedy for his family and a potentially explosive tale of international intrigue when it comes to advanced technology materials.

    INTERNATIONAL INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner:  Steve Stecklow, Babak Dehghanpisheh, Yeganeh Torbati, Reuters, for “Assets of the Ayatollah”

    This project had it all: Jaw-dropping findings. Powerful examples. Clear explanations and clean writing. Reporting it clearly wasn’t easy. The writers showed impressive resourcefulness, persistence and courage.

    Finalist: Staff, members and media partners, International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, for “Secrecy for Sale.”

    Stunning in its sweep, this project trained a powerful light on the shadowy, multi-trillion-dollar world of offshore tax havens. It was a monumental reporting effort, involving 112 journalists and 42 media partners, and it yielded dramatic results.

    NEWS AGENCIES

    NEWS AGENCIES BREAKING NEWS

    Winner: Tim Higgins, Jeff Green, Carol Hymowitz, Laura Colby, Bryant Urstadt, Bloomberg News, for “Scoop: GM Chooses Barra as First Female CEO.”

    Impressive depth of reporting and clearly a step ahead of the competition. Each story was well written and answered all the key questions while finding new angles on the central news of Mary Barra’s appointment. The overall package did an impressive job of breaking news ahead of general release.

    NEWS AGENCIES COMMENTARY

    Winner: Susan Antilla, Bloomberg View, for her columns.

    Terrific topics. Tough, engaging, enlightening, head-snapping. Well-reasoned arguments. Writes with authority and insight in a simple, declarative style that doesnt wander. No navel-gazing. Sophisticated humor used lightly in a way that advances the argument. Not humor for humors sake.

    NEWS AGENCIES EXPLANATORY

    Winner: Michelle Conlin, Brian Grow, Reuters, for “They Own the House, but Not What Lies Beneath.”

    This story revealed a surprising new player in the “fracking” energy boom: home builders. The exhaustively researched but tightly written piece chronicles how builders are keeping underground mineral rights to home lots they sell, a practice they disclose to homeowners in the fine print of contracts. But the Reuters coverage pulled back the curtain on the growing industry practice.

    Finalist: Scot Paltrow, Kelly Carr, Reuters for “Unaccountable.”

    A surprising and incisive look at the human costs of decades of bad bookkeeping at the Pentagon. The three-part series pulls together an impressive mix of public records and interviews, along with graphics and videos, to illustrate the absurdity of billions wasted on failed attempts to modernize defense-department systems while soldiers are nickel-and-dimed.

    Finalist:Bernard Condon, Paul Wiseman, David McHugh, Elaine Kurtenbach, Nick Harbaugh, The Associated Press, for “Great Reset.”

    The pieces of this ambitious package each explain key concerns about the U.S. and world economies, and work together with a series of graphics to paint a larger picture. The stories didn’t break news, but broke down complex issues and combined them with colorful personal anecdotes.

    NEWS AGENCIES FEATURE

    Winner: Carol Hymowitz, Bloomberg News, for “The End of Retirement.”

    Bloomberg and Hymowitz deserve real credit for a deep and passionate depiction of a major American problem — the lack of personal wealth needed to afford retirement. Beautifully reported, well written and elegantly produced this is a first-rate feature

    Finalist: Scott Mayerowitz, The Associated Press, for “From the Start, Dreamliner Jet Program was Rushed.”

    The AP took a deep dive into the high-flying aerospace business to reveal how ad-hoc and often poorly organized was Boeing construction of its 787. This is a definitive account of an important 2013 story.

    Finalist: Anne D’Innocenzio, The Associated Press, for “No Guarantees When Shopping for ‘Ethically Made’ Clothes.”

    Solid work in a tough category. A marvelously sourced, deeply written account of the complexities hidden inside of even simple clothing and garments. Excellent job.

    NEWS AGENCIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Winner: Staff, Reuters.

    Reuters excelled in a tough field with an entry that showed strength in core business-news reporting and exceptional enterprise journalism that displayed courage, ambition and mastery of new storytelling techniques. Where Reuters clearly excelled was with its two enterprise piecesAssets of the Ayatollah, and Connected China. Both pieces shed light on stories about two of the most importantand opaquenations on Earth: Iran and China. Great journalism married with great design. Reuters broke ground with its insightful piece of what Janet Yellen, now the head of the Federal Reserve, knew about the troubled housing market in California before the subprime bubble burst.

    Finalist: Matthew Winkler, Serena Saitto, Lee Spears, Leslie Picker, Ari Levy, Brian Womack, Michael Smith, David Evans, Jason Harper, Liam Vaughan, Gavin Finch, Ambereen Choudhury, Bloomberg News. 

    Bloomberg had a strong entry in this category, including investigative work on foreign exchange, and explanatory stories on manged futures, and features on the revival of a Detroit Chrysler plant.

    Finalist: Barbara Ortutay, Michael Liedtke, Scott Mayerowitz, Tom Krisher, Dee-Ann Durbin, Jonathan Fahey, Bernard Condon, Paul Wiseman, The Associated Press.

    AP’s entry was good, especially stories on how technology is eliminating some jobs, and the explanatory piece on huge changes in the oil industry.  Solid work on Chevrolet.

    NEWS AGENCIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner: Scot Paltrow and Kelly Carr, Reuters, for “Unaccountable.”

    Exhaustive, clear reporting on a subject of real consequence, the business of government. It expertly mixes the human component of Pentagon mismanagement with the macro problems, as well as the bungled bureaucratic attempts to fix it. Powerful and descriptive writing mixes with stellar presentation, including photography, video and smartly produced infographics.

    PERSONAL FINANCE

    Winner: Kimberly Lankford, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for stories on financial planning for Alzheimer’s disease.

    While Alzheimer’s is a widely known ailment, the enormous financial toll is rarely discussed. Lankford presented the material in an upfront but easy to understand way. It gave different examples of how families are coping. This is true service journalism that educated the reader, and most likely helped people grappling with which way to turn.

    Finalist: Susan Tompor, Detroit Free Press, for series on Detroit bankruptcy effect on city pension recipients.

    An important series of stories that personalizes a city in crisis. Tompor combines data with anecdotes to make the Detroit situation come to life.

    Finalist: Amanda Gengler, Money, for “Future of Your Healthcare.”

    This piece is extremely well-reported, with great art, and it not only outlines problems, but offers advice on how to solve them. It ticked a lot of boxes, and it was an on-trend topic.

    PRINT-DAILY NEWSPAPERS

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 1

    Winner: Getahn Ward, The Tennessean, for “Convention Center Redevelopment.”

    This well-written, well-rounded story packed a lot of important information into a breaking news story. It hit all the big points that readers in this community would want to know — the size and shape of the project, the potential tenants and the financing. The reporter broke the story in a competitive market, forcing rivals to source the paper for much of the day and the mayor to issue the lease that evening.

    Finalist: Maria Aspan, Jeff Horwitz, American Banker, for “Chase Halts Card Debt Sales Ahead of Crackdown.”

    The American Banker article was very strong, requiring digging through court documents and sourcing with high-level industry insiders. Comparing the change in court filings was a creative and enterprising way to get at the story.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 2

    Winner: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Staff, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, for “Atlanta Braves Move to Suburbs.”

    When the Braves announced the shocking and unexpected news that the team would move to the suburbs, the AJC provided a thorough first-day report. Most impressive was its tick-tock of how the top-secret deal came together, a story that one would not expect to gel until later. It was a comprehensive package, including residents’ and officials’ reactions, as well as looking at the experience of other organizations that have moved to the suburbs. Coverage was enhanced by strong graphics. Commentary on the deal was sharp and provocative.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 3

    Winner: Ivan Penn, Drew Harwell, Robert Trigaux, Barbara Behrendt, Jeff Harrington, Tampa Bay Times, for “Duke Pulls Plug.”

    Bold with its coverage of Duke Energys decision to close the area nuclear plant.  The team clearly knew the issues, which gave them the ability to both break the news and spin a good story with a sharp point of view.   The reporting also did a good job connecting the news with the impact on the local economy and community.

    Finalist: Terry Maxon, The Dallas Morning News business staff, The Dallas Morning News, for  American-U.S. Airways merger coverage.

    The Dallas Morning News wins points for being fast on the news with a solid, authoritative take, and then live blogging every angle. The Morning News rounded out coverage with smart sidebars, including the impact on consumers.

    NEWSPAPERS BREAKING NEWS, Division 4

    Winner:  E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times, for “Wells Fargo Sales Schemes.”

    Solid consumer protection reporting and good document research and inside the company reporting. Would have liked a clear explanation of the cost to consumers and/or taxpayers. But a very good story.

    Finalist: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Ben Protess, Peter Eavis, The New York Times, for “JP Morgan Settlement.”

    Solid job on a highly competitive story. The package is complete, with context of how JPM manufactured mortgages and how the SEC and Justice pursued the bank.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner: Tim Steller,  Arizona Daily Star, for his columns.

    Tight and well-reported focus on the local community, with local voices making his point.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner: David Nicklaus, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, for his columns.

    David Nicklaus writes an impressive example of a destination business column, both commanding and concise. It takes an impressive depth of understanding to present complex topics in such sure and accessible terms. We admired his ambitious targets, sharp writing and well-focused arguments.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 3

    Winner (Tie): Gary Silverman, Financial Times, for his columns.

    Silverman demonstrates how form is as important as content in commentary. He engages the reader with off-the-wall thoughts, literary references and eloquent writing. In doing so, he lures people into thinking about issues — such as monetary policy, gay marriage and taxes — that they otherwise might have found repellant. Excellent work!

    Winner (Tie): Brier Dudley, The Seattle Times, for his columns.

    Dudley is doing a great service to the people of Seattle. With original reporting and a strong sense of fairness, he exposes cases of greed, hypocrisy and misinformation that have a direct effect on the lives and livelihoods of his audience — and that probably aren’t being covered anyplace else. Local, activist, set-the-record-straight journalism at its best.

    NEWSPAPERS COMMENTARY, Division 4

    Winner: David Lazarus, Los Angeles Times, for his columns.

    Lazarus has the ability to hone in on bold and original subject matter. He used the flexibility of his column to boldly explore unique angles to important topics and expose them to much-needed public scrutiny. Lazarus makes the large and seemingly abstract subject of U.S. healthcare accessible by focusing on issues that directly impact readers.

    Finalist: James Stewart, The New York Times, for his columns.

    Mr. Stewart trained his keen analytical eye on the boards of large institutions like Hewlett-Packard and the New York City Opera , explaining and exposing governance and management failings in a way that few other journalists can.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner: Marc Perrusquia, The Commercial Appeal, for “Southern Transplants.”

    Judges were impressed with this series on the transplant business in Memphis. Its a well-told story with nice writing.

    Finalist: Laurence Hammack, David Ress, Roanoke Times, for “Understanding Obamacare.”

    Well-done, public service/explanatory reporting on a very important topic; they were also on top of the healthcare.gov problems even before the roll out.

    Finalist: Kevin Wack, American Banker, for “How Big Banks Killed a Plan to Speed Up Money Transfers.”

    Nice regulatory reporting. Exceptionally clear writing and very good that a trade journal would take on the big banks.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner: Bernard Wolfson, Orange County Register,  for “Obamacare in Orange County.”

    In a category where so many people dug in so deeply, this was executed in a very simple way. So much has been written on the political aspect, but I don’t know that I have read anything this helpful on this topic. Dispassionate, simply presented.

    Finalist: Dan Haar, The Hartford Courant, for “America’s Rifle: Rise Of The AR-15.”

    This series stood apart from the emotional debate over the Newtown school shooting to look at the pre-eminence of the AR-15 rifle in terms of Connecticut’s history, culture and meaning to the innovation economy, and they deserve a lot of credit for being able to do that.

    Finalist: Rick Romell, Allan James Vestal, Bill Schulz, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “A Time to Build.”

    Sheer ambition: Not many newspapers this size would have taken on something like this. Deeply reported, with exhaustive use of demographic data and lots of humanity. It was pro-Milwaukee but not in a way that felt rah-rah.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 3

    Winner: Nathan Bomey, John Gallagher and Free Press Staff, Detroit Free Press, for “How Detroit Went Broke.”

    A revelatory piece of in-depth reporting. The reporters gave us a great read, informative graphics and a new perspective on the unprecedented bankruptcy.

    Finalist: Ivan Penn, Tampa Bay Times, for “Nuclear Myths.”

    Ivan Penn turned conventional wisdom on its head with this piece, which in turn changed policy in Florida.

    Finalist: Sean Silcoff, Jacquie McNish and Steve Ladurantaye, Globe and Mail, for “Inside the Fall of Blackberry.”

    A great example of explanatory business reporting that took us inside the fall of this once-dominant company.

    NEWSPAPERS EXPLANATORY, Division 4

    Winner: Gretchen Morgenson, David Kocieniewski, Robert Gebeloff, The New York Times, for “House Edge.”

     Normally any feature that starts out talking about aluminum turns quickly into a room-emptier. But the writers showcased remarkable reporting and writing skill set to describe and analyze a scheme by Goldman Sachs for driving up the cost of beverage cans. The story immediately connected the thesis to the reader’s pocketbook. Impact? Government investigations came almost immediately.

    Finalist: Jenny Strasburg, Tom McGinty, John Carryrou, Michael Rothfeld, James Sterngold, Chad Bray, Susan Pulliam, The Wall Street Journal, for “Capital Offenses: Insider Trading at SAC Capital.”

    No financial story has proved more fascinating recently than the federal probe into the giant, secretive hedge fund SAC Capital. Continuing its legacy of insider trading coverage that dates back to stories about Ivan Boesky and Dennis Levine in the 1980s, The Journal launched an impressive multi-platform assault on SAC — putting scoops on its website, “explainers” in the paper and videos on air.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 1

    Winner: Victor Epstein, Mark Marturello, Katie Kunert, The DesMoines Register, for “Insurance Heavyweights.”

    Great enterprise with a clear thesis that identifies a trend and backs it up with examples. Strong sidebars about specific companies, charts that underline the thesis and a diversity of voices from the industry. Very impressive and ambitious package lots of detail and analysis.

    Finalist: Paul Edward Parker, Providence Journal, for “This Changes Everything.”

    Interesting features about how technology changes all aspects of our lives. Great work online with some good videos and polls to engage readers and encourage them to follow the whole series. Enjoyed the hiking and food trucks stories especially.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 2

    Winner: Barbara Soderlin, Omaha World-Herald, for “Finding a Recipe for Success.”

    Great series. Compelling and informative for all those looking to start their own businesses. The stories took readers through various steps for opening a business, including the important impact it has on family life. The writer nicely balanced the business details with human interest reporting.

    Finalist: David Markiewicz, Atlanta Journal Constitution, for ” The Inventor.”

    A story you couldn’t stop reading. The inventor was successful on many counts, but not financially. The story showed the roller-coaster ride of emotions and breaks and setbacks, and the impact on his family.

    Finalist: Rick Romell, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “An Immigrant’s Story”

    Rich background in outline the journey of a Siberian immigrant who made good, first as a software entrepreneur and then as a gelato maker.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 3

    Winner: Nathan VanderKlippe, Globe and Mail, for Keystone pipeline project.

    Highly readable and relevant project whose ambitions are as big as the proposed pipeline itself. The reporter consistently delivers on those ambitions with insights gleaned by simply spending time with people living and working along the pipelines trail. No one side wins out in this one, no one hero or villain emerges; instead, a complex issue is explained well and brought to life.

    Finalist: Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, OH), for “Slavic Village, Devastated by the National Housing Crisis, is Battling Back.”

    Exquisitely detailed exploration of the slow comeback of a neighborhood in Cleveland that was epicenter of the foreclosure crisis. An interesting and compelling read even for people not from or familiar with the area.

    Finalist: Ronald. J. Hansen, The Arizona Republic, for “Income Tax Turns 100.”

    With fun-telling graphics and tidbits, took potentially dry topic of income tax 100 birthday and recounted history in lively anecdote-filled story. An article you just had to share as you read.

    NEWSPAPERS FEATURES, Division 4

    Winner: Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times, for “Tougher Workplace.”

    Alana Semuels obviously worked overtime herself to produce this very readable and extremely well-organized series on overworked Americans. Writing on an important topic, Semuels strikes a balanced tone. She is fair to employers while giving voice to Americans who feel as if they have become human machines on the job.

    Finalist: Walter Hamilton, Shan Li, Los Angeles Times, for “Five Years After Meltdown Family.”

    Shows the long-term human cost of the financial crisis for ordinary people. Full of color and anecdotes, it focuses on appealing central character and family. It is sympathetic without going overboard, and the authors resist the temptation to sermonize. This economy of writing heightens the impact of the story.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner: Editorial Staff, American Banker

    American Banker provides innovative finance coverage on everything from leveraged loans to force-placed insurance. It’s not always easy to make articles on banking fascinating, but the writers at American Banker manage to do it consistently in issue after issue. We loved articles like Lessons from a Terrible Thursday at JPMorgan, Too Big to Jail, Taxpayers Lose as GSE Plan Dies and the expansive coverage on the unbanked. Journalists write with authority and institutional knowledge on a variety of policy issues from the fate of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to the impact of Dodd-Frank on the industry — often with angles that won’t be found anywhere else. Bravo!

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner (TIE): Business News Staff, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Any new resident of or visitor to Milwaukee who reads the Journal Sentinel’s business section will quickly know what the town is all about, how its economy fits into the region, state and nation, which industries are thriving and which aren’t, where the city’s been and where it’s going. The large Business Section is impressively filled with staff stories supplemented by well-chosen wires and syndicated columns.

    Winner (TIE): Business News Staff, The Columbus Dispatch

    The staff showed consistently good quality work, with a solid contingent of enterprise pieces. We were particularly impressed with an investigative piece — on a scam in which some apartment dwellers in the city are getting jacked-up utilities bills. Other stories looked at craft brewers, Frontier Air, food safety, the city’s growing tech sector, and the plight of folks after an aluminum-smelting plant closing. The Dispatch business section served its audience well.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 3

    Winner: Business News Staff, The Dallas Morning News

    Strong investigative reporting on the police pension fund’s investment in luxury homes and the disparity between Parkland Hospital’s wealth and its treatment of patients. That, plus the thorough coverage of the American Airlines merger made the Dallas paper the winner. The News showcased first-rate investigative work and comprehensive local reporting.

    NEWSPAPERS GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 4

    Winner: Business News Staff, The New York Times

    The Times was in a class by itself. No other entry matched the breadth of coverage it offered. Stories exhibited rich detail and sophistication. The section showed a deep commitment to foreign coverage. There were multiple columnists, a book review, letters and special features.

    Finalist: Business News Staff, Los Angeles Times

    A worthy honoree. In particular, the papers investigation on Wells Fargo sales quotas featured on the front page exhibited great enterprise in exposing questionable behavior from a bank that had largely avoided scrutiny.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 1

    Winner: Michael Braga, Anthony Cormier, The Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Breaking the Banks.”

    What the Herald-Tribune did so well is tell stories that spanned a number of saucy topics: insider deals, theft, nepotism, death threats, drug lords, careless lenders and a slate of other unsettling yet enticing elements. The variety of stories from news to profiles kept the package interesting, as did the stories about the “good guys” who maintained their integrity and ethical business standards. A comprehensive, intriguing package that showcased the breadth and depth of what business journalism can be.

    Finalist: Kate Berry, Jeff Horwitz, American Banker, for “Housing Group Taps Dubious Data, HUD Ties to Demand Millions from Banks”

    Packed with points of tension that make it appealing to a wide array of readers: minorities, fair housing advocates, lawyers, bankers, politicians and civic leaders, and others. This is a thoroughly engaging piece of work.

    Finalist: Kate Berry, American Banker, for “Buried in Fine Print: $57B of FHA Loans Big Banks May Have to Eat.”

    This story points to a caution that every business reporter should heed: If you want to know more, look beyond the numbers and read the footnotes on financial reports. The reporter really dug into the forensics of financial statements and provided an excellent example of the type of discipline more business journalists need.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner: Ellen Gabler, Mark Johnson, John Fauber, Allan James Vestal, Kristyna Wentz-Graff, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, for “Deadly Delays.”

    Rare investigative reporting project that led literally to life and death outcomes. Very thorough, well told, a compelling narrative on delays in processing newborn screening tests that combined outstanding use of rich data and interactive features. Demonstrated a commitment beyond time and resources.

    Finalist: Dan Gearino, Columbus Dispatch: for “Shocking Cost.”

    This entry distinguished itself by helping to bring to a stop an unconscionable practice. One of the higher goals in any investigative journalism project – the exposure helped to end the evictions, with legislation introduced to bring the middlemen under regulation.

    Finalist: Marjie Lundstrom, Sam Stanton, Manny Crisostomo, Sharon Okada, The Sacramento Bee, for “The Carissa Carpenter Saga.”

    Richly mined tale, including obtaining of details of history of activity, and quotes from interviews and e-mails. Distinguished itself from other investigations into corrupt commercial activity/ con-artists/ poinzi schemes by contributing to its halt. There should be a category for before-the-horse-has-bolted journalism.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 3

    Winner: Grant Robertson, Jacquie McNish, Globe and Mail, for “Lac-Mégantic.”

    The Globe and Mail wasn’t the only news organization to probe what went wrong last July when a train carrying oil derailed and exploded, killing 47 people in the small Quebec town of Lac-Mégantic. But the Globe and Mail dug deeper and found out more, drawing on dozens of interviews as well as company and government documents obtained through access-to-information laws.

    Finalist: Luis Fabregas, Andrew Conte, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, for “Donor Dilemma.”

    In a nearly year-long investigation, the newspaper discovered that many organ procurement organizations aren’t nearly as altruistic as the people who donate their organs upon death. They pored over the records of all 51 organizations for which detailed financial data was available, finding that their top executives averaged $320,000 a year in pay.

    Finalist: Megan Woolhouse, Beth Healy, The Boston Globe, for “Deloitte.”

    Boston Globe reporters Woolhouse and Healy broke news repeatedly over the course of four months in a dogged investigation of the problem-plagued launch of an unemployment system built by Deloitte Consulting.

    NEWSPAPERS INVESTIGATIVE, Division 4

    Winner: Alison Young, John Hillkirk, USA TODAY, for “Supplement Shell Game, The People Behind Risky Pills.”

    A story that uncovered the world of criminals-turned-entrepreneurs who lace supplements with harmful chemicals, market them to the public and perpetually escape the grips of the law. This series likely saved lives and, hey, what could be more important than that? The interactive graphic alone showed tremendous research and focus.

    PRINT-MAGAZINE CATEGORY

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 1

    Winner: Dale Kurschner, Twin Cities Business, for What about Partners?”

    Kurschner speaks to his audience, making them better informed about their area, using numbers and clear statements to make his points.

    MAGAZINES COMMENTARY, Division 2

    Winner: Dan Primack, Fortune, for his columns.

    Commentary should be deeply reported and sharply written, marshaling new evidence to convey a clear viewpoint that helps readers figure out what to think about the topic at hand. The originality of Primack’s ideas compels him into fresh, authoritative reporting; he has a strong ability to explain complex issues. His writing is lively, and we’re never left wondering where he stands. The columns speak in a well-read, well-informed voice.

    Finalist: Paul Barrett, Bloomberg Businessweek, for “Gun Control.”

    Barrett took on the intensely emotional issue of gun control. This kind of reporting isn’t just good explanatory journalism, but it puts the issues into context and helps readers understand what’s at stake no matter which side they are on.

    Finalist: Peter Coy, Bloomberg Businessweek, for his columns.

    Coy takes us below the surface of subjects and shows us the financial angles we might not have thought of. He takes you below ground and shows you the roots of things that are going on beneath the headlines. His reporting is original, and the writing is clear.

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 1

    Winner: Adam Pincus, The Real Deal, for “Empire State Building: A Buyer’s Manual.”

    A clear and concise presentation about an iconic piece of real estate in Manhattan. A different approach than a typical narrative. The two-page spread uses a striking illustration, photos and charts to show the reader some history about the major players owners as well as tenants.

    Finalist: Jeff Horwitz, Maria Aspan, American Banker, for “The Bank Doctor.”

    The powerful consultancy employs a whos who among regulators and private sector bankers. Rich in detail, well organized, enhanced theme of the story in a reader-friendly design. We were especially impressed for the infographic detailing Promontory’s connections.

    MAGAZINES EXPLANATORY, Division 2

    Winner: Peter Elkind, Doris Burke, Fortune, for “Amazon’s War on Taxes.”

    Deftly tells the story of how Amazon.com managed to avoid collecting state sales taxes for so many years by taking advantage of an old court ruling and employing some fairly hard-nosed tactics. Writers tell what could be a dry tax story with flair and color.

    Finalist: Amanda Gengler, Money Magazine, for “Future of Your Healthcare.”

    Deeply reported yet easily digestible, providing an unvarnished view for consumers of what to expect with the rollout of the largest overhaul of health insurance in a generation. Gave readers a prescient look of the future of health care in which more of the cost and responsibility is placed on the consumer. The three-part series, which kicked off in June, set the stage for many of the issues that became front-page news in the fall.

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 1

    Finalist: Stephanie Forshee, Auto Dealer Monthly, for “Inside Job: Special Report on Embezzlement.”

    Takes a colorful look at embezzlement at auto dealerships, building on a prison letter from the perpetrator of one of the largest and longest-running dealer ripoffs. The report paints a social picture that starts to explain why many cases go undetected and remain hushed.

    MAGAZINES FEATURE, Division 2

    Winner: Jeff Howe, Money Magazine, for “Paying for Finn.”

    Grabbed me almost immediately. It was our unanimous choice before we even got on the phone.

    Finalist: Julie Segal, Institutional Investor, for “Is Alpha Dead?”

    A strong submission that’s as accessible to an individual investor as it is to a Peter Lynch. A topic that appears to have been hiding in plain view.

    Finalist: Jeffrey Goldberg, Bloomberg Business Week, for “Drowning Kiribati.”

    All the world’s problems seem to have visited an obscure cluster of islands in the Pacific. A fascinating, original account of the plight of the “Saudi Arabia of fish.”

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 1

    Winner: Staff, The Real Deal

    The Real Deal hits its target-audience in the New York real estate industry dead-on, while its edgy, creative and highly informative content bridges the gap to general readers. The cover stories draw you in through their smartly designed presentation and then deliver the goods.

    MAGAZINES GENERAL EXCELLENCE, Division 2

    Winner: Josh Tyrangiel, editor, Bloomberg Businessweek

    Superb mix of timely stories, smart analysis and lively writing. The deep-dive issue on the 5th anniversary of Lehman’s collapse was a business junky’s dream. The foreign coverage had some nice surprises, like Adam Higginbotham’s tale of the confidence man who swindled the Iraqi government out of millions with his phony bomb detectors. But most unexpected were the magazine’s attitude and sense of fun.

    FInalist: Andy Serwer, managing editor, Fortune

    Fortune is complete and consistent. The issue with the spycatcher was fantastic beginning to end.

    MAGAZINES INVESTIGATIVE, Division 2

    Winner: Cam Simpson, Bloomberg Businessweek, for “Stranded.”

    When Apple launched its iPhone 5 in fall of 2012, the heat was on suppliers to get the devices on the shelves. According to Bloomberg Businessweek reporter Cam Simpson, the company “had planned… the most aggressive production-and-launch schedule ever attempted by Apple.” But in that rush to satisfy Apple customers, Simpson found in reporting this investigative piece, there were some who paid a very steep price: the 1,500 workers from Nepal who paid job brokers to be flown to Malaysia to assemble cameras for the new smartphones. When the work was moved to a different factory, the workers became stranded in a legal limbo for two months, unpaid, unable to go home and frightened of starving to death. With his vivid, harrowing report, Simpson exposed a darker side of the electronics supply chain. His work forced Apple — and the U.S. government – to take notice and work to stop the brokers who demand payments from factory job recruits. After reading this tale of exploitation, you’ll never look at your iPhone the same way.

    Finalist: Michael Smith, Alex Webb, Tim Culpan, Bloomberg Markets, for “Tungsten’s Tainted Trail.”

    Turning the world’s supply chain for tungsten upside down, this story has the perfect mix of drama and danger. But, most important, it displays the hallmark of a good investigative piece — impact. Diligent, deep reporting led Bloomberg Markets to uncover an illegal activity that thrives “because no one outside the nation has bothered to notice” it. Following this six-month investigation, now some companies have stopped buying tungsten from Columbia. In addition, the European Union changed its laws to prevent companies from buying minerals that fund conflict in Columbia.

    PRINT-WEEKLIES AND BI-WEEKLIES CATEGORY

    WEEKLIES BREAKING NEWS

    Winner: James Rufus Koren, Los Angeles Business Journal, for “Amazon Expands Delivery Service.”

    Demonstrated great reporting instincts, and scored an intriguing story with intense regional interest and national relevance. His article on Amazon’s delivery service expansion was detailed, thorough, and an engaging read.

    Finalist: Matthew Kish, Portland Business Journal, for “Welcome to Swooshville.”

    Impressive reporting on Nike’s land deals.  Result: a high-impact package of articles and graphics that brought the reader into the corporate behemoth’s empire. The series provided a comprehensive look at Nike’s sprawling corporate campus that was both visually appealing and highly informative.

    WEEKLIES COMMENTARY

    Winner: Bruce Kelly, Investment News, for his columns.

    A seasoned journalist who combines sophisticated research with plain talk that’s easy to follow. No one wonders what he means when he says an individual has “fudged documents.” He’s a champion of the individual investor, calling on the securities industry to silence brokers who should no longer be giving advice.

    Finalist: Joe Cahill, Crains Chicago Business, for his columns.

    Good reporting and willing to take the powerful to task.

    WEEKLIES EXPLANATORY

    Winner: Adam Sichko, Albany Business Review, for “A Way of Life Under Fire.”

    Great read and a fresh approach to the gun-control issue. Very well reported. Full of human texture. Excellent illumination as well of the overarching theme of the decline of U.S. manufacturing.

    Finalist: Staff, Crains New York Business, for “Sandy One Year Later.”

    Enormous breadth of coverage — every conceivable aspect. Well reported and presented in digestible pieces. Each section was packed with information.

    Finalist: Alby Gallun, Micah Maidenberg, Crains Chicago Business, for “Reckless Abandon.”

    Smart approach. Personalized the crisis of urban decay and provided an illuminating example of a national issue. Presentation helped make this a story you wanted to read.

    WEEKLIES FEATURE

    Winner: Meribah Knight, Crains Chicago Business, for “A Business of Life and Death.”

    How does a family-owned company catering to lower-income consumers respond to a surge in business? The answer is just the starting point for this extensively reported story of a local funeral home and its efforts to cope with a surging murder rate in Chicago.

    Finalist: Aaron Elstein, Glenn Coleman, Crains New York, for “Capturing the Seggermans.”

    This story about four siblings and a family tax-evasion scheme is a compelling read. E-mail excerpts at the start spell out the conspiracy, and interviews with family members and others flesh out the details. The report skillfully explains how the case was tied into a broader crackdown on tax cheats.

    Finalist: Bill King, Tom Stinson, Brandon McClung, Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, for “Staying True.”

    Sports Business Journal’s decision to give Jerry Reinsdorf a Lifetime Achievement Award provided an opportunity to tell the definitive tale about him. The weekly rose to the challenge, as the story and related sidebars add up to a package that any sports publication would surely be proud to have.

    WEEKLIES GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Winner: Staff, Crains New York Business

    New York sets the bar high for financial coverage and Crains NY rises above the challenge.  Issues are full of surprises, both local and national in scope. One issue told you about food vendors who profit from pint-sized locations, turn the page and its how much A-Rods return cost the Yanks.  And, then its local, local, local with a piece on how Queens homeowners foot the bill for sidewalk damage, and snappy commentary on a variety of issues.  Clearly, well deserving of overall excellence.

    Finalist:  Staff, Street and Smiths Sports Business Journal

    Thank goodness someone is keeping a close eye on the multi-billion-dollar business of sports. And thank goodness for Street and Smiths, who keep track of ad rates from FoxSports as well as the fine point of business sponsorship of sporting events. Particular kudos on covering sports industry security ramifications following the Boston Marathon bombing, and a thorough special section on 75th anniversary of the NCAA.

    Finalist: Staff, Albany Business Review

    Local coverage done right with articles of interest to a wider community, such strong best of lists. Of note were two outstanding articles, one on how immigrant businessmen are contributing to the local economy despite federal red tape in getting a green card, and a stellar profile on the town of Ilion in a post-Newtown world. The article profiles the mixed feelings of those who work for Remington arms amid anti-gun sentiment in the state.

    WEEKLIES INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner: Alfred Lee, Los Angeles Business Journal, for “EB-5 Inquiry.”

    The stuff that makes (or should make) local journalism what it is. It’s clear-cut, watchdog-style, impactful journalism. This story is clearly written, and reporter Alfred Lee shows that great investigative stories don’t have to be pages long and full of flowery prose.

    Finalist: Chris Bragg, Erik Engquist, Glenn Coleman, Crains New York, for “State Pol’s Radio Silence.”

    Another work that local watchdog journalism is alive and well. Reporter Chris Bragg examined legal documents and tax returns to break the story that a Brooklyn Assemblyman who failed to disclose advertising payments to a firm he owned. The story prompted New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to launch an investigation into the matter.

    Finalist: Lynne Marke, Crains Chicago Business, for “Futures Shock.”

    Marek takes a comprehensive look at five years of enforcement action by day-to-day regulators by CME and the National Futures Association. The story is well done, full of rich detail and first-hand accounts from market participants.

    RADIO/TELEVISION CATEGORY

    RADIO/TV BEST SEGMENT OR INTERVIEW

    Winner: Elise Hu, Uri Berliner, Neal Carruth, National Public Radio, for “Health Care Website Launch.”

    NPR reporter Elise Hu’s coverage of the national healthcare rollout was smart, enterprising and emotional. Day after day, Hu broke news on a story that every news outlet in the country was covering. She told us things we hadn’t heard elsewhere, such as delving into the role of federal IT know-how. She spoke with energy and intensity and presented herself like the expert on the subject that she clearly is.

    RADIO/TV BEST SERIES OR INVESTIGATIVE

    Winner: Patrick Madden, Julie Patel, Meymo Lyons, American University School of Communication, WAMU 88.5 News, for “Deals For Developers.”

    Lots of ground covered, great interviews with lots of players and lots of tough questions asked. Good use of numbers to show connections between developers and politicians. Writing is strong and clear with a good emotional bent, sharing stories of the people affected by the misuse of the subsidies. Best example of strong, impactful local journalism.    This is local accountability journalism at its best.

    RADIO/TV BEST SHOW

    Winner: Nik Deogun, Tyler Mathisen, Susie Gharib, Richard Carolan, Rebecca White, CNBC, for Nightly Business Report.

    RADIO/TV FEATURE OR FIELD REPORT

    Winner: Tyler Mathisen, Mitch Weitzner, Mary Noonan Robichaux,  James Segelstein, Na Eng, Jeanine Ibrahim, Patrick Ahearn, Steven T. Banton, John Werner, Meghan Lisson, CNBC, for “Death: It’s a Living.”

    CNBC takes a topic that most of us would prefer to ignore and makes it compelling and even humorous. From raffling a free cremation at a senior lifestyle expo, to a woman wanting to make sure her final resting place has no obstructed views, Story hooks us and then takes us on a balanced view of the highs and lows of the death industry.

    Finalist: Willem Marx, Dan Przygoda, Amy Marino, Bloomberg TV, for “Blackstone Expanding Rental-Home Empire.”

    The financial press often writes about the housing market’s recovery and how Wall Street firms have played a strong role in the market bouncing back. What made Bloomberg TV’s story on Blackstone’s expansion into the rental market compelling was that it dove under the surface to make a connection between this recovery and the plight of families forced to pay rents higher than mortgages they could hardly afford.

    REAL ESTATE

    Winner: Drew Harwell, Tampa Bay Times, for “Florida Land Rush.”

    The Times broke new ground with its block-by-block analysis of the role of seven investment companies in buying foreclosed homes and turning them into rentals. Using a variety of public records, Harwell documented the way these seven companies snapped up available properties so quickly, preventing first-time and other home buyers from purchasing residential property. Harwell compellingly put a face to the problem. This let readers quickly grasp what these real estate deals meant to communities–and people–in the Tampa Bay area.

    Finalist: Heather Perlberg, John Gittelsohn, Bloomberg, for “Wall Street Becomes America’s Landlord.”

    High-level reporting and clear, concise writing made Wall Street’s new role as local landlord understandable to the reader. The national sweep of these Bloomberg stories, along with the local details these reporters uncovered, set this entry apart.

    Finalist: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Ben Protess, The New York Times, for “Foreclosure/Mortgage Abuse.”

    The New York Times showed that the mortgage crisis continues to provide opportunities for deep dives six years after the meltdown. Well-written and reported work.  Impressive.

    SMALL BUSINESS

    Winner: Caroline McMillan, The Charlotte Observer.

    Lively writing and solid reporting, packed with sound and useful advice. McMillan’s stories ranged from small businesses hit by the Affordable Care Act, the saga of an appliance dealer working his way out of a great recession bankruptcy and how a social media site is helping small businesses to the impact of last year’s federal government shutdown on small businesses and tips for such enterprises to grow by earning seals of approval from certification networks.

    Finalist: David Markiewicz, Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

    A terrific read about a colorful, never-say-die entrepreneur who fell in love with his zany invention, the HotDog Ez Bun Steamer, and pursued his dream until it almost killed his tiny company.

    Finalist: Jessica Bruder, Inc. Magazine.

    A revealing journey deep into one of the darkest and seldom openly discussed sides of entrepreneurship: how failure can lead founders, whose emotions rise and fall with the vicissitudes of the company, to depression and even suicide.

    SOCIAL MEDIA

    Winner: Hanna Ingber, The New York Times.

    The New York Times stood out in this category because of its effective use of social media across all social platforms. Each medium – Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn — are also used to report as well as inform, a new form of traditional shoe leather used with ease. Facebook was used to share a graphic, LinkedIn was used for a career chat, Twitter was used to cultivate conversation, which then made its way into newspaper stories. Each use was platform-specific.

    Finalist: Janet Stauble, Bankrate.

    The team at Bankrate used multiple platforms to share content, and was able to create a level of engagement that makes them worthy of an honorable mention. The team asked relevant money questions on platforms such as Facebook, and created charts that were widely shared. A bonus, each member of the social media team is identified in a background photo on the publications Twitter account, which then allows followers to identify the voice of the brand.

    STUDENT – PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS

    Winner: Caitlin McCabe, University of North Carolina/Charlotte Observer, for “Nearly 13,000 N.C. Jobless Stuck in Backlogged Benefits.”

    North Carolinas s jobless-benefits program that is affecting thousands of people. It was timely article and demonstrated a good use of statistics. But the reporter went beyond the numbers with victim interviews that kept the readers interest. Excellent reporting, strong context and clear writing.

    Finalist: Brandon Brown, Arizona State University/Arizona Daily Republic, for “Superior Hopes Magma’s Makeover will help transform a Copper Town into a Tourist Destination.”

    A wonderful example of a fine feature story and compelling video. The multimedia package brings to life the struggles of an old copper town thats trying to remake itself. The article was comprehensive and the writing lively.

    Finalist: Nick Shchetko, University of North Carolina/Minyanville, for, “How Much will Google Glass Cost? The Price of Production Offers Some Clues,”

    The reporter excels at research and went beyond the call to get information required to answer the question of how much Google Glass could cost the average consumer. The result was an innovative story that surely was devoured by tech geeks.

    STUDENT – STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

    Winner: Chad Garland, Andrew Knochel, Arizona State University/ News 21, for “Scoundrels, Thieves and Rip-off Artists’ Prey on Veterans.”

    Clean, thorough, comprehensive presentation of what was clearly a hefty amount of data and interviews. The use of uncovering of significant information was stunning.  A tremendous job.

    Finalist: Caitlyn McCabe, University of North Carolina/ Synapses, for “The Cost of a Scandal.”

    Well written, thoroughly researched with a good amount of background.

    Finalist: Marie J. French, University of Missouri/The Columbia MIssourian, for “Families, Child Care Providers.”

    Important piece with “news you can use” applications. Use of interviews took the reporting past pure numbers and gave the problems a human face.

    TECHNOLOGY

    Winner: Nicole Perlroth, David Barboza, David Sanger, Michael Schmidt, The New York Times, for “China Hacking.”

    When it found itself the victim of a high-profile hack, The New York Times did what it does so well: reported the hell out of it. Combining superlative reporting and fantastic storytelling.

    Finalist: Jacquie McNish, Sean Silcoff, Steve Ladurantaye, Iain Marlow, Tim Kiladze, Boyd Erman, Globe and Mail,  for “BlackBerry Fall”

    The judges were extremely impressed with the strong reporting and terrific writing throughout the Globe & Mail’s package on BlackBerry’s woes. The main piece was so rich with detail that the reader didn’t want it to end. The authors also did a great job covering virtually every aspect of  the story through executive profiles, stories from customers and a glimpse of what the future may hold for the embattled company

    Finalist:  Tony Romm, Politico, for “Silicon Valley Dives Into DC.”

    Excellent package of stories on technology lobbying, with the strongest article on Google’s lobbying efforts, in particular to the Federal Trade Commission.  That article showed, through interviews and a listing of the notables Google has hired, the reach of its lobbying operations.  The package also included some fresh ways to cover what could have otherwise been a ho-hum story:  When Apple offered an interview with its CEO, Politico also spoke to other tech executives to put those comments in context.

     

  • Record numbers turn out for SABEW’s annual fall conference; 257 attend the Oct. 3-4 event in New York City

    Posted By admin on Monday October 7, 2013

    SABEW NYC logo 2013 copyBy WARREN WATSON

    NEW YORK–SABEW set attendance records for its annual fall conference, which was held Oct. 3-4 at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.

    A total of 257 journalists registered for the two-day program.  It was the best turnout in the four years since SABEW revived a fall training event in 2010, anchoring it in the heart of its membership base of financial journalists.

    “It is our most successful fall event ever,” said Kevin Shinkle, the conference co-chair who serves as acting business editor of The Associated Press. “The challenge of any conference is catering to the many constituencies SABEW serves.”

    The program featured newsmakers, government officials, panel discussions and education and skills programs for journalists at all levels.

    A highlight was a discussion on the future of journalism moderated by Paul Steiger of Pro-Publica.  The discussion featured Matt Winkler, Bloomberg News; Mark Hoffman, CNBC, Mark Thompson, The New York Times; and Kathleen Carroll, The Associated Press.

    Hoffman mentioned that media outlets are still focused on technical and delivery issues.  He sees a day when that will change:  “I’m hoping content will be king again,” Hoffman said.

    Two major CEOs – Richard Anderson of Delta Air Lines and Terry Lundgren – addressed the gathering of business journalists from all across the country and Canada.

    Two journalists were formally recognized during the program.  Author Michael Lewis was selected as SABEW’s annual distinguished achievement award winner.  He will receive the award at SABEW’s annual spring conference in Phoenix in March.  Steve Shepard, retiring dean at CUNY, was given the SABEW President’s Award for his work in business journalism.

    Seventy-six college journalists attended.  Schools represented included CUNY, Baruch College, Arizona State University, University of Missouri and New York University.

    Program organizers were Shinkle and Greg David, who heads business and economics programs at CUNY.

    SPONSORS: Conference sponsors were: Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law, American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, The Associated Press, CNBC, T. Rowe Price, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Newsday, Los Angeles Times, B2BCFO, McClatchy, University of Toronto Rotman School of Management, IESE Business School, and the National Endowment for Financial Education.

    (Warren Watson, a former reporter, editor and executive at multiple publications, has been executive director of SABEW since September 2009.  SABEW’s next national conference will be in Phoenix March 27-29.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Winners of the Barlett and Steele awards include the Tampa Bay Times, NY Times and The Wall Street Journal

    Posted By admin on Tuesday October 1, 2013

    BarlettSteeleAward_2Special to SABEW

    PHOENIX–The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism announced today the winners of the prestigious Barlett and Steele awards.

    The gold prize went to  a Tampa Bay Times/Center for Investigative Reporting collaboration on “America’s Worst Charities,” a project by Kris Hundley and Kendall Taggart that identified charities that steered as much as 95 percent of donations to boiler-room operations and direct-mail companies.

    The silver award went to “The United States of Subsidies,” by Louise Story of The New York Time. The project tabulated the $80 billion that local governments dole out to corporations each year in tax breaks and other business incentives – expenditures to recruit and keep businesses that may or may not produce results.

    The bronze went to Susan Pulliam, Rob Barry, Michael Siconolfi and Jean Eaglesham of The Wall Street Journal for their work on “Inside Game: How Corporate Insiders Profit Ahead of the Public,” an  examination of how more than 20,000 corporate executives traded their own companies’ stock over the course of eight years.

    Read the full story here.

    The awards are named for the renowned investigative team of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, whose numerous awards include two Pulitzer Prizes, these annual awards, funded by the Reynolds Center, celebrate the best in investigative business journalism.

    The judges for this year’s awards were Amanda Bennett, editor-at-large for Bloomberg News; Paul Steiger, ProPublica’s founding editor-in-chief and current executive chairman; and Rob Reuteman, freelance writer, professor at Colorado State University and former president of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

    The awards will be conferred Nov. 18 at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University in Phoenix.

  • 2012 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By admin on Thursday June 20, 2013

    Complete list of winners in SABEW’s 18th annual Best in Business Awards

     

    DIVISION: DIGITAL

    BREAKING NEWS

    Digital: All sizes

    CNNMoney

    Hostess

    Christopher Isidore, Parija Kavilanz, Annalyn Censky, James O’Toole

    CNNMoney gave browsers a steady agenda of stories on the demise of Twinkies maker Hostess Brands. Coverage, which began within minutes of the announcement, included articles on the tough job market for the 18,500 employees out of work. Video segments, Tweets and other reader comments along with articles about the hoarding of Hostess’s output, including Twinkies, rounded out the coverage.

    COMMENTARY

    Digital: Less than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    ProPublica

    The Trade

    Jesse Eisinger

    Jesse Eisinger wins this award based on the variety of topics he covers and how interesting he makes them, every time. The quality of writing, depth of reporting and insight are simply superb.

    Digital: More than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    Huffington Post

    Banking and Financial Crisis

    Peter Goodman

    Peter Goodman’s columns are not just well reported and opinionated, they are also hard-hitting. One of his pieces – which dealt with the role played by a regulator whose federal agency oversaw Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac – helped fuel a call for that official’s ouster and influenced a national debate on housing policy. Goodman’s columns are consistent in taking up significant financial issues on behalf of his readers

    Huffington Post

    Social Media

    Bianca Bosker

    Themes ranged from the success of Pinterest and the Apple Maps debacle to privacy problems at Facebook. Bosker’s writing is intelligent, clear and witty. Her columns, which are noteworthy for their strong point of view, have a healthy balance of opinion and reportage. While all good columnists share these attributes, what makes Bosker’s columns stand out is her courage and willingness to use personal experiences – even embarrassing ones – to make larger, important points.

    EXPLANATORY

    Digital: Less than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

     

    ProPublica

    The Great American Foreclosure Crisis

    Paul Kiel

    Years from now, people will be reading this story to learn about the housing collapse of the late 2000s. ProPublica put a human face on that crisis with the detail of one woman’s experience while illuminating the broad scope of the problem through its definitive research.

    Digital: More than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    Huffington Post

    Foreclosure Crisis

    Peter Goodman, Benjamin Hallman

    This entry certainly evokes emotion by putting faces on working people who have been negatively affected by foreclosures. But the stories don’t deal with people in isolation. Instead, the reportage moves to a broader view of how certain realities could affect everyday taxpayers. This is an excellent package that drills down more deeply into the knotty issues bedeviling owners of “underwater” homes. The focus on one Long Island home that became the poster child of the crisis was insightful, and the feature on the mortgage arbitration process at a Bronx courthouse was powerful.

    CNET News

    The Life of an iPhone

    Jay Greene

    The involvement of Apple in less-than-desirable conditions in overseas factories is not a new topic. However, this package looks at the toll of producing and disposing iPhones from a variety of perspectives. This series follows the “life” of a ubiquitous product that affects the lives – often in horrible ways – of people worldwide. In particular, the angles related to mining, the environment, and pollution-related disease and death are compelling. In all the pieces, the writing has rich detail and lovely narrative; they are truly explanatory and interesting given the iPhone’s popularity. An enjoyable read.

    GlobalPost

    America the Gutted

    Thomas Mucha, Solana Pyne, David Case, Emily Lodish, Kyle Kim, Nicholas Dynan, GlobalPost Staff

    This package has everything that business computer-assisted reporting is: a great theme with tension and relevance to a broad readership, digital storytelling and data visualization. The scope of the story pivots around the middle-class dilemma in the U.S., then pans various global economies. This was an ambitious effort to tackle a big subject. The presentation of this story was excellent. Overall, the piece is provocative and well done.

    FEATURE

    Digital: Less than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    ProPublica

    The Great American Foreclosure Crisis

    Paul Kiel

    In recounting the ordeal of a 58-year-old grandmother who lost her Florida home after a debilitating injury, Kiel makes a complicated national issue personal and shows how mortgage originators, servicers and government programs designed to help all failed. Congratulations for producing such a compelling and well-reported piece.

    Digital: More than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    GlobalPost

    Losing the Nile

    Erin Cunningham, Peter Gelling, Ben Solomon

    Superb writing, a strong video and an excellent slideshow, all neatly packaged with a graphic header, made this series a clear and classy stand-out. The choice of topic and angle also made this our top choice. We read so little about that part of the world, yet it is incredibly relevant to so much of politics and economics. This story was different from the usual coverage of the region and the presentation and writing allowed us to see the implications for the global economy. Water is the one thing none of us can do without. Stunning.

    Huffington Post

    Poverty

    Peter Goodman

    Wide ranging in scope and deeply reported, this series delivered a clear perspective on the other side of the economy, and those struggling to make it. The breadth was matched by the strength of the beautifully visual writing. A big and important story, masterfully told.

    Huffington Post

    Google X

    Bianca Bosker

    From the dramatic, hair-raising lead, the writing gripped and never let go. The video provided a fuller dimension, but it was the strength of the reporting and writing that brought the subject to life. We all know Google and we all have an idea that these people are different. This story showed us that these people don’t see the world the way the rest of us do. It’s not easy to pull off such a profile. This one succeeded.

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Digital: All sizes

    CNET News

    CNET News Staff

    CNET took us on a journey from California to Asia, shining a light on the makings of a public relations disaster at Netflix and the human face of iPhone production in China. We liked that CNET combines this great journalism with live blogging, industry commentary and product reviews. CNET takes full advantage of its digital platform to offer features that appeal to techies, the layperson seeking a recommendation on the latest tablet and anyone in search of a good tech read.

    PolitiFact

    Fact Checking Business in Campaign 2012

    Louis Jacobson, Becky Bowers, Molly Moorhead, Bill Adair, Angie Drobnic Holan

    In an election season shaped by the economy and Mitt Romney’s business background, Politifact stood out for its original work demystifying ads and political statements for the public. The site’s thorough pieces make you feel like you’re sleuthing right along with the reporter. Filings, interviews and assorted news sources give the site’s investigations authority. Politifact added more fresh reporting on these important political/business stories than many of the so-called traditional business sites this past year.

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Digital: Less than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    ProPublica/Frontline

    Cell Tower Deaths

    Ryan Knutson, Liz Day, Travis Fox, Martin Smith,  Habiba Nosheen

     Impressive investigation of dozens of cell tower deaths, connecting the accidents to the lax supervision of the contractors, culture of the workers and the rush to get us all good mobile reception. Reporters overcame data difficulties by tracing deaths back to the telecommunications firms that originally paid for the work. Impact could prevent injuries and save lives. Compelling Frontline narrative.

    Center for Public Integrity

    Skin & Bone: The Shadowy Trade in Human Body Parts

    Kate Willson, Gerard Ryle, Mike Hudson, Kimberley Porteous, David Donald and Marina Walker Guevara, The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (USA) Vlad Lavrov, The Kiev Post (Ukraine) Martina Keller, freelance (Germany) Thomas Maier, Newsday and News12 Long Island (USA) Sandra Bartlett, Joe Shapiro and Susanne Reber, National Public Radio (USA) Mar Cabra, freelance (Spain) William Venuti and Antonio Aldo Palaleo, The Daily Slovakia (Slovakia) and La Voce della Repubblica Ceca (Czech Rep.) Alexenia Dimitrova, 24 Chasa (Bulgaria) Nari Kim, Channel A (South Korea)

    Disturbing and ambitious work. Herculean examination of huge volume of U.S. and international records to unravel human tissue trade. Documents gaps in oversight and problems with record-keeping. Stories are well-detailed.

    Center for Public Integrity

    Fraud and Folly: The Untold Story of General Electric’s Subprime Debacle

    Michael Hudson, Scott Reckard

    Nicely documented case of another subprime lender that at best turned a blind eye to fraudulent loans. Largely depends on information from lawsuits and uses fair number of blind quotes. Although familiar, project is strong.

    Digital: More than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    GlobalPost

    Fault Line: Aid, Politics, and Blame in Post-Quake Haiti

    GlobalPost Staff

    In a year-long series of deeply reported articles, GlobalPost asked the tough question: Where did all the money for post-earthquake Haiti go? While well-meaning people around the world give money after a disaster, too often there is no journalistic follow-up as the world moves to the next disaster. Especially in Haiti, where there is so much uncertainty, no one was keeping notes. GlobalPost’s insistence on answers upholds the highest traditions of investigative journalism.

     

    DIVISION: INNOVATION

    All Sizes

    USA Today

    Ghost Factories

    USA Today Staff

    USA Today clearly felt the poisons lurking in America’s collapsing industrial infrastructure was a story worthy of its best innovative effort. Excellent design, deep reporting and a solid, yet understated, user-experience combine to offer this year’s definitive perspective of the dangers of industrial toxins. Judges were especially impressed by reporters trained to measure for industrial impurities on their own, bringing a new meaning to the term “investigative journalism.”

    Financial Times

    The LIBOR Scandal

    FT Staff

    The Financial Times deserves recognition for breaking down a complex topic — LIBOR — into a simple interactive experience. Using nothing more than basic graphical tiles, easy-to-understand business concepts and a firm grasp of the topic, the FT made an opaque scandal clear to investors and the lay business reader alike. Not easy indeed.

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    Pipeline

    Erich Schwartzel, Andrew McGill, Laura Olson, Mary Leonard

    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette proves that innovation is not limited to major media market brands with big budgets. This mid-market news company wrapped the basics of exhaustive coverage, multimedia content and social interaction into a compelling microsite devoted to a critical local story: The effect of oil shale industry on this part of Pennsylvania. What was exciting here was how innovative the Gazette was with off-the-shelf tools. The use of 360 degree view-cams was particularly effective. This group deserves real credit for engineering a sum that was greater than its parts.

     

    DIVISION: INTERNATIONAL

    COMMENTARY

    The Wall Street Journal

    Heard on the Street: Energy

    Liam Denning

    Liam Denning’s columns for The Wall Street Journal (Heard on the Street: Energy) are clear and contextual. Denning shows a deep knowledge of his subject and a delightful writing style. Most importantly, Denning shines a light into the future and offers opinion that is both credible and actionable.

    EXPLANATORY

    Bloomberg News

    Mother India Starves Her Children

    Mehul Srivastava, Andrew MacAskill, Adi Narayan

    The Bloomberg package describes in impressive detail the extent and effects of worsening hunger in India – including malnutrition deaths among India’s poorest citizens, particularly children — despite the country’s steady economic growth. By highlighting the reasons for this depressing trend – which include corruption and government incompetence – Bloomberg’s reports should help lend urgency to efforts to solve this most fundamental of societal problems.

    Reuters

    Corporate Taxation Series

    Tom Bergin

    Reuters’ series combines knowledgeable reporting on complex international tax law with accessible storytelling. The story lends keen insights into the legal behavior and tax avoidance maneuvering of companies that have helped build their brand around a socially responsible or “hipness” mantra.

    Financial Times

    If Greece goes…

    FT Staff

    “If Greece Goes….” took on the task of predicting the fallout if Greece had exited the Eurozone – a difficult challenge under any circumstance, but especially so in the midst of a highly fluid situation. The FT cut through the back and forth of daily events to present a clear-headed analysis of the ultimate impact of an event that, perhaps because of its potentially severe economic consequences, didn’t materialize. The FT’s work is a comprehensive look at a story that many Americans saw only in short snippets and understood little about.

    FEATURE

    GlobalPost

    Cuba Kapital

     Nick Miroff, Alex Leff

    This was the one award that all judges were unanimous about right out of the gate. The intelligent approach to explaining and analyzing Raul Castro’s economic reforms and how they are affecting ordinary Cubans stood out for its stellar reportage and broad appeal, which made for great reading.

    The Los Angeles Times

    On China

    David Pierson

    Whether writing about “trademark squatters,” (getting the infamous Kardashian sisters into the lede) or how the growing problem of myopia means big business in China, Pierson’s fresh, and — dare we say (for a feature category) concise approach — was written with a flair rarely seen in business reporting.

    Globe and Mail

    RIM’s Last Stand

    Iain Marlow

    RIM’s survival may, surprisingly, depend on keeping its number one presence in Africa. Iain Marlow’s trip to Nigeria showed us a developing world where BlackBerry is still king, a fact that hasn’t made headlines over here. Marlow’s interviews with executives, business owners and the young hipsters in Nigeria who either aspire to own, or wouldn’t trade, a BlackBerry, gave us a new perspective on a company that’s been written about a thousand times.

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Bloomberg News

    Revolution to Riches

    Michael Forsythe, Shai Oster, Natasha Khan, Dune Lawrence, Ben Richardson, Bloomberg Staff

    Many news organizations tackled the story of how the extended family of China’s ruling elite has used its connections to amass huge wealth. But Bloomberg’s “Revolution to Riches” stood apart, humanizing the story and showing the impact on family relations. Bloomberg reporters doggedly tracked the ownership of businesses, real estate and stock of the relatives of top Chinese officials despite personal threats and the difficulty of cutting through a web of secrecy laden with fake names and offshore interests. “Revolution to Riches” caused overwhelming reaction in China when it was published, resulting in the government’s blocking of Bloomberg’s website, which remains inaccessible there today.

    The New York Times

    Wal-Mart Abroad

    David Barstow

    Most had taken for granted that Wal-Mart – the world’s largest retailer – would always dominate the markets it entered. It was The New York Times that shined a light on the business practices that enabled it to do so in Mexico. David Barstow traveled across Mexico digging through databases and filing cabinets to uncover a hidden corporate drama that involved Wal-Mart paying bribes in city after city to win approval to build stores. As a result of the Times’ stories, the Justice Department, the Securities and Exchange Commission and Mexican authorities are investigating.

    DIVISION: NEWS AGENCIES

    BREAKING NEWS

    Bloomberg News

    Supreme Court Healthcare Decision

    Greg Stohr, Erik Schatzker, Megan Hughes, Edward Adams

    Bloomberg set the standard for newswires with its coverage of the Supreme Court’s landmark healthcare ruling. It was not only correct, while other services very publicly bumbled along, it interpreted the ruling of a complex case essentially in real time. Impressive stuff by any standard.

    COMMENTARY

    Bloomberg News

    Bloomberg View columns

    Susan Antilla

    Susan Antilla’s sharp-edged commentaries give no quarter to those who mistreat investors or to the meek regulators who let offenders off easy. Her writing is crisp and eviscerating — two powerful traits when it comes to sharing opinions. Antilla demonstrates a shrewd understanding of the financial industry and its unsteady interaction with the federal government.

    EXPLANATORY

    Bloomberg News

    Indentured Students

    John Hechinger, Janet Lorin

    A fresh and vivid approach to an increasingly important topic. This series combined superb explanatory writing with in-depth reporting, vivid story-telling and compelling anecdotes.

    Associated Press

    China’s Reach

    Rod McGuirk, Charles Hutzler, Joe McDonald, Youkyung Lee, Denis D. Gray, Elaine Kurtenbach, Sarah DiLorenzo, Nick Perry

    Original reporting of a familiar but significant global trend. The AP team’s quantitative analysis of China’s growing influence carried the stories beyond the usual anecdote-based features, and packed a powerful punch.

    Reuters

    Inside Chesapeake Energy

    Brian Grow, Anna Driver, Joshua Schneyer, Reuters staff

    Reuters led other journalistic outlets in the reporting of Chesapeake Energy’s problems and the downfall of the company’s storied founder and chief executive, Aubrey McClendon. This detailed, concise and colorful report lays out in detail how Chesapeake’s problems have affected McClendon’s personal finances, reporting that McClendon even had to sign over part of his wine collection to secure a loan. The explanatory material made this series come alive not only for business experts but also for general readers.

    FEATURE

    Bloomberg News

    Son Who Hears Voices Finds Healthcare Fatally Dysfunctional

    Tom Moroney

    This is a riveting account of how the U.S. healthcare system failed to take care of a mentally ill patient, resulting in the death of an innocent person. In this compellingly written article, Moroney uses statistics and exhaustive (but never exhausting) reporting to illustrate a mental health system that is failing not only its patients, but also the innocent victims — whom we now know include school children in Newtown Conn.  First-class journalism.

    Associated Press

    Booze, Smokes on Agenda for Quirky Government Group

    Daniel Wagner

    Excellent journalism in the spirit of John McPhee. The writer casts light on the innerworkings of a government agency we’ve all heard of but know little about. While ambling through the bureau, he highlights intriguing facts and anecdotes that help us better understand a bit about what our government does. He also draws out controversies in a way that informs without alienating the reader. It’s a well-researched piece, and a fine read that never feels like homework.

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Reuters

    Reuters Staff

    Reuters nailed it with a year’s worth of groundbreaking reporting. Few knew Chesapeake’s CEO Aubrey McClendon borrowed $1.1 billion against his company stake until Reuters’ excellent report, which sparked a shareholder revolt and led to his eventual resignation. Reuters also caught a red-faced Starbucks boasting of UK profits while claiming a loss to the taxman. And even as global banking giant HSBC claimed it had cleaned up its act, Reuters uncovered a trail of funds leading to terrorist organizations. Reuters’ interactive series “The Unequal State of America” led the way for new forms of data-rich storytelling.

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Bloomberg News

    Indentured Students

    John Hechinger, Janet Lorin

    This package of stories identifies a serious social problem, explains how it developed—cancer-like—with the complicity of politicians and university officials, and shows how it has led to spending sprees at schools even as it has hobbled borrowers for life. It’s an extraordinary melding of data and insight, reflecting a keen understanding of economics and incentives. The work is humanized with heartbreaking case studies, especially those involving the debt-collection agencies gone amok.

    Bloomberg News

    The Inside Story of Insider Trading

    David Voreacos, Bryan Gruley, David Glovin, Greg Farrell

    This package goes into people’s bedrooms, as well as courtrooms, to tell its sorry tales. There’s remarkable drama, even involving suicide. There’s also a dash of celebrity, with the Playboy example. The package reflects insights about Wall Street, putting human faces on a phenomenon that remains all too common, despite its illegality. This package takes an abstraction and makes it tangible.

     

    DIVISION: PERSONAL FINANCE

    The New York Times

    You For Sale

    Natasha Singer

    We know almost nothing about one of America’s fastest growing industries, yet it knows all kinds of things about us because it collects and analyzes the details about our personal finances and then sells this information to the highest bidders. Singer unpacked this obscure and unregulated industry — largely data brokers and data analytics firms — in a fascinating and ultimately unsettling series that shows how marketers have exploited new technology to enable companies to peer ever more deeply into our lifestyles so they can profit more by selling us their goods and services. Thanks in part to Singer’s work, Congress and the Federal Trade Commission have launched separate investigations into this industry.

    The Wall Street Journal

    The Intelligent Investor

    Jason Zweig

    Tightly written and probing work that plays a watchdog role in exposing conflicts and too-good-to-be-true schemes. Goes well beyond the ‘don’t put all your eggs in one basket’ approach that prevails in so many advice columns. Extra points for how he discovered that a money manager who publishes a newsletter co-owned by personal finance personality Suze Orman overstated the performance of a mutual fund he manages, a disclosure that eventually led the fund to apologize. Zweig knows how to speak truth to power.

    Money Magazine

    End of Life

    Lisa Gibbs, Ismat Mangla, Penelope Wang, Gary Weiss

    In a deeply reported and hard-hitting yet sensitively written series, this team showed how end-of-life medical bills and funeral and burial costs can significantly and unexpectedly worsen the emotional strains caused by the deaths of spouses and others close to us. One article documented the tactics some funeral homes and cemeteries use to persuade families to overspend. Another found that aggressive and costly end-stage medical treatments sometimes do little to respect the wishes of the dying. A third piece painted a moving portrait of a man dying of ALS and how he and his wife have been making the best of their remaining time together, managing his soaring healthcare expenses and planning for her financial security. The articles pointed readers to many ideas and sources for lowering our end-of-life financial burden.

    DIVISION: PRINT – DAILY NEWSPAPERS

    BREAKING NEWS

    Dailies: Less than 100,000

    The Providence Journal

    Curt Schilling’s 38 Studios Declares Bankruptcy

    Mike Stanton, Paul Grimaldi, Lynn Arditi, Kate Bramson, Andy Smith

    This entry showed how a newspaper can use the Internet to comprehensively cover breaking news and complement the print paper. The reporting quickly digested and translated former baseball player Curt Schilling’s complex bankruptcy filing and covered important issues such as taxpayers’ liability, and it did so in language average readers could understand.

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Kansas City Star

    Sprint

    Mark Davis, Scott Canon

    Comprehensive package that clearly explained Softbank’s deal and the implications for Sprint and its employees, the Kansas City area and the mobile industry. The elements complemented each other smartly and the writing was extremely readable and relevant

    The Charlotte Observer

    Big Crowds of Shareholders, Demonstrators Expected for BofA Meeting

    Kirsten Valle Pittman, Ely Portillo,  Andrew Dunn, Cleve R. Wootson Jr.

    The story painted a vivid portrait of a meeting that generated little news on its own, as the reporters acknowledged in print. Anyone who only saw the front page would understand the tension between Bank of America and its shareholders, and also between the bank and the larger community. The remainder of the story provided just enough detail to flesh out these themes.

    Dailies: 200,000 to 400,000

     Star Tribune

    Best Buy’s Founder Exits over Scandal

    Thomas Lee, Jennifer Bjorhus, Patrick Kennedy, Janet Moore, David Phelps, Neal St. Anthony

    The country’s only remaining go-to, big-box store for consumer electronics, already flailing, is further weakened by a decision not to share embarrassing, but crucial, information by the man who helped make Best Buy what it became. The stories by the Star-Tribune staff give readers an inside look into the downfall of an empire they mainly know through the yellow-and-blue Sunday ads in their newspapers.

    Houston Chronicle

    British Petroleum Plea Deal

    Houston Chronicle Staff

    A comprehensive and human approach to covering a plea deal about the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history that took the lives of 11 workers and immeasurably damaged the Gulf Coast environment and economy. The stories keep the focus on the loss of human life and the victims’ families, left behind to deal with the pain, just as much as the impact on the environment and BP’s negligence on many fronts. Loren Steffy’s column about the victims on A-1 kept that tragic human story front and center. Coverage about the plea deal was not just a recitation of it, but written in terms that any reader could understand.

    Dailies: More than 400,000

    The Wall Street Journal

    Buying the Big Board

    Anupreeta Das, Jenny Strasburg, Jacob Bunge, E.S. Browning, Telis Demos, Sharon Terlep

    This was a great scoop by the Journal. From the beginning and day after day, the coverage was solid and richly explanatory. The color analytical piece was an excellent complement to the breaking news.

    COMMENTARY

    Dailies: Less than 100,000

    American Banker

    Barbara Rehm

    Barbara Rehm’s clear and compelling columns take on her publication’s core banker readership with well-buttressed arguments some of them may not want to read. Rehm tells bankers to split their businesses into smaller pieces, show gratitude for government bailouts and burnish their images by expanding lending. Rehm demonstrates the best qualities of effective columnists: She is comprehensive and prescriptive, but not ponderous.

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    Detroit News

    Daniel Howes

    These columns are thoroughly reported and rich in telling detail, giving them an authoritative tone that makes Howes’ passion for his topics all the more impressive. “He really cares, and you can tell,” said one of the judges. The writing is concise, well-structured and elegant while remaining broadly accessible and relevant.

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    David Nicklaus

    These columns are admirably fair in tone. The depth of the reporting and the complexity of the topics don’t interfere with the ease and clarity of the writing. All the judges were impressed by the remarkable range of topics Nicklaus covered and the sober, credible voice of his commentary. “His breadth is amazing,” said one of the judges.

    Dailies: 200,000 to 400,000

    Financial Times

    John Gapper

    John Gapper demonstrated an impressive ability to cut the powerbrokers of global business down to size. He offers readers timely insight, well-argued. His views are geared to elicit a reaction and spark debate, and his illuminating, original columns consistently hit the mark.

    Houston Chronicle

    Loren Steffy

    Every city needs a Loren Steffy, whose work illustrates the importance of a watchdog that officials and CEOs fear and local residents and investors cheer. His column about property appraisals of prominent Houston office buildings showed how a legal loophole was costing residents billions of dollars in lost taxes. He rebutted one company’s claim that the Obama administration was to blame for its bankruptcy. And he took the government to task for not protecting energy workers in the Gulf of Mexico. In each, he showed deep, original reporting and sprightly writing. And more importantly, in the grand tradition of local columnists, he has the backs of the people in Houston.

    Dailies: More than 400,000

    The New York Times

    James Stewart

    Exemplary because of the scope of coverage, lucid writing and original reporting. The personal tax rate column was engaging. The Apple column was prescient. The SEC column was both great explanatory journalism and news breaking in terms of why the case was dropped. And the Replacement Limited column was inspirational.

    EXPLANATORY

    Dailies: Less than 100,000

    St. Cloud (Minn.) Times

    Chasing Futures in the Oil Patch

    Kevin Allenspach

    The paper was able to show readers a direct relationship from the boom in North Dakota to St. Cloud’s economy. The package showed an extraordinary investment of time, thought and space by the paper to the story, although St. Cloud has limited resources.

    American Banker

    Payment Protection Controversy

    Victoria Finkle, Jeff Horwitz

    The story was one of the best explanations that the judges had seen of this topic, clearly written in an economical way.

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    Care Quandary

    Jim Doyle

    This story personalized the financial and ethical dynamics of healthcare costs, mixing national statistics with the personal stories of Athlee William’s family. We appreciated the excellent summary of the costs associated with Williams’ last six months of life and the extensive use of family members’ voices to describe the drama associated with her last month.  A great example of using a personal story to illustrate a national dilemma.

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Port Wars

    Dan Chapman, Matt Kempner, Brant Sanderlin, Melissa Angle

    East and Gulf coast ports are spending $15 billion in upgrades in anticipation of new business from the expanded Panama Canal. Chapman became skeptical. His reporting found no evidence that the U.S. ports would benefit. Plus, the AJC used great pictures and informative graphics to support the package. The package was detailed and incredibly informative, distilling a complex issue into easily understandable parts.

    The News Tribune (Tacoma, Wash.)

    Small Business vs. Big Oil

    John Gillie

    An epic David v Goliath story that helped reveal the behind the scenes workings of the retail gas industry. The reporter’s attention to detail helped explain the way the contracts work, the problems that bubble up over the course of the contracts, and the financial stakes for both parties. The outstanding reporting gives readers a clear view of the problems this dealer faces. It also places the problems in the larger context of national issues in the industry.

    Dailies: 200,000 to 400,000

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Paper Cuts

    John Schmid, Mike Di Sisti, Emily Yount, Lou Saldivar, Nick Lujero

    A well-told story that got even more interesting as it moved from the lay of the land in Wisconsin to the state of the art in China. It’s a rare piece that we could explain with equal enthusiasm to colleagues around the office and a 15-year-old. Trees that grow to maturity in six years! Machines that crank out as much paper in a week as the entire state of Wisconsin in a year! And a lovely portrait of Wisconsin’s by-gone industry and its feisty modern-day champion

    The Oregonian

    Diminished Expectations

    Kelly House, Brent Hunsberger, Jeff Manning, Elliot Njus, Molly Young

    Outstanding, well-researched, well-written, well-edited five-part series explaining why so many Oregonian readers feel like the 2007 recession never ended. Solid use of graphics and data to back up anecdotal stories of the recession’s lingering impact on college students, recent grads, younger families and older households. There were a number of papers in this category that took on the fallout from the lingering recession but this entry stood out to the judges as the best executed and most vivid.

    The Seattle Times

    Amazon: Behind the Smile

    Amy Martinez, Kristi Heim, Hal Bernton, Susan Kelleher, Jim Brunner, Jim Simon

    This was an ambitious piece of journalism for anyone, but particularly for Amazon’s hometown newspaper. The judges collectively felt that they had heard bits and pieces of the Amazon story, but never all at once, or with such sweep. We were particularly struck by the shoe-leather reporting in the story about working conditions at the company’s distribution centers

    Dailies: More than 400,000

    The New York Times

    Tax and Spending Myths

    Binyamin Appelbaum, Robert Gebeloff

    The Times produced reporting that was both comprehensive and comprehensible to expose the mythology and self-contradictions that surround American attitudes toward taxes and spending — the most persistent and perhaps the most important domestic issue facing the U.S. The series was engagingly written, a real feat for a story about tax policy, and was accompanied by an extensive multimedia package of video, charts and a standout interactive graphic.

    USA Today

    Green Inc.: Environmentalism for Profit

    Thomas Frank, Christopher Schnaars

    USA Today’s Thomas Frank demolished the green building movement, showing how builders received bragging rights and hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks for making small improvements of dubious environmental value. Frank detailed how builders dominated the standard-setting, and how the organization in charge of those rules made money from the green construction business. With convincing data and compelling writing, USA Today demonstrated that the movement was much more likely to benefit earnings than the environment.

    The New York Times

    The iEconomy

    Charles Duhigg, Keith Bradsher, David Barboza, David Segal, David Kocieniewski,

    Bill Vlasic, Hiroko Tabuchi

    Marshaling its global resources, the Times explained how Apple has transformed manufacturing, retailing, employment and lifestyles in ways that sometimes belie the iconic brand’s shiny image. It revealed living and work conditions abroad that few Americans would tolerate, and the failure of the company’s success to translate into U.S. jobs and tax revenue or sustainable careers for overworked American sales associates. The ambitious series spanned multiple continents and was aided by memorable anecdotes, data analysis and multimedia packages.


    FEATURES

    Dailies: Less than 100,000

    Roanoke (Va.) Times

    Picking up the Pieces

    Beth Macy

    Powerful writing. This well-researched piece draws readers into the story from the start, with the scenario of the businessman trying to pinpoint the source of a cheap chest of drawers. We loved the family tree and the photos just made the sources come to life. Kudos to this paper for allowing such wonderful journalism to continue.

    The Providence Journal

    Full Steam Ahead Aboard a Fast-Attack Nuclear Sub

    Paul Edward Parker, Sandor Bodo

    This story was well of the beaten path – how often does a dispatch come from a submarine? We had fun reading this well researched package by enthusiastic journalists. (We’re dying to know what legal waivers had to be signed!) Three cheers to the editors who didn’t dismiss a unique pitch.

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    Omaha World-Herald

    China Connection

    Paul Goodsell

    A strong series that explains to Omaha World-Herald readers how they supply China’s fast-growing economy, who makes the things they import, and why some Nebraska products (beef) don’t sell in this huge market. Crisply written with great photography.

    The Gazette (Montreal, Que.)

    Canadian mine in Andes

    Catherine Solyom

    A clear, concise examination of how a local employer affects, for better and worse, people and communities thousands of miles away. The resulting story could have been a wonky, overly earnest slog, but instead the writer delivered a package that’s fair, packed with detail, and careful to explain complex concepts.

    The Gazette (Montreal, Que.)

    Voicing concern

    Jeff Heinrich

    This is a fun, small story about a quirky local industry. I love the small observations: the differences between dubbing in France and Quebec, how the French demand dubbing over subtitles, and the process of making a foreign language come out of an actor’s lips .

    Dailies: 200,000 to 400,000

     Star Tribune

    The Lost Empire

    Thomas Lee, David Shaffer, Paul McEnroe

    A comprehensive package detailing the history of an important local business that also did a fine job of explaining how the founder is now back to possibly save the company from oblivion.

    The Boston Globe

    Victory Outreach

    Casey Ross

    An insightful investigative story that had strong feature elements and resulted in changes to state regulations to better protect workers. Story showed how large companies can improperly benefit from cheap labor provided by a ministry, illustrated with examples of real people.

    Dailies: More than 400,000

    The New York Times

    McAfee

    David Segal

    A fantastic yarn, cleverly told. Informed readers probably had known something about John McAfee’s life on the lam by the time this story appeared, but David Segal did a wonderful job of framing the increasingly bizarre behavior of the onetime tech mogul, who actively worked to confuse police, journalists and the general public. The narrative moved you through the story at a good pace, which is tough to do in something long even on an interesting subject. It stayed focused, stayed sharp, stayed witty.

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Dailies: up to 200,000

    The Des Moines Register

    Christopher Doering, Donnelle Eller, Victor Epstein, Lynn Hicks, Patt Johnson, Dan Piller, Marco Santana

    The paper shined with an impressive mix of features, including page-one pieces on banks’ firing of low-level employees for minor offenses, wage stagnation and conflicts over biofuels. The Register had commanding coverage of both agriculture and technology. Its sections offered lively Biz Buzz and Tech Talk columns. Bold graphic storytelling and modern illustrations enhanced its reporting.

    The Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, Ariz.)

    Norma Coile, David Wichner, Gabriela Rico, Angela Pittenger

    The paper demonstrated outsized ambitions for a staff of three reporters, mixing high-impact page-one projects with a smart tech column and shorter items to engage readers. The staff distinguished itself with an in-depth look at the impact of the Mexican economy on Arizona and an investigation of legal bills at a local community college.

    Dailies: 200,000 to 400,000

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Staff

    The centerpiece of this outstanding entry is the two-part series about the Wisconsin paper industry. Rather than limiting the effort to how competition was hurting the state’s largest business, the newspaper went to China to show what the biggest competitor was doing. Its online version of the story traced the evolution of changes in the paper industry from the launch of the iPad in January 2010 and the resulting impact on so many businesses. In the same issue, they also broke an investigative piece about how someone who had donated to the new governor’s recall campaign won a contract to manage a $1 million program, an apparent violation of the state’s pay-to-play rules.

    Star Tribune

    Star Tribune Staff

    The paper owned the Best Buy story. The submissions showed blanket coverage of the turmoil at an important company in the state. Reporters interviewed a wide range of people — including former executives and analysts –to give readers a view of what went wrong at a once-high-flying company. The Sunday submission that featured stories on flood insurance, the recovering housing market and farmland investment gave an interesting perspective on the broader real-estate market.

    Dailies: More than 400,000

    USA Today

    USA TODAY Money Section

    USA Today combines its consistently strong consumer focus with powerful accountability reporting. Topics included dubious tax breaks for supposedly green buildings, dilatory response to auto recalls by rental companies, and the surging cost of water treatment and delivery.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Dailies: Less than 100,000

    The Register-Guard (Eugene, Ore.)

    Highway 20

    Winston Ross

    This four-part series describes the human and financial costs of a stretch of a road crossing a mountain in Oregon, and the state’s botched attempt to repair it. Ross depicts a project beset by problems, and of the highest importance: Drivers regularly die on the narrow, twisting Highway 20, which offers few lanes for passing, and many miles for frustration to build up, encouraging drivers to make dangerous moves which often end fatally. Combing the human, political, and engineering aspects of a complicated story in a clear, readable way, Ross has built a terrific piece of public-interest journalism, which also happens to be a great read.

    American Banker

    Debt Collection Debacle

    Jeff Horwitz, Maria Aspan

    An eye-opening story about how two of the country’s biggest banks ran roughshod over customers, selling paid-off debts to collection agencies, churning out lawsuits that in many cases couldn’t be supported, and firing employees who raised objections. Debt-collection practices have long been fertile ground for investigative journalism, but here the subjects were not little-known under-the-radar debt collectors, but JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America. Horowitz and Aspan combined excellent document work with relentless, old-fashioned reporting.

    The Tennessean

    Assisted Living Abuses

    Walter Roche, Deborah Fisher

    An investigation into assisted-living centers in eight Tennessee counties found one-fifth had residents who needed more care than the centers could provide. The Tennessean’s investigation into the growing assisted-living industry found minimal state oversight, including no staff-to-resident ratios. Reporter Walter Roche uncovered resident-on-resident violence between dementia patients that resulted in death, and a retired Catholic priest with dementia who exhibited intrusive sexual behavior toward at least five female residents before being moved.

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Columbus Dispatch

    Credit Scars

    Jill Riepenhoff, Mike Wagner

    This was the pinnacle of investigative journalism, a superb and comprehensive examination of a frightening problem: damage caused by inaccurate credit reports and the stubborn credit-scoring companies. The individual stories were heartbreaking. Congratulations to the Dispatch for inspiring legislators to move to correct these problems.

    The Charlotte Observer and The (Raleigh) News & Observer

    Prognosis: Profits

    Ames Alexander, Karen Garloch, Joseph Neff, David Raynor

    Another thorough effort that exposed the complicated mess healthcare has become in North Carolina. They captured the players, the problems and the greed of those involved.

     

     Dailies: 200,000 to 400,000

    The Oregonian

    The PERS Problem

    Ted Sickinger, Joany Carlin

    One of the best explanations of a complex pension system, bolstered by numerous real-life examples and great analysis of data. The generous system and the continuing costs to taxpayers can now be understood by any Oregonian reader.

    The Boston Globe

    Victory Outreach

    Casey Ross

    A richly told tale of recovering addicts exploited by the ministry they turned to for help. Through dogged, street-level reporting, the Globe revealed how these men became the cheapest of labor sources, farmed out by their church to do back-breaking work at upscale hotels. The grimy details exposed weak worker protection laws and awakened regulators to the situation.

    Dailies: More than 400,000

    The New York Times

    Wal-Mart Abroad

    David Barstow

    Barstow amassed devastating evidence about significant wrongdoing and crafted compelling narratives. The reconstruction of Wal-Mart’s internal dealings, including the role of senior executives, was gripping. Corruption in Mexico is a topic often described in general but seldom detailed with specifics. This project delivered.

    Chicago Tribune

    Playing With Fire

    Patricia Callahan, Sam Roe, Michael Hawthorne

    The Tribune’s series combined a worthy public-service aim, compelling reporting and gripping storytelling. The historical sweep, including the role of the tobacco industry in reshaping the debate about furniture fire safety, was especially revealing.

     

    CATEGORY: PRINT – MAGAZINES

    COMMENTARY

    Magazines: Less than 100,000

    Seattle Business Magazine

    Bill Virgin

    Great analysis and expressed point of view, strength in story/news writing and ability to connect with readers, Virgin’s work jumped off from a solid news hook. It was readable and appealing without falling into hokiness. Virgin tackled news topics pertinent to his audience and wove together stories with solid commentary and data, pushing readers to form their own point of view.

    Magazines: Over 100,001

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Peter Coy

    Peter Coy’s writing is compelling, his opinions are well supported and his analysis is spot-on. The judges particularly liked the Bain Capital and Fiscal Cliff pieces because they looked at topics where there was a lot of noise and far-flung predictions and made sense of what to expect. This is high-level, smart writing that puts complex subjects into focus in a compelling way and offers well-reasoned solutions.

    EXPLANATORY

    Magazines: Over 100,001

    Fortune

    Megaupload

    Roger Parloff

    This story was a perfect fit for the category. Writer Roger Parloff, drawing on his legal background, offers a comprehensive and conversational look at a conflict between copyright and technology brought to the fore by the arrest of Kim Dotcom. He tackles the legal gray area of the Supreme Court Sony Betamax ruling and why it does not stand up in today’s world, especially with the growing phenomenon of “cyberlockers.”

    Bloomberg Markets

    The Scourge of the Superbugs

    Jason Gale, Adi Narayan

    “Superbugs” is a thorough and comprehensive explanation and analysis of a growing threat to our world. The story is well crafted, weaving anecdotes of horrific health situations with plain, easy to understand language detailing the medical side of story.

    SmartMoney Magazine

    The Attack of the 6.5-Point Typeface

    Missy Sullivan

    SmartMoney’s well-written and eye-opening exploration of fine-print disclosures is loaded with historical detail, colorful examples and “shocking” study results that show how little attention consumers pay before they sign. Graphic breakouts on categories from banking to travel offer interesting statistics and helpful consumer tips, and an online-only story adds some of the tricks of the fine-print trade.

    FEATURE

    Magazines: Less than 100,000

    National Underwriter Life & Health

    The Complete ELNY Saga: 21 Years of Mismanagement, Corruption, Broken Promises and Shattered Lives

    Bill Coffin, Warren Hersch, Elizabeth Festa, Mike Stanley, Shawn Moynihan, Corey Dahl, Nichole Morford

    This fantastic story combines great factual reporting of a complex industry with powerful personal stories of the real impact on people.

    Magazines: Over 100,001

    Fortune

    ConMan

    Roger Parloff

    Most business stories don’t read like a movie plot. This one did. The way the reporter was able to navigate all of the court records and spin this into such a great read is a testament to his skill. This was a tough division this year, there were probably six stories that could have landed in the top two. Con Man was thoroughly researched and very well written. Narrative writing in its finest form.

    Bloomberg Markets

    Blowing the Whistle on Citi

    Bob Ivry

    This story took an issue that was not new and layered on all sorts of detail with real-person interviews. There’s been a lot written about the sausage factory that was mortgage finance, but very little of it had real people telling what they saw and did. Kudos to a piece with strong research and good storytelling.

    Inc. Magazine

    Turntable.fm

    Burt Helm, Dan Ferrara, Jane Berentson

    After finishing this piece, we wanted to read it again. It showed the balance between the creative side and the business side of a company. Hands down the best written of the magazine pieces. Took a seemingly routine event and made it must-read material. Story was structured well and engaging.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Magazines: All sizes

    Bloomberg Markets

    Ronald Henkoff, Laura Colby, Siung Tjia

    A magazine that appeals to the market professional as well as the individual with a true global interest in business news. It has a nice mix of articles that give investing ideas, to those articles that dig more deeply behind the scenes of important topics – like the cover story of mortgage fraud and one Citigroup employee’s attempt to blow the whistle on questionable mortgage underwriting and packaging practices and the consequences she faced by having done so. The magazine tries to tell topical stories through the voice of people who are part of those stories as a way to give new and additional insight.

    The Real Deal

    Stuart Elliott

    If you are involved in New York real estate, this publication seems to be the bible in our view. But it goes way beyond the typical stories of who bought what, or local trends or puff pieces on big players in the local industry. And thus, has an appeal beyond the Realtor. If you want to invest in real estate, you should read this magazine.

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Magazines: Over 100,001

    Bloomberg Markets

    Danger on Your Dinner Plate

    Stephanie Armour, John Lippert, Michael Smith

    Food-borne illnesses seem to be cropping up with sickening regularity. In “Danger on Your Dinner Plate,” Bloomberg Markets reports that each year 48 million Americans fall ill from unsafe food; 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die. Reporters Stephanie Armour, John Lippert and Michael Smith investigated what is behind those numbers and discovered a largely privatized food safety system plagued by secrecy, conflicts of interests and sham inspections.

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Tech’s Tragic Secret

    Cam Simpson, Tim Culpan, Dwi Sadmoko, Eko Listiyorini

    “Tech’s Tragic Secret” follows the trail from Indonesia’s deadly tin mines, where workers are frequently buried alive, to the leading names in electronics manufacturing like Apple, Sony and Panasonic. Writer Cam Simpson and photographer Kemal Jufri journeyed to the mud pits and lagoons where miners labor, bringing back vivid details of the hazards they face. Their story also uses a variety of well-crafted graphics to show how that tin finds its way into the TVs, laptops, tablets and smartphones and other devices that use solder.

    CATEGORY: PRINT – WEEKLIES / BIWEEKLIES

    BREAKING NEWS

    Crain’s Detroit Business

    Lawmakers Quick with Fix

    Daniel Duggan

    A high-quality piece of investigative journalism, where the reporter used his understanding and experience covering the industry to break a story with big implications. Revealing how a major state politician’s brother lobbied successfully to get a bill passed through the legislature in three weeks showed great reporting, use of multiple sources and deep understanding of the beat. Even more importantly, he was able to tell a story.

    The Business Review (Albany, N.Y.)

    Azalea

    Adam Sichko

    Strong perspective about the economic development climate for chips in the Albany area, as well as a decent collection of details about what the site would require.

    COMMENTARY

    Baltimore Business Journal

    Rants and Raves

    Joanna Sullivan

    Sullivan’s columns are engaging, thoughtful and vividly written. She knows how to hook readers with a lede, and she reminds us that business is about people. She is empathetic when she can be and skeptical when she must be. She seems to have a firm handle on the literary ideal that telling the story of one person can sometimes tell the story of us all.

    Crain’s New York Business

    In The Markets

    Aaron Elstein, Glenn Coleman

    Elstein’s columns offer financial analysis with a touch of whimsy. Not just debt service and gross margins, but Umbrian olive oil and free-range fowl. His piece on specialty grocer Fairway was as strong a column as one can do on a particular business. He’s funny, entertaining, has a great eye for detail and can sometimes slice to the bone with a single quote. The line about how Fairway should be going bankrupt, not public is just precious.

    EXPLANATORY

    Portland Business Journal

    Bank Blight

    Matthew Kish

    These simply, but powerfully, written stories explain a problem that was in plain sight in many places beset by high foreclosure rates: vacant houses. Backed up by solid public-records and shoe-leather reporting, the reporter clearly explains the complicated ownership pattern that makes cleaning up neighborhood eyesores so difficult. The effective use of multimedia in an interactive map and a slide show of vacant houses complements well the sad tale told by those affected.

    Phoenix Business Journal

    Behind a Bank Failure

    Jennifer A. Johnson

    This very well-reported entry makes good use of documents and human sources to explain the complicated aftermath of a local bank’s failure. The journalist uses this one bank’s unwinding to shed light on a critical topic: the quest by government officials to recapture funds paid out to keep depositors whole when banks fail. The reporting takes you in the room as the drama unfolds, turning a complex process into a page-turner. Strong data and facts combined with good color and context make for a compelling micro-level tale that explains a macro-level saga.

    Crain’s New York Business

    King Cab

    Jeremy Smerd, Glenn Coleman

    King Cab is a well-written, well-sourced, succinct story that explains the inner workings of the New York City cab industry, which is tightly controlled by five families. It is an excellent example of reporting on private companies, without benefit of an interview with the key player. It is packed full of information, yet makes judicious use of numbers and color to provide a fascinating look at an under-covered business operating in plain sight. It develops the angle of the tension between the “cabbie cabal” and Mayor Bloomberg to provide a timely portrayal of that conflict.

    FEATURE

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Sears — Where America Shopped

    Brigid Sweeney

    This well-written, sophisticated story is as much a narrative about the U.S. economy as it is a profile of its subject, Sears, Roebuck & Co. and the Sears Holding Corp. Reporter Brigid Sweeney was able to use color from the past to bring us up to the difficult present, and offered an explanation of why Sears (and perhaps by extension other great American corporations) may be facing an economic environment in which it cannot survive.

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    The Agitator

    Tripp Mickle, Tom Stinson

    This portrait of how a controversial Olympic sports agent nabbed some of the best athletes in the world and sent them to London starts like this: “Evan Morganstein was drunk.” From that lede, Mickle builds his profile with broad sourcing, great anecdotes and strong writing to explain how this prickly, iconoclastic agent works – and why he’s been successful.

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    The Cost of Crime: The Story of Austin

    Lorene Yue, Stephen J. Serio

    It’s one thing to report that a neighborhood has a lot of violent crime. It’s another to show readers what that means on a human level. And while profiles of families torn by violence are moving, powerful and important, Crain’s Chicago Business reporter Lorene Yue took a different approach, telling the story in the words and experiences of small business owners trying to eke out a living in a neighborhood so dangerous that the customers are afraid to visit. “When I first moved here three years ago, this office was generating three to four sales a month,” real estate broker Sidney Taylor told Yue. “Now it’s doing four to five sales a year.”

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Advertising Age

    Advertising Age Staff

    A 2012 redesign elevated the look of the publication. Ad Age consistently presented terrific headlines, eye-grabbing graphics, and stories that answered all of the key questions. The judges especially loved the story about Tide managing a grand slam in a crowded market with its Pods, and a feature on Louisville marketing itself to eldercare companies.

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Crain’s Chicago Staff

    The first thing the judges noticed about Crain’s Chicago Business was its sharp content and snappy design. The publication makes nice use of graphics to support and tell stories. It also publishes several innovative standing features. A weekly ‘Business of Life’ page, which carries news about everything from dining and books to nonprofits, recognizes that executives have personal lives too. And the Info Junkie profile offers a fresh take on the tried and true executive Q & A.

    Boston Business Journal

    Boston Business Journal Staff

    The Boston Business Journal owns coverage of biotechnology, one of its indigenous industries. But the publication also surprises and delights readers with a wide range of other types of coverage, including a story about an executive who survived lymphoma and went on to raise $1 million to endow a scholarship to train oncologists to provide the same type compassionate care this executive had received. The Boston Business Journal’s coverage is readable, fresh and memorable.

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Northern Colorado Business Report

    Abound Solar

    Steve Lynn

    The “Abound Solar” package stood out for its FOIA of Dept. of Energy records that blew open the oft-reported cause cited by other media for Abound Solar’s
    bankruptcy, competition from China, to show that defective products were really to blame. The accompanying and follow-up articles, on faulty installations to
    unpaid taxes to new jobs found by company execs, provided additional details.

    Washington Business Journal

    Impossible Dreams

    Bryant Ruiz Switzky

    “Impossible Dreams” distinguished itself by the innovative use of public records, extensive interviews and insightful analysis. It reflected an impressive scope as it crunched SBA data and used strong anecdotes to reflect patterns in lending showing that African-Americans had not rebounded as much as other groups in receiving loans.

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    Land Bank Giveaway

    Cory Schouten

    The Indianapolis Business Journal’s Land Bank Giveaway detailed the bulk sale of 154 different properties sold to a non-profit in a practice no longer permitted by the city.

     

    DIVISION:  RADIO/TV

    EXPLANATORY

    CNBC

    Facebook Explainer

    Julia Boorstin, Andy Tarabocchia, Nick O’Connor, Andy Barsh, Eric Vuolle, Erin Barry, Rich Uliasz, Kelly Frisco, Evan Tyler, Ray Parisi

    Delivered a slick, smart and appealing look inside a popular phenomenon that not only has captured global clicks, but also big-time cash opportunities both for Facebook and powerful brands that have harnessed its mass appeal. Great job in real time, attractively produced.

    FEATURE

    Southern California Public Radio

    KPCC: Movie Trailers

    Sanden Totten, Paul Glickman

    KPCC’s “Movie Trailers” took a fresh story idea and went deep. The judges were drawn into this series of stories just like a popcorn-eating moviegoer is drawn into a good movie trailer. The pieces were thorough, engaging and rich with multimedia extra extras like slide shows, audio clips and video.

    CNBC

    20 Under 20: Transforming Tomorrow

    Susan Krakower, Luke Bauer, Michael Davies, Andrew Fried, Stephanie Masarsky-Sloves, Greg Groggel, Sean Stuart, Lindsay Panell, Jeffrey Plunkett, Kelly Martin, Nicola Marsh, Adrienne Gits, Bill Sherman, Kenseth Thibideau, Rachel Garza, Danny O’Malley, Tim Groseclose, Steven Williams, Ravi Subramanian, Danny O’Malley, Matthew Akers, Todd Banhazl, Rachel Morrison, Brian Relph, Jeremy Saulnier, Jeff Bierman, Mark Eaton, Michael Epple, Ari Issler, Jason Joseffer, Clare Major, Noah Stout, Jonathan Bowerbank, Gabe Redder, Greg Miller, Glenn Abbey, John Osborne, Cedric Pilard, David Silberberg, Adrienne Wade, Darcel Walker, Erik Whitestone, Alexander Yaker, Michael Di Ricco, Matthew Tomko, Bryan Landis, Deric Ned, AJ Pyatak, Candace Nyoz, Big Machine Indelible, Luis Fernandez, Thomas Guyer, Scott Hanschew, Lisa Harding, Scott Martinez, Harrison Osborne, Andrew Parsons, Tyler Smith, Crawford Watson, David Webber

    A fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the selection process for PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel’s $100,000 fellowship program. We were drawn in by the teens and the artful way in which their characters were developed. By the end of this lengthy but riveting visual narrative, we found ourselves rooting for the amazing young people profiled. The narrative is interwoven with a central question: is college worthwhile? Beautifully produced and written.

    INVESTIGATIVE

    CNBC

    Filthy Rich

    Scott Cohn, Catherine Corrigan, Jeff Pohlman, Steven T. Banton, Gary Princz, Vito Tattoli, Gina Saudino, Gerard Miller, David Grogan, Heinrich Walling, Raul Marin, Jack Rayzor, Jerrald Hattan, Brian Prentke, Glen Aust, Chris Balcom, Oscar Molina, Jerry Fraser, Joseph Hancock, Chris McIntire, Claudio Musajo, Michael Schwartz, Michael Tomaso, Zac Bissonnette, Valerie Patriarca, Scott Matthews, Nikhil Deogun

    Fresh, thought-provoking, and intrusive to the subject matter in all the right ways. We liked how the report asked the key question of who is responsible and examined how the U.S. has enabled some of these actions. It was nice to see examples of how these problems are being addressed as well. And judges appreciate the time and effort it took to track down all different story lines stories in a visual forum.

     

    CNBC

    Cyber Espionage: The Chinese Threat

    David Faber, Sabrina Korber, Jeff Pohlman, Steven T. Banton, Vito Tattoli, Gina Saudino, Angel Perez Sr., John Rehm, Rich Marko, Gerard Miller, David Grogan, Bob Briscoe, Herb Forsberg, Leroy Jackson, Jeff Kleinman, John Lawrence, Rob Massey, Adam Shanker, Mark Thalman, Paul Green, Dave Schumacher, Tony Stewart, Barry Weisblat, Everett Wong, Peter Kourkoumelis, Keith Kyak, Danielle Kennedy, Jennifer Schlesinger, Scott Matthews, Nikhil Deogun

    Incredibly prescient piece that did an impressive job of adding context. The judges appreciate what it took to track down a tough story to tell and tell is in an explainable and visual way.

    CNBC

    Health Care Hustle

    Scott Cohn, Catherine Corrigan, Sabrina Korber, Jeff Pohlman, Steven T. Banton, Conrad deVroeg, Vito Tattoli, Gina Saudino, Gerard Miller, David Grogan, Michael Vaughn, Christopher Balcom, Jerry Fraser, Todd Williams, Guy Morton, Mike Concepcion, Everett Wong, Michael Schwartz, Michael Tomaso, Zac Bissonnette, Valerie Patriarca, Scott Matthews, Nikhil Deogun

    The judges found the time and effort that went into this to be impressive. It’s an interesting look at a very important topic.

    DIVISION: REAL ESTATE

    Sun Sentinel (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.)

    Bad-Neighbor Banks

    Megan O’Matz, John Maines

    Entries like this remind us to be thankful for dogged journalists employed by regional newspapers dedicated to serving their communities. The foreclosure crisis has battered cities from coast to coast, but these reporters weren’t satisfied to just drive by increasing decay each day. Hard work and determination detailed in well-researched stories the role lenders were playing in a local nightmare that ended in a young child’s death. The stories were gripping and the art was compelling.

    The New York Times

    Mortgage

    Jessica Silver-Greenberg

    These stories on shoddy lending practices involving reverse mortgages and widows left off the loan documents of traditional mortgages, thus leaving them open to losing their homes, exemplified exclusive, sophisticated business journalism in the public service. Silver-Greenberg applied a healthy skepticism to the meme that the housing market was recovering and the abuses of the bubble were old news. Instead, her work showed that older Americans were being victimized by deceptive practices at worst and highly problematic mortgages at best.

    Newsday

    Insurance Catch-22

    Joe Ryan

    The “After Sandy” stories are a model of how to report and write on a complex (and often boring) topic: insurance. Ryan’s pieces are short, clear, authoritative and fascinating, not to mention a public service to the people of Long Island. He blends the complexity of the topic — including essential statistics, legalities and policies — with the story of real Long Islanders. These stories could be studied by students and professionals alike as proof that long doesn’t mean good.

    DIVISION: SMALL BUSINESS

    Inc. Magazine

    After the Squeeze

    Burt Helm, Larry Kanter, Eric Schurenberg

    “After the Squeeze” went beyond the typical political blame game to demonstrate the challenges businesses face when one of their most important relationships — the one with their bankers — goes awry through no fault of their own. The damage chronicled by Inc.’s Burt Helm lingers today as the U.S. economy slowly recovers. Deeply reported tales, combined with practical advice, made this entry a clear winner.

    Newsday

    After Superstorm Sandy

    Lisa Du, Maura McDermott, Keiko Morris, Joe Ryan

    Newsday captured the devastating impact of Hurricane Sandy on Long Island’s small business community through excellent writing, compelling pictures and informative graphics. But Newsday also spun the story forward on important topics, such as insurance coverage and whether it was even worth the risk, in some cases, to reopen. Newsday’s coverage was comprehensive and poignant in depicting the diversity of Long Island’s stricken small businesses.

    Fortune

    How I Got Started

    Dinah Eng

    All big businesses started out small — and Fortune’s “How I Got Started” told readers just how some of today’s best-known entrepreneurs started with little and made it big. From Crate & Barrel using a cigar box for a cash register, to John Paul DeJoria living in his car while selling shampoo, Dinah Eng’s stories are rich with anecdotes and deeply-felt advice

    DIVISION: TECHNOLOGY

    The New York Times

    Fake Reviews

    David Streitfeld

    Streitfeld takes us into the world of paid reviewers, people who will, for a small fee, say very nice things, multiple times, about your book/ restaurant/ product. He does a really nice job detailing this new review economy and how these reviews are replacing traditional advertising.

    Fortune

    Technology Coverage

    Miguel Helft, Jessi Hempel, Michal Lev-Ram, Adam Lashinsky

    Tech giants Amazon, Facebook and Apple influence all of our lives, yet explaining what makes these powerful companies tick is no easy task. Fortune’s tech writers, however, are easily up to the challenge by bringing us inside the minds of the likes of Jeff Bezos and Tim Cook in a way that reflects how their companies operate, and what makes these titans of the industry distinct. The pre-IPO story about Facebook, in particular, gives readers an unusually well-sourced, nuanced understanding about what has brought Facebook to its current level of success and the new challenges that stand in its way.

     

    Reuters

    Silicon Valley’s Dirty Secret – Age Bias

    Sarah McBride

    In “Silicon Valley’s Dirty Little Secret,” Sarah McBride of Reuters has found a scandal hiding in plain sight. If the captains of any other large American industry were caught discriminating against African Americans, women, Jews, gays or any other minority group heads would roll. But in Silicon Valley, where a culture of youth adoration remains alive and well, age discrimination is a built-in feature of the corporate culture. As technology professionals age they try to adapt to the looks and “likes” of the Facebook generation. But the fact remains that much of what appears to be “success” in the Silicon Valley is built on a corporate identity wrapped up in law-breaking.

     

    DIVISION: STUDENT

    Stories Written for Student Publications

    University of North Carolina

    UNC’s Bowl Ban Could Put Funding from Nike and Learfield Sports in Jeopardy

    Melvin Backman

    Looking at the “sacred” issue of sports financing and revealing the financial vulnerability of the athletic department (even one with a sports program as successful as UNC) showed great enterprise. The well reported piece explained how the cut in funding affected not only the sports but students who would have to pay more in fees to make up the shortfall.

    University of Missouri

    Foreclosure

    Walker Moskop

    (Honorable mention)

    This easy-to-read, compelling story is an excellent, comprehensive look at one family, and by extension, the crisis of subprime mortgages and the damaging effects. The story also explains complex banking jargon and financial ratios in a way that’s easy readers to understand.

     

    Stories Written for Professional Publication

    University of Missouri

    Yelp’s Ad Pitch Gets Bad Reviews

    Johanna Somers

    This piece stands out from the pack, in part because it offers solutions to the problem. There is a good range of sources including interviews with affected business owners. The story is sophisticated, well written and original.

    University of North Carolina

    Student Debtors Find Much Forgiven in Small Towns

    Jeanna Smialek

    (Honorable mention)

    This piece offers a new twist on an old topic. It is well researched and written. The lede is very human and the writer came back to the example at story’s end, a nice touch. The scope of reporting is impressive with examples from multiple states.

    University of Missouri

    Different Policies Regulate College Student Data

    Allison Prang

    (Honorable mention)

    There is good use of public records here. A lot of research went into this piece.

    Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    Trump Post-Tiger Golf Bottom-Fishing Signals Rebound: Mortgages

    Christine Harvey

    (Honorable mention)

    A new angle on the recession story that is well researched and sophisticated in approach. However, the reporter should spend more time on her writing. The piece, in spots, is hard to understand. Too many numbers presented in rapid succession.

  • 2012 Fall Conference – NYC

    Posted By admin on Monday April 2, 2012

    NEW YORK —More than 200 journalists and others attended SABEW’s fall conference Sept. 27-28 at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.

    Participants, including students and academics as well as business journalists, heard from luminaries from business and government and also attended sessions ranging from the business of health care, to private equity, to social media.

    The highlight of the two-day conference was the presentation of SABEW’s highest honor, its distinguished achievement award to Diana Henriques , veteran reporter at The New York Times and author of the best-seller, “The Wizard of Lies.” She was honored at a Thursday-night reception and participated in a public conversation about investigative reporting with Jill Abramson, executive editor of the Times.

    “The sessions were great.  Every one of them,” said attendee Steve Pounds, a SABEW member.

     

    Some highlights of the two days:

    ·      Lex Fenwick, CEO of Dow Jones, the opening keynote speaker on Sept. 28, extolled the value of quality journalism as media works through a continuing period of flux. In particular, he told interviewer Lisa Gibbs, “(Digital) is one of the greatest opportunities afforded to us.”
    ·      Robert Khuzami, the direct of enforcement for the Securities and Exchange Commission, often criticized for not moving aggressively enough against white-collar crime, got a zinger of a first question from interviewer Floyd Norris, Asked Norris: “So why is it that the SEC doesn’t put more people in jail?”
    ·      In a discussion of the business of health care, Sara Collins a vice president of The Commonwealth Fund, told the audience that actions surrounding the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, are very much still developing. “The new insurance market exchanges that are part of the act will be a hug change in the business.”
    ·      And Alex Wayne, a reporter at Bloomberg News, echoed Collins, noting that some states balking at the development of those exchanges might have a change of heart. “States will have enormous pressure to take the (federal) money. GOP governors may find that they really don’t want the federal government to take over their market exchanges.”

     

    Distinguished Achievement Award goes to Diana Henriques

    The award, which is SABEW’s highest honor, is given annually to someone who has made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who has served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession.

    “We could think of no one who meets this criteria more than Diana,” said Kevin Noblet, immediate past president and chair of the selection committee. “Her investigative reporting sets a high standard for all of us in terms of rigor and relevance. And she has been so generous to those who ask her help to become better professionals.”

    A reporter for The New York Times since 1989, Henriques has largely specialized in investigative reporting on white-collar crime, market regulation and corporate governance.

    She was a member of The New York Times’ reporting teams that were Pulitzer Prize finalists for coverage of the 2008 financial crisis and the aftermath of the Enron scandals.

     

    Read the conference’s schedule.

    See a list of attendees here.

    Click here to see photos from the conference.


     SPONSORS

    SABEW’s 2012 fall conference was sponsored by Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law, SABEW Chair, Missouri School of Journalism, The Commonwealth Fund and the Goldschmidt Foundation.

    Conference Coverage

     

    SABEW conference-goers salute Henriques

    by DORIANNE R. PERRUCCI, journalist, editor and coauthor of the book Asset Allocation for Dummies.

    For just a moment, the investigative reporter didn’t know how to answer the question. “You are drawn to dark corners,” said Julie Abramson, editor of The New York Times, leaning closer. “What fascinates you most?”  Read more…

    Much Ado About Social Media with Sree

    By JI HYUN LEE, freelance at The NY Times Co. and Hearst Magazines

    Social media was the topic du jour for the 2012 Fall SABEW conference and leading the Friday morning panel was Columbia University’s Sree Sreenivasan, a longtime professor with a newly minted title, chief digital officer.  Possibly the most revealing, and entertaining moment of the workshop was when he began the lecture by casually asking the room which hash tag they were using to disseminate tweets for the event. Read more…

    On being ‘direct, immediate and in the moment’

    By NICK THOMPSON, journalism student at the University of Missouri

    In describing the operation of a news organization, Gary Silverman, deputy U.S. managing editor of the Financial Times, likened it to a jazz band. Reporters and editors are to know their instrument. Together, the band works to be “direct, immediate, and in the moment.” Read more…

    Restructuring: A Conversation with Lex Fenwick

    By KATIE BRENNANjournalism student at the University of Missouri

    Lex Fenwick seems to have a knack for switching up longtime tendencies. Earlier this year, he accepted the position of CEO of Dow Jones and Co. The move came after 25 years at Bloomberg. In his conversation with Lisa Gibbs of Money Magazine, Fenwick said making the decision was scary, “like leaving part of the family, knowing you will never come back.” Read more…

    Making practical use of social media in the newsroom

    By JUSTIN YANG, journalism student at the University of Missouri

    Journalists must use social media to reach a wider audiences, a panel of experts told SABEW’s fall conference Sept. 27. Lewis DVorkin of Forbes and Emily Peck of the Huffington Post discussed in their panel how their newsrooms are utilizing social media, the debates that arise from using social media and emerging platforms. Read more…

    On covering the nation’s fiscal cliff

    By NICK THOMPSON, journalism student at the University of Missouri

    An economics correspondent, Merrill Lynch economist, Bloomberg tax writer, and a tax lawyer all offered insight at the SABEW fall conference into covering one of the U.S. biggest policy conundrums: the fiscal cliff. Read more...

    A Panel of Experts discuss the Challenges of Hiring in a Changing Media World

    By KELSEA WASUNG, journalism student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    At the 2012 Fall Society of American Business Editors and Writers conference, a panel of three media professionals and experts, shared their views on hiring in the changing media industry and the skills needed to obtain a job. Read more…

    Panel discusses the secrets of attracting an audience

    By VIVIAN PADILLA, journalism student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    In today’s field of journalism the outlets for reporting are many, but rising to the top can be claimed if a loyal audience supports the organization. How can a newspaper, magazine, television program or online content thrive without a following? To hook the audience with content is key, but maintaining the viewers or readers is approached differently by each organization. Read more…

    There’s room for all types of social media in the changing world of journalism

    By BLAKE WILSON, journalism student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    The changing journalism requires the use of all types of social media. The Society of American Business Editors and Writers fall conference, in part, explored what role social media is playing in the currently evolving future of media. Read more…

    Long time journalist receives SABEW’s highest honor

    By CALE OTTENS, journalism student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    Tears of joy filled the eyes of Diana Henriques, a longtime investigative reporter for the New York Times, as SABEW’s Kevin Noblet presented her with the business writers and editors organization’s highest honor, SABEW’s distinguished achievement award. Read more…

    Dow Jones CEO has positive view on journalism’s future

    By KEVIN KELLER, journalism student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    A positive outlook for business journalism means that investment in it is definitely merited, Dow Jones CEO Lex Fenwick told SABEW’s Fall Workshop at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism in New York City. Read more…

    There’s no room at SABEW for Debbie Downers when talking about the future of journalism jobs

    By JENNER SMITH

    “Journalism is really going through major changes, but there are jobs out there,” Greg McCune, editor in charge of Reuters America Service, said. Read more…

     

    Once again, the home for the SABEW conference was the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism, located in the historic former home of the old New York Herald-Tribune at 219 W. 40th St. in midtown Manhattan.

    SPEAKERS

     

    Jill Abramson

    Jill Abramson is executive editor of The New York Times, a position she assumed in September 2011.  She is the highest-ranking editor and first woman to lead the Times newsroom in its 160-year history.
    Abramson was managing editor from 2003 until 2011.  As managing editor, she helped supervise the coverage of two wars, four national elections, hurricanes and oil spills.  She was also deeply engaged in the newsroom’s effort to change its approach to the dissemination of news and to expand to new and varied digital and mobile platforms.  Abramson joined The New York Times in 1997.  She was named Washington bureau chief in 2000 and served in that position until 2003.
    Abramson worked at The Wall Street Journal from 1988 to 1997.  While there, she served as deputy bureau chief in its Washington, D.C., bureau and investigative reporter, covering money and politics.

     

    Lex Fenwick

    Lex Fenwick, CEO of Dow Jones  became CEO of Dow Jones in February after 25 years at Bloomberg. Fenwick joined Bloomberg in 1987 and spent much of his early years as manager of Bloomberg operations in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. He served as chief operating officer of Bloomberg L.P. under Michael R. Bloomberg and, when his boss ran for mayor of New York City in 2001, Fenwick became chief executive. He later founded and led a Bloomberg L.P. subsidiary, Bloomberg Ventures.

     

     

    Robert Khuzami

    Robert Khuzami is Securities and Exchange Commission enforcement chief. For 11 years just before his February 2009 appointment as SEC enforcement division director, Khuzami served as a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York.
    There he served as chief of that office’s Securities and Commodities Fraud Task Force for three years. According to the SEC, in that role, Khuzami “prosecuted numerous complex securities and white-collar criminal matters, including those involving insider trading, Ponzi schemes, accounting and financial statement fraud, organized crime infiltration of the securities markets, and IPO and investment adviser fraud.”

     

    Andrew Ross Sorkin

    Andrew Ross Sorkin is an award-winning journalist and author. He is a financial columnist for The New York Times and a co-anchor of CNBC’s Squawk Box. He is also the founder and editor of DealBook, a financial news service published by The New York Times.

    Sorkin joined The Times full time in 1999 as the newspaper’s European mergers and acquisitions reporter, based in London, and the following year became The Times’ chief mergers and acquisitions reporter, based in New York, a position he still holds.

     

    Bethany McLean

    Before joining Vanity Fair as a contributing editor in 2008, Bethany McLean was an editor-at-large for Fortune magazine. McLean is the co-author, with Fortune colleague Peter Elkind, of The Smartest Guys in the Room, exposing the corrupt business practices of Enron officials. The book was the result of reporting she did for Fortune. The article titled “Is Enron Overpriced?” was published in the March 5, 2001 issue. The book was later made into the Academy Award nominated documentary Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room.

    She co-authored a book with New York Times columnist Joe Nocera on the 2008 financial crisis titled All the Devils Are Here, (November 2010). It details the crisis and concludes that banks understood the big picture but continued with bad practices. McLean is also a financial columnist for Reuters.

     Floyd Norris

    Floyd Norris is the chief financial correspondent of The New York Times and writes a weekly column for the financial section.

    He was named to that post in September 1999, after spending a more than a year as a member of The Editorial Board of The Times. He joined the paper in October 1988 as a financial columnist, a position he held until he joined the Editorial Board in May 1998.

    Before joining The Times, Mr. Norris had been with Barron’s National Business and Financial Weekly since December 1982, where he began as a staff writer and subsequently was promoted to stock market editor. He began writing “The Trader” column in mid-1983 and was cited by the New York Society of Certified Public Accountants for outstanding reporting on accounting issues in 1984. In 1998, he was cited by the Financial Writers Association of New York for outstanding lifetime achievement.

     

    Dr. Herbert S. “Pug” Winokur Jr.

    Dr. Herbert S. “Pug” Winokur Jr. is a managing partner at Celerant Capital with over 20 years of private equity investment experience. Winokur founded Capricorn Holdings, Inc. and has been its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer since 1987.

    From 1983 to 1987, he served as senior executive vice president, a Member of the office of the President, and Director at Penn Central Corporation. He served as president of American Financial Group Inc.. Winokur also served as senior management positions at Pacific Holding Corporation, where he completed over $8 billion in transactions and at The Palmieri Company. He also worked in the office of Secretary of Defense. Winokur has been a Director of various public and private entities.

    Winokur holds Ph.D., A.M., and A.B. degrees from Harvard University.

     

    Nik Deogun

    Nik Deogun is the senior vice president and editor-in-chief, Business News, overseeing Business Day content, coverage and production.

    Deogun joined CNBC in 2010 as managing editor, business news. He came to CNBC from “The Wall Street Journal,” where he was the deputy managing editor since July 2008. Deogun oversaw all financial coverage for the news organization and directed the Journal’s international network of bureaus and correspondents. Prior to this, Deogun was editor of the Journal’s Money & Investing section, where he oversaw coverage of Wall Street, banking, hedge funds, private equity, mutual funds, financial markets, investing and personal finance.

     

    Nicholas Carlson

    Nicholas Carlson is a deputy editor at Business Insider who has written extensively about Facebook, Twitter and Groupon, among other companies. He is a contributor to Bloomberg Television’s biography series “Game Changers” and a frequent guest on CNBC. Previously, he reported for Gawker Media’s Silicon Valley gossip blog, Valleywag. He got his start on the beat at InternetNews.com.

     
    Lisa Gibbs

    Lisa Gibbs is a Senior Writer at MONEY magazine, covering primarily insurance and real estate. Before joining the magazine in 2009, she was the Executive Business Editor of the Miami Herald. Gibbs is on the board of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW). She co-chairs the Best in Business contest and works on SABEW’s international committee.

     

     

    Chris Roush

    Chris Roush is founding director of the Carolina Business News Initiative, which provides training for professional journalists and students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is also the author of two books about business journalism – Show me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication (2004) and Profits and Losses: Business Journalism and its Role in Society (2006) – as well as author or co-author of books about Progress Energy (2008), Home Depot (1999), Pacific Coast Feather Co. (2006) and Alex Lee Inc. (2006). He has also taught business journalism at Washington & Lee University and the University of Richmond.

    He also was managing editor of the SABEW web site and blogs about business journalism at www.talkingbiznews.com. For three years, he wrote a twice-monthly blog called “The Roush Rant” for the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, where he was a lead instructor for six years. He has also created a website on the history of business journalism and a web site for college students interested in careers in business journalism.

     

    Jill Jorden Spitz

    SABEW president Jill Jorden Spitz is assistant managing editor for the Arizona Daily Star in her hometown of Tucson. She formerly was the paper’s business editor, and before that covered Walt Disney World and Universal Studios for the Orlando Sentinel.

     

     

     

    Kevin G. Hall

    Kevin G. Hall, the former South America bureau chief, is the McClatchy bureau’s national economics correspondent. During a 25-year career he has worked in Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City, Saudi Arabia, Miami, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., and has reported from across the globe. He is the 2004 winner of the Sigma Delta Chi award, given by the Society of Professional Journalists Award for best foreign correspondence. A member of the National Economists Club, Hall is also on the executive committee of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers, the nation’s premier association for business journalists.

    In 2010, he was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for national reporting (along with colleagues Greg Gordon and Chris Adams) for detailing in 2009 how Wall Street sold out investors and caused the nation’s deep financial crisis. They shared the University of Southern California’s Loeb Award for that package. He is also the 2011 recipient of the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism, given by Washington University in St. Louis.

     

    Jodi Schneider

    Jodi Schneider is the team leader in charge of tax policy and Congressional coverage for Bloomberg News, working from the Washington, D.C. Bureau. She supervises the team handling these coverage areas for various Bloomberg entities. Jodi joined Bloomberg in November 2010.  She has been a financial editor in Washington, D.C., for the past 17 years. Previously, she was local business editor at The Washington Post, an assistant managing editor at U.S. News and World Report magazine, and economics and finance editor at Congressional Quarterly.

    Before coming to Washington, she was a deputy managing editor at the Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel and before that, was an editor and writer at newspapers in Colorado and Wisconsin. Jodi is a past president and active member of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW).

     

    Michael Hanson

    Michael Hanson is a senior U.S. economist at BofA Merrill Lynch Global Research. Hanson has nearly 20 years of experience as an economist in financial markets, the Federal Reserve System and academia. In his current role, he is responsible for analysis of Federal Reserve and budgetary policy and modeling the U.S. economy, with particular emphasis on inflation. He meets regularly with clients across the firm’s business lines, publishes weekly commentary on economics and policy and has appeared in printed, radio and televised media.

    Prior to joining the firm, Hanson worked as an economist in the Monetary Affairs division of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors and as a senior economist at Lehman Brothers. He also has held positions at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Wesleyan University and Yale School of Management. He has published academic research in macroeconomics, monetary policy and econometrics.

    Mr. Hanson graduated cum laude with honors from the University of Pennsylvania with bachelor’s degrees from both the College of Arts and Sciences and The Wharton School. He earned his master’s degree in mathematics at New York University and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

     

    Deborah Brewster

    Deborah Brewster is the deputy managing editor of The Wall Street Journal. She is responsible for training, recruitment and staffing in addition to the Journal’s use of design and graphics. Ms. Brewster joined the Journal in 2009 after previously working for 10 years as a journalist for the Financial Times where she was an editor and also a writer.

    Before the Financial Times, Brewster was communications correspondent — from 1994 to 1998 — for the newspaper The Australian.

    Before that, she worked at The Age newspaper, based in Melbourne, Australia. At The Age she was at first personal finance editor, and then the newspaper’s business editor, becoming the first woman to hold that position. She was in charge of the daily business section in addition to the property, personal finance and technology sections. She began her career in journalism as a writer for Australian Investment magazine in 1987.

    Born in Indonesia, Brewster earned her bachelor of arts degree with honors from the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. She lives in Manhattan.

     

    Sree Sreenivasan

    Sree Sreenivasan is an academic administrator, professor and technology journalist based in New York City. In July 2012, Columbia University named Sreenivasan its first chief digital officer. Prior to that, he was the dean of student affairs and digital media professor at the Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism. His courses focus on new media, web design and social media.

    Sreenivasan helped found SAJA, the South Asian Journalists Association, a group of over 1,000 journalists ofSouth Asian origin in the U.S. and Canada, and served as its first president. Sree has also worked in local television in New York. From 2009 through 2011, he helped launch and develop DNAinfo.com, a hyperlocal news startup covering Manhattan.

     

    Josh Tyrangiel

    Josh Tyrangiel is editor of Bloomberg Businessweek. He joined the magazine following its acquisition by Bloomberg L.P. in December 2009. Earlier, Tyrangiel was deputy managing editor of Time magazine and managing editor of time.com.

    Tyrangiel joined Time in 1999, holding various positions including assistant managing editor, national editor, and London correspondent. He was also a music critic for Time from 2001-2009. Tyrangiel attended the University of Pennsylvania and received his master’s degree in American Studies from Yale University. Before coming to Time, he worked at Vibe and Rolling Stone magazines and produced the news at MTV. He joined Time in 1999 as a staff writer and music critic.

     

    Karen Danziger

    Karen Danziger is a managing partner of The Howard-Sloan-Koller Group in New York City and directs the firm’s recruitment in the areas of cross-platform content and creative direction, as well as public relations and corporate communications. She leads business development and execution of searches for senior-level content, creative and communications talent across all media platforms, while also participating in marketing and general management searches.

    Karen has a BA in journalism and political science from the University of Michigan.

     

    Gillian Tett

    Gillian Tett is a British author and award-winning journalist at the Financial Times, where she is the U.S. managing editor. She has written about the financial instruments that were part of the cause of the 2008 fiscal crisis. She was named Journalist of the Year by the British press in 2009 and won the Spear’s Award for Financial Book of the Year for her Fool’s Gold.

    In 2007 she was awarded the Wincott prize, the premier British award for financial journalism, for her capital-markets coverage. She previously served as the newspaper’s Tokyo bureau chief, economic correspondent, and foreign correspondent. She speaks regularly at conferences around the world on finance and global markets. She has a doctorate in social anthropology from Cambridge University.

     

    Greg McCune

    Greg McCune of Reuters is a past SABEW president. He has more than 30 years of business journalism experience including more than 25 with Reuters. He has written and edited business news in five countries — the United States, Canada, Britain, Belgium and Australia. He was Reuters’ chief correspondent in Canada (1992-1996), Washington bureau chief (1996-2000) and Chicago bureau chief (2000-2004).

    McCune was appointed training editor in 2004, with a key responsibility for career development and training for some 600 Reuters editorial staff in the Americas. He now serves as editor in charge of the Reuters America Service, based in Chicago. With SABEW, he also coordinated the Best in Business competition. As president at SABEW in 2009-10, he oversaw the hiring of a new executive director and the transition to a new office in Phoenix at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

     

     Julie Hartenstein

    Julie Hartenstein has been affiliated with the Graduate School of Journalism since 1997, when she joined the adjunct faculty. Subsequently, she taught full time in the M.S. degree program, broadcast concentration for five years (RW1, Television News Magazine and Columbia News Tonight workshops) and joined Career Services as associate director  in September 2005.

    Prior to coming to Columbia, Hartenstein spent 17 years at ABC Network News. She was originally hired as a researcher on the original staff of ABC News Nightline when it emerged as a nightly program from the American Held Hostage updates in 1980. For most of her 10 years on the broadcast, she worked as an editorial producer and field producer, covering a wide range of national and international stories.

    Her next assignment was as a producer of American Agenda segments on ABC News World News Tonight with Peter Jennings. She also worked as an assignment editor, produced for Good Morning America, 20/20, helped develop correspondent talent for ABC News and has served as a freelance program consultant on various projects.In 1985 she was awarded the Benton Fellow in Broadcast Journalism at the University of Chicago, and spent 7 months studying clinical medical ethics.

     

    Sara R. Collins

    Sara R. Collins, Ph.D., is vice president for Affordable Health Insurance at the Commonwealth Fund. An economist, Dr. Collins joined the Fund in 2002 and has led the Fund’s national program on health insurance since 2005. Since joining the Fund, Dr. Collins has led several national surveys on health insurance and authored numerous reports, issue briefs and journal articles on health insurance coverage and policy. She has provided invited testimony before several Congressional committees and subcommittees. Prior to joining the Fund, Dr. Collins was associate director/senior research associate at the New York Academy of Medicine, Division of Health and Science Policy. Earlier in her career, she was an associate editor at U.S. News & World Report, a senior economist at Health Economics Research, and a senior health policy analyst in the New York City Office of the Public Advocate. She holds an A.B. in economics from Washington University and a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University.

     

    Joseph Baratta

    Joseph Baratta of Blackstone is global head of private equity and a member of the firm’s Management and Executive Committees. Since joining Blackstone in 1998, Baratta has been involved in the execution of Blackstone’s investments in Universal Orlando, Nycomed Pharmaceuticals, Houghton Mifflin, Spirit Group and is responsible for Blackstone’s investments in Seaworld Parks and Entertainment, Merlin Entertainments Group and Center Parcs, among others. In 2001, Baratta moved to London to help establish Blackstone’s corporate private equity business in Europe. Baratta also worked at Morgan Stanley in its mergers and acquisitions department. Baratta graduated with honors from Georgetown University where he currently serves on the University’s Board of Regents.

     

    Stephen Labaton

    Stephen Labaton advises companies on issues at the intersection of policy and law. He founded Georgetown Policy Advisers, LLC in 2010 following a 23-year career at The New York Times, where he was a senior writer in the Washington Bureau.
    In 2009 Mr. Labaton was part of a small team that was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for a Times series, “The Reckoning,” on the causes of the market crisis. He won a Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism that year for the series. In 2003 Mr. Labaton won a Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism in the category of beat reporting for his coverage of the Securities and Exchange Commission. That year he was part of a team that was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in the national reporting category. In 2008 Mr. Labaton won the Futrell Award for excellence in communication and journalism, an award presented annually by Duke University’s Terry Sanford Institute.
    Mr. Labaton joined the business section of The Times in 1986 as a clerk and became a legal affairs correspondent in New York in 1987 for the business section. In the fall of 1990, he was transferred to the Washington bureau of The Times.

     

    Cristina Alesci

    Cristina Alesci covers private equity and deal making for Bloomberg Television and Bloomberg News. Based in New York, she also contributes articles to Bloomberg Markets Magazine and Bloomberg Businessweek.

    Alesci broke news on the largest buyout deals of 2012 and interviewed some of the major dealmakers in private equity including Blackstone Group Chairman and CEO Steve Schwarzman, Blackstone Group President and COO Tony James, KKR co-Chairman and co-CEO Henry Kravis and Carlyle Group co-CEO David Rubenstein. She has covered the collapse of commodity brokerage MF Global, the challenges facing Bank of America and potential conflicts of interest in leveraged lending.

    Prior to joining Bloomberg L.P. in February 2009, Alesci worked at Pfizer Inc. in New York and at law firm Sidley Austin LLP.

    Alesci is a graduate of the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism and earned her undergraduate degree from Pace University.

     

    Alexander Navab

    Alexander Navab  joined KKR in 1993. He co-heads KKR’s North American Private Equity business and heads the Media and Communications industry team in the U.S. Mr. Navab serves on the Firm’s Management Committee, is the Global Co-Chair of the Private Equity Investment Committees and serves on the Capital Solutions Investment Committee. Mr. Navab played a significant role in the development of Borden, Intermedia Communications, IPREO, KSL Recreation, Neway Anchorlok, Newsquest Media, The Nielsen Company (formerly VNU Group), NuVox (NewSouth Communications), PanAmSat, RELTEC, Tenovis, Visant, Yellow Pages Group, Weld North, World Color Press, and Zhone Technologies. He is currently on the board of directors of IPREO, The Nielsen Company, Visant, and Weld North.

    Prior to joining KKR, Mr. Navab was with James D. Wolfensohn Incorporated where he was involved in mergers and acquisitions as well as corporate finance advisory work. From 1987 to 1989, he was with Goldman, Sachs & Co. where he worked in the Investment Banking Department. He received a B.A. with honors, Phi Beta Kappa, from Columbia College, and an M.B.A. with High Distinction, Baker Scholar, Wolfe Award, from the Harvard Business School.

    Mr. Navab serves on the Leadership Council of the Robin Hood Foundation: an organization dedicated to fighting poverty in New York City; he also serves as Vice-Chair of the Board of Visitors of Columbia College, Columbia University.

     

    Lewis DVorkin

    Lewis DVorkin is chief product officer of Forbes Media. DVorkin was founder and CEO of True/Slant, which was acquired by Forbes in 2010. The acquisition marked a homecoming for DVorkin, who previously served as executive editor of Forbes. He has also worked at AOL, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and even TMZ.

     

     

    Emily Friedlander Peck

    Emily Friedlander Peck is managing editor, business, of The Huffington Post. Peck manages all business and money content at the Huffington Post. Prior to that she served as an editor at the Wall Street Journal and WSJ.com and at IP Law and Business.

     

     

     

    Martin Wolk

    Martin Wolk is executive business editor of NBC News Digital. Wolk manages all business and money content on NBCNews.com and TODAY.com. Prior to joining the company in 1999, when it was known as msnbc.com, Wolk worked at Reuters. He is based in Seattle.

     

     

    Amy Zipkin

    Amy Zipkin is a seasoned and versatile business journalist who reports on management and careers, small business, business travel and personal finance. Her by-lines include The New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal special sections and others. She blogs about emerging business trends at www.amyzipkin.com.

    From 2000-2010 she was a corporate contributing management columnist for The New York Times feature, “The Boss,” where her profiles ranged from John Chambers to Franklin Raines to Mark Thompson.

    Amy received her B.A. in English Literature from SUNY Binghamton, studied 19th century British Literature at Exeter College, Oxford University and earned an M.Ed. from the University of Rochester, NY. Born and raised in The Bronx, New York she now lives in southwestern Connecticut.

     

    Minda Zetlin

    Minda Zetlin, president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors, is a business and technology writer and speaker, a columnist for Inc.com, and author or co-author of five books, most recently The Geek Gap: Why Business and Technology People Don’t Understand Each Other and Why They Need Each Other to Survive. Founded in 1948, ASJA is an association of more than 1,300 of the nation’s most successful independent writers and book authors.

     

     

    Jonathan Blum

    Jonathan’s work regularly appears on TheStreet, Entrepreneur Magazine, and Entrepreneur.com and many other publications and websites. Prior to that he was a cable industry analyst for Kagan Media, and worked in various media and marketing capacities at CNN, Fortune Small Business, CNN.com, ABC News, CNBC, MTV and VH1. He sits on the board of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers and is a graduate of Columbia University in the City of New York.

     

     

    Rosina Rubin

    Rosina Rubin is chief operating officer of Attitude New York Inc., a high-end chauffeured transportation service on the city’s West Side. Since joining the company in 1990, she has helped grow a struggling small business into a successful enterprise with more than 65 employees. Prior to entering the entrepreneurial arena, Rosina spent six years in corporate communications at NBC, and several years as a freelance writer for publications including New York magazine and Premiere.

    In 2010, she appeared on a SABEW panel discussing reform of health care, which she oversees in her business.  In her spare time, Rosina curates the work of her late aunt, painter Anna Walinska (1906-1997). She has curated seven exhibitions, including two in New York City, as well as the inaugural exhibition at the Center for Holocaust Studies at Clark University and an exhibit at the Ghetto Museum at the Terezin Memorial in the Czech Republic.

     

     

  • 2011 BIB Award Winners

    Posted By admin on Friday March 30, 2012

    Complete list of winners in SABEW’s 17th annual Best in Business Awards

    Click here to read awards list with judges’ comments.

     

    DIVISION: DIGITAL


    BLOG

    Digital: All sizes

     

    Repowatch.org

    Mary Fricker

    Financial Crisis


     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Digital: All sizes

     

    FINS.com:

    Julie Steinberg, Aaron Lucchetti

    MF Global


     

    CNNMoney.com

    Chris Peacock and CNNMoney Staff

    Dow Plunges 635 Points on August 8


     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Ioan Grillo, John Dickie, Sarah Childress, Mark Scheffler

    Narconomics

     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

    CNNMoney.com

    Gabrielle Solomon

    Best Places to Live

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Blake Ellis, Jordan Malter

    America’s Biggest Boomtown


    MSNBC.com

    Allison Linn, Martin Wolk, Jim Seida, John Brecher, John Makely

    We are the median

     

    EXPLANATORY

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

    ClimateWire

    Tiffany Stecker

    Europe’s Cap-and-Trade System Brings Jobs to Georgia


     

    ClimateWire

    Joel Kirkland

    China’s Energy

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Patrick Winn, Emily Lodish

    Burma Rebooted


     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

    The Motley Fool

    Alex Dumortier, Dari FitzGerald

    “Low-Risk” Trade That Brought Down MF Global

     

    CNNMoney.com

    David Goldman

    The Cybercrime Economy

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Steve Hargreaves

    Military’s War on Oil

     

    FEATURE

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

     

    ClimateWire

    Tiffany Stecker

    Europe’s Cap-and-Trade System Brings Jobs to Georgia

     

    InsuranceQuotes.com

    John Egan, Lisa Shidler

    Medical Bills Can Mount for Shooting Victims

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Sarah Childress, Simeon Tegel, Girish Gupta, Nadja Drost, John Otis

    The Scramble For El Dorado

     

    GlobalPost

    Emily Lodish, Patrick Winn, Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Jason Overdorf, Justin McCurry, Tristan McConnell, Kate Lamb, Nicholas Dynan

    Rice 2.0


     

    Digital:  More than 2.5 million

     

    CNNMoney.com

    David Goldman

    Android’s law

     

    Bankrate.com

    Claes Bell, Katherine Lewis, Janna Herron, Marcie Geffner, Stephen Pounds

    Financial Reform, One Year Later

     

    CNBC.com

    Jeff Cox

    Occupy Wall Street

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Digital: Fewer than 2.5 million

     

    FINS.com

    Editorial staff of FINS.com

     

    PolitiFact

    Bill Adair, Martha Hamilton, Louis Jacobson

     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

     

    CNET News

    CNET Editorial Staff

     

    MarketWatch

    MarketWatch Staff

     

    CNNMoney.com

    CNNMoney Staff

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

    Center for Public Integrity

    Michael Hudson

    The Great Mortgage Cover-Up

     

    ProPublica

    Paul Kiel, Olga Pierce

    Foreclosure Crisis

     

    Texas Watchdog

    Steve Miller

    The Hurricane Insurance Hustle

     

    Digital: More than 500,000

     

    GlobalPost

    Patrick Winn, Emily Lodish

    Burma Rebooted

     

    GlobalPost

    Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Sharron Lovell, Emily Lodish, Mark Scheffler

    Relocation Nation


     

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

     

    ProPublica

    Jesse Eisinger

    The Trade Columns

     

    Xconomy.com

    Luke Timmerman

    Biotech columns

     

    Reuters

    Rob Cox, Jeffrey Goldfarb, Robert Cyran, Agnes T. Crane, Antony Currie

    Breakingviews Columns

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Thomas Mucha

    Mucha Columns

     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Paul R. La Monica

    The Buzz

     

    MarketWatch

    Rex Nutting

    Columns

     

    TheStreet.com

    Adam Feuerstein

    Pharma Fraud

     

    DIVISION: INTERNATIONAL


    BLOG

    Financial Times

    Staff

    FTAlphaville

     

    BREAKING NEWS

     

    Financial Times

    Financial Times staff

    The Eurozone crisis

     

    Reuters

    Reuters Staff

    The Libyan Revolution

     

    Financial Times

    Jonathan Soble, Louise Lucas, Lindsay Whipp

    The Olympus Accounting Scandal

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    The (Toronto) Globe and Mail

    Kevin Carmichael, Greg Keenan, Moe Doiron, Claire Neary, Adriano Valentini

    Remade in Canada – The Future of Factories

     

    Financial Times

    Christine Spolar, Jeff Gerth (ProPublica), Megan Murphy, Vanessa Houlder, Johanna Kassel, Benjamin Freese

    Tax Wars Series

     

    GlobalPost

    Thomas Mucha, David Case, Emily Lodish, Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Justin McCurry, Michael Goldfarb, Jon Jensen, Mark Scheffler

    7 Deadly Stories

     

    FEATURE

     

    Fortune Magazine

    James Bandler

    Afghan Gold

     

    GlobalPost

    Sarah Childress, Alex Leff, Nick Miroff

    Gangsters’ Paradise

     

    The (Toronto) Globe and Mail

    Mark Mackinnon

    The Empire Sino-Forest Built

     

    EXPLANATORY

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Phred Dvorak, Peter Landers Yuka Hayashi, Norihiko Shirouzu, Chester Dawson, Juro Osawa, Yumiko Ono, Mitsuru Obe

    Fukushima Daiishi: Causes and Consequences

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Lethal Commerce

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Marcus Walker, Charles Forelle, Stacy Meichtry, Chirstopher Rhoads, Brian Blackstone, Matthew Karnitschnig

    Europe Disunion


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Lethal Commerce


    Financial Times

    Christine Spolar, Jeff Gerth (ProPublica), Megan Murphy, Vanessa Houlder, Johanna Kassel, Benjamin Freese

    Tax Wars Series

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Phred Dvorak, Peter Landers Yuka Hayashi, Norihiko Shirouzu, Chester Dawson, Juro Osawa, Yumiko Ono, Mitsuru Obe, Andrew Morse

    Fukushima Daiishi: Causes and Consequences

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

     

    Financial Times

    Wolfgang Münchau

     


     

     

    DIVISION: NEWS AGENCIES


    BREAKING NEWS

    Bloomberg News

    Tom Schoenberg, Sara Forden, Jeff Bliss, Cornelius Rahn, Zachary Mider

    Blocking a Deal

     

    Bloomberg News

    Katherine Burton

    Soros to End Four Decades as Hedge Fund Leader by Returning Investor Cash

     

    The Associated Press

    David Koenig, Scott Mayerowitz, Samantha Bomkamp, Dave Carpenter, Joshua Freed

    American Airlines Bankruptcy


     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    Bloomberg News

    Cam Simpson

    Victoria’s Secret Revealed in Child Picking Burkina Faso Cotton

     

    Bloomberg News

    Vernon Silver, Ben Elgin, Alan Katz

    Wired for Repression

     

    Bloomberg News

    Bradley Keoun, Phil Kuntz, Bob Ivry, Craig Torres, Scott Lanman, Christopher Condon, Donal Griffin, Greg Stohr and Matthew Winkler

    The Fed’s Trillion-Dollar Secret


     

    EXPLANATORY

    Bloomberg News

    Cam Simpson, Alan Katz, Simon Clark, Heather Walsh

    Anything But Fair

     

    Reuters

    Scot Paltrow

    Robo-Signing Redux

     

    Bloomberg News

    Bradley Keoun, Phil Kuntz, Bob Ivry, Craig Torres, Scott Lanman, Christopher Condon, Donal Griffin, Greg Stohr and Matthew Winkler

    The Fed’s Trillion-Dollar Secret

     

    FEATURE

     

    Reuters

    Scot Paltrow

    The Congressman with Banks on the Side

     

    The Associated Press

    Bernard Condon

    Farmland Boom

     

    The Associated Press

    Bernard Condon, Randy Herschaft

    Madoff Victim’s Lawyer


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    The Associated Press

    Jeff Donn

    Aging Nukes

     

    Scripps Howard News Service

    Isaac Wolf, Thomas Hargrove

    Grave Mistakes

     

    Bloomberg News

    Peter Waldman

    Preparing Americans for Death Lets Hospices Neglect End of Life

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Reuters

    Jack Schafer

    Jack Shafer Columns

     

    Dow Jones Newswires

    Al Lewis

    Al’s Emporium Column

     

    Dow Jones Newswires

    Neal Lipschutz

    Point of View Column

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE

     

    Money Magazine

    Lisa Gibbs

    Consumer Protection


     

    The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer

    Teresa Dixon Murray

    On Money

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jason Zweig

    The Intelligent Investor

     

     

    DIVISION: PRINT – DAILY NEWSPAPERS

     

    BLOG

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The (Quincy, Mass.) Patriot Ledger:

    Jon Chesto

    Mass. Market blog

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    Elisabeth Ponsot, Laura Olson, Erich Schwartzel, Laura Malt Schneiderman, Steve Mellon


    Pipeline

     

    The Des Moines Register

    Philip Brasher, Dan Piller

    Green Fields

     

    Hartford Courant

    Matthew Sturdevant

    Insurance Capital Blog

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Tom Daykin

    Land and Space blog

     

    The Orange County (Santa Ana, Calif.) Register

    Jonathan Lansner, Jeff Collins, Marilyn Kalfus

    Lansner on Real Estate

     

    Charlotte Observer

    Andrew Dunn, Kirsten Valle Pittman

    Bank Watch


     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    Houston Chronicle

    Dwight Silverman

    TechBlog

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Braga, Matthew Doig

    14 Indicted in Major Flipping Conspiracy

     

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Pollick, Doug Sword

    Jackson Lab Picks Sarasota County

     

    Ventura County (Ventura, Calif.) Star

    Stephanie Hoops

    Feds Take Over Debt Collection Business


     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Detroit News

    David Shepardson

    CAFE Standards

     

    Honolulu Star-Advertiser

    Andrew Gomes, Rob Perez

    Hawaiian Electric Suitor

     

    The Detroit News

    Jaclyn Trop

    Final Chapter for Borders

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Fort Worth Star-Telegram

    Andrea Ahles, Bob Cox, Gordon Dickson, Scott Nishimura, Mitchell Schnurman

    American Airlines Bankruptcy

     

    The Seattle Times

    Dominic Gates

    Boeing, Union Seal Deal

     

    The Boston Globe

    The Boston Globe Business staff

    Stock Plunge


     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

    The New York Times

    The New York Times Staff

    MF Global Bankruptcy

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The (Memphis, Tenn.) Commercial Appeal

    Daniel Connolly, Amos Maki, Michael Erskine, Grant Smith

    Landing Electrolux

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Dan Chapman, Michael Kanell

    Atlanta Forward

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson, Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    (Minneapolis) StarTribune

    Staff

    Ford Plant Shutdown

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jason Bellini, Jonathan Cheng, Mary Pilon

    Anticipating a Downgrade of U.S. Debt


     

    EXPLANATORY

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The Roanoke (Va.) Times

    Matt Chittum, Megan Schnabel

    Food Deserts Parch Roanoke Residents of Nutrition


     

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Pollick

    In Foreclosure, Fees That Haunt

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Providence Journal

    Tom Mooney, Paul Edward Parker, Barbara Polichetti

    Understanding R.I.’s Pension Puzzle

     

    The (Memphis, Tenn.) Commercial Appeal

    Ted Evanoff

    Genius at Work

     

    The Detroit News

    David Shepardson, Christina Rogers

    GM: A Chastened Detroit Icon Claws Its Way Back

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson and Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

     

    The Arizona Republic

    Ronald J. Hansen

    Business Taxes

     

    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

    Lou Kilzer

    China Syndrome

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    Washington Post

    Lori Montgomery, Brady Dennis, Alec McGillis
    Running in the Red – U.S Debt

     

    Los Angeles Times

    Ken Bensinger

    Wheels of Fortune

     

    The New York Times

    Ian Urbina

    Drilling Down—Natural Gas

     

    FEATURE

     

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    (Melbourne, Fla.) Florida Today

    Patrick Peterson

    Scrap Daddy

     

    Times-Tribune (Scranton, Pa.)

    Denise Allabaugh

    Winds of Change

     

    (Melbourne, Fla.) Florida Today

    Patrick Peterson

    Bright Idea Man


     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City)

    Bryan Painter

    Drought


     

    The Providence (R.I.) Journal

    Alex Kuffner

    The Toll Oil Prices Take


     

    The (Montreal) Gazette

    Lynn Moore

    Playing with Chance

     

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Financial Times

    David Gelles, Gillian Tett

    Madoff Spins His Story

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson and Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Cary Spivak

    Demise of Marshall & Ilsley Corporation

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    The New York Times

    David Segal

    The Dirty Little Secrets of Search

     

    Detroit Free Press

    Katherine Yung

    Work Wanted – Desperately


     

    Los Angeles Times

    Alana Semuels

    Down but Not Out


     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The (Quincy, Mass.) Patriot Ledger

    Steve Adams, Jon Chesto, Shaunna Gately, Alex Spanko, Patrick Ronan

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Detroit News

    Joanna Firestone, Alan Derringer, Richard Burr, Greg Tasker, Mary Bailey, Daniel Howes, Scott Burgess, David Shepardson, Bryce Hoffman, Louis Aguilar, Melissa Burden, Brian O’Connor and Jaclyn Trop

     

    The (Montreal) Gazette

    Jeff Blond, Paul Delean, Jay Bryan, Francois Shalom, Lynn Moore, Allison Lampert, Jason Magder, Alison MacGregor


     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

    Financial Times

    The Financial Times staff

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Journal Sentinel Business News Staff

     

    U-T San Diego

    Nirmala Bhat, Dean Calbreath, Mike Freeman, Janet LaVelle, Morgan Lee, Lily Leung, Tanya Mannes, Diana McCabe, Greg Schmidt, Roger Showley, Jim Watters, Lori Weisberg

     

    Dailies:  More than 500,001


     

    The New York Times

    The New York Times Staff

     

    Los Angeles Times

    Los Angeles Times Business Staff

     

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Star Tribune Business Staff


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Dailies: Under 25,000

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Jeff Horwitz, Kate Berry

    Revolving Door

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Jeff Horwitz

    Kickbacks

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Kate Berry

    Robo-Signing


     

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The News-Press (Fort Myers)

    Dick Hogan


    Flopping: Fraud Runs Rampant

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Braga, Matthew Doig

    First Priority’s Collapse


     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The (Memphis, Tenn.) Commercial Appeal

    Daniel Connolly and Amos Maki

    Landing Electrolux

     

    Knoxville News Sentinel

    Josh Flory

    Down the Drain

     

    The Providence (R.I.) Journal

    Paul Edward Parker, Tom Mooney

    Uncovering Unfunded Pension Liabilities in Rhode Island


     

    Dailies:  200,000 to 500,000

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett, John Diedrich, Ben Poston

    Shattered Trust

     

    The Seattle Times

    Michael Berens and Ken Armstrong

    Methadone and the Politics of Pain

     

    The Orlando Sentinel

    Jim Stratton

    Workforce Central Florida

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Paul Sonne, Steve Stecklow, Matt Bradley, Farnaz Fassihi, Loretta Chao, Margaret Coker

    Censorship, Inc.

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Brody Mullins, Susan Pulliam, Steve Eder, Michael Rothfeld, Jenny Strasburg, Vanessa O’Connell, David Enrich, Dana Cimilluca, Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Jeannette Neumann, Michael Siconolfi

    Inside Track

     

    USA Today Money Section

    Thomas Frank

    Public-Sector Pensions


     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Providence (R.I.) Journal

    John Kostzrewa, assistant managing editor

     

    Hartford Courant

    Dan Haar

     

    The Detroit News

    Brian J. O’Connor


     

    Dailies:  200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Baltimore Sun

    Columns by Jay Hancock

     

    Financial Times

    Columns by John Gapper

     

    Fort Worth Star-Telegram

    Columns by Mitchell Schnurman

     

    Dailies: Over 500,001

    The New York Times

    Gretchen Morgenson

    Fair Game

     

    Washington Post

    Ezra Klein

     

    The New York Times

    David Carr

    The Media Equation

     

    CATEGORY: PRINT – MAGAZINES

    BLOG

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    SmartMoney staff

     

    Blog

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Magazines: Over 500,000

    Forbes

    Tom Post, Matthew Schifrin, Jenna Goudreau

    Private Equity Chief Lynn Tilton


     

    EXPLANATORY

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

    HousingWire

    HousingWire editorial staff



     

    Magazines 2: 75,000 to 500,000

    New York Magazine

    Steve Fishman

    Madoff on Madoff: The Madoff Tapes


     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Yoolim Lee, Ruth David

    When Microfinance Goes Wrong

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Stephanie Baker

    Shaking Up the Old Boys Club


     

    Magazines:  Over 500,001

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Felix Gillette, Businessweek staff

    Casino

     

    Fortune Magazine

    Adam Lashinsky

    Inside Apple

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Matt Heimer, Reshma Kapadia

    Investing Reinvented

     

    FEATURE

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

    Columbia Journalism Review

    Dean Starkman

    Confidence Game: Limited Vision of the News Gurus

     

    Mortgage Banking

    Terry Sheridan

    Short on Results

     

    D CEO

    Glenn Hunter

    Gold Metal Recyclers


     

    Magazines 2: 75,000 to 500,000

    New York Magazine

    Steve Fishman

    Madoff on Madoff: The Madoff Tapes

     

    Institutional Investor

    Alexander Osipovich

    Browder’s War

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith

    Lethal Commerce


     

    Magazines: Over 500,001

    Forbes

    Steven Bertoni

    Agent of Disruption

     

    Fortune Magazine

    David Whitford

    Sandler

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Anne Kadet

    Cashathon


     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

     

    D CEO Magazine

    Glenn Hunter, Christine Perez

     

    Magazines: Over 500,001

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Josh Tyrangiel


     

    Fortune

    Andy Serwer


     

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine

    Knight A. Kiplinger, Kevin McCormally, Janet Bodnar

     

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Magazines: 75,000 to 500,000

     

    Barron’s

    Bill Alpert

    The Troubles at Fairholme Fund

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Asjylyn Loder, David Evans, Leigh Baldwin, Angela Cullen, Elisa Martinuzzi

    The Secret Sins of Koch Industries

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Global Black Market Human Organs

     

    Magazines: Over 500,001

    Fortune Magazine

    Peter Elkind, Jennifer Reingold, Doris Burke

    Pfizer

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

     

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

     

    D CEO

    Mitchell Schnurman

    Bottom Line Columns


     

    Magazines:  More than 500,001

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Peter Coy

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Dyan Machan

    Smart Ideas


     

    PRINT – WEEKLIES / BIWEEKLIES


    BLOG

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    Anthony Schoettle

    The Score

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Aaron Elstein

    In The Markets

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Crain’s Detroit Business

    Daniel Duggan, Chad Halcom, Nancy Kaffer, Bill Shea, Sherri Welch

    Light Rail Derails

     

    Pacific Coast Business Times

    Marlize van Romburgh

    San Luis Trust Bank Fails

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Matthew Kish

    Wiederhorn Battles Creditors


     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS ALL PLATFORMS

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Steve Hendershot, Lisa Leitner, Erik Unger, Danny Ecker, Jason McGregor, Jeff Hartvigsen, Karen Freese

    State of Small Business


     

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    J.K. Wall, Francesca Jarosz, Mason King, Perry Reichandter
    Testing Reform Online


    EXPLANATORY

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King, Eric Fisher, David Bourne, Brandon McClung,

    Second Thoughts: Secondary Market Redefines Ticket Business

     

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Richard Clough

    Money Machine

     

    Mainebiz

    Jackie Farwell, Carol Coultas; Jan Holder, Matt Selva

    Absolute control


     

    FEATURE


     

    Advertising Age

    E.J. Schultz

    Williston, The Town the Recession Forgot

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Elizabeth MacBride, Glenn Coleman, Xana Antunes

    The Great Escape

     

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King, Tom Stinson,

    Power of the Ring


     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

     

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Crain’s Chicago Business Staff

     

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Los Angeles Business Journal staff

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Crain’s New York Business staff


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Richard Clough

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Risky Business

     

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Steve Daniels, Paul Merrion

    Higher Risk Education: State’s prepaid tuition plan

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Matthew Kish

    Oregon’s Predatory Lending Industry


     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Charlotte Business Journal

    Erik Spanberg

    Queen City Agenda Column

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Rob Smith

    Opinions


     

    RADIO / TV


    BLOG

    CNBC

    Patti Domm

    Market Insider with Patti Domm


     

    BREAKING NEWS

    CNBC

    Mary Thompson, Melissa Lee, Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Sue Herera, John Harwood , Simon Hobbs, Brian Sullivan, Bill Griffeth, Maria Bartiromo, Steve Liesman, Sharon Epperson, Scott Cohn, Nikhil Deogun, Matthew Quayle, Todd Bonin, Chris Sheridan, Robert Fasbender, Sanford Cannold, Han-Ting Wang, Lulu Chiang

    Downgrade Day

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    CNBC

    Stacy Eisner, Alexandra Privitera, Mary Catherine Wellons, Gina Francolla, Mark Koba, Eamon Javers, Nikhil Deogun

    Your Money Your Vote: The Republican Presidential Debate


     

    EXPLANATORY

    CNBC

    Kate Kelly; Jesse Bergman, Nikhil Deogun

    Trading on Twitter

     

    MarketWatch Radio Network

    John Wordock, Andrew O’Day, Larry Kofsky, Adrienne Mitchell, Steve Orr

    Wall Street’s Wild Week — S&P Downgrade, the Fed and Historic Stock Swings


     

    FEATURE

    CNBC

    Mitch Weitzner,  Lori Gordon-Logan,  Michael Beyman,  Patrick Ahearn, Richard Korn, Michael Sheehan, Allison Stedman, Lester Holt, Ray Borelli

    Pepsi’s Challenge

     

    REAL ESTATE

     

    The Baltimore Sun

    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Scott Calvert

    Taxing Baltimore

     

    Denver Post

    David Migoya

    Public Trustee – Foreclosure Reporting

     

    The Miami Herald

    Toluse Olorunnipa

    Real Estate Coverage

     

    STUDENT

    Stories Written for Student Publications

     

    Elvina Nawaguna-Clemente, Arizona State University

    Deteriorated Properties Prompt Battles Between Struggling Towns, Professor

    Cronkite News

     

    Honorable Mention

     

    Robson Abbott, University of Missouri

    Les Bourgeois Becoming Force in Missouri Wine Industry

    Columbia Missourian

     

    Daniel Wiser, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Unsustainable Path

    The Daily Tar Heel

     

     

    Stories Written for Professional Publications

     

    Sarah Frier, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Jefferson County Agony Means Higher Borrowing Costs for Alabama Taxpayers

    Bloomberg News

     

    Honorable Mention

    Tarini Parti, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Tobacco companies adjusting strategies to remain prominent political players

    OpenSecrets.org

     

  • Best in Business 2011 contest-judges’ comments

    Posted By admin on Tuesday March 13, 2012

    JUDGES’ COMMENTS

    about the winners of SABEW’s 17th annual Best in Business Awards*

    *For winners without judges’ comments, judges did not provide them.

    = = =

     

    DIVISION: DIGITAL

    BLOG

    Digital: More than 2.5 million unique monthly visits

    Repowatch.com

    Mary Fricker

    Financial Crisis

    With passion for her subject and attention to detail, Mary Fricker has created an impressive and important blog devoted to an esoteric and overlooked risk factor in the modern economy: the institutional repo loan market. RepoWatch is hardly light reading, but it is invigorated by Fricker’s shout-from-the-rooftops fervor that the public, and journalists, need to understand how the post-crisis financial landscape remains fraught with perils. Among them: the little understood market in which large financial institutions borrow trillions of dollars from each other and from central banks every day, using securities as collateral. Things went bad in 2008 in this market, and Fricker points out another disaster, last year’s collapse of MF Global, was also hastened by repo loans. Fricker’s blog deserves plaudits for committed reporting and analysis of a crucial component of the financial system.

     

     

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Digital all sizes

     

    FINS.com

    Julie Steinberg, Aaron Lucchetti

    MF Global

    FINS.com used its small staff to great effect in the coverage of MF Global’s implosion, finding an angle that hadn’t been covered – the firing of the company’s chief risk officer more than a year earlier. FINS did a nice analysis not only of what that event meant for MF and its employees, but broadened it out to lessons that would be useful for the entire industry.

     

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Chris Peacock and CNNMoney Staff

    Dow Plunges 635 Points on August 8

    The CNNMoney team covered the market turmoil of Aug. 8 from an impressive variety of angles. It was impressive that, so soon after the big news of the U.S.’s credit-rating downgrade by S&P, the group had so many different articles and videos to help readers understand the market impact and what could come next.

     

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Ioan Grillo, John Dickie, Sarah Childress, Mark Scheffler

    Narconomics

    We found the website to be very interactive and creative. The stories were inspiring and deeply reported. Given the subject matter, we know the reporters faced an element of risk in filming the video series and they did a superb job.

    ]

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

    CNNMoney.com

    Gabrielle Solomon

    Best Places to Live

    Dynamic use of data to create a tool that is useful year-round. But it also uses that data to build good editorial features, such as the lists of “top earners” and such. It’s a little bit more of a tool first than a story that finds creative ways to leverage technology, but it still stands as a good example of how other newsrooms should think about what’s possible.

    CNNMoney.com

    Blake Ellis, Jordan Malter

    America’s Biggest Boomtown

    This entry makes use of various media to provide layer after layer of information that shows the oil boom in North Dakota in stunning color and complexity. Video provides a frame, stories a landscape and slideshows give close-ups of individual characters.

    MSNBC.com

    Allison Linn, Martin Wolk, Jim Seida, John Brecher, John Makely

    We are the median

    What’s it like to have a median family income? TODAY’s Life Inc. blog (on MSNBC.com) asked its readers and was overwhelmed with responses. Stories were packaged into a series that included a chat, polls, poll comments, text, photos, video and the use of social media on Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus. The package made heavy use of poll and poll comments and, even a month after the series, stories from families continued to pour in.

     

     

    EXPLANATORY

    Digital: More than 500,000

    ClimateWire

    Tiffany Stecker

    Europe’s Cap-and-Trade System Brings Jobs to Georgia

    Judges felt this article was “compelling” and “surprising” in describing how regional green policies are having an impact on international trade. They also noted that it uses a concrete, data-driven example. It was informative, well-written and comprehensive, providing easy ways to look at complex issue such as carbon offsets and carbon debts.

     

    ClimateWire

    Joel Kirkland

    China’s Energy

    This package of stories provided excellent reporting and great narrative detail.

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Patrick Winn, Emily Lodish

    Burma Rebooted

    The judges applaud the initiative, imagination and courage shown in focusing on change in Burma, where for too many years truth has been negotiable and criticism of government unwelcome. Patrick Winn investigates recent changes with energy and due skepticism, while allowing the facts to speak for themselves. He writes with zest, humor, and occasional streaks of descriptive brilliance, as in this street scene: “Children dusted head-to-toe in black soot wander downtown like Dickensian chimney sweeps. Dark mold nibbles on colonial structures left behind by the British. The currency is so frayed that shopkeepers offer change in tissues and cigarettes.”

     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

    The Motley Fool

    Alex Dumortier, Dari FitzGerald

    “Low-Risk” Trade That Brought Down MF Global

    MF Global was a great tight package. Alex Dumortier did a fine job of translating a dense subject into something a layman can understand. One example is the analogy describing the trades to pocketing the difference between the mortgage and what a renter would pay. The straightforward sequential graphics of how the trades should have gone vs. how they actually went down showed what went wrong. The article also provided a good flavor of Corzine’s personality.

    CNNMoney.com

    David Goldman

    The Cybercrime Economy

    Cybercrime was ambitious in its week-long scope and it lived up to that by offering insights into a phenomenon that affects consumers, businesses and national security. This entry shed light on a subject that matters enormously and yet is difficult to explain. The compelling video reports augmented the text well. And the graphics added to the storytelling.

    CNNMoney.com

    Steve Hargreaves

    Military’s War on Oil

    Military offers great insights into technology that may be unfamiliar to many viewers. It provides a great service by peeling back the fringe image to showcase how sensible people make dollars-cents-and-lives calculations to go green. The piece also broke the stereotype of the military as non-innovative. And the life-or-death angle was compelling.

     

     

    FEATURE

    Digital: More than 500,000

     

    ClimateWire

    Tiffany Stecker

    Europe’s Cap-and-Trade System Brings Jobs to Georgia

    A quirky idea that was well researched. We liked the ambition in making cap-and-trade a local economic story that questioned the staying power of Georgia’s mushrooming wood-pellet industry.

    InsuranceQuotes.com

    John Egan, Lisa Shidler

    Medical Bills Can Mount for Shooting Victims

    A victim’s own research into the cost of his recovery from a shooting spree in a Colorado church provided a different look at how people can be victimized all over again when left with huge medical bills their insurers won’t cover.

     

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

    GlobalPost

    Sarah Childress, Simeon Tegel, Girish Gupta, Nadja Drost, John Otis

    The Scramble For El Dorado

     

    GlobalPost

    Emily Lodish, Patrick Winn, Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Jason Overdorf, Justin McCurry, Tristan McConnell, Kate Lamb, Nicholas Dynan

    Rice 2.0

     

     

    Digital:  More than 2.5 million

     

    CNNMoney.com

    David Goldman

    Android’s law

    Well-reported and nicely written, this was a nice overview of the rapidly changing market for those not already well-versed in the intricacies of cell phone technology. Good use of graphics to enhance the reportin

     

    Bankrate.com

    Claes Bell, Katherine Lewis, Janna Herron, Marcie Geffner, Stephen Pounds

    Financial Reform, One Year Later

    A thorough report on which financial reforms are having an impact and which have fallen short a year later, nicely presented.

     

    CNBC.com

    Jeff Cox

    Occupy Wall Street

    Excellent work burrowing into a complex topic to dispel some of the myths about who the 1 percent really are.

     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Digital: 2.5 million

     

    FINS.com

    Editorial staff of FINS.com

    If I were employed (or unemployed) in the financial industry, this would be a must-visit site daily for me. Its combination of original material and aggregated previously published content provides a focused look at the issues driving employment trends in finance. Impressive numbers for such a narrowly defined subject.

     

    PolitiFact

    Bill Adair, Martha Hamilton, Louis Jacobson

    That we have a web site like PolitiFact illustrates how important business and economic issues are to politics. It also shows the extent to which politicians will bend the truth in pursuit of being elected. PolitiFact should be required reading for anyone who takes politics and public policy seriously. Its assertions on the truth or falsehood of public statements are always well-documented and backed up with links to original source materials.

     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

     

    CNET News

    CNET Editorial Staff

    CNET continues to be one of the dominant forces in covering technology. The writing is sharp, and the journalism strong.

     

    MarketWatch

    MarketWatch Staff

    MarketWatch continues to demonstrate that it is a “go to” source for retail investors seeking everything from a stock quote to investing advice and real-time news. It pulls news from a variety of sources, and does not waste readers’ time.

    CNNMoney.com

    CNNMoney Staff

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Digital: More than 500,000

    Center for Public Integrity

    Michael Hudson

    The Great Mortgage Cover-Up

    The reporting is incredibly deep and Michael Hudson has done a marvelous job of storytelling. The role of GE in the subprime meltdown has not been described in such detail. The housing meltdown was such an enormous catastrophe that only with the passage of time could the story be put in perspective.

     

    ProPublica

    Paul Kiel, Olga Pierce

    Foreclosure Crisis

    Timely reporting that held banks and government agencies to account for incompetence, malfeasance and foot dragging.

     

    Texas Watchdog

    Steve Miller

    The Hurricane Insurance Hustle

    Texas Watchdog has done some fine work in exposing the connections that greased the wheels for powerful people to profit from the Hurricane Ike insurance fund. A pickup truck as part of a severance agreement? Perhaps only in Texas would this be business as usual, but it makes us wish every state had a Watchdog this effective.

     

     

    Digital: More than 500,000

     

    GlobalPost

    Patrick Winn, Emily Lodish

    Burma Rebooted

     

    GlobalPost

    Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Sharron Lovell, Emily Lodish, Mark Scheffler

    Relocation Nation

     

     

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Digital: More than 500,000

     

    ProPublica

    Jesse Eisinger

    The Trade Columns

    Tight writing and smart sentiments. A compelling blend of reporting and opinion. Clear, writerly approach.

     

    Xconomy.com

    Luke Timmerman

    Biotech columns

    Engagingly written. We wanted to read these columns to the end, even though we had no special interest in the biotech area. Interesting context on the industry’s history and current situation as relates to the topics at hand.

     

     

    Reuters

    Rob Cox, Jeffrey Goldfarb, Robert Cyran, Agnes T. Crane, Antony Currie

    Breakingviews Columns

    Engaged with strong writing and editing.

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Thomas Mucha

    Mucha Columns

    Smart, fluent analysis.

     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Paul R. La Monica

    The Buzz

    Paul LaMonica goes beyond just spouting his opinion and uses reporting to back up what he’s saying. His opinion is clear and reasoned, and he is persuasive, which is what commentary should be about.

     

    MarketWatch

    Rex Nutting

    Columns

    Nutting does a great job of explaining the significance of the economic numbers that come out of Washington on a regular basis, and he explains their significance to the average person in a way they can understand.

     

    TheStreet.com

    Adam Feuerstein

    Pharma Fraud

    A great series of articles about a major issue many people should care about — fraudulent statements from a publicly traded company. Feuerstein went beyond the press releases to actually check the facts the company was giving everyone and discovered that many of them were complete fabrications.

     

     

    CATEGORY: INTERNATIONAL

    BLOG

    Financial Times

    Staff

    FTAlphaville

    Entries showed eager, timely coverage followed by multidimensional commentary and analysis. It’s intelligent, insightful and addictive.

     

    BREAKING NEWS

     

    The Financial Times

    Financial Times staff

    The Eurozone crisis

    This topic, ultimately, was more important than any other last year. Comprehensive in scope and rich in detail, this was easily the world’s best series on the eurozone crisis.

     

    Reuters

    Reuters Staff

    The Libyan Revolution

    The Libyan revolution wasn’t easily understandable to Americans. Videos showing the death of Gaddafi did little to explain the sea change taking place in the Middle East. This package, however, shed light on the event from many perspectives in large and small ways.

     

    The Financial Times

    Jonathan Soble, Louise Lucas, Lindsay Whipp

    The Olympus Accounting Scandal

    Sometimes simplicity works best. A video interview with an executive reveals not only the issue at hand, but also the entirety of Japanese financial culture. Letting the eloquent subject do most of the talking was key in this interview. Less is more.

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    The Globe and Mail

    Kevin Carmichael, Greg Keenan, Moe Doiron, Claire Neary, Adriano Valentini

    Remade in Canada – The Future of Factories

    The ambition of this project was staggering. For non-Canadians, this is the one package that explains it all without resorting to inside baseball.

    The Financial Times

    Christine Spolar, Jeff Gerth (ProPublica), Megan Murphy, Vanessa Houlder, Johanna Kassel, Benjamin Freese

    Tax Wars Series

    What could have been a confusing package on accounting ended up being a well-told tale on simple tax dodging — something that happens day in, day out right under governments’ noses.

    GlobalPost

    Thomas Mucha, David Case, Emily Lodish, Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Justin McCurry, Michael Goldfarb, Jon Jensen, Mark Scheffler

    7 Deadly Stories

    Last year was eventful on many fronts — politics, economics, world disasters. These journalists saw that 2011 was extraordinary and sought to do something about it. Timely, grand and well-executed, this package had a lot to say — and much to teach.

     

    FEATURE

     

    Fortune Magazine

    James Bandler

    Afghan Gold

    What great business journalism is all about: Take a great character, a unique and dangerous location, and complex business dealings and turn it into a story the reader can’t wait to finish. It sings with details.

    GlobalPost

    Sarah Childress, Alex Leff, Nick Miroff

    Gangsters’ Paradise

    Here is a story that goes beyond the statistics. The reporting is strong. The details are great. The author puts a face on drug use. Combined with the Q&A, these three stories make a strong feature package.

     

    The Globe and Mail

    Mark Mackinnon

    The Empire Sino-Forest Built

    From its terrific lead, the author weaves a story of history, business, potential massive fraud, and the impact on the people of rural China. This story is an example of a journalist shining a light where it needs to be shone.

     

    EXPLANATORY

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Phred Dvorak, Peter Landers Yuka Hayashi, Norihiko Shirouzu, Chester Dawson, Juro Osawa, Yumiko Ono, Mitsuru Obe

    Japan Nuclear International

    This series brought strong investigative and explanatory journalism to the nuclear crisis in Japan. Informational graphics and writing helped explain a complex story that went way beyond the human tragedy and pointed out potential solutions. Journal reporters detailed how fateful choices dating back to the 1960s made the complex vulnerable to an accident. The stories revealed the chaos and delays in decision-making after the accident began and showed how the large-scale radiation release and effects of the accident continues to haunt the country and will for decades to come.

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Cash, Crime and Human Organs

    A tremendous enterprise series that shows the inside story of the human transplant business and the criminal industry spanning four continents that has risen to provide healthy organs to those in the richest countries. A team of 13 reporters in nine countries tracked impoverished people left humiliated, maimed and killed by organ traffickers. It is worth noting that Bloomberg reporter Michael Smith was tailed by secret police in Azerbaijan, Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine while researching this story. Smith even stayed on in Azerbaijan for two weeks in defiance of the police to find more victims of multinational criminal gangs who pay cash for kidneys.

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    The Wall Street Journal Staff

    Europe International

    Beyond explaining how and why the economic crisis occurred in Europe, The Wall Street Journal showed the impact on the average European citizen through compelling photos, graphics and stories. The series took us from the financial institutions to the politicians to the common man, giving context and reader engagement. The complexity of the subject meant expertise was needed in a wide array of areas including economics, politics, banking, social policy and the financial markets. But the Journal’s coverage met that challenge and excelled – repeatedly breaking news, explaining the scope and causes of the emergency and helping readers to make judgments about what might lie in store. Journal reporters also deployed all the tools of modern journalism to get the story out – breaking news in real-time, contributing to live blogs and frequently appearing on WSJ.com via live video that helped readers stay updated as the unfolding crisis rocked financial markets on a daily, and often hourly, basis.

     

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Cash, Crime and Human Organs

    The dark world of human-organ trafficking comes to light in a frightening and heart-wrenching investigative story. The story uncovers multinational criminal gangs that deal in cash for kidneys, dying patients driving demand, and impoverished donors selling their organs in hopes of a better life. Powerful writing, provocative illustration and illuminating graphics and photography make this package stand out. The writers provided plenty of compelling human detail and did an excellent job laying out the larger issues that have created this underground economy.

     

    Financial Times

    Christine Spolar, Jeff Gerth (ProPublica), Megan Murphy, Vanessa Houlder, Johanna Kassel, Benjamin Freese

    Tax Wars Series

    Captivating readers with a tale of tax avoidance is no easy feat, making the The Financial Times’ “Tax Wars” series all the more impressive. The FT teamed up with ProPublica to reveal how banks took advantage of gaps in two countries’ tax laws and how the U.S. government lost billions in the process. A highly readable take on a complex subject, exposing a serious issue in a way that is interesting and understandable to a broad audience. “Tax Wars” is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the corporate tax debate raging in the U.S. today.

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Phred Dvorak, Peter Landers Yuka Hayashi, Norihiko Shirouzu, Chester Dawson, Juro Osawa, Yumiko Ono, Mitsuru Obe

    Japan Nuclear International

    News organizations aspire to “own the story” — to break news, delve deeper and stay ahead of the competition. The Wall Street Journal did this in its coverage of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The Journal’s team of reporters revealed to readers the nuclear plant’s vulnerabilities, the mishandling of the accident, and the disaster’s effect on the country. WSJ’s Japan nuclear investigation is a stellar example of the value in continuing to dig deep when most other media have headed home.

     

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

     

    Financial Times

    Wolfgang Münchau

    Wolfgang Münchau uses a vivid writing style to dig into the hard issues of Europe’s sovereign debt crisis. His knowledgeable columns manage to inform an expert audience as well as the general reader with sophisticated and fact-based analysis.

     

     

    DIVISION: NEWS AGENCIES

    BREAKING NEWS

    Bloomberg News

    Tom Schoenberg, Sara Forden, Jeff Bliss, Cornelius Rahn, Zachary Mider

    Blocking a Deal

     

    Bloomberg News

    Katherine Burton

    Soros to End Four Decades as Hedge Fund Leader by Returning Investor Cash

     

    The Associated Press

    David Koenig, Scott Mayerowitz, Samantha Bomkamp, Dave Carpenter, Joshua Freed

    American Airlines Bankruptcy

    Most thorough, comprehensive coverage of all the entries. Context was on the mark, and reporters did a great job of providing historical data. Elements like the timeline added spark.

     

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    Bloomberg News

    Cam Simpson

    Victoria’s Secret Revealed in Child Picking Burkina Faso Cotton

    Through the story of a child laborer, 13-year-old Clarisse, who is forced to pick the fair trade organic cotton destined to end up in Victoria’s Secret underwear, Simpson reveals all the “accomplices to exploitation.” This is great storytelling, with heart-wrenching details delivered in controlled prose. The writer assembles the facts and lets them speak for themselves. A video interview with Clarisse, who unemotionally talks about her plight, and vivid photography make this an unforgettable package. The reader can’t look at feel-good marketing that accompanies fair trade products in the same way. At the end of story, nothing has changed for Clarisse, but the reader is left with the hope that her story will help others like her.

     

    Bloomberg News

    Vernon Silver, Ben Elgin, Alan Katz

    Wired for Repression

    Bloomberg’s “Wired for Repression” takes the reader to the dark heart of the Arab Spring where “Western surveillance sales to authoritarian regimes” result in terror, repression and death. The level of detail and the breadth and depth of the investigation makes for jaw-dropping reading and underscores the dangers of a world without privacy. Bloomberg tracks the players and names names of the Western companies benefitting from the “commerce of death.” Wired for Repression is an exhaustive work with the detail of a spy thriller. Video, photography and graphics enhance strong writing. The package also offers an unsettling “glimpse of what the future might hold.”

     

    Bloomberg News

    Bradley Keoun, Phil Kuntz, Bob Ivry, Craig Torres, Scott Lanman, Christopher Condon, Donal Griffin, Greg Stohr and Matthew Winkler

    The Fed’s Trillion-Dollar Secret

    Bloomberg’s “Fed’s Trillion Dollar Secret” digs up the facts the Federal Reserve Bank was determined to hide and every American deserved to know: What banks were benefitting from $1.2 trillion dollars in bailout money and how much did they get. It took a FOIA request, a lawsuit and a Supreme Court decision to begin to get answers — in 29,000 pages of documents — testament to the reporters’ dogged pursuit of the truth. In the process, the reporting uncovers a trail of misinformation and lies from both the government and the banks. This is a tour de force, a tale of desperation and greed told with patience and clarity. This package of 20 stories — backed by databases, graphics, photography and explanatory videos — strikes a blow against government secrecy. It is a tribute to reporter Mark Pittman who began the investigation but didn’t live to see the result. His team of colleagues deserves high praise for their unwavering commitment to complete the task.

     

     

    EXPLANATORY

    Bloomberg News

    Cam Simpson, Alan Katz, Simon Clark, Heather Walsh

    Anything But Fair

    This series illustrates how the right personal stories can bring to life a complex issue. It clearly explains how the international fair-trade agreement works, why there is so much at stake for those involved, and how the system’s flaws prevent it from improving the lives of the farmers and laborers it’s designed to help. The judges appreciated the range of perspectives these stories, photos and videos captured. The farmers, the child laborers, the corporations, the consumers and those hoping to change the system – all were represented through patient and thorough reporting.

     

    Reuters

    Scot Paltrow

    Robo-Signing Redux

    The judging panel appreciated the detail and clarity of these features, which explain the process of robo-signing, as well as other dubious practices, that helped produce thousands of illegal documents that in turn were used by banks to foreclose on home loans. Clear prose, good art and design, and solid reporting and story-telling with an emphasis on the consumer combine for a broad, thorough and vibrant explanation of a timely and important topic.

     

    Bloomberg News

    Bradley Keoun, Phil Kuntz, Bob Ivry, Craig Torres, Scott Lanman, Christopher Condon, Donal Griffin, Greg Stohr and Matthew Winkler

    The Fed’s Trillion-Dollar Secret

    This entry excelled at unpacking a massive amount of complex data and thoroughly explaining its importance. Before this series, the public could only guess at the scale of the Federal Reserve’s actions to keep some of the big banks afloat during the 2008 financial crisis. It’s a tremendous effort notable not just for the thoroughness of its analysis and reporting, but also for its related impact on the Fed’s transparency.

     

     

    FEATURE

    Reuters

    Scot Paltrow

    The Congressman with Banks on the Side

    A crisply written, painstakingly reported account of the way banking really works in a place like Georgia.  In the process, Paltrow has also done a public service, unearthing evidence that Representative Phil Gingrey of the state’s 11th congressional district may have violated House ethics rules barring members from serving as paid directors of corporate boards.

     

    The Associated Press

    Bernard Condon

    Farmland Boom

    Kudos to Bernard Condon for uncovering a man bites dog story on the cornfields of Michigan. Here is the tale of a software engineer who plowed so much money into the purchase of hundreds of acres of farmland that people who actually grow corn for a living were left shaking their heads. Welcome to the world of the new breed of gentlemen farmers.

     

    The Associated Press

    Bernard Condon, Randy Herschaft

    Madoff Victim’s Lawyer

    Irving Picard, the court-appointed trustee seeking the return of money to the victims of Bernard Madoff, likes to keep a low profile. This AP feature uses interviews with people who know him to tell the evocative tale of Picard’s often thankless task.

     

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    The Associated Press

    Jeff Donn

    Aging Nukes

    This is an ambitious series about a topic of increasing significance: the life cycle of first-generation nuclear power plants. Each story in the series carried its weight, adding up to a well-written, accessible set of articles that deftly tested real-time claims against the historical record.

     

    Scripps Howard News Service

    Isaac Wolf, Thomas Hargrove

    Grave Mistakes

    The analysis of the abuse of government data was enterprising and impressive, and the human consequences of that abuse were richly documented and told in a crisp, concise fashion. A timely and powerful series that included much-needed protective advice for consumers.

     

    Bloomberg News

    Peter Waldman

    Preparing Americans for Death Lets Hospices Neglect End of Life

    A gripping topic addressed with impressive enterprise and compelling anecdotes. Careful but painful accounts of current abuses were woven into the history of this evolving industry, adding insights and depth to our understanding of the issue.

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

     

    Reuters

    Jack Schafer

    Jack Shafer Columns

    Shafer is a delight to read; feisty, humorous, lively detail.

     

    Dow Jones Newswires

    Al Lewis

    Al’s Emporium Column

    Lewis moves the reader quickly through an engaging story.

     

    Dow Jones Newswires

    Neal Lipschutz

    Point of View Column

    Lipschultz’s columns are important and readable.

     

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE

     

    Money Magazine

    Lisa Gibbs

    Consumer Protection

    Thorough body of work on how older Americans are often vulnerable to unscrupulous operators. It could just as well be your mom or dad or your grandparents, and they might not tell you what they’ve done with their money out of pride and independence. Gibbs navigated through a sea of complexity to expose bad practices and then come up with ways to identify and deal with them. The scamming of seniors is a running story everyone can relate to, no matter what age or level of personal wealth.

     

    The Plain Dealer (Cleveland)

    Teresa Dixon Murray

    On Money

    Dixon Murray did her due diligence. Anyone who can pore over 30,000 pages of boilerplate, user-unfriendly Fed documents and come out of it with a thorough, readable story on the health of their local banks deserves our respect. She dug into widespread debit card fraud in Ohio and, unlike similar stories we read, persisted with heavily sourced, well-explained material. That made for a compelling series. Most notably, she nailed a serious flaw in the system when she signed for her own credit card purchases with names like “Daffy Duck” and “Mother Nature” — nobody asked any questions. How much more personal does finance get than a debit or credit card?

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jason Zweig

    The Intelligent Investor

    His succinct, sharply written columns are informative and accessible, and he’s clearly not afraid to rattle some cages. He gave us a warning about the silver crash, punctured exaggerated claims for funds’ returns, showed how investors vacillated over the debt-ceiling crisis last summer just as much as Congress did and documented how the Occupy Movement’s protests about Wall Street practices are actually rather mild by the measure of similar protests a century and more ago. While some personalities use their platforms for self-promotion, Zweig uses his to scrutinize what they say and to truth-squad them if necessary.

     

    DIVISION: PRINT – DAILY NEWSPAPERS

     

    BLOG

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The (Quincy MA) Patriot Ledger:

    Jon Chesto

    Mass. Market blog

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    Elisabeth Ponsot, Laura Olson, Erich Schwartzel, Laura Malt Schneiderman, Steve Mellon

    Pipeline

     

    The Des Moines Register

    Philip Brasher, Dan Piller

    Green Fields

     

    Hartford Courant

    Matthew Sturdevant

    Insurance Capital Blog

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Tom Daykin

    Land and Space blog

    Daykin’s aggressive reporting and accessible, explanatory writing make him a must-read for his tight-knit and highly engaged audience. Daykin uses the blog medium effectively with frequent updates to keep his readers informed in real-time and connecting and engaging with them in the comments.

     

    The Orange County Register

    Jonathan Lansner, Jeff Collins, Marilyn Kalfus

    Lansner on Real Estate

    “Lansner on Real Estate” demonstrates how a blog serves its readers with news-driven coverage that is both fierce and fun. The blog delivers a mix of surprising topics, strong local reporting and regular statistical analysis. Lansner and Collins seem to have an intimate sense of what their readers want; and they deliver with substance and wit.

     

    Charlotte Observer

    Andrew Dunn, Kirsten Valle Pittman

    Bank Watch

    Dunn and Pittman power their blog with the immediacy, smarts, skepticism and engagement their readers demand.

     

     

    Dailies: More than 500,000

     

    Houston Chronicle

    Dwight Silverman

    TechBlog

    Silverman does what blogs should do. He delivers breaking news straight from sources, not from the work of other journalists, He writes with a distinctive voice, provides smart analysis and is accessible to readers without his obvious command of the subject. He makes good use of multimedia — charts, pictures, screen grabs, videos — to show what he’s telling.

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    Sarasota Herald-Tribune

    Michael Braga, Matthew Doig

    14 Indicted in Major Flipping Conspiracy

    Phenomenal visual packaging of a complex, deeply reported story, and smart pairing of the straight news coverage with a community-impact article.

     

    Sarasota Herald-Tribune

    Michael Pollick, Doug Sword

    Jackson Lab Picks Sarasota County

    Jobs are the main local story, and this represents an appropriate amount of effort on an important subject.

     

    Ventura County Star

    Stephanie Hoops

    Feds Take Over Debt Collection Business

    Hard work and tenacity paid off for this reporter. Detailed, easy to read, nicely done.

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Detroit News

    David Shepardson

    CAFE Standards

    A genuine scoop on a widely relevant topic. The author did an excellent job of explaining to readers why they should care, what the likely impact would be on the cost of owning a car and how the news fit into the broader context of the conflict between environmentalists and automakers.

     

    Honolulu Star-Advertiser

    Andrew Gomes, Rob Perez

    Hawaiian Electric Suitor

    A compelling package that takes a rumor/wire flash and chases down the story in a timely and comprehensive fashion. A skeptical and incisive analysis of Kuokoa’s plan to take over Hawaiian Electric Industries, along with useful background on Roald Marth, the man behind Kuokoa.

     

    The Detroit News

    Jaclyn Trop

    Final Chapter for Borders

    A compelling, crisply written narrative that chronicled the demise of bookstore chain Borders and the last-ditch effort to keep the business solvent. A graphic timeline of the company’s rise and fall was a smart and useful accompaniment. Quotes from Borders customers and the company’s president, the investors who tried to buy the chain, the mayor of Ann Arbor and an unsympathetic small bookstore owner all breathed life and local interest into what otherwise might have been a dry, straightforward account.

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Fort Worth Star-Telegram

    Andrea Ahles, Bob Cox, Gordon Dickson, Scott Nishimura, Mitchell Schnurman

    American Airlines Bankruptcy

    Really nice job exploring the local angles of the AMR bankruptcy, like what this bankruptcy could mean to another big local employer – the DFW airport. The report delved into the role labor unions played in AMR’s demise and took a shot at defining what the airline might look like going forward, among other stories. A very comprehensive package.

     

    The Seattle Times

    Dominic Gates

    Boeing, Union Seal Deal

    The Seattle paper took apart the Boeing labor pact announcement and explained the historical significance of it – not the least of which was the role it could play in helping the Puget Sound region get back on its economic feet.

     

    The Boston Globe

    The Boston Globe Business staff

    Stock Plunge

    Excellent explanation of the effect of the stock market tumble on the lives of ordinary people, not just the 1%, putting the economic ramifications into context. Readers got many sides to the story, not just a recounting of the numbers. What financial reporting on the effects of the stock market should be. Great job all around.

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    The New York Times

    The New York Times Staff

    MF Global Bankruptcy

    This report on not just of the bankruptcy of MF Global but the startling discovery that hundreds of millions of dollars of customer money invested with the brokerage firm had gone missing exemplifies breaking news coverage at its finest. The New York Times dominated the fast-breaking coverage of this major news story, which remained in the headlines throughout the last quarter of 2011.

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The (Memphis, TN) Commercial Appeal

    Daniel Connolly, Amos Maki, Michael Erskine, Grant Smith

    Landing Electrolux

    Good package of data, documents, and reporting.

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Dan Chapman, Michael Kanell

    Atlanta Forward

    So much for Hotlanta. This ambitious, comprehensive and servicey project used every trick imaginable — scorecards, video, even a game — to examine Atlanta’s viability, painting a picture of a city now crumbling in a post-Olympic haze. Traffic, resources, education and jobs all weigh heavily on Atlanta’s future to move forward. The judges were wowed by its interactive, and, truly creative, scope.

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson, Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

    We had no idea something fishy was going on with our fish until we read this gorgeously executed package. But we were hooked by the smart, extensive slideshow of restaurants serving cheap substitutes. The high-quality reportage in the video added to the project’s lure. Kudos for keeping this undertaking fresh with a recent update on state regulations.

     

    Dailies: More than 500,000

     

    StarTribune (Minneapolis)

    Staff

    Ford Plant Shutdown

    The team used every journalistic resource to turn what could have been a simple story of a plant shutdown into a complex look at our economy, providing insight and pointing to solutions.

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jason Bellini, Jonathan Cheng, Mary Pilon

    Anticipating a Downgrade of U.S. Debt

    Great work taking a complicated and much-covered story and make it understandable “even to my mother” in the words of one judge. “They took a process story and by dynamic reporting made people care about it,” said another.

     

     

    EXPLANATORY

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The Roanoke Times

    Matt Chittum, Megan Schnabel

    Food Deserts Parch Roanoke Residents of Nutrition

    This deeply reported story transcended the daily business formula. The reporter brought to life economic and demographic data, showing the wide variety of health and business issues that result from the lack of food options in needy neighborhoods — all framed within one family’s grocery run.

     

    Sarasota Herald-Tribune

    Michael Pollick

    In Foreclosure, Fees That Haunt

    In economical, straightforward prose, the reporter explains a lesser-known development in the foreclosure crisis.

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Providence Journal

    Tom Mooney, Paul Edward Parker, Barbara Polichetti

    Understanding R.I.’s Pension Puzzle

    Rhode Island lies near the center of the U.S. public pension crisis and the Providence Journal devoted substantial reporting and editing resources to quantifying and qualifying the funding problem in “The Pension Puzzle.” Paul Edward Parker and colleagues performed in journalism’s noblest tradition to wrest this story to the ground, including taking pains to collect audited statements for each of Rhode Island’s public plans. Reaction was swift: “New R.I. pension tab leaves many local leaders stunned.” Inspiring body of work.

     

    The (Memphis, TN) Commercial Appeal

    Ted Evanoff

    Genius at Work

    Morgan Keegan’s rise and fall offered a golden opportunity for grounding a big story in the low-rise Mid-South. Fund manager Jim Kelsoe, the math wiz left alone by his boss to make cash stockpiles multiply, is introduced as an inviting character through whom to tell this story as the subprime balloon burst. And billionaire John Paulson, who bet against the house and won, ending up with a big stake in Morgan’s corporate parent, Regions Financial, is somebody for the reader to keep score by. Congratulations on stepping back from the daily news grind to polish the big picture for readers.

     

    The Detroit News

    David Shepardson, Christina Rogers

    GM: A Chastened Detroit Icon Claws Its Way Back

    The Detroit News elevated the daily story of GM’s comeback so that it becomes part of the central narrative in the city’s socio-economic history. The CEO interview was particularly insightful and effective.

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson and Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

    A national eye-opener. The investigation was broad and fair, capturing a number of businesses in white lies; some even corrected their menus. This series should inform our fish buying and eating habits.

     

    The Arizona Republic

    Ronald J. Hansen

    Business Taxes

    Great job of reporting and explaining, especially the thoroughness of 15 years of data to show the trend.

     

    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

    Lou Kilzer

    China Syndrome

    Terrific reporting on China business interests informed by a wide swath of sources in business, analysis and government. Impressive.

     

    Dailies: More than 500,000

     

    Washington Post

    Lori Montgomery, Brady Dennis, Alec McGillis
    Running in the Red – U.S Debt

    This series from The Washington Post was superbly reported, beautifully written and brought to life a difficult and potentially dull topic — the escalating U.S. federal deficit. The series wrestled a serious and consequential subject to the ground and analyzed it from a variety of perspectives, examining the historical, the political, the economic and the human elements.

     

    Los Angeles Times

    Ken Bensinger

    Wheels of Fortune

    A stunning series about how, through entirely legal practices, an entire sub-industry of used car dealers is taking advantage of poor people with poor credit ratings. Through what are called Buy Here Pay Here dealerships, desperate buyers are purchasing worn-out cars for exorbitant prices and agreeing to borrowing terms with rates sometimes above 20 percent. The buyers often can’t keep up their payments, the dealers quickly repossess the cars, resell them at inflated prices and then sue to force full payment of the original contract. This well-written and illuminating series illustrates clearly just how far some consumers will go in extremely difficult economic circumstances, and at the same time, how far some businesses will go to make a profit.

     

    The New York Times

    Ian Urbina

    Drilling Down—Natural Gas

    The New York Times has taken an important local topic, but one with national energy and economic implications, and used explanatory and investigative reporting to break new ground on the crucial energy issues facing the U.S. The Times examined the health, regulatory, economic, political and human impact of natural gas drilling in Pennsylvania. Bolstering the series were consistently stellar graphics, which helped explain industry practices, inherent risks and dangers and other key aspects of gas exploration and acquisition. Throughout the series, the reporting was careful, thoughtful and thorough — masterful work that will no doubt have a continuing impact on regulators, drillers and consumers.

     

    FEATURE

     

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    Florida Today

    Patrick Peterson

    Scrap Daddy

    Fascinating microcosm of the economy that spoke to the levels of entrepreneurship people display when faced with diversity. Incredible gripping elements of what people have to do to make it, what people are willing to do to survive. Shows on a local level how global demand is pushing up prices for these metals and giving people economic incentive to collect and recycle.

     

    Times-Tribune (Scranton, Pa.)

    Denise Allabaugh

    Winds of Change

    Well-balanced take on a controversial topic. Showed the tension between environmental concerns and the need for energy and government revenue, a debate being played out all over the country. A useful, educational piece.

     

    Florida Today

    Patrick Peterson

    Bright Idea Man

    Engaging and entertaining writing about a quirky character that also offered insight for potential investors about a company’s prospects.

     

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City)

    Bryan Painter

    Drought

     

    The Providence (RI) Journal

    Alex Kuffner

    The Toll Oil Prices Take

     

    The (Montreal) Gazette

    Lynn Moore

    Playing with Chance

     

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

    The Financial Times

    David Gelles, Gillian Tett

    Madoff Spins His Story

    When the Financial Times’ David Gelles and Gillian Tett got one of the first prison interviews with the Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff, they did much more than let Madoff tell his side of the story of his $65 billion fraud. Through their contextual reporting, and their cinematic writing about the interview itself, they let the reader assess the man and his motives. Without taking a position themselves, Gelles and Tett gave readers 6,000 highly readable words on which to draw their own conclusions.

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson, Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

    A literal tale of bait and switch. In this case, the bait was fish, which reporters found was being widely misrepresented on restaurant menus and in markets in Massachusetts. The two turned their five-month investigation, based on DNA testing and interviews with dozens of merchants, into a compelling and well-written feature. The piece led to federal and state investigations, as well as changes in practices by more than a dozen supermarkets and restaurants. We were hooked from the first graf.

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Cary Spivak

    Demise of Marshall & Ilsley Corporation

    A strong story for the historical record, one that told of the sad decline of a Milwaukee and Wisconsin institution. The story underscored how changes in risk exposure and in leadership, if not the right ones, can undermine even a venerable, longstanding bank such as Marshall & Ilsley. The report also reminds readers how companies that are intertwined with a state’s history and social fabric have a responsibility to guard that position.

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    The New York Times

    David Segal

    The Dirty Little Secrets of Search

    A well-written, well researched story about the flaws in the search process most readers probably were not aware of. The writer offered some great examples of how the search process had been compromised.

     

    Detroit Free Press

    Katherine Yung

    Work Wanted – Desperately

    Unemployment — especially long-term unemployment — was the most critical economic issue of 2011. This series of articles offers some good character stories about the impact on individuals and families. It also seeks to dispel some of the myths about people who have been out of work for months or years.

     

    Los Angeles Times

    Alana Semuels

    Down but Not Out

    The housing crisis was at the root cause of the steep recession, but finally there are some faint signs of life in the residential housing market in one of the hardest hit areas. This story, written at a time when most of news about housing remained grim, was prescient in its ability to find some evidence of revival in one of the hardest hit markets in the country. The story is well written and well-constructed.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The Patriot Ledger

    Steve Adams, Jon Chesto, Shaunna Gately, Alex Spanko, Patrick Ronan

    Sections had a good quantity of staff-written articles on a nice variety of subjects. Stories of local interest, from farmers’ markets to presents for dogs to profiles of area companies, received intelligent and relevant treatment and were delivered in a visually attractive and enjoyably readable style.

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Detroit News

    Joanna Firestone, Alan Derringer, Richard Burr, Greg Tasker, Mary Bailey, Daniel Howes, Scott Burgess, David Shepardson, Bryce Hoffman, Louis Aguilar, Melissa Burden, Brian O’Connor and Jaclyn Trop

    By any measure, The Detroit News delivered excellent business coverage in 2011. It’s natural to expect the News to own the auto beat, but how many newspapers still live up to lofty expectations? On tight deadlines, the staff produced definitive reports on the labor talks that reshaped the auto industry, including a leaked memo from the Chrysler CEO. Clear writing and strong graphics were constants, and the solid news judgment was sometimes surprising. The judges loved an enterprising report on a spike in land prices in a blighted part of downtown; the motive and buyer remained a mystery, but the News delivered a must-read by asking the right questions and following every thread. This is an organization that still has impressive resources. More important, The Detroit News knows what to do with them.

     

    The Gazette (Montreal)

    Jeff Blond, Paul Delean, Jay Bryan, Francois Shalom, Lynn Moore, Allison Lampert, Jason Magder, Alison MacGregor

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

    The Financial Times

    The Financial Times staff

    The standard was very high throughout, and the topics are timely and relevant. Whether it’s breaking news on the European Central Bank or analysis of the American political climate, the FT does a great job covering its core area.

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Journal Sentinel Business News Staff

    The investigative efforts from this entry were impressive, with real and interesting people profiled, dots connected in the narratives and stand-out stories overall. The visual layout and the photographs were also quite good.

     

    The San Diego Union-Tribune

    Nirmala Bhat, Dean Calbreath, Mike Freeman, Janet LaVelle, Morgan Lee, Lily Leung, Tanya Mannes, Diana McCabe, Greg Schmidt, Roger Showley, Jim Watters, Lori Weisberg

    Content such as a strong executive-pay package and quality profiles of local businesspeople helped distinguish this entry. The amount of staff-written content was impressive as well.

     

     

    Dailies:  More than 500,000

     

    The New York Times

    The New York Times Staff

    Simply in a class by itself, it has more people, more space, more stories, more talent than any competing general interest daily. It blankets economics, finance, political economy, regulation, international. Its stable of columnists is awesome: in this sampling alone, Morgenson, Lieber, Leonhardt, Stewart, Carr and others. And it does investigative work, probing the tax avoidance strategies of Ron Lauder.

     

    Los Angeles Times

    Los Angeles Times Business Staff

    On any given day, it’s still as good as anyone, despite enormous staff cuts. The focus is local (Stuart Pfeiffer’s pursuit of fatal weight-loss lap-band surgery), national (Bank of America’s huge layoff plans) and international, particularly Pacific Rim (China’s new rich guys display their status flaunting leather man-bags to carry their dual cell phones and bulging billfolds). In Columnist Mike Hiltzik, it may have a worthy successor to Allan Sloan as the nation’s sharpest-tongued exposer of bad business behavior.

     

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Star Tribune Business Staff

    It punches far above its weight, blanketing and penetrating the industries and big companies most relevant to its upper Midwest readership. Mike Hughlett provides searching insights into how the region’s top purveyors of processed meats and breakfast cereals strive to squeeze out salt and sugar but still keep their stuff seductively tasty. David Phelps exposes financial misbehavior by the scion of one of the region’s richest families.

     

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Dailies: Under 25,000

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Jeff Horwitz, Kate Berry

    Revolving Door

    In revealing some questionable ties between a government official and the industry it regulates, this piece exemplifies excellent investigative reporting drawn from documents, good use of FOIA and also good sourcing. The reporters clearly waded through a lot of material, but the piece remains focused. The follow-up, holding a former public official accountable for his record, using the measure he used to defend himself, is an excellent example of accountability journalism, and a strong supporting piece for the original.

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Jeff Horwitz

    Kickbacks

    A thoroughly reported piece that provides insight into a pernicious, long-standing problem that few outside the industry knew about, and which regulators had done little to fight (until recently). It also provides good insight into the process by which a promising government investigation can wither on the vine.

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Kate Berry

    Robo-Signing

    A new wrinkle on the robo-signing mortgage scandal is revealed in a compelling way that clarifies and doesn’t confuse. A balanced report that raises questions about backdated documentation to facilitate foreclosures but doesn’t pass judgment.

     

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The News-Press (Fort Myers)

    Dick Hogan

    Flopping: Fraud Runs Rampant

    An examination of real-estate transactions uncovered a wave of deals in Southwest Florida in which real-estate agents profited as banks unloaded foreclosed properties at below-market costs. The story used industry voices, a database search and graphics to show readers how the process works, and who wins and loses. It gave readers a fresh perspective on the ongoing distress in the housing market. The piece impressed us with how thoughtfully it investigated an issue of great concern right now that has implications for a variety of stakeholders, from taxpayers to homeowners to banks, yet that has gone under reported because of the “gray area” nature of these transactions. It took on the ethical and legal ambiguities of such practices with clarity, and with an eye toward the human significance of the data that was being unearthed.

     

    Sarasota Herald-Tribune

    Michael Braga, Matthew Doig

    First Priority’s Collapse

    More than a year after Florida’s first bank failure, the Sarasota newspaper used documents and interviews to tell a story about what happened at the four-year-old bank before it was seized by regulators. The autopsy of the bank’s failure gave readers a rare, fascinating, and frightening look behind the scenes and showed how regulators are seeking to recoup the losses incurred on the failure.

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The (Memphis, TN) Commercial Appeal

    Daniel Connolly and Amos Maki

    Landing Electrolux

    Fascinating package that details economic incentives package Electrolux received for its new Memphis plant that sat vacant for 25 years. Well-written accompanying articles on company’s leaders and strategies; good behind-the-scenes anecdotes; impressive online goodies.

     

    Knoxville News Sentinel

    Josh Flory

    Down the Drain

    Comprehensive, detailed package gives readers a sense of problems involving the state’s 182 water utility districts, factors behind their issues, and their impact. Fantastic graphics.

     

    The Providence Journal

    Paul Edward Parker, Tom Mooney

    Uncovering Unfunded Pension Liabilities in Rhode Island

    Effectively put in perspective a complicated issue. These stories explored every angle, looked back and ahead, answered every question. Sheer volume of research alone makes this entry worthy of recognition.

     

    Dailies:  200,000 to 500,000

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett, John Diedrich, Ben Poston

    Shattered Trust

    A perfectly executed specimen of investigative reporting, pairing the heart-rendering tale of a child’s death with a huge-size-and-scope examination of the Food and Drug Administration’s failures to safeguard the public interest. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has done it again. Outstanding, exceptional work.

    The Seattle Times

    Michael Berens and Ken Armstrong

    Methadone and the Politics of Pain

    Brilliant, shoe-leather reporting combined with smart, innovative data analysis changed state policy and undoubtedly saved lives. The Seattle Times has served the public well. Bravo!

     

    The Orlando Sentinel

    Jim Stratton

    Workforce Central Florida

    A wonderful example of the impact reporters can have when they start to peel back the layers of a truly rotten onion. Great results. Great digging. These are the types of corruption stories all government beat reporters should be on the lookout for.

     

    Dailies: More than 500,000

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Paul Sonne, Steve Stecklow, Matt Bradley, Farnaz Fassihi, Loretta Chao, Margaret Coker

    Censorship, Inc.

    We were impressed by not just the stories but the degree of difficulty encountered in doing the research. Freedom of information requests don’t work in the Middle East and with western businesses, meaning the reporters had to rely on doing this the old-fashioned way — sources. This series was a public service to the world.

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    The Wall Street Journal Staff

    Inside Track

    The writers pull back the curtain on dirty dealings on Wall Street and in Washington in a detailed, colorful fashion that leaves the reader both outraged and intrigued.

     

    USA Today Money Section

    Thomas Frank

    Public-Sector Pensions

    The judges agreed that the writer took on a monumental task: there are hundreds of public pension systems in the country and he examined most if not all of them to bring together this expose about how the public servants we put our trust in manipulate the system for their own benefit.

     

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Providence Journal

    John Kostzrewa, assistant managing editor

     

    Hartford Courant

    Dan Haar

     

    The Detroit News

    Brian J. O’Connor

     

    Dailies:  200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Baltimore Sun

    Columns by Jay Hancock

    Strong voice combined with reporting.

     

    Financial Times

    Columns by John Gapper

    Very strong writing, well-reasoned, persuasive. Makes you care.

     

    Ft. Worth Star-Telegram

    Columns by Mitchell Schnurman

    Forceful, brings passion to local issues that matter.

     

    Dailies: Over 500,000

    The New York Times

    Gretchen Morgenson

    Fair Game

    Morgenson combines her astute journalism with terrific character-based narratives to deliver hard-hitting columns that teach, inform and entertain readers.

     

    Washington Post

    Ezra Klein

    There is no one better at writing about health care issues than Ezra Klein. And he’s pretty strong in other areas, too. Very powerful material.

     

    The New York Times

    David Carr

    The Media Equation

    David Carr is fearless. He combines great investigative reporting with lively writing. The pieces are beautifully crafted and quite thoughtful.

     

    CATEGORY: PRINT – MAGAZINES

    BLOG

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    SmartMoney staff

    Blog

    A series of well-written personal finance pieces devoted to helping readers make sense of the breaking business and financial news. The value delivered is impressive in its brevity and timeliness.

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Magazines: Over 500,000

    Forbes

    Tom Post, Matthew Schifrin, Jenna Goudreau

    Private Equity Chief Lynn Tilton

    With smart mix of multiple interlinking original posts and Web source material, Goudreau skillfully engaged readers in the journey she undertook as she unraveled the mysterious tale of Lynn Tilton, a self-proclaimed, self-made billionairess. The result is a fascinating look at the story behind the story, as the subject of this piece unsuccessfully tried to manipulate its telling. Forbes showed creativity and resourcefulness and wound up with a fascinating package that really rewarded attention across two platforms. It felt not just comprehensive, but exciting and fun.

     

     

    EXPLANATORY

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

     

    HousingWire

    HousingWire editorial staff

    The Elephant in the Room

    Comprehensive and straightforward examination of the mess that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are now and the alternatives for cleaning them up. Nicely reported, with quotes that consistently advanced the narrative. Great layout, featuring graphics that captured the scope of this far-reaching economic and political challenge.

     

    Magazines 2: 75,000 to 500,000

    New York Magazine

    Steve Fishman

    Madoff on Madoff: The Madoff Tapes

    This dramatic, compelling and highly readable story was the result of remarkably tenacious and ingenious work. The author offered fascinating glimpses into the psyche of Bernie Madoff, now in prison for the largest Ponzi scheme in history. He also wove in intriguing insights on other significant topics, such as the Madoff family and his own process of contacting Madoff.

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Yoolim Lee, Ruth David

    When Microfinance Goes Wrong

    This eye-opening article ripped the veil of rosy press coverage from the phenomenon of micro-lending in India. Micro-lending has been widely hailed as a model for helping poor people throughout the world, including in the U.S. The story put a human face on both ends of the equation – the micro-lenders and their clients, some of whom get in far over their heads. The article added significant perspective, background and context on an important issue.

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Stephanie Baker

    Shaking Up the Old Boys Club

    This profile of a woman’s crusade to bring about significant change personalizes the struggle to against discrimination, and in doing so, shines new light on the problem. A fascinating, deeply reported piece about a continued problem.

     

    Magazines:  Over 500,000

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Felix Gillette, Businessweek staff

    Casino

    Sharp, tight, thorough, balanced, insightful, this report had tons of great facts and anecdotes that only come from smart on-the-ground reporting.

     

    Fortune Magazine

    Adam Lashinsky

    Inside Apple

    This article manages a difficult task: Saying something new about one of the most-watched and most-analyzed companies in the world.

     

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Matt Heimer, Reshma Kapadia

    Investing Reinvented

     

    FEATURE

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

    Columbia Journalism Review

    Dean Starkman

    Confidence Game: Limited Vision of the News Gurus

     

    Mortgage Banking

    Terry Sheridan

    Short on Results

     

    D CEO

    Glenn Hunter

    Gold Metal Recyclers

     

    Magazines 2: 75,000 to 500,000

    New York Magazine

    Steve Fishman

    Madoff on Madoff: The Madoff Tapes

    The story behind the story detailing how the writer got the interview with Madoff is as compelling as the article itself. But the execution of the profile, especially how it is structured, makes it a brilliant read, even amid all the profiles of Madoff that have been written so far.

     

    Institutional Investor

    Alexander Osipovich

    Browder’s War

    A striking example of great on-the-record sourcing, and a real sense of authority in the story telling.

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith

    Lethal Commerce

     

    Magazines: Over 500,000

    Forbes

    Steven Bertoni

    Agent of Disruption

    Good use of the first-person, amazing access that clearly took some real work to get. Best of all, some really interesting insights into a fascinating figure in American business. This piece was not only well-written and enjoyable, it tackled a subject who is difficult to pin down, giving the reader insight into someone who is at once well-known and greatly misunderstood. It was well constructed and went well below the surface to reveal a lot about a complex subject.

     

    Fortune Magazine

    David Whitford

    Sandler

    A very powerful and moving piece of journalism on a tough guy who rose to an incredible challenge. The style and tone are so unexpected, and they work beautifully. The writer stepped in some thorny bushes with this story – taking on the idea of profiting from the tragedy of Sept. 11 – and he did it so matter-of-factly and bravely that it took the story to a much deeper level. This story managed to elicit strong emotions while also giving good insights about the company to a business reader.

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Anne Kadet

    Cashathon

    Before Susan G. Komen recently blew up, this piece was already looking under the hood of the big-event charity-athon movement. It marries solid investigation with entertaining story-telling. Good topic that touches everyone and solid findings.

     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

     

    D CEO Magazine

    Glenn Hunter, Christine Perez

    D CEO had a nice, professional presentation and clearly understands its audience. The articles had strong points of view and gave readers new insight into some of the most powerful and interesting people in the Dallas area.

     

    Magazines: Over 500,000

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Josh Tyrangiel

    The revitalized weekly magazine showcased substantive content. It had strong pieces on areas where the rest of the media wasn’t looking, such as why bond investors like Ireland and how the Mississippi is still prone to flooding. The art is original and the covers are striking. Strong opening remarks column by Romesh Ratnesar on the meaning of 9/11.

     

    Fortune

    Andy Serwer

    The magazine showcased a surprising diversity of subjects, from the flagship Fortune 500 to James Bandler’s article on JPMorgan’s hunt for gold in Afghanistan, which included stunning photos. Roger
    Parloff’s story on investing in lawsuits was troubling, built on hard-to-dig-up information.

     

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine

    Knight A. Kiplinger, Kevin McCormally, Janet Bodnar

    The magazine had smart writing with get-to-the-point advice with useful packages.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Magazines: 75,000 to 500,000

     

    Barron’s

    Bill Alpert

    The Troubles at Fairholme Fund

    A wonderfully detailed reporting job about the fall of superstar fund manager Bruce Berkowitz and his ill-advised reliance on Charles Fernandez, an inexperienced cohort with a troubled past.

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Asjylyn Loder, David Evans, Leigh Baldwin, Angela Cullen, Elisa Martinuzzi

    The Secret Sins of Koch Industries

    A meticulous, well-organized report that documents decades of price fixing, theft, bribery and environmental violations by one of the world’s largest privately held companies. Offers a staggering amount of information about a private corporation, through both internal documents and on-the-record interviews. The result: A mind-boggling litany of crimes and misdeeds by an unrestrained, unrepentant conglomerate.

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Global Black Market Human Organs

    A haunting package of stories about people on four continents who have been kidnapped, maimed and killed by organ traffickers and the doctors with whom they work. “Cash, Criminals and Human Organs” exposes transplant rings supplying wealthy Americans, Europeans and Israelis with kidneys – at the expense of the impoverished donors. It’s a sad, human story of suffering, broken dreams and greed.

     

    Magazines: Over 500,000

     

    Fortune Magazine

    Peter Elkind, Jennifer Reingold, Doris Burke

    Pfizer

    An enthralling tale of jealousy, ambition, revenge and betrayal at the top of the world’s largest drug company. Combining impressive reporting and gripping narrative, the Fortune team leads readers through the halls of Pfizer, where they see first-hand how human failings and shoddy management led a giant organization astray.

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

     

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

     

    D CEO

    Mitchell Schnurman

    Bottom Line Columns

    Schnurman’s skewering of Rick Perry is a great example of what smart economic and business journalists can do. It reveals hypocrisy and punctures political rhetoric through a careful examination of the facts. Smart, sophisticated stuff.

     

    Magazines:  More than 500,000

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Peter Coy

    Coy is arguably the best economic journalist in the business today. He brings to bear an analytical mind, a potent intellect and a keen knowledge of the field. He also understands the intersection of economics and politics and grasps the limits of ideology. Data drive him, rather than preconceived notions or a rigid worldview. He represents the best of the old BusinessWeek in its new wrapping.

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Dyan Machan

    Smart Ideas

    Machan’s work is a welcome breath of fresh air. She handles complex topics with a breezy style that could set a standard for business writers. Her piece on ADHD is smart, balanced and intriguing. Her work on the China manufacturing challenge is insightful and based in shoe-leather journalism. Her deft touch includes a sharp sense of humor — breast-pump bras?! She can make peas and carrots taste like crème brulee.

     

     

     

    PRINT – WEEKLIES / BIWEEKLIES

    BLOG

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    Anthony Schoettle

    The Score

    Offers a fresh look at the business of sports, and the well-written entries grab readers. Its originality makes it the kind of blog that people would want to visit with regularity – whether they’re a sports lover or not.

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Aaron Elstein

    In The Markets

    Judges liked Elstein’s clear writing style and distinct voice while explaining complex financial issues. The blog’s tight focus makes this a must-read for people who follow the markets closely.

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Crain’s Detroit Business

    Daniel Duggan, Chad Halcom, Nancy Kaffer, Bill Shea, Sherri Welch

    Light Rail Derails

    Comprehensive coverage of the late night news event. Nice inclusion of behind the scenes decisions and implications of the event.

     

    Pacific Coast Business Times

    Marlize van Romburgh

    San Luis Trust Bank Fails

    Notable for its on-the-scene reporting.

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Matthew Kish

    Wiederhorn Battles Creditors

     

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS ALL PLATFORMS

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Steve Hendershot, Lisa Leitner, Erik Unger, Danny Ecker, Jason McGregor, Jeff Hartvigsen, Karen Freese

    State of Small Business

    Crain’s Chicago deserves recognition for turning what is in essence a basic regional business package into compelling content. The use of narrative, interactive elements and company material paints a detailed picture of the state of small firms in the Windy City. Nice use of the web as well.

     

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    J.K. Wall, Francesca Jarosz, Mason King, Perry Reichandter
    Testing Reform Online

    Excellent reporting and solid use of cross platform technologies gave this look into local education real journalistic integrity. The time and pacing of stories was also excellent. And we were impressed with how each piece of this package advanced the complex narrative. Thorough reporting on a topic of high public interest, good use of graphics and video online that connected to the themes as a strong package.

     

    EXPLANATORY

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King, Eric Fisher, David Bourne, Brandon McClung,

    Second Thoughts: Secondary Market Redefines Ticket Business

    This story illuminated the dark secret of today’s sports franchises — tickets on the secondary market are selling far below face value. This story really follows the money and explains who benefits and who loses out.

     

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Richard Clough

    Money Machine

    A fascinating explanation of how well-connected buyers of IndyMac Bank are making millions while the FDIC lost billions on the deal. A classic example of how to turn monthly banking reports into blockbuster stories. Exhaustively reported and well written; it’s a complex story told in plain English.

     

    Mainebiz

    Jackie Farwell, Carol Coultas; Jan Holder, Matt Selva

    Absolute control

    A look into the alcohol laws in Maine that benefit a private entity, and allow the state to set the price of every bottle sold in Maine. This story cuts deep and explains a complex system to readers who pay for this control on alcohol. This entry has some nice examples, like the local distillery that ships booze to the capital before making what would have been a two-mile trip to the retailer.

     

     

    FEATURE

     

    Advertising Age

    E.J. Schultz

    Williston, The Town the Recession Forgot

    This piece has it all: Good pacing, a serious and important subject, a creative take, and evocative examples and telling details. Great sidebar that benefits from the first person without being overshadowed by it.

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Elizabeth MacBride, Glenn Coleman, Xana Antunes

    The Great Escape

    Well written and compelling, with a good mix of anecdotes and broadening analysis/stats. It’s a great example of how you can tell a good and meaningful story about a small trend.

     

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King, Tom Stinson,

    Power of the Ring

    Several great yarns woven together, some real insight into the mechanics of a little-known but fascinating business (from the industry level to the company level), and good art too. If all sports business stories were this good, we’d read a lot more of them.

     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

     

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Crain’s Chicago Business Staff

     

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Los Angeles Business Journal staff

    Good balance of stories, giving comprehensive coverage of a diverse, sprawling community. Emphasizes local coverage without being parochial.

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Crain’s New York Business staff

     

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Richard Clough

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Risky Business

    Clough managed to get in front of a federal investigation of alleged wrongdoing at Wilshire State Bank by obtaining documents and interviewing insiders, competitors, analysts and the people brought in to clean up the mess.

     

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Steve Daniels, Paul Merrion

    Higher Risk Education: State’s prepaid tuition plan

    Daniels’s report on shortfalls in Illinois’s pre-paid tuition program and the aggressive investing used to recoup losses led to the ouster of its chief.

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Matthew Kish

    Oregon’s Predatory Lending Industry

    Kish uncovered the unintended consequences of Oregon’s anti-usury law. Solid revelations about illegal activity and failed legislation. Timely topic presented in a compelling way. Good balance of data and anecdotes to humanize the issues.

     

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Charlotte Business Journal

    Erik Spanberg

    Queen City Agenda Column

    Spanberg brings a relevant local perspective to his readers, tackling issues by framing them around people in his community. His take on same-sex marriage, for instance, explores a national controversy through the eyes of a gay furniture company executive, and brings the story home. Solid writing and reporting with just the right mix of opinion.

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Rob Smith

    Opinions

    Short, straight-for-the-jugular editorials leave little readers little room to disagree. Wells Fargo’s debit fee “a shameless ripoff.” Insurance industry response to a bill seeking transparency is simply “strange” and “curious.” These editorials call it like it is in just a few well-chosen words that sure to resonate with a local audience.

     

     

    RADIO / TV

    BLOG

    CNBC

    Patti Domm

    Market Insider with Patti Domm

    Through her blog, Domm shows her authority on the subject of financial markets. Her blog is very informative, it is multisourced and impressive given the frequency of posting. With the addition of graphics and visuals, Domm’s blog becomes a very useful tool for online readers.

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    CNBC

    Mary Thompson, Melissa Lee, Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Sue Herera, John Harwood , Simon Hobbs, Brian Sullivan, Bill Griffeth, Maria Bartiromo, Steve Liesman, Sharon Epperson, Scott Cohn, Nikhil Deogun, Matthew Quayle, Todd Bonin, Chris Sheridan, Robert Fasbender, Sanford Cannold, Han-Ting Wang, Lulu Chiang,

    Downgrade Day

    A great accounting of a dramatic day, telling the story as it happened and providing a great real-time explanation of events. CNBC played to its strengths, bringing a range of live analysis that over the course of a day presented a mix of views on a major market/economic event. The variety of angles was nice, including the analysis of the gold market. The touches of humor were also welcome.

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    CNBC

    Stacy Eisner, Alexandra Privitera, Mary Catherine Wellons, Gina Francolla, Mark Koba, Eamon Javers, Nikhil Deogun

    Your Money Your Vote: The Republican Presidential Debate

    CNBC pioneered the use of the financial ticker in broadcast television decades ago. And deserves credit for doing interesting ticker work today. The business broadcaster integrated Tweets into its bottom-of-screen graphic feed to create a so-called “Twicker.” Live tweets and comments that ran during a recent Republican debate. This content was further integrated with rich Web and Social media material into a compelling new media package.

     

     

    EXPLANATORY

    CNBC

    Kate Kelly; Jesse Bergman, Nikhil Deogun

    Trading on Twitter

    In a strong category, Kate Kelly’s piece on Twitter investing was distinguished by original reporting and exceptionally clear writing and presentation. Months later, it continues to be fresh and informative.

     

    MarketWatch Radio Network

    John Wordock, Andrew O’Day, Larry Kofsky, Adrienne Mitchell, Steve Orr

    Wall Street’s Wild Week — S&P Downgrade, the Fed and Historic Stock Swings

    Covering the wild days that followed the downgrading of U.S. debt, these series of reports were clear and informative on a complicated issue and always engaging.

     

    FEATURE

    CNBC

    Lester Holt, Mitch Weitzner, Lori Gordon-Logan, Michael Beyman, Patrick Ahearn, Richard Korn, Michael Sheehan, Allison Stedman, Ray Borelli

    Pepsi’s Challenge

    Very well-done, thoroughly reported and visually compelling entry.

     

    REAL ESTATE

     

    The Baltimore Sun

    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Scott Calvert

    Taxing Baltimore

    Undeterred by bureaucrats who deemed copying a database too cumbersome, Baltimore Sun reporters did what journalists are supposed to do: They dug. Armed with data scraped from the city’s own website, the reporters analyzed the effects of Maryland’s homestead property tax exemptions, uncovering millions of dollars in lost revenue and prompting a legislative review of a broken system. The project also had strong interactive elements on the Web. In this era of shrinking newsroom budgets, projects like this one give us hope.

     

    Denver Post

    David Migoya

    Public Trustee – Foreclosure Reporting

    The total package — compelling storytelling, exhaustive research, a unique and fresh view of an otherwise well-worn topic, and a public service.

     

    The Miami Herald

    Toluse Olorunnipa

    Real Estate Coverage

    Olorunnipa offered an in-depth look at issues likely to weigh on local and national real estate markets for years to come. He explained how the “shadow inventory” of millions of unsold and foreclosed homes is slowing the real estate recovery; how “negative equity” is hurting American homeowners; how local developers who used government money to build affordable housing have jacked up rents so much that they are now unaffordable to many; and how mortgage fraud and unscrupulous lawyers forced one Jamaican immigrant to lose her home of 14 years in Miami Gardens.

     

    STUDENT

    Stories Written for Student Publications

     

    Elvina Nawaguna-Clemente, Arizona State University

    Deteriorated Properties Prompt Battles Between Struggling Towns, Professor

    Cronkite News

    An incredible body of reporting in this unique story about a professor who has purchased properties in former Arizona copper mining towns. Readers can appreciate the impact the buildings have had on economic development in the towns as the professor lets them deteriorate. Detailed interactive maps of the properties in Hayden, Superior and Globe-Miami help readers visualize the location of the buildings and towns. Extensive use of public records, interviews with town leadership and other primary documents add to the reporting and the overall package.

     

    Honorable Mention

     

    Robson Abbott, University of Missouri

    Les Bourgeois Becoming Force in Missouri Wine Industry

    Columbia Missourian

    Good example of a multimedia package that consists of a strong print story and a slideshow of photos that correspond to an interview with the winery owners. Lots of good reporting here, particularly the industry leaders and other winery owners. Readers come away with a good sense of Les Bourgeois Vineyards and how it fits into the larger Missouri industry.

     

    Daniel Wiser, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Unsustainable Path

    The Daily Tar Heel

    A thoughtful and thorough story on an issue of national concern with a local flavor. Solid reporting, a number of good sources, starts out very strong with a personal example. Graphics support story well.

     

    Stories Written for Professional Publications

     

    Sarah Frier, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Jefferson County Agony Means Higher Borrowing Costs for Alabama Taxpayers

    Bloomberg News

    This student entry showed the sophistication of an experienced and seasoned reporter. She used the Bloomberg database to analyze the data and reach a thesis that the financial plight of Jefferson County, Ala. was a negative drag on the rest of the state. Then she conducted smart interviews and used the quotes sparingly and smartly.

     

    Honorable Mention

    Tarini Parti, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Tobacco Companies Adjusting Strategies to Remain Prominent Political Players

    OpenSecrets.com

    Good investigative reporting from this student entry showed clearly that Big Tobacco continues to channel funds to politicians through less obvious organizations in hopes of garnering favors. Well reported. Well written.

     

  • 2011 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By admin on Friday February 17, 2012

    Complete list of winners in SABEW’s 17th annual Best in Business Awards

    Click here to read awards list with judges’ comments.

    Click here to register for the 49th annual SABEW spring conference and the Best in Business Awards reception.

    DIVISION: DIGITAL


    BLOG

    Digital: All sizes

     

    Repowatch.org

    Mary Fricker

    Financial Crisis


     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Digital: All sizes

     

    FINS.com:

    Julie Steinberg, Aaron Lucchetti

    MF Global


     

    CNNMoney.com

    Chris Peacock and CNNMoney Staff

    Dow Plunges 635 Points on August 8


     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Ioan Grillo, John Dickie, Sarah Childress, Mark Scheffler

    Narconomics

     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

    CNNMoney.com

    Gabrielle Solomon

    Best Places to Live

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Blake Ellis, Jordan Malter

    America’s Biggest Boomtown


    MSNBC.com

    Allison Linn, Martin Wolk, Jim Seida, John Brecher, John Makely

    We are the median

     

    EXPLANATORY

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

    ClimateWire

    Tiffany Stecker

    Europe’s Cap-and-Trade System Brings Jobs to Georgia


     

    ClimateWire

    Joel Kirkland

    China’s Energy

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Patrick Winn, Emily Lodish

    Burma Rebooted


     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

    The Motley Fool

    Alex Dumortier, Dari FitzGerald

    “Low-Risk” Trade That Brought Down MF Global

     

    CNNMoney.com

    David Goldman

    The Cybercrime Economy

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Steve Hargreaves

    Military’s War on Oil

     

    FEATURE

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

     

    ClimateWire

    Tiffany Stecker

    Europe’s Cap-and-Trade System Brings Jobs to Georgia

     

    InsuranceQuotes.com

    John Egan, Lisa Shidler

    Medical Bills Can Mount for Shooting Victims

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Sarah Childress, Simeon Tegel, Girish Gupta, Nadja Drost, John Otis

    The Scramble For El Dorado

     

    GlobalPost

    Emily Lodish, Patrick Winn, Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Jason Overdorf, Justin McCurry, Tristan McConnell, Kate Lamb, Nicholas Dynan

    Rice 2.0


     

    Digital:  More than 2.5 million

     

    CNNMoney.com

    David Goldman

    Android’s law

     

    Bankrate.com

    Claes Bell, Katherine Lewis, Janna Herron, Marcie Geffner, Stephen Pounds

    Financial Reform, One Year Later

     

    CNBC.com

    Jeff Cox

    Occupy Wall Street

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Digital: Fewer than 2.5 million

     

    FINS.com

    Editorial staff of FINS.com

     

    PolitiFact

    Bill Adair, Martha Hamilton, Louis Jacobson

     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

     

    CNET News

    CNET Editorial Staff

     

    MarketWatch

    MarketWatch Staff

     

    CNNMoney.com

    CNNMoney Staff

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

    Center for Public Integrity

    Michael Hudson

    The Great Mortgage Cover-Up

     

    ProPublica

    Paul Kiel, Olga Pierce

    Foreclosure Crisis

     

    Texas Watchdog

    Steve Miller

    The Hurricane Insurance Hustle

     

    Digital: More than 500,000

     

    GlobalPost

    Patrick Winn, Emily Lodish

    Burma Rebooted

     

    GlobalPost

    Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Sharron Lovell, Emily Lodish, Mark Scheffler

    Relocation Nation


     

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Digital: Fewer than 500,000

     

    ProPublica

    Jesse Eisinger

    The Trade Columns

     

    Xconomy.com

    Luke Timmerman

    Biotech columns

     

    Reuters

    Rob Cox, Jeffrey Goldfarb, Robert Cyran, Agnes T. Crane, Antony Currie

    Breakingviews Columns

     

    Digital: 500,000 to 2.5 million

     

    GlobalPost

    Thomas Mucha

    Mucha Columns

     

    Digital: More than 2.5 million

     

    CNNMoney.com

    Paul R. La Monica

    The Buzz

     

    MarketWatch

    Rex Nutting

    Columns

     

    TheStreet.com

    Adam Feuerstein

    Pharma Fraud

     

    DIVISION: INTERNATIONAL


    BLOG

    Financial Times

    Staff

    FTAlphaville

     

    BREAKING NEWS

     

    Financial Times

    Financial Times staff

    The Eurozone crisis

     

    Reuters

    Reuters Staff

    The Libyan Revolution

     

    Financial Times

    Jonathan Soble, Louise Lucas, Lindsay Whipp

    The Olympus Accounting Scandal

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    The (Toronto) Globe and Mail

    Kevin Carmichael, Greg Keenan, Moe Doiron, Claire Neary, Adriano Valentini

    Remade in Canada – The Future of Factories

     

    Financial Times

    Christine Spolar, Jeff Gerth (ProPublica), Megan Murphy, Vanessa Houlder, Johanna Kassel, Benjamin Freese

    Tax Wars Series

     

    GlobalPost

    Thomas Mucha, David Case, Emily Lodish, Kathleen E. McLaughlin, Justin McCurry, Michael Goldfarb, Jon Jensen, Mark Scheffler

    7 Deadly Stories

     

    FEATURE

     

    Fortune Magazine

    James Bandler

    Afghan Gold

     

    GlobalPost

    Sarah Childress, Alex Leff, Nick Miroff

    Gangsters’ Paradise

     

    The (Toronto) Globe and Mail

    Mark Mackinnon

    The Empire Sino-Forest Built

     

    EXPLANATORY

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Phred Dvorak, Peter Landers Yuka Hayashi, Norihiko Shirouzu, Chester Dawson, Juro Osawa, Yumiko Ono, Mitsuru Obe

    Fukushima Daiishi: Causes and Consequences

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Lethal Commerce

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Marcus Walker, Charles Forelle, Stacy Meichtry, Chirstopher Rhoads, Brian Blackstone, Matthew Karnitschnig

    Europe Disunion


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Lethal Commerce


    Financial Times

    Christine Spolar, Jeff Gerth (ProPublica), Megan Murphy, Vanessa Houlder, Johanna Kassel, Benjamin Freese

    Tax Wars Series

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Phred Dvorak, Peter Landers Yuka Hayashi, Norihiko Shirouzu, Chester Dawson, Juro Osawa, Yumiko Ono, Mitsuru Obe, Andrew Morse

    Fukushima Daiishi: Causes and Consequences

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

     

    Financial Times

    Wolfgang Münchau

     


     

     

    DIVISION: NEWS AGENCIES


    BREAKING NEWS

    Bloomberg News

    Tom Schoenberg, Sara Forden, Jeff Bliss, Cornelius Rahn, Zachary Mider

    Blocking a Deal

     

    Bloomberg News

    Katherine Burton

    Soros to End Four Decades as Hedge Fund Leader by Returning Investor Cash

     

    The Associated Press

    David Koenig, Scott Mayerowitz, Samantha Bomkamp, Dave Carpenter, Joshua Freed

    American Airlines Bankruptcy


     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    Bloomberg News

    Cam Simpson

    Victoria’s Secret Revealed in Child Picking Burkina Faso Cotton

     

    Bloomberg News

    Vernon Silver, Ben Elgin, Alan Katz

    Wired for Repression

     

    Bloomberg News

    Bradley Keoun, Phil Kuntz, Bob Ivry, Craig Torres, Scott Lanman, Christopher Condon, Donal Griffin, Greg Stohr and Matthew Winkler

    The Fed’s Trillion-Dollar Secret


     

    EXPLANATORY

    Bloomberg News

    Cam Simpson, Alan Katz, Simon Clark, Heather Walsh

    Anything But Fair

     

    Reuters

    Scot Paltrow

    Robo-Signing Redux

     

    Bloomberg News

    Bradley Keoun, Phil Kuntz, Bob Ivry, Craig Torres, Scott Lanman, Christopher Condon, Donal Griffin, Greg Stohr and Matthew Winkler

    The Fed’s Trillion-Dollar Secret

     

    FEATURE

     

    Reuters

    Scot Paltrow

    The Congressman with Banks on the Side

     

    The Associated Press

    Bernard Condon

    Farmland Boom

     

    The Associated Press

    Bernard Condon, Randy Herschaft

    Madoff Victim’s Lawyer


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    The Associated Press

    Jeff Donn

    Aging Nukes

     

    Scripps Howard News Service

    Isaac Wolf, Thomas Hargrove

    Grave Mistakes

     

    Bloomberg News

    Peter Waldman

    Preparing Americans for Death Lets Hospices Neglect End of Life

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Reuters

    Jack Schafer

    Jack Shafer Columns

     

    Dow Jones Newswires

    Al Lewis

    Al’s Emporium Column

     

    Dow Jones Newswires

    Neal Lipschutz

    Point of View Column

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE

     

    Money Magazine

    Lisa Gibbs

    Consumer Protection


     

    The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer

    Teresa Dixon Murray

    On Money

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jason Zweig

    The Intelligent Investor

     

     

    DIVISION: PRINT – DAILY NEWSPAPERS

     

    BLOG

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The (Quincy, Mass.) Patriot Ledger:

    Jon Chesto

    Mass. Market blog

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    Elisabeth Ponsot, Laura Olson, Erich Schwartzel, Laura Malt Schneiderman, Steve Mellon


    Pipeline

     

    The Des Moines Register

    Philip Brasher, Dan Piller

    Green Fields

     

    Hartford Courant

    Matthew Sturdevant

    Insurance Capital Blog

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Tom Daykin

    Land and Space blog

     

    The Orange County (Santa Ana, Calif.) Register

    Jonathan Lansner, Jeff Collins, Marilyn Kalfus

    Lansner on Real Estate

     

    Charlotte Observer

    Andrew Dunn, Kirsten Valle Pittman

    Bank Watch


     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    Houston Chronicle

    Dwight Silverman

    TechBlog

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Braga, Matthew Doig

    14 Indicted in Major Flipping Conspiracy

     

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Pollick, Doug Sword

    Jackson Lab Picks Sarasota County

     

    Ventura County (Ventura, Calif.) Star

    Stephanie Hoops

    Feds Take Over Debt Collection Business


     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Detroit News

    David Shepardson

    CAFE Standards

     

    Honolulu Star-Advertiser

    Andrew Gomes, Rob Perez

    Hawaiian Electric Suitor

     

    The Detroit News

    Jaclyn Trop

    Final Chapter for Borders

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Fort Worth Star-Telegram

    Andrea Ahles, Bob Cox, Gordon Dickson, Scott Nishimura, Mitchell Schnurman

    American Airlines Bankruptcy

     

    The Seattle Times

    Dominic Gates

    Boeing, Union Seal Deal

     

    The Boston Globe

    The Boston Globe Business staff

    Stock Plunge


     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

    The New York Times

    The New York Times Staff

    MF Global Bankruptcy

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The (Memphis, Tenn.) Commercial Appeal

    Daniel Connolly, Amos Maki, Michael Erskine, Grant Smith

    Landing Electrolux

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Dan Chapman, Michael Kanell

    Atlanta Forward

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson, Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    (Minneapolis) StarTribune

    Staff

    Ford Plant Shutdown

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Jason Bellini, Jonathan Cheng, Mary Pilon

    Anticipating a Downgrade of U.S. Debt


     

    EXPLANATORY

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The Roanoke (Va.) Times

    Matt Chittum, Megan Schnabel

    Food Deserts Parch Roanoke Residents of Nutrition


     

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Pollick

    In Foreclosure, Fees That Haunt

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Providence Journal

    Tom Mooney, Paul Edward Parker, Barbara Polichetti

    Understanding R.I.’s Pension Puzzle

     

    The (Memphis, Tenn.) Commercial Appeal

    Ted Evanoff

    Genius at Work

     

    The Detroit News

    David Shepardson, Christina Rogers

    GM: A Chastened Detroit Icon Claws Its Way Back

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson and Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

     

    The Arizona Republic

    Ronald J. Hansen

    Business Taxes

     

    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

    Lou Kilzer

    China Syndrome

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    Washington Post

    Lori Montgomery, Brady Dennis, Alec McGillis
    Running in the Red – U.S Debt

     

    Los Angeles Times

    Ken Bensinger

    Wheels of Fortune

     

    The New York Times

    Ian Urbina

    Drilling Down—Natural Gas

     

    FEATURE

     

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    (Melbourne, Fla.) Florida Today

    Patrick Peterson

    Scrap Daddy

     

    Times-Tribune (Scranton, Pa.)

    Denise Allabaugh

    Winds of Change

     

    (Melbourne, Fla.) Florida Today

    Patrick Peterson

    Bright Idea Man


     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City)

    Bryan Painter

    Drought


     

    The Providence (R.I.) Journal

    Alex Kuffner

    The Toll Oil Prices Take


     

    The (Montreal) Gazette

    Lynn Moore

    Playing with Chance

     

     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

     

    Financial Times

    David Gelles, Gillian Tett

    Madoff Spins His Story

     

    The Boston Globe

    Jenn Abelson and Beth Daley

    Fishy Business

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Cary Spivak

    Demise of Marshall & Ilsley Corporation

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    The New York Times

    David Segal

    The Dirty Little Secrets of Search

     

    Detroit Free Press

    Katherine Yung

    Work Wanted – Desperately


     

    Los Angeles Times

    Alana Semuels

    Down but Not Out


     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The (Quincy, Mass.) Patriot Ledger

    Steve Adams, Jon Chesto, Shaunna Gately, Alex Spanko, Patrick Ronan

     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Detroit News

    Joanna Firestone, Alan Derringer, Richard Burr, Greg Tasker, Mary Bailey, Daniel Howes, Scott Burgess, David Shepardson, Bryce Hoffman, Louis Aguilar, Melissa Burden, Brian O’Connor and Jaclyn Trop

     

    The (Montreal) Gazette

    Jeff Blond, Paul Delean, Jay Bryan, Francois Shalom, Lynn Moore, Allison Lampert, Jason Magder, Alison MacGregor


     

    Dailies: 200,000 to 500,000

    Financial Times

    The Financial Times staff

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Journal Sentinel Business News Staff

     

    U-T San Diego

    Nirmala Bhat, Dean Calbreath, Mike Freeman, Janet LaVelle, Morgan Lee, Lily Leung, Tanya Mannes, Diana McCabe, Greg Schmidt, Roger Showley, Jim Watters, Lori Weisberg

     

    Dailies:  More than 500,001


     

    The New York Times

    The New York Times Staff

     

    Los Angeles Times

    Los Angeles Times Business Staff

     

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Star Tribune Business Staff


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Dailies: Under 25,000

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Jeff Horwitz, Kate Berry

    Revolving Door

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Jeff Horwitz

    Kickbacks

     

    American Banker/SourceMedia

    Kate Berry

    Robo-Signing


     

    Dailies: 25,000 to 100,000

     

    The News-Press (Fort Myers)

    Dick Hogan


    Flopping: Fraud Runs Rampant

    Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune

    Michael Braga, Matthew Doig

    First Priority’s Collapse


     

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

     

    The (Memphis, Tenn.) Commercial Appeal

    Daniel Connolly and Amos Maki

    Landing Electrolux

     

    Knoxville News Sentinel

    Josh Flory

    Down the Drain

     

    The Providence (R.I.) Journal

    Paul Edward Parker, Tom Mooney

    Uncovering Unfunded Pension Liabilities in Rhode Island


     

    Dailies:  200,000 to 500,000

     

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett, John Diedrich, Ben Poston

    Shattered Trust

     

    The Seattle Times

    Michael Berens and Ken Armstrong

    Methadone and the Politics of Pain

     

    The Orlando Sentinel

    Jim Stratton

    Workforce Central Florida

     

    Dailies: More than 500,001

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Paul Sonne, Steve Stecklow, Matt Bradley, Farnaz Fassihi, Loretta Chao, Margaret Coker

    Censorship, Inc.

     

    The Wall Street Journal

    Brody Mullins, Susan Pulliam, Steve Eder, Michael Rothfeld, Jenny Strasburg, Vanessa O’Connell, David Enrich, Dana Cimilluca, Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Jeannette Neumann, Michael Siconolfi

    Inside Track

     

    USA Today Money Section

    Thomas Frank

    Public-Sector Pensions


     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Dailies: 100,000 to 200,000

    The Providence (R.I.) Journal

    John Kostzrewa, assistant managing editor

     

    Hartford Courant

    Dan Haar

     

    The Detroit News

    Brian J. O’Connor


     

    Dailies:  200,000 to 500,000

     

    The Baltimore Sun

    Columns by Jay Hancock

     

    Financial Times

    Columns by John Gapper

     

    Fort Worth Star-Telegram

    Columns by Mitchell Schnurman

     

    Dailies: Over 500,001

    The New York Times

    Gretchen Morgenson

    Fair Game

     

    Washington Post

    Ezra Klein

     

    The New York Times

    David Carr

    The Media Equation

     

    CATEGORY: PRINT – MAGAZINES

    BLOG

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    SmartMoney staff

     

    Blog

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

    Magazines: Over 500,000

    Forbes

    Tom Post, Matthew Schifrin, Jenna Goudreau

    Private Equity Chief Lynn Tilton


     

    EXPLANATORY

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

    HousingWire

    HousingWire editorial staff



     

    Magazines 2: 75,000 to 500,000

    New York Magazine

    Steve Fishman

    Madoff on Madoff: The Madoff Tapes


     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Yoolim Lee, Ruth David

    When Microfinance Goes Wrong

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Stephanie Baker

    Shaking Up the Old Boys Club


     

    Magazines:  Over 500,001

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Felix Gillette, Businessweek staff

    Casino

     

    Fortune Magazine

    Adam Lashinsky

    Inside Apple

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Matt Heimer, Reshma Kapadia

    Investing Reinvented

     

    FEATURE

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

    Columbia Journalism Review

    Dean Starkman

    Confidence Game: Limited Vision of the News Gurus

     

    Mortgage Banking

    Terry Sheridan

    Short on Results

     

    D CEO

    Glenn Hunter

    Gold Metal Recyclers


     

    Magazines 2: 75,000 to 500,000

    New York Magazine

    Steve Fishman

    Madoff on Madoff: The Madoff Tapes

     

    Institutional Investor

    Alexander Osipovich

    Browder’s War

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith

    Lethal Commerce


     

    Magazines: Over 500,001

    Forbes

    Steven Bertoni

    Agent of Disruption

     

    Fortune Magazine

    David Whitford

    Sandler

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Anne Kadet

    Cashathon


     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

     

    D CEO Magazine

    Glenn Hunter, Christine Perez

     

    Magazines: Over 500,001

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Josh Tyrangiel


     

    Fortune

    Andy Serwer


     

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine

    Knight A. Kiplinger, Kevin McCormally, Janet Bodnar

     

     

    INVESTIGATIVE

    Magazines: 75,000 to 500,000

     

    Barron’s

    Bill Alpert

    The Troubles at Fairholme Fund

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Asjylyn Loder, David Evans, Leigh Baldwin, Angela Cullen, Elisa Martinuzzi

    The Secret Sins of Koch Industries

     

    Bloomberg Markets

    Michael Smith, Daryna Krasnolutska, David Glovin

    Global Black Market Human Organs

     

    Magazines: Over 500,001

    Fortune Magazine

    Peter Elkind, Jennifer Reingold, Doris Burke

    Pfizer

     

    OPINION/COLUMN

     

    Magazines: Less than 75,000

     

    D CEO

    Mitchell Schnurman

    Bottom Line Columns


     

    Magazines:  More than 500,001

     

    Bloomberg Businessweek

    Peter Coy

     

    SmartMoney Magazine

    Dyan Machan

    Smart Ideas


     

    PRINT – WEEKLIES / BIWEEKLIES


    BLOG

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    Anthony Schoettle

    The Score

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Aaron Elstein

    In The Markets

     

    BREAKING NEWS

    Crain’s Detroit Business

    Daniel Duggan, Chad Halcom, Nancy Kaffer, Bill Shea, Sherri Welch

    Light Rail Derails

     

    Pacific Coast Business Times

    Marlize van Romburgh

    San Luis Trust Bank Fails

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Matthew Kish

    Wiederhorn Battles Creditors


     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS ALL PLATFORMS

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Steve Hendershot, Lisa Leitner, Erik Unger, Danny Ecker, Jason McGregor, Jeff Hartvigsen, Karen Freese

    State of Small Business


     

    Indianapolis Business Journal

    J.K. Wall, Francesca Jarosz, Mason King, Perry Reichandter
    Testing Reform Online


    EXPLANATORY

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King, Eric Fisher, David Bourne, Brandon McClung,

    Second Thoughts: Secondary Market Redefines Ticket Business

     

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Richard Clough

    Money Machine

     

    Mainebiz

    Jackie Farwell, Carol Coultas; Jan Holder, Matt Selva

    Absolute control


     

    FEATURE


     

    Advertising Age

    E.J. Schultz

    Williston, The Town the Recession Forgot

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Elizabeth MacBride, Glenn Coleman, Xana Antunes

    The Great Escape

     

    Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal

    Bill King, Tom Stinson,

    Power of the Ring


     

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE

     

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Crain’s Chicago Business Staff

     

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Los Angeles Business Journal staff

     

    Crain’s New York Business

    Crain’s New York Business staff


     

    INVESTIGATIVE

     

    Richard Clough

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    Risky Business

     

    Crain’s Chicago Business

    Steve Daniels, Paul Merrion

    Higher Risk Education: State’s prepaid tuition plan

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Matthew Kish

    Oregon’s Predatory Lending Industry


     

    OPINION/COLUMN

    Charlotte Business Journal

    Erik Spanberg

    Queen City Agenda Column

     

    Portland Business Journal

    Rob Smith

    Opinions


     

    RADIO / TV


    BLOG

    CNBC

    Patti Domm

    Market Insider with Patti Domm


     

    BREAKING NEWS

    CNBC

    Mary Thompson, Melissa Lee, Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Sue Herera, John Harwood , Simon Hobbs, Brian Sullivan, Bill Griffeth, Maria Bartiromo, Steve Liesman, Sharon Epperson, Scott Cohn, Nikhil Deogun, Matthew Quayle, Todd Bonin, Chris Sheridan, Robert Fasbender, Sanford Cannold, Han-Ting Wang, Lulu Chiang

    Downgrade Day

     

    CREATIVE USE ACROSS MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

     

    CNBC

    Stacy Eisner, Alexandra Privitera, Mary Catherine Wellons, Gina Francolla, Mark Koba, Eamon Javers, Nikhil Deogun

    Your Money Your Vote: The Republican Presidential Debate


     

    EXPLANATORY

    CNBC

    Kate Kelly; Jesse Bergman, Nikhil Deogun

    Trading on Twitter

     

    MarketWatch Radio Network

    John Wordock, Andrew O’Day, Larry Kofsky, Adrienne Mitchell, Steve Orr

    Wall Street’s Wild Week — S&P Downgrade, the Fed and Historic Stock Swings


     

    FEATURE

    CNBC

    Mitch Weitzner,  Lori Gordon-Logan,  Michael Beyman,  Patrick Ahearn, Richard Korn, Michael Sheehan, Allison Stedman, Lester Holt, Ray Borelli

    Pepsi’s Challenge

     

    REAL ESTATE

     

    The Baltimore Sun

    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Scott Calvert

    Taxing Baltimore

     

    Denver Post

    David Migoya

    Public Trustee – Foreclosure Reporting

     

    The Miami Herald

    Toluse Olorunnipa

    Real Estate Coverage

     

    STUDENT

    Stories Written for Student Publications

     

    Elvina Nawaguna-Clemente, Arizona State University

    Deteriorated Properties Prompt Battles Between Struggling Towns, Professor

    Cronkite News

     

    Honorable Mention

     

    Robson Abbott, University of Missouri

    Les Bourgeois Becoming Force in Missouri Wine Industry

    Columbia Missourian

     

    Daniel Wiser, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Unsustainable Path

    The Daily Tar Heel

     

     

    Stories Written for Professional Publications

     

    Sarah Frier, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Jefferson County Agony Means Higher Borrowing Costs for Alabama Taxpayers

    Bloomberg News

     

    Honorable Mention

    Tarini Parti, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Tobacco companies adjusting strategies to remain prominent political players

    OpenSecrets.org

     

  • 2010 Fall Conference

    Posted By admin on Monday July 19, 2010

    Program Highlights

    The fall event will be highlighted by the keynote speech Friday, Oct. 1, by Federal Reserve Bank of New York CEO William Dudley. Another highlight: Noted Columbia University economist Joseph Stiglitz is the speaker at our opening reception at Reuters headquarters on Times Square Thursday, Sept. 30. Still another: The  joint appearance of two of the most outspoken journalists on Wall Street, Bloomberg News’ Jonathan Weil and the Fox News Channel’s Charlie Gasparino, giving their uncensored view of Wall Street regulation – and the next big financial bombshell. Plus, Starwood CFO and Vice Chairman Vasant Prabhu and JetBlue COO Rob Maruster will gaze into the skies with their predictions for the future of tourism. Other highlights include breakout sessions and hands-on workshops, including an intensive video production training brought to you by the Reynolds Center. For more about the conference, click here. For exhibitor or sponsorship information, please click here.

    Register

    Conference Schedule

    PRE-CONFERENCE EVENT, THURSDAY, SEPT. 30

    6:30 p.m. Reception Keynote
    Joseph Stiglitz, recipient of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in economics, is University Professor at Columbia University. He served as chairman of President Bill Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers and as chief economist of the World Bank. Reuters America Headquarters, 3 Times Square. Dinner on your own.

    FRIDAY, OCT. 1

    8:15 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Welcome. (Newsroom)

    With Stephen Shepard, Dean, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, and Rob Reuteman, President, Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

    8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Keynote. (Newsroom)
    William Dudley, president, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

    9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Wall Street Breaking News. (Newsroom)
    Three rapid-fire assessments of the state of the securities industry. The audience can ask questions at the end of each presentation. Moderator: Greg David, director, business and economics reporting program, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

    • Financial Crisis: Where We Go From Here? Roger Lowenstein, author, The End of Wall Street
    • Future of Wall Street: Brad Hintz, analyst for Sanford Bernstein
    • Future of the Exchanges: Larry Liebowitz, COO, NYSE Euronext

    11:20 a.m. to 12:20 a.m. The State of the Consumer: Will Travel Rebound? (Newsroom)

    With Vasant M. Prabhu, Vice-Chairman, Starwood Hotels and Resorts; Rob Maruster, Chief Operating Officer, JetBlue. Moderator: Kevin Noblet, Deputy Managing Editor, Dow Jones Newswires.

    12:45 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Covering Wall Street: How Bad Are We? (Newsroom/Pantry). Lunch provided.

    With Joe Nocera, business columnist, The New York Times; Jonathan Weil, columnist, Bloomberg News. Moderator: Chris Peacock, executive editor/vice-president, CNN Money.

    2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. CONCURRENT SESSIONS

    • The Obama Health Plan and Small Business. (Room 308)

    While everyone will be affected by the Obama Health Care Plan, the burden may be greatest for small businesses. This in-depth seminar sponsored by the Commonwealth Fund will explain the issues and the stories that will need to be covered.
    – Elizabeth MacBride, contributing editor, small business, Crian’s New York Business
    – Mark Wager, CEO, Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield
    – Rima Cohen, counselor to the secretary, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services
    – Rosina Rubin, CFO, Attitude New York

    • State and Local Governments: How Bad Are Their Finances? (Newsroom)

    State and local governments seem locked in an endless crisis of budget deficits, spending cuts and higher taxes. How bad is it?
    – E.J. McMahon, director, Empire Center
    – Michael Mulgrew, president United Federation of Teachers
    – Robert Ward, director, Rockefeller Institute
    – Moderator: Greg David, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. CONCURRENT SESSIONS

    • GDP: It’s Not So Simple. (Room 308)

    Should GDP be replaced with Gross National Happiness? Or should it be extended by including measures of welfare such as distribution of income and measures of sustainability? This newsy session will explain the ins and outs of GDP, from the expert and journalist point of view.
    – Steve Landefeld, director of the Bureau of Economic Analysis
    – Mike Mandel, editor in chief, Visible Economy LLC, (formerly of BusinessWeek)
    – Moderator: Kevin Hall, national economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    • Newsroom 2.0: Cloud-based Computing for Journalists. (Newsroom)

    Analysis from cutting-edge project in journalism.
    – Jonathan Blum, founder, Blumsday LLC
    – Pamela O’Hare, founder, BatchBlue
    – Jonathan Rochelle, group product manager, Google Docs
    – Charles Seybold, CEO, LiquidPlanner

    6 p.m. Reception at Bloomberg News
    731 Lexington Avenue, between 58th and 59th Sts. Take cab or subway to reception site. Go to ground-level Bloomberg reception desk, where you’ll receive a badge. You must have government-issued ID for entry. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres. Welcoming remarks by: Karen Toulon, NY Bureau Chief Dave Wilson, Bloomberg News Columnist

    SATURDAY, OCT. 2

    Doors open at 8 a.m. Please use entrance on 41st St. between 7th and 8th Aves.
    8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. The Outlook For Hiring. (Room 308
    )
    Representatives from Dow Jones, Bloomberg, Reuters and others talk about the job outlook for their companies. A must-attend for anyone even thinking about changing jobs, or checking out the competition.

    With: Michelle LaRoche, hiring manager, Dow Jones Newswires; Walden Siew, Top News Editor, Thomson Reutersl; a Bloomberg representative. Moderator: Marty Steffens, SABEW Chair, University of Missouri

    9:35 a.m. – 10:40 a.m. CONCURRENT SESSIONS

    • How to Use Government Data, Direct From The Source. (Room 430)

    Pros from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Bureau of Economic Analysis will help you analyze and use data for your stories in a special hands-on session. Please bring laptops to maximize the training.
    – Shane Taylor and Mauricio Ortiz, Bureau of Economic Analysis
    – Martin Kohli, regional economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    • Doing the Math: How to Run a Profitable Freelance Writing Business. (Room 432)

    Shifts within the news business are prompting many journalists to become freelance writers, bloggers and columnists. And it’s not a bad option. Better work/life balance, higher pay and greater fulfillment are all within reach for skilled journalists with the knowledge and work ethic to pursue them. Learn the ins and outs of running a profitable writing business from setting a realistic budget and making sound business decisions to tapping lucrative markets and invoicing and collecting like a pro. You’ll leave with greater clarity about what it really takes to thrive as an independent journalist.
    – Maya Smart, freelance journalist and author

    • One-On-0ne Critiques. (Room 308)

    Sign up for an individualized critique with a noted journalist. See the registration desk to sign up.

    • Google Advanced Training: Can you search better? (Room 434)

    The pros from Google gives you tricks and tips to make your job easier.
    – Sean Carlson, manager, global communications and public affairs, Google

    9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reynolds Center Workshop: Creating Business News Videos. Room 436
    Arizona State University TV-production specialist Brian Snyder leads a day-long, hands-on training to equip you with the skills and build your confidence to shoot business news videos. No previous experience with video is required. Cameras, tripods and editing equipment will be provided. (Separate registration required.)

    10:45 am- Noon CONCURRENT SESSIONS REPEAT

    • How to Use Government Data/Direct from the Source (Room 430)
    • One-on-one critiques (Room 308)
    • Google Advance Training (Room 434)
    • Doing the Math: How to Run a Profitable Freelance Writing Business. (Room 432)

    Noon: Conference over. Lunch on your own.
    (Reynolds participants will receive lunch, and that session ends at 6 p.m.)

    Book Your Room

    Four Points by Sheraton Manhattan

    Four Points by Sheraton

    CLICK HERE to get our fabulous conference hotel rate of $235 per night at the nearby Sheraton Four Points – Times Square which is within walking distance of CUNY.

  • Distinguished Achievement Award

    Posted By admin on Thursday June 10, 2010

    The Distinguished Achievement Award was established in 1993 to single out individuals who have made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who have served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession.

    Recipients

     
    2019Michelle Singletary, personal finance columnist, The Washington Post

    2018Gretchen Morgenson, senior special writer – investigations unit, The Wall Street Journal

    2017Lawrence Ingrassia, managing editor, Los Angeles Times

    2015 – Michael R. Bloomberg, founder, Bloomberg LP

    2013 – Michael Lewis, author/contributing editor, Vanity Fair

    2012Diana Henriques, The New York Times

    2011 – Donald Barlett and James Steele, Vanity Fair

    2009Ray Shaw*, American City Business Journals

    2008Floyd Norris, The New York Times

    2007 – Paul Steiger, ProPublica

    2006 – Carol Junge Loomis, Fortune magazine

    2005 – Stephen B. Shepard, City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism

    2004 – Linda O’Bryon, PBS’ “Nightly Business Report”

    2003 – James K. “Jimmy” Gentry, University of Kansas School of Journalism

    2003 – Randy Smith, The Kansas City Star

    2002 – Byron “Barney” Calame, The Wall Street Journal

    2001 – Allan Sloan, ProPublica

    2000 – Ernest Holsendolph, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    1999 – Chet Currier*, The Associated Press and Bloomberg News

    1999 – John Cuniff*, The Associated Press

    1998 – Marshall Loeb*, Money magazine, Fortune magazine

    1997 – Chris Welles*, BusinessWeek

    1996 – Cheryl Hall, Dallas Morning News

    1995 – Larry Birger*, Miami Herald

    1994 – Myron Kandel, CNN Business News

    1993 – Hobart Rowan*, The Washington Post

    *Deceased

     

  • Currier, 1999 SABEW Distinguished Award winner, dies at age 62

    Posted By admin on Monday October 6, 2008

    By Joyce M. Rosenberg, AP Business Writer

    (reprinted with permission by Associated Press)

    Chet Currier , whose stock market and investing stories were fixtures in newspapers across the U.S. during a 29-year career at The Associated Press, died Sunday. He was 62.  

    Currier, who also worked for Bloomberg News, died of prostate cancer at a hospice in Santa Monica, Calif., his son Craig said Monday.

    A prolific writer, Currier for years reported the Wall Street story as it developed throughout the trading day, also turning out three weekly columns on the markets and personal finance: Weekly Wall Street, Ticker Talk and On The Money. He later launched two columns on mutual fund investing for the AP.

    He also turned a passion for crossword puzzles into a side career, creating more than 1,000 Sunday-size puzzles for the AP over the course of 20 years.

    Currier viewed the stock market realistically – over the long term, it was likely to go up, but along the way it most certainly was going to suffer plenty of pullbacks, consolidations and shifts from bull to bear and back again.

    His writing was clear and concise, two critical elements in explaining the complexities of a stock market to millons of readers who were more likely to get their financial news from their local newspapers than the The Wall Street Journal.

    Currier reported about mutual funds before the average investor knew much about them. “I saw my job really as, first of all, kind of educating people that they didn’t have to keep their money in a bank savings account any longer. They had new choices,” he said during a 2005 interview that was part of an AP oral history project.

    “Chet had a talent and instinct for bringing to life investing and managing money. He took ideas and themes that other people made complicated and explained them simply, but not simplistically,” said Michael Millican, a former AP business editor, now president of Robert Marston Corporate Communications.

    “Chet Currier defined the Wall Street beat for The Associated Press at a time when millions of average Americans were becoming stock and mutual fund owners,” said Jim Kennedy, AP vice president and director of strategic planning. “He literally opened the territory for the general news audience.”

    Kennedy, who directed the AP’s business news staff in the late 1980s and early ’90s, said Currier’s finest moment may have been his daily coverage of the stock market crash of October 1987. “He was able to put an unprecedented event into perspective almost immediately,” Kennedy recalled.

    Currier covered the stock market almost daily from 1974 until 1992, then became a full-time columnist. If a triple-digit swing in the Dow Jones industrials unnerved him, he didn’t show it in the newsroom.

    “He was wise and calm, able to write rapidly and incisively, and had a deep understanding of markets,” said Floyd Norris, an AP business writer from 1979 to 1981 and now chief financial correspondent at The New York Times. “I remember watching in admiration and awe as he covered the silver market crisis brought on by the Hunt brothers in 1980.”

    On Oct. 13, 1989, the day of what became known as the Friday the 13th mini-crash, when the Dow Jones industrials plunged a then-unnerving 190 points and revived fears of another collapse like the October 1987
    debacle, Currier showed his ability to write a story that was straightforward and that also put a big Wall Street move into context:

    ” NEW YORK (AP) – The biggest selloff since the crash of 1987 rocked the stock market Friday, driving prices into a free-fall decline following news that a big buyout deal for UAL Corp. had fallen through.

    “The sudden slide came almost exactly two years after a similar Friday-afternoon rout that preceded Black Monday on Oct. 19, 1987.

    “But many Wall Streeters insisted it was far too soon to declare that another collapse was in the making.”

    Indeed, there wasn’t another collapse ahead.

    Currier didn’t climb on bandwagons, didn’t try to time the market and believed that being a long-term diversified investor was the smartest course. Norris said that while Currier didn’t try to forecast the
    markets, “he was better at it than those who were in that business.”

    In 1999, he received the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

    At Bloomberg, which Currier joined in 1999, he wrote columns twice a week on Wall Street, bonds, mutual funds and investing. His last article was published June 29, according to Jim Greiff, columns editor for
    Bloomberg.

    “It was classic Chet, clear, concise and insightful,” Greiff said.

    Currier was fascinating to watch at his craft, tending to write in spurts. He would sit quietly, deep in thought, or go outside for a break; he’d then turn back to his computer and begin pounding away furiously at the keyboard, not stopping until he was done. Norris recalled that when he was working on a crossword puzzle, the rest of the staff would occasionally hear an odd question from Currier’s corner such as, “Who had the first name Norma?”

    Sometimes irascible, he had strong opinions that he wasn’t afraid to voice. But he also had a sense of humor that had him making pithy, acerbic and sometimes earthy assessments of people in their daily lives, all the while flashing a big smile across his broad face.

    He was also patient when needed, teaching and encouraging younger staffers as they wrote their first stock market stories.

    A man of eclectic tastes, he was well-read on a range of topics, loved to talk about the music he listened to growing up in the 1950s and ’60s and about sports. He thoroughly enjoyed betting on horses no matter how
    well he fared, and told a co-worker, “the only thing better than a losing day at the track is a winning day at the track.”

    Chester S. Currier was born in New York in 1945, and lived most of his life in Connecticut before moving to Southern California more than a year ago. He received his bachelor’s degree from Amherst College, served in the U.S. Navy and did a stint at Fairchild Communications before joining the AP in Kansas City in 1970. Two years later, he moved to the cooperative’s world headquarters in New York as a business writer and became its full-time Wall Street writer in 1974.

    “At that time, the Dow was sagging under 600, mutual funds were thought to be an endangered species, and the AP was just beginning to broaden its coverage of investing and personal finance,” Currier once wrote.

    Currier also wrote several books, among them “The Investor’s Encyclopedia,” “The 15-Minute Investor,” “Careers in the ’80s” and “Careers in the ’90s.”

    Besides his son, he is survived by his wife Carol and his daughter Dana. Funeral arrangements were incomplete Monday.

  • 2001 News: SABEW 2001 Distinguished Achievement Award Recipient Announced

    Posted By admin on Monday April 30, 2001

    Veteran Wall Street Editor Receives Business Journalism AwardColumbia, Mo., April 30, 2001–Allan Sloan, Wall Street editor for Newsweek magazine, has been selected as the Society of American Business Editors and Writers’ Distinguished Achievement Award winner for 2001. He will receive SABEW’s top honor tomorrow at its 38th annual convention in New York City at the Marriott World Trade Center.

    Established in 1993, the Distinguished Achievement Award singles out individuals who have made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who have served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession. The late Hobart Rowen of The Washington Post was the first recipient.

    “Allan Sloan is an aggressive business sleuth who can turn the complex into the comprehendible,” said Cheryl Hall, business columnist for The Dallas Morning News, who chairs the awards committee and is also a past recipient. “Young reporters can learn more by watching him in action than from any seminar they might attend.”

    “I’m very flattered that people who actually know me – and many of whom are my competitors – have chosen me for this lifetime honor, and I’m not even dead yet,” said Sloan, whose columns run regularly in Newsweek and The Washington Post.

    Sloan’s 30-year career in business journalism began at The Charlotte Observer in 1970, and continued through stints at The Detroit Free Press, Forbes, Money and Newsday before he joined Newsweek in 1995. In 1984, while at Forbes, Sloan and coauthor Howard Rudnitsky published the first definitive profile of Drexel Burnham Lambert’s Michael Milken and his network of junk bond buyers.

    Sloan has won five Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism.

    “The thing I’m proudest of is I’ve won them in three different categories in three different decades for four different employers,” Sloan said. “That defines versatility.”

    Past recipients of SABEW’s Distinguished Achievement Award also include: Myron Kandel, financial editor at Cable News Network; the late Larry Birger of the Miami Herald; Chris Welles, a former senior editor of BusinessWeek; Marshall Loeb, formerly of Money and Fortune magazines, now with CBSMarketWatch.com; John Cuniff of the Associated Press; Chet Currier, formerly of the Associated Press, now with Bloomberg News; and Ernest Holsendolph, business columnist at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

    Sloan will accept his award at SABEW’s Distinguished Award Luncheon, May 1 at the Marriott World Trade Center hotel. To obtain tickets, please call 573-882-7862.

    SABEW is a tax-exempt educational organization representing more than 3,000 print, broadcast and electronic business journalists and based at the Missouri School of Journalism. For more information about SABEW and the convention, see the SABEW web site, www.sabew.org.

    Contact: Carolyn Guniss, SABEW executive director, 573-882-8985, or Calame, 212-416-2624.

     

     

  • SABEW - Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication,
    Arizona State University

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