2019 State of the Business Journalism Industry survey released

Posted By Renee McGivern on Saturday November 9, 2019

SABEW and rbb Communications conducted a Snapshot Survey about the State of Business Journalism Today in late October that engaged 78 members. rbb is an integrated communications agency in Miami, Florida, which generously sponsors the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award contest.

The survey is designed to capture a “read” of how members feel rather than be scientifically perfect. We asked about digital content manipulation, attacks on the media, the most important skill young journalists need, today’s journalism environment and unionization. The following are the answers from 78 survey participants; 27 of them chose to make comments at the end of the survey.

Here are the results of the 2018 Snapshot Survey.

Question 1 Answers
* Because of “bad actors” and other digital content manipulation, people are facing an onslaught of false or misleading information. Which of the following do you believe to be most true?
The platforms that are publishing this information, i.e. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, must be held to higher standards and be accountable for policing this content. 31
It is impossible to stop the flow of misleading information and it is up to the consumer to pay more attention to the source of their news. 12
News organizations should take a more proactive role and devote more resources to debunking false information and producing media literacy. 35
78
Question 2
* The media continues to be at the center of attacks with regards to its credibility and perceived bias. Which of the following most reflects your feelings on this topic?
1. The attacks have made me more concerned for my overall safety and I am now paying more attention to my surroundings when working. 31
2. The questions about bias and “fake news” has made me more aware of the need to source and double check my reporting and the information I receive from sources. 12
3. It’s had zero effect on me and I continue to do my job the same way as I always have. 35
78
Question 3
* Which of the following is the most important skill young journalists (those with 1-3 years of experience) should be learning?
1. Mining data for stories. 15
2. Building relationships with sources. 21
3. Building their own individual brand by focusing on a beat and an individual marketing plan. 3
4. Generating and pursuing story ideas. 34
5. Understanding the business aspects of your news organization. 5
78
 Question 4
  * In thinking about today’s journalism environment, which of the following do you find the least pleasant?
The pressure of producing content for any platform (produce an audio story/podcast, write several iterations of a story for a website and social media sites such Facebook and Twitter, shoot video, create graphics, report on-air). 8
The continued uncertainty and instability in terms of jobs. 19
Journalists are continually being asked to do more with less, sacrificing depth and nuance in favor of brevity and click-friendly content. 51
78
Question 5
* Which of the following best describes your feelings toward unionization in the journalism industry?
I fully support news organization unions and feel they are necessary to protect my interests. 57
The formation of unions is detrimental to the journalism profession and is likely to hasten more news organization closures because profits will be squeezed even more than they already are. 21
78
Question 6
*Any comments about the state of the industry?
Question 5 is not an either-or question. 1
I’m not sure if this is me getting older and having worked in the industry longer, but I’ve never been more depressed by media news than I was in the past year or two. The layoffs, closings, drama around purchases, attacks on credibility, push to do dumbed-down stories for clicks, job instability… 2
The industry has mostly itself to blame for shifting from objective reporting to more-of-less participatory (a.k.a. “advocacy”) journalism. While this latter approach is an acceptable business model (primarily from the entertainment perspective), it hurts us traditional journalists who only care about the numbers, not the politics, of the story. 3
In some ways, I feel the giant news organizations — NYTimes, WAPO, WSJ — are strong. But it’s the newsrooms in our big and medium-sized cities that are at peril. We need to be more vigilant and relevant than ever as our nation reels under a government and leaders — in both political parties — who exaggerate and manipulate information. 4
The industry needs to find a way to support the continued production of quality journalism. This requires establishing standards of pay that will make journalism a field that talented young professionals want to enter– not one you can only afford to work in if you have a well-to-do family or spouse behind you. We cannot develop a diverse newsroom and freelance group if we underpay staff and especially freelancers. My company (a website) pays staff OK, but pays freelancers one-tenth of what freelancers used to make writing for print outlets, say 10-15 years ago. It makes it difficult to recommend the field to talented young people. This also means that writers cannot “afford” to spend as much time developing stories and reporting as they could when they were paid better. 5
Regarding unions: The union effort at my paper has been incredibly disruptive, and the guild has used incredibly misleading statements that would never pass muster for a news story. It’s incredibly sad and disappointing that “journalists” would essentially lie and mislead others in order to get a union passed. 6
I answered the first two questions with the closest answers I could find to what I think. But the phrasing of the questions and the options provided as answers tells me this survey isn’t interested in finding out the truth. “Fake news” isn’t an accusation, it’s a product, pumped out by far too many of my colleagues at name-brand national media. It’s clearly a one-party industry that has dropped all pretense of objectivity — and, just as clearly, can’t see that fact because of groupthink. We have largely earned this contempt. 7
Every day I think of leaving, but every day I decide its important to stay. 8
I’d like more than an either/or option for question 5, because I think it depends on the employer. I see both advantages and disadvantages with unions. 9
You bet: There is a social breakdown underway – which I call DMR – Digital Mob Rule. Its the underlying societal change driving social which is in process of breaking everything. Balance is gone, depth is at the airport getting ready to leave, and attribution to credible sources was shot at the wall some years back. The pups today are “vics” who don’t see who the “perps” are and have blindly accepted the new corporate “rent your life” business model that predominates in the asset-stripping of individual assets and the “community” response (communism/socialism) which has inculcated at deep levels by the hysterical revisionists in education. (cranky George of UrbanSurvival.com whined in passing. As much of his 2012 book Broken Web is now coming to pass…) 10
I can’t help but feel like journalism as profession is being devalued because anyone with a camera and YouTube/Instagram account now is considered a writer and part of the ‘working media.’ Some of the content is great, but I feel like it can be detrimental to the industry overall. 11
Business journalists need to get back to the job of following the business niches they focus on — and learning its ins and outs. They should grease the skids of commerce in those niches by providing value to the B2B or B2C buyers and sellers. Translate the value proposition of the sellers into language the buyers understand — and become the objective source of info that brings together buyers and sellers. And it can be done with zero coverage of what normally goes for “news”. The news buyers want to hear is “how do I get ahead in my profession? How can what a solution provider sells allow me to reach my goals.” Fraud and social justice issues should play a valuable but only minor role in everyday business journalism. A biz journalist can succeed as a moderately paid independent if they learn a particular industry niche well, develop contacts, and can position themselves as an essential info provider and indirectly be “in the middle of a sale”. What I’m advocating is to become a combined industry journalist and analyst — not in Fortune 500 markets, but serving B2B professional niches where pros buy software, services, data analysis, and productivity enhancing tools. Would be happy to develop a podcast program (or other educational tool) for SABEW to provide tips on how I position myself in the telecom industry as a good example of what can be done elsewhere. I have listened to several of the podcasts regarding freelance journalism and I think I’ve developed a more realistic program of personal branding in an industry niche — as opposed to relying on cultivating editors. Calling your own shots and your own editorial niche is more fun and motivating. And i calculated there are something like 4,000 B2B niches out there in the US market that could support a journalist. My journal is Black Swan Telecom Journal (bswan.org). My name is Dan Baker and my email is [email protected] 12
The gradual evisceration of mid-sized dailies makes me very sad. I feel we’re going to be left with a few national newspapers and specialty pubs for lobbyists/industry, and it is very worrying for civic health. 13
The way the current administration denigrates facts and normalizes lies makes journalism as important as it has ever been. Yet the resources to hold elected officials accountable to the majority of their constituents shrinks and leaves Americans increasingly vulnerable to exploitation and manipulation by those with power. 14
If the question about paying reporters more isn’t on the table then journalism as a whole faces an existential threat. A young talented professional who could be a great asset to a newsroom will go to other professions that pay them more competitive wages. 15
Any statistics from this survey are going to be distorted by the lack of alternate answers available to many of the questions…including a none of the above 16
It is really bad out there. the ability to do real, good journalism has been violently circumscribed. everywhere i have worked has hired me with the promise of time and space to do investigations, failed to publish most of those investigations when I’ve done them, and demanded daily sums of 500 words on Bill Ackman’s latest equity stake, for some reason. AI can’t come soon enough. 17
There clearly needs to be more investigative journalism in business coverage. That has clearly gone by the wayside as more of the profitable publications in existence depend on premium subscriptions (so don’t bite the hand that feeds you) while traditional newspapers, struggling to find a profitable business model, seem to be cutting back on exactly this. 18
Concerned that some readers don’t differentiate between objective news and sponsored. And I see it at the newspaper with management pushing those boundaries. I get google alerts on a story with the name of our paper but it is written by the advertising division. First residential areas that new home buyers should look at, then home sections, now some other sections. there has been talk of getting grants to hire reporters who will write only positive business stories while we can write the objective ones etc. VERY concerning. Slippery slope
19
Practically every story is about Trump, or needs to relate back to Trump in some way according to editors. This will ultimately backfire and erode public trust in the media even further. Also, the industry needs much more diversity of thought and background. The fact that practically no professional news organization saw the 2016 election outcome coming underscores how far removed journalists are from the every day reality of Americans. 20
Your union question isn’t black and white. 21
I did not want to answer question 1 because all the answers are equally important holistically in the real world. As a researcher, I find that question to be poorly written. 22
The concentration of advertising revenue in a few digital platforms worries me more than unionization. 23
I would have rather had a third option on Question 5. I’m pretty ambivalent to unions but the answers offered require a very black-and-white response. I support unions, but I DO NOT believe they are necessary to protect my interests. 24
God help us all. We are more important than ever. 25
 To thrive, it will be essential to move quickly and pivot to adjust to the vast changes ahead in the industry. At the same time, certain rules continue to apply: Treat people fairly, be passionate about the truth, and engage readers and viewers. Short cuts, layoffs and one poorly thought out new idea after another won’t ring the register. 26
Too damn many agenda pushers, reporters who really are stenographers. 27
  • Rich story ideas abound in emerging marijuana industry

    Posted By sabew on Friday May 20, 2016

    Story by Agnel Philip
    Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University

    Video by Kat Lonsdorf
    Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism


    News publications have a responsibility to objectively cover the marijuana business, according to two key players in the Denver Post’s recent efforts to ramp up coverage of the burgeoning industry.

    “To be able to talk about this in a modern perspective, to have a frank conversation about what this means has been a gift,” said Ricardo Baca, editor of the Post’s marijuana-focused website “The Cannabist” at the “Covering the Business of Pot” panel at the SABEW 2016 annual conference Friday in Washington, D.C.

    Baca and Kevin Dale, the Post’s former news director, said that business journalists have opportunities to cover a wide variety of stories concerning marijuana from banking to agriculture. Covering marijuana has allowed the Post to debunk myths and expose the good and bad of the drug, he said.

    With some states having legalized or being in the process of legalizing recreational marijuana, money has flowed into an industry without an established financial and regulatory infrastructure. For example, due to federal regulations, few marijuana-related businesses have bank accounts, meaning that the vast majority of the nearly $1 billion industry in the state is conducted in cash.

    Dale, the current executive editor of Arizona PBS’s Cronkite News, said the Post attempted to cover marijuana like any other legal substance, but the effort was not without backlash, especially in rural Colorado.

    “We did take some heat in writing about ‘12 Great Brownie Ideas’ or the reviews or the best vape pens, but to balance that, we were able to show just the harder edge reporting that the newsroom had been doing throughout,” Dale said.

    If the Post hadn’t put effort into covering the growth of the marijuana industry, it would have failed to cover significant economic trends, Dale said. In Denver, the growth of the marijuana industry has had a profound impact on commercial real estate in particular. Facilities associated with the production of the drug occupy more than 3.7 million square feet of industrial space, while leases on warehouses have jumped 56 percent over the past five years, Dale said.

    Covering cannabis

    Ricardo Baca and Kevin Dale recount their coverage of Colorado’s nascent legal cannabis industries. (Cassidy Trowbridge/ASU Walter Cronkite School)

    Baca and Dale said audiences have appreciated the effort the Post made to cover this industry objectively.

    “That’s our place as journalists, to be looking at all angles and trying to bring a little more enlightenment to stories,” Dale said.

    Jason Shaltiel, a freelance writer and recent graduate Baruch College at the City University of New York, said that the panel strengthened his belief that marijuana offers an abundance of coverage opportunities.

    “It did reinforce that there is legitimate journalism behind this, there is good reporting behind it,” he said.

  • SABEW update from President Kim Quillen

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Tuesday July 21, 2020

    It’s July, and we’re halfway through a doozy of a year.

    SABEW wasn’t able to hold its May conference in Toronto because of the coronavirus, so I missed seeing many of you. But I’m pleased and honored to serve as SABEW president until next spring, and I wanted to take a moment here to introduce myself and share a couple of exciting things our organization has been up to.

    This month, we launched our first ever business book contest. This competition builds upon the successful Best in Business journalism competition SABEW runs each year. The book contest is the brainchild of SABEW Vice President Caleb Silver, editor in chief of Investopedia, and I’m grateful for his hard work on this project. If you’re interested in entering a recent business book you’ve authored, there’s still time. We’re accepting entries through Aug. 17, 2020. Look for the results of this competition to be announced later this year.

    SABEW has also been busy the last several months producing virtual training sessions aimed at helping newsrooms cover the business aspects of COVID-19. Some of you know that I’m a long-time chair of SABEW’s Training Committee, and this type of distance learning for members is a particular interest of mine. If you’re looking for fresh ideas and resources for your coverage, take a moment to check out our training archive and catch up on any sessions you may have missed. And be sure to mark your calendars for Aug. 11, 2020, when we’ll be holding our next training session on “Approaching the Business Beat with a Diverse Lens.” There’s also plenty more to come. We’re mapping out training plans for the months ahead. If you have an idea, or a request for training in a particular area, don’t hesitate to drop me a line.

    Lastly, to say that these past few months have been difficult for our industry would be a tremendous understatement. You probably saw the report from outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas, Inc. showing that newsrooms cut 11,027 jobs during the first half of this year, an increase of 170% over the number of cuts during the first half of 2019. Too many exceptional business reporters and editors are out of work, and our organization is working to meet the needs of these journalists.

    We’ve expanded the job listings on the SABEW website, and we have a fledgling effort underway that allows journalists to pitch themselves as potential job candidates. If you’ve got ideas about how we can better serve business journalists who are in transition, please let me know. We are already taking a forgiving approach to members who’ve been furloughed or laid off.  Please let us know how you are doing and we will work with you!

    Finally, a little more about me. I’m currently one of the editors on the Chicago Tribune business desk. I’m a career business journalist and editor, with previous stops at the Arizona Republic, the (New Orleans) Times-Picayune, and the Delaware State News.

    Most importantly, I’ve been an active member of SABEW for almost 15 years and a member of the board of governors for more than 10. This organization – and the professional journalists involved in it — has offered me a great deal of support over the years. I’m looking forward to giving back to SABEW over the months to come, and I hope you’re up for playing a role. Please feel free to reach out with suggestions, feedback, and ideas about how we can better meet the needs of the business journalism community. I look forward to hearing from you.

    Kim Quillen
    [email protected]

  • SABEW Board of Governors Election 2020

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Tuesday April 21, 2020

    SABEW 2020-21 Board of Governors
    Voting Opens April 27

    Voting for the SABEW 2020-21 Board of Governors opens Monday, April 27 and closes at 5 p.m. EDT on Friday, May 1. Voting members will receive your ballot information direct from the online voting service provider Opavote.org. If you are the voting member for your newsroom and also have an individual membership, you will receive two separate emails. If your newsroom voting representation has changed, please contact Tess McLaughlin.


    Ballots will be cast for eight open SABEW Board of Governors seats. Six are three-year terms ending spring 2023 and two are one-year terms ending spring 2021.


    Cesca Antonelli
    Editor-in-Chief, Bloomberg Industry Group
    My initial year filling in on the SABEW board has inspired me to seek election. I had the privilege of collaborating with the team in its work to elevate business journalism, assisting efforts to expand the number of talented reporters and editors who are touched by SABEW’s programs and helping with recruiting.

    I would like to build on SABEW’s great work to help set up training classes in more cities across the country, and to boost the board’s efforts with the core functions of networking and recruiting to further the organization’s presence and reach.

    I have spent more than 20 years as a reporter and editor in six cities around the world, building up teams of journalists to cover big stories across the spectrum of business reporting. I’d like an opportunity to put more of my skills to work in a full board term. Thank you for considering me.


    Robert Barba
    Spot news editor, Dow Jones Newswires and The Wall Street Journal

    I’m seeking re-election to the SABEW Board of Governors because I have more work to do for this important organization dedicated to advancing business journalism.

    I joined the SABEW board in 2015. Since then, I’ve been involved in planning events and conferences, served as a judge for the Best in Business competitions in the U.S. and Canada, and was part of the finance committee. Late last year, I oversaw the Night of SABEW, a coordinated, cross-continental happy hour that brought together more than 100 people in nine cities.

    If reelected, I would continue to find new ways to bring business journalists together to connect with colleagues, find their next editor or build camaraderie with others in their industry.


    Pallavi Gogoi
    Chief business editor, NPR
    During my 25-year career as a reporter or editor at various news outlets — NPR, Business Week, the AP, CNN, Dow Jones and USA Today — I have been a champion of business journalism.

    My mission has always been to bring a deeper understanding of business and economics, and their impact on the everyday lives of people. I believe they play a central role in shaping everything – from personal decisions and societal behavior to national policies and global diplomacy.

    The importance of our form of journalism is particularly evident during the current coronavirus pandemic, where health and economics have collided violently and have devastated lives in so many ways.

    This past year on the SABEW board I have met professional peers who believe in the purpose of lifting business journalism. It’s left me humbled and inspired and I would like to give back more to the profession and also to an organization that furthers a cause I fully believe in. I am particularly passionate mentoring of young journalists, high quality training and pursuing high standards of journalism.

    I am seeking your support for election to the board, with the hope that I can work with all of you to make our work at SABEW even more relevant and impactful.


    Matthew Goldberg
    Consumer banking reporter, Bankrate

    I’d be grateful to have the opportunity to be a member of SABEW’s Board of Governors. It’s been my pleasure serving on multiple SABEW committees and being a Best in Business judge this past year. These experiences have helped me better understand and appreciate SABEW’s impact on journalism.

    I am passionate about SABEW’s purpose, which includes being an educational resource for journalists. I am on SABEW’s training committee and have been on conference planning committees for SABEW. Newsrooms are struggling during this difficult economic time, and training budgets are likely to be cut. This makes SABEW’s training offerings and educational panels at conferences even more valuable for journalists.

    I have been either a reporter or in financial services for nearly all of the past 21 years. This would give me a unique voice and perspective on SABEW’s board. Currently, I use that experience to help SABEW’s finance committee.

    Growing SABEW’s membership is also a priority if I’m elected to the board. Spreading the word about SABEW’s initiatives is important for journalism and SABEW.


    Glenn Hall
    Chief editor, Wall Street Journal

    I am seeking re-election to the SABEW board in order to continue to serve the organization, its members and the profession of journalism. I feel a profound obligation to help others in our field by mentoring, offering counsel, making professional connections and helping in any way I can. SABEW makes that possible for me and I want to pay it forward. Thank you for your consideration.


    Dean Murphy
    Associate managing editor of investigations, The New York Times
    I’m seeking re-election to the SABEW Board of Governors and would greatly appreciate your support.

    I was eager to continue in this role well before the coronavirus pandemic, but the events of the past few months have added to my resolve. I am committed to assisting our incoming president and her leadership team navigate this uncertain time, drawing upon my five years of experience on the board and a decade of SABEW involvement.

    I am currently a member of the Spring Conference and Nominations committees, and like all board members, I have served as a Best in Business judge for many years.

    My background spans many subjects and roles. I was the business editor at The New York Times for more than four years, and a deputy business editor before that. I have been a foreign correspondent in Europe and Africa, a politics reporter in California and New York and once, while at the Los Angeles Times, was even paid to cover the beach. My focus now is investigative journalism at The New York Times.

    It would be a great privilege to serve SABEW for another term.


    James B. Nelson
    Business editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor, Marquette University
    I would be honored to serve a second term on the SABEW Board of Governors. I’ve enjoyed my first term on the board and am ready to build upon our recent accomplishments and do even more to advance the goals of this important organization.

    Since joining the SABEW board, I believe I’ve made valuable contributions. I chair the committee that vetted, tested and selected our new contest platform. The next step is underway: replacing our outdated website. Also, I’m vice chairman of the Finance Committee and have spent considerable time understanding SABEW’s fiscal strengths and challenges, the bedrock for this kind of organization. I’ve served on the planning committee for spring and fall conferences, and am eager to help during these events to ensure they run as efficiently as possible.

    I also enthusiastically participate as a BIB judge, a role I enjoyed for many years before I joined the board.

    Working for a midsized newspaper in the Midwest, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, I bring the perspective of journalists who SABEW needs to attract and engage with in order to grow and remain relevant. There’s considerable hunger for networking, training and the insights that we offer at our conferences and training sessions. Every time I bring a student or colleague to one of our events, they come away impressed and inspired.

    I’m a big believer in the value that quality business journalism brings to our readers. It is important we maintain excellence in business journalism, especially in these challenging economic times for the news industry. I pay it forward by teaching business journalism (and an editing class) at Marquette University and by being active in local journalism organizations such as the Milwaukee Press Club and, at the national/international level, SABEW.

    Thank you for considering me for the SABEW board; I would be honored to continue serving this fine organization.


    Oliver Staley
    Culture and lifestyle editor, Quartz
    Thank you for considering my candidacy. In my 26 years in business journalism, I’ve worked across a wide range of organizations, from small and mid-sized newspapers in the northwest and south, to Bloomberg News in New York and London, and for the past four years at Quartz, where I serve as an editor.

    While the decline of regional news outlets across the US has been well documented, the coronavirus pandemic has rapidly compounded the crisis. Business journalism may well be a casualty as newsroom budgets are cut, but it’s more vital than ever. As small businesses struggle and trillions of dollars in aid washes through the economy, our watchdog role is critical.

    SABEW has an important role to play in helping our colleagues in vulnerable newsrooms, through education and advocacy, and as a board member I would be eager to explore other potential responses.

    I’m also interested in helping SABEW grow, whether by using my contacts in business and media to help organize and expand the New York conference or by finding ways to extend SABEW’s reach overseas. Quartz is a global news organization, and I know international business journalists would benefit from SABEW’s advocacy for transparency and press freedoms.

    Lastly, I’m inspired to run in part to support The Xana Fund. Xana Antues, a longtime SABEW member who passed away in January, was a mentor and friend, and I want to help make sure her memory is honored through the fund dedicated to providing resources for mid-career female business journalists.

  • SABEW Canada announces the finalists for the 6th Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday April 15, 2020

    The Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is excited to (belatedly) announce the list of finalists for the 6th Annual Best in Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published and produced in Canada in 2019.

    This year’s finalists covered a wide range of stories, including a rags-to-riches-to-rags tale of Dofasco’s founding family, the spin-off effects of climate change, the future of work, an inside look at how lawyers get paid, money laundering, and the mysterious death of a crypto CEO.

    We hope to be able to hand out the awards in the After Times, once Covid-19 restrictions have been lifted (maybe sometime in the fall, with plenty of free drinks in hand). In the meantime, as we all sit at home in our sweat pants, searching for a glimmer of good news, here are the winners and finalists for this year’s awards:

     


    Jeff Sanford Best Young Journalist Award

    Our second annual Best Young Journalist Award (named after former Financial Post and Canadian Business journalist Jeff Sanford) goes to Natalie Wong of Bloomberg News. Soon after joining Bloomberg in 2017, Natalie broke news about the Canadian government’s plan to impose steel tariffs on importers, which moved the loonie and shares of some of the biggest steel companies. Last year, she penned a feature about college kids living in Vancouver mansions amid a luxury housing upheaval, which garnered global attention. It was the most-read Bloomberg Canada story of 2019. She also scooped her competitors on some of the biggest real estate stories in Canada last year, including Oxford’s sale of its Fairmont portfolio and the state of talks between Waterfront and Sidewalk Labs.

    Natalie’s impact extends beyond real estate: She wrote a profile on the co-inventor of BlackBerry for Bloomberg Businessweek magazine and spent days in a courthouse digging up documents essential for the feature, “The Unsolved Murder of an Unusual Billionaire,” which chronicled the mysterious circumstances behind the deaths of Barry and Honey Sherman and won a 2019 Best in Business Canada Award. She also broke news about NBA player Steph Curry’s investment in a Canadian travel startup, landing an exclusive TV interview with him.

    When a commercial property reporter position opened in New York late last year, the U.S. team snatched Natalie up and gave her ownership over one of the biggest real estate markets in the world. She has approached that beat with gusto and has already developed an array of sources that led to scoops about the fallout from WeWork’s botched IPO and the impact of the retail apocalypse on iconic high-streets, among other stories.


    Outstanding Achievement Award

    The winner of our second annual Outstanding Achievement Award is Marina Strauss, who retired from The Globe and Mail last summer. Marina has been among the most important voices in Canadian retailing over the past two decades, gaining the respect of both her peers and industry executives (who often dreaded her phone calls but took them anyway). She was known for her tenacious probing, critical eye and profound knowledge of the sector, bringing analysis and context to her stories, but with an easy-to-understand style that broadened her appeal beyond the business pages. As a beat reporter, she consistently broke news but also delved deep into big stories, providing definitive coverage on the collapse of Sears Canada, early troubles at Target Canada, the ups and downs of Hudson’s Bay Co., tensions between Tim Hortons franchisees and their new Brazilian owner, and so much more. She won Best in Business Awards in both the U.S. and Canada in 2019 for her story, “Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons,” and won best beat reporter at SABEW Canada’s inaugural awards in 2015.

    Beyond her writing, Marina was the model citizen in the office, often collaborating on stories and helping mentor other journalists. Internally at The Globe, she led workshops on writing business stories, developing sources and covering bankruptcies. She loved her work, and her enthusiasm rubbed off on her colleagues. Even after retiring, she took time to prepare her successor for the beat and still provides counsel—a mark of her commitment to her craft.


    Audio or Visual Storytelling

    Scott Gill and James McLeod (Financial Post), “Focals by north”

    Sean Stanleigh, Stephanie Chan, Laura Regehr, Ann Lang and Tara Deschamps (The Globe and Mail), “Industry interrupted”

    Matt Lundy (The Globe and Mail), data visualizations


    Beat Reporting

    Brent Jang, The Globe and Mail (natural gas industry)

    Eric Atkins, The Globe and Mail (transportation)

    Catherine McIntyre, The Logic (the gig economy)


    Breaking News

    The Logic (Amanda Roth and Catherine McIntyre), “Sidewalk Labs and Waterfront Toronto reach a deal”

    The Globe and Mail (Josh O’Kane, Alex Bozikovic, Jeff Gray, Rachelle Younglai and Tom Cardoso), Sidewalk Lab negotiations

    The Globe and Mail (Emma Graney, Jeffrey Jones, Carrie Tait, Kelly Cryderman, Gary Mason, James Bradshaw, Christine Dobby, Andrew Willis, Ian McGugan, David Milstead and David Berman), “Encana to move its headquarters to U.S.”


    Commentary

    Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)

    David Parkinson (The Globe and Mail)

    Rita Trichur (The Globe and Mail)


    Editorial Newsletter

    HuffPost Canada (Daniel Tencer), HuffPost Canada Housing Newsletter

    The Logic (The Logic staff), Daily Briefing

    Financial Post (Yadullah Hussein and Pam Heaven), Posthaste


    Feature (Long-Form)

    Charles Wilkins (Report on Business magazine), “Castaways”

    Zander Sherman (Report on Business magazine), “Forged by fire”

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Jessica Leeder and Lindsay Jones (The Globe and Mail), “Crypto chaos”


    Feature (Short-Form)

    Joe O’Connor (Financial Post), “An historic gold mine in a tiny Ontario town…”

    Danielle Bochove (Bloomberg News), “In planet’s fastest-warming region, jobs come with thaw”

    Sean Silcoff (The Globe and Mail), “Montreal analytics startup uses AI to play a big role
    in NHL playoffs”


    Investigative

    Matthew McClearn, Geoffrey York and Stephanie Nolen (The Globe and Mail),
    “See No Evil”

    Gordon Hoekstra and Kim Bolan (Vancouver Sun), money laundering

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Nathan VanderKlippe and Jessica Leeder
    (The Globe and Mail), “How did Gerald Cotton die?”


    Package

    Geoffrey Morgan and Vanmala Subramaniam (Financial Post), “Rural Alberta (dis)advantage”

    Ryan Stuart (BCBusiness Magazine), “The future of work”

    Chris Fournier, Erik Hertzberg, Natalie Wong, Kevin Orland and Paula Sambo (Bloomberg News), consumer debt


    Personal Finance and Investing

    Victor Ferreira (Financial Post), “The inconvenient truth about responsible investing”

    Tim Shufelt (The Globe and Mail), “The data game”

    Mark Brown, Sandra E. Martin, Julie Cazzin, Chris Richard and Daisy Barette (MoneySense), “Canada’s best dividend stocks 2020”


    Profile

    Kristine Owram and Susan Berfield (Bloomberg News), Bruce Linton

    Steve Kupferman (Pivot), “Toy Story”

    Jason Kirby (Report on Business magazine), “Trash talking”


    Scoop

    Geoffrey Morgan (Financial Post), “Billionaire Koch brothers dump Canada’s
    oil sands leases…”

    Niall McGee and Rachelle Younglai (The Globe and Mail), “Barrick eyes hostile bid…”

    Mark Rendell and Jeffrey Jones (The Globe and Mail), “CannTrust allegedly used fake walls to hide pot…”


    Trade Article

    Kelsey Rolfe (Benefits Canada), “Rise of the machines”

    Daniel Fish (Precedent Magazine), “Paying the partners”

    Leah Golob (Investment executive), “Singles: a growing demographic”

     

    Thank you to everyone who entered and to all our amazing judges. Stay tuned!

     

  • Taking out student loans for graduate school may be worth it

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Thursday April 9, 2020

    By Tyler Wilkins 

    Hannah Smith knew pursuing graduate education was the right decision, but she didn’t know she’d need to take out loans to supplement her monthly income.

    Smith, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Crop & Soil Sciences at the University of Georgia, earned a master’s degree from the University of Arkansas. She took an assistantship with a $14,000 stipend, but it didn’t fully cover the cost of fees, food, rent and gas during her program.

    “You feel like you’re starting out behind,” Smith said. “You have this mountain of debt that you have to overcome once you finally do get a job. And sometimes it hits you, and you’re like, ‘Oh, man, this is accruing interest right now, even as I speak.’”

    While it was not optimal to incur debt before entering the workforce, Smith said she expects to pay off the loan a few years after working in the agricultural chemical industry.

    To better the prospects of working in her dream industry, Smith returned to her home state of Georgia after she completed her master’s program. She said she sought advice from people working in her industry, and they said earning a doctoral degree would be the best route for landing a job in her field.

    Smith holds an assistantship while completing her doctoral program, but its stipend is about twice the amount she received from her previous assistantship, allowing her to cover all of her expenses.

    Without an assistantship, Smith said she probably wouldn’t have gone to graduate school at all.

    “It would have been too much financially,” Smith said. “I had some mentors as I was going for my bachelor’s and master’s that said, ‘You should not have to pay for that. You should be on an assistantship.’” 

    To offset the costs of living while completing a graduate program, Smith said prospective graduate students should seek an assistantship, which will help cover the costs of tuition and other expenses. She said the process of finding an assistantship involves networking to find the right adviser.

    Kristin Short, a UGA financial planning doctoral student, whose previous assistantship sought to educate graduate students about personal finance, agreed with Smith. Not only do stipends help pay for tuition and other expenses, but “they enhance your experience in the program,” Short said.

    When looking at graduate school programs, it’s best to find one that offers full funding for tuition, Short said. But if completing a graduate degree will significantly enhance someone’s earning potential in their industry, then resorting to loans to cover the cost of graduate school is worth it, she said.

    Much of the research Short conducts for her doctoral program pertains to stress that graduate students face. Graduate school can be stressful without the attached price tag, but many graduate students find the opportunity costs, like delayed salary earnings, worth it once they complete their program and enter their desired field, Short said.

    And rather than working in a non-industry-related job while completing a graduate program, Short said students should try to complete assistantships and internships to gain valuable work experience in their field that will separate them from other graduates, even if that means taking out more loans.

    “There’s this big fear about student debt,” Short said. “Instead of taking on student loans, they’ll take on a part-time job. The problem is they’re scraping by in their classes and bussing tables at night, stretching themselves thin when they could be building their resume and making themselves more marketable after they finish their degree.”

    Tyler Wilkins is a journalism student at the University of Georgia. The reporting for this article was completed before the campus closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 14, 2-3 p.m. EDT: Coronavirus – Covering the Business Impact of the Pandemic

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Wednesday April 1, 2020

    Tuesday, April 14
    2-3 p.m. EDT
    Listen to the recording.

    The full economic impact of the new coronavirus has yet to be seen. But workers are idled at companies large and small, travel is at a standstill, and a $2 trillion economic relief package is making assistance available directly to households. During SABEW’s next teletraining session, we’ll examine how the global outbreak is impacting business and the economy. We’ll also talk about what the outlook is, and what some of the big story lines going forward will be for business journalists.

    MODERATOR

    Jim Tankersley, The New York Times

    Jim Tankersley covers economic and tax policy for The New York Times. Over more than a decade covering politics and economics in Washington, he has written extensively about the stagnation of the American middle class and the decline of economic opportunity in wide swaths of the country. Jim was previously policy and politics editor at Vox and before that, an economics reporter for The Washington Post. He covered the 2008 presidential campaign for the Chicago Tribune and began his career working for The Oregonian, The Rocky Mountain News and The Toledo Blade. A native of McMinnville, Ore., Jim is a Stanford University graduate, an avid camper and backpacker and the father of a 13-year-old named Max.


    PANELISTS

    Robert Faturechi, ProPublica

    Robert Faturechi covers money in politics. At ProPublica, he has reported on self-dealing by political consultants, industry lobbyists blocking safety standards, corporate donors targeting state elections officials and political committees running afoul of the law. Before joining ProPublica, he was a reporter at The Los Angeles Times, where his work exposed inmate abuse, cronyism, secret cop cliques and wrongful jailings at the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Robert grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from UCLA in 2008.

     


    Suzanne Clark, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

    Suzanne Clark is president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the largest business federation in the world. She focuses on strategy, government relations and market innovation working in support of the group’s more than 3 million member companies internationally. She leads a wide range of policy and operational initiatives and was the first senior executive vice president in the institution’s 104-year history. Suzanne sits on the board of two public companies – AGCO, a Fortune 500 global leader in the design, manufacture and distribution of agricultural equipment, and TransUnion, a provider of global risk and credit information. Suzanne earned her bachelor’s degree and an MBA from Georgetown University. Provided by Suzanne: Implementing a National Return to Work plan.

     

    Rami Grunbaum, The Seattle Times

    Rami Grunbaum is business editor of The Seattle Times, and oversees a staff of half a dozen journalists covering the hometown of Amazon, Microsoft, Nordstrom, Starbucks and Boeing’s Commercial Airplanes division, among others. Grunbaum became business editor in 2016, having previously served as deputy business editor and as editor of Puget Sound Business Journal. Seattle Times coverage of Boeing’s 737 MAX Crisis has recently been honored with a George Polk award, a Scripps Howard award and two SABEW Best in Business awards. Provided by Rami: Seattle Times stories discussed during training.

  • 2019 Best in Business Honorees – Judging Comments

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday March 30, 2020

    Audio

    Winner – A collaboration of The Wall Street Journal and Gimlet Media; WeWork trilogy
    The Wall Street Journal’s WeWork trilogy dissected one on the biggest business stories of the year: the rise and fall of WeWork. The podcast employed smart questions to reporters covering the story and even smarter answers that not only explained WeWork’s spectacular collapse, but also revealed new information. Each program was driven by a compelling narrative that pulled listeners through the story and its complications, leaving them to want to hear more.

    Honorable Mention – NPR; Profiles of America in full employment
    NPR’s Profiles Of America In Full Employment is a smart look at what full employment means in the early 21st century, covering the landscape in tight, well-produced and insightful reports that range from workers in the Midwest regaining bargaining power to a California agricultural community bypassed by the record economic expansion.

    Honorable Mention – American Banker; Bankshot
    American Banker’s Bankshot podcast took boring but important issues and made them interesting without diminishing their importance. Holding a listener’s attention while explaining LIBOR and why everyone should care about it – and even having fun doing it – is no small accomplishment.


    Banking/Finance, Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Covert operation
    Covert Operation is a strong, original work that highlighted great reporting with the potential for industry change. The story revealed how an opaque industry is structured but, in the end, it’s the character-driven narrative that was both riveting and infuriating.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and 16 media partners; Mauritius Leaks
    Mauritius Leaks is another great ICIJ investigation that involved the heavy-lift work of going through leaked documents. The strong visual treatment let the data tell the story and the historical analysis set the context for understanding the players and their motivations.

    Banking/Finance, Medium division

    Winner – ProPublica; Trump’s taxes
    This was a tour de force of investigative journalism that broke new ground in a series of well-structured stories about President Donald Trump and his family business. The articles gave some of the clearest and most detailed account of the finances of the Trump Organization and the Trump family. They provided two clear insights. First, that the Trump organization and its advisors are expert at creating and exploiting ambiguities in financial reporting to add and subtract value to their various holdings when it suits their financial needs. Second, that one reason why the Trump family and business entities are fighting tooth and nail to hide their tax returns from the public is that the tax returns might reveal even more about exploitation of various aspects of the IRS code.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of American Banker and ProPublica; How Trump’s political appointees thwarted tougher settlements with two big banks
    This entry represents a groundbreaking collaboration between an established financial publication and a non-profit. With unusual insight and rich detail, it explains how the Trump Administration’s political appointees intervened to reduce sanctions against two large banking organizations involved in trading risky securities leading to the 2008 financial crisis. The reporting provides unusual insights into how the Trump administration has reversed the Obama administration’s policies and provided substantial relief for banks whose actions led to the Great Recession. The project benefited from strong writing and editing, and it resulted in demands for review of the settlements.

    Banking/Finance, Small division

    Winner – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    Every paragraph left one judge saying, “you gotta be kidding.” I thought this was a spectacular piece, written for an industry newsletter that I imagine depends on wealth management groups to pay their salaries. This was aggressive and bold, and it worked hard to tell the truth, and the truth was outrageous. This is a terrific piece of reporting that shone a much-needed light on some pretty murky practices. It was also nicely written and well organized, with the action moving along at a nice clip. The scene-setting at the top, in somewhat tawdry surroundings, really helped pull the judges into the story.

    Honorable Mention – The Real Deal; Trouble in the land of OZK
    The judges especially liked that this was an exclusive interview with an interesting person. It was an outside-the-box look at a different kind of bank.


    Breaking News, Large division

    Winner – Reuters; U.S.-China trade war
    The trade relationship between the U.S. and China was perhaps the biggest economic story of 2019. Our panel of judges concluded that Reuters’ deadline reporting on China backtracking on almost all aspects of its U.S. trade deal was especially compelling, given the deep use of industry and government sources. Readers were brought inside the diplomatic cables that were “riddled with reversals” and the Reuters team did an excellent job explaining the complicated process of negotiating an agreement only to have much of it fall apart.

    Honorable Mention – The Financial Times; WeWork
    The Financial Times team brilliantly laid out how it all went wrong at WeWork, a onetime tech darling with an iconoclastic chief executive, Adam Neumann. 

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; PG&E files for bankruptcy
    The superb reporting team clearly explained what led once mighty PG&E to become the biggest utility bankruptcy in U.S. history, and why the company chose to take the bankruptcy route.

    Breaking News, Medium division

    Winner – Dallas Morning News; U.S. pilots faulted 737 Max jets
    The judges had a number of strong entries but the Dallas Morning News took an ongoing story of major national and international importance, two crashes involving the 737 Max, and significantly moved it forward. DMN’s work showed the crashes were less about pilot error and more about design problems and lax regulatory vigilance. This story is a fine example of advancing news on a developing story by digging hard and deep.

    Breaking News, Small division

    Winner – Baltimore Business Journal; Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding
    In “Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding,” Baltimore Business News’ Melody Simmons demonstrates how sound reporting can hold powerful people accountable and make an impact on a community. Simmons’ efforts to review tax filings and other documents is a testament to the upfront work required to break this type of news. Additionally, the article was high-impact: It led to the FBI raiding the nonprofit, City Hall firing three staffers associated with the training center, and added to the pressure on Pugh, already under fire over her “Healthy Holly” book deals. The mayor ultimately resigned and was sentenced on Feb. 27, 2020, to three years in prison. Congratulations to Melody and her editors!


    Commentary/Opinion, Large division

    Winner – The New York Times; China-Think
    Li Yuan, a native of China, won for her NYT columns that gave an insightful insider’s view of why most of China’s people oppose the Hong Kong protests. She documented how China’s government uses technology and social media to indoctrinate its 1.4 billion people with group think, which she describes as “a deeply rooted belief in what many call the China Model: economic growth at the cost of individual rights.” The judges were impressed by her courage in staying with this story despite the risk to her safety. Her editors wrote in their cover letter that Ms. Yuan, who lacks the shield of a Western passport, “is regularly called a traitor on Chinese social media, and state news outlets have attacked her in print and online. She moved to Hong Kong after seeing friends imprisoned in Beijing.”

    Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times (CA); Michael Hiltzik opinion/commentary
    Michael Hiltzik received the honorable mention distinction for his Los Angeles Times columns that presented “strong, well-argued commentaries on a range of topics,” as one judge noted. In one column, Mr. Hiltzik strongly opposed the University of California at San Francisco’s pending affiliation with Dignity, a Catholic hospital chain, pointing out the drastic impact that would have on the healthcare that would be available to women and LGBT people. In another column, he wrote that President Trump’s plan to “save” Medicare would actually ruin it. In a third column, he took this stand, reflected in the headline:  The truth about U.S. taxes is that they aren’t high enough. Here’s what one judge had to say: “A convincing mix of fact and opinion with just enough rhetorical flourish to make it a really good read. The tax piece is a good example of using data to tell readers something they should know but may not want to hear.” Another judge pointed out that Mr. Hiltzik’s piece on the Catholic hospitals focused on “an issue relevant to a local audience” while it was of national interest as well. This judge noted that Mr. Hiltzik’s columns show that commentary and opinion writing is alive and well at major regional newspapers.

    Commentary/Opinion, Medium division

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; America’s broken health care system
    Elisabeth Rosenthal deftly uses the medical bills she received to guide readers through the maze of medical bureaucracy and deliver a clear exposition of how and why the nation’s health care system has become so beleaguered, unfair and inefficient. Her analysis of “Medicare for All” combines clever writing and detailed research to illuminate what dramatic healthcare overhaul would mean for jobs and the industry. Overall, her work is informative, timely and a joy to read. 

    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle; Accountability
    Chris Tomlinson of the Houston Chronicle takes issues of great regional concern — like port dredging — and weaves them into conversations about pressing national concern, such as trade protectionism. His writing is lucid, his takes are carefully reasoned and the topics he chooses are of obvious public interest. 

    Commentary/Opinion, Small division

    Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Holding Chicago companies accountable
    Cahill provides readers with sharp, no-nonsense commentary that makes its point clearly and concisely. Details are woven skillfully into the narrative and the use of a corporate regulatory filing as the basis for one column was especially impressive.

    Honorable Mention – STAT; Commentary on drug pricing and development
    An authoritative analysis of relatively complex topics: biotech companies’ credibility, fake cancer cures, drug pricing. The use of footnotes to point readers to supporting material is especially helpful.


    Economics, Large division

    Winner – Bloomberg News; Addicted to debt
    The winner, Bloomberg’s “Addicted to Debt” entry, told each of the judges something new about a fresh type of subprime debt: online installment loans. This felt to us like the kind of revelation we may learn much more about when the next downturn hits. The Bloomberg entry also included a thorough analysis of debt forgiveness plans politicians of both parties are pitching to voters, and a sobering look at the generational shackles student debt places on some families who can’t free themselves, no matter how hard they work. All entries included sharp graphics. Overall, this package illuminated dark corners of an otherwise vibrant economy with crisp storytelling everybody can relate to.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; How Trump’s trade war went from method to madness
    What sold the judges on this entry was its skillful blend of breaking newswriting and expository journalism, giving each new development ample context for the reader to understand its significance. Judges were particularly impressed with the story about how the White House was considering imposing limits on U.S. investors’ portfolio investments in Chinese markets and companies. At first, presidential advisers labeled it “fake news,” before being forced to admit it was true.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; TOPLive
    These three live blogs of major interest-rate announcements are unparalleled in thoroughness, speed and readability. Readers are walked up to the news with strong analysis and graphics that explain what to watch for. A team of reporters then blogs the announcement itself with a succession of short headlines and clearly written single paragraphs of news and analysis—alternated with market reaction and short commentaries from reporters and outsiders. 

    Economics – Medium division and Small division

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Judges praised this deeply reported and engagingly written series for its ambition, comprehensiveness and clarity. In addition to the compelling, on-the-farm reporting, this team made strong use of data, photos and multimedia to give readers a deep and nuanced understanding of the economics of milk from the perspective of Wisconsin’s struggling dairy farms.

    Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; No mercy
    No Mercy was an exemplary series of stories about how the loss of a local hospital affects a rural community.


    Energy/Natural Resources – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Brazil’s deadly dam collapse
    The judges were all struck by the strength of the reporting, which revealed major concerns around safety protocols that could have mitigated the disaster. The coverage of the collapse was widespread, but Journal reporters did the kind of work that had real impacts – contributing to evidence in a case; holding executives accountable for a lack of oversight; and providing fodder for proposed changes to industry practices. The losses suffered by these families demanded a response. This is excellent work.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; Is one of the world’s biggest lawsuits built on a sham?
    This story was a masterful example of feature writing, a compelling yarn. But it’s not just a page-turner: there are real implications here for the energy industry. The story speaks to a culture of corruption that deeply affects how business is done in such a crucial resources market — with incentives to latch on to projects doomed to fail in order to drain government coffers through litigation. The reporters explained how this practice is impacting the Nigerian economy in a major way, enough to cripple funding for schools and healthcare, or even to accomplish what the country set out to do in the first place: eliminate harmful flaring.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; PG&E’s disconnect
    This is an important story. To show that the company was lobbying for a shield against liability for wildfires, even as those fires burned, is extremely troubling. Times reporters provided a deep look at the safety lapses that imperiled people’s homes and threatened lives.

    Energy/Natural Resources – Medium division

    Winner – The Arizona Republic; Arizona’s next water crisis
    This superb series does a great job of telling the story and serves as a strong example of accountability journalism, raising questions about the sustainability of Arizona’s present and future in an age of climate change and water scarcity. The subject affects every reader in a vital way — at the faucet and the wallet. The fear, uncertainty and what it’s like not to have water was palpable through the voices of the residents. The tale brings truth to light, educating citizens as it connects all the dots on power, profits, influence, winners and losers. The graphics and pictures are top notch, using online to breathe more impact to the text. The reader comes away knowing what to look for, who to blame, questions to ask and what to demand. So, it is not just a powerfully reported expose but one with real-world impacts as lawmakers were moved to respond. While nearby water war sagas like the Oglala aquifer and Colorado River diversions have often been told, this series shed new light on one of the most pressing issues for the Sun Belt’s economy and habitability. The judges all rated it No. 1. 

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity and “The World”; Pushing plastic
    Where does our garbage end up? In modern, throwaway society it is an ethical question we should all address: like water use, a huge problem right under our nose. So, this series has great moral impact. But it also zeroes in on the culprits — corporations, regulators and consumers — ie. us. It lays out the impacts. Perhaps nothing since DDT would make Rachel Carson weep more than micro-plastics now permeating our oceans, food chains and drinking water. It paints a powerful connect-the-dots picture of the Third World as a dumping ground for First World. And it names names for corporate interests and lets them speak. The different angles help to tell the story and there are some really great quotes. The story comes full circle with the part written about Malaysia. Overall, this is a very valuable and educational series. ***

    Energy/Natural Resources – Small division

    Winner – Honolulu Civil Beat; Reeling it in
    Through shoe-leather reporting and analysis of federal records, Honolulu Civil Beat crafted an exemplary package of stories that deftly shows how U.S. taxpayer dollars earmarked for conservation are instead being used to promote aggressive fishing practices across Hawaii and U.S territories. The series prompted a federal investigation, underscoring the journalism’s true impact, as well as the benefit to the local population and all taxpayers.

    Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent; Dicey deals kept English Station dirty
    Christopher Peak of the New Haven Independent unraveled a tangle of shady real estate deals surrounding a mothballed power plant in New Haven’s harbor, and revealed a fascinating story hiding in plain sight. Through deft writing and an eye for the absurd (and aided by some clever graphics), Peak brought color and humor to what could have been a hopelessly dry article. The story wasn’t just entertaining, though: His reporting led New Haven’s mayor to call for an investigation into why the plant remains undeveloped.


    Explanatory – Large division

    Winner – Reuters; Hidden injustice
    Powerful reporting reveals the dangers caused by the finely honed practice of hiding the results of court proceedings from the public (and journalists). The Reuters team found that for at least 20 years, judges helped companies hide the truth about the harmful effects of products such as opioids, cars, medical services and more. People died or got hurt using some of these products, such as the 5,000-plus, seat belt-wearing passengers who didn’t survive GM rollover accidents in a 10-year period.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; New red scare
    Peter Waldman combines narrative writing and meticulous investigation in New Red Scare, a three-part series exposing examples of U.S. authorities harassing, demoting and expelling Chinese and Chinese American scientific researchers from universities and in one story, a prestigious U.S. Army intelligence unit.  Set against a backdrop of suspicion and acrimony over intellectual property theft by China, the series takes a shocking tack: uncovering false accusations against prominent scientists. Waldman delivers enough detail for the reader to reach an informed conclusion and enough character development to make us care.  New Red Scare has heroes, victims and villains but ultimately sheds light on a system made rotten by complex world forces.

    Explanatory – Medium division

    Winner – Fortune; Epidemic of fear
    Fry detailed the disastrous rollout in the Philippines of French drug giant Sanofi’s vaccine Dengvaxia to combat dengue fever. Fry took a complex, human story and clearly and objectively explained the impact of the rollout, including a wave of anti-vaccination panic that could have worldwide consequences. Deeply reported and well written, the story is a dramatic and disturbing piece that raises serious policy questions.

    Honorable Mention – E&E News; Dealing with disasters
    This eye-opening story focuses on how FEMA is taking care of so many small disasters and deploying workers to them that the agency is caught short when large disasters, such as Hurricane Harvey, hit. The deeply reported piece explains how and why FEMA comes up short when its resources are needed the most.

    Honorable Mention – Chronicle of Higher Education; How America’s college-closure crisis leaves families devastated
    This well-sourced, well-written story explains the cascading effect of for-profit college closures and how individuals who can least afford it – older students, low-income students and racial minorities – are hit the hardest.

    Explanatory – Small division

    Winner – Marker; The cutthroat battle between S’well and its bougie water bottle copycats
    This well-written piece, combined nitty-gritty reporting and powerful detail, provides a lucid explication of how and why the problem of counterfeit products persists to bedevil entrepreneurs. Judges were impressed by its lively language, strong sourcing and smart graphics. All in all, a terrific example of explanatory journalism.

    Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    Strong digging and analysis gave this entry its power. Judges also appreciated the clarity with which it demonstrated the importance of this relatively obscure agency.

    Honorable Mention – Denver Business Journal; Why Molson Coors had to leave Denver
    This piece gracefully pulled together and illustrated a number of trends and market forces that are driving U.S. businesses away from the notion of a traditional “headquarters.”


    Feature – Large division

    Winner – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    Reuters won the top prize in this category by combining great reporting and multimedia storytelling to shed light on wildcat mining and gold smuggling out of Africa. The team not only sought to quantify the extent of smuggling but pointed to two dangers of this practice. The first danger explored the high health risks to those wildcat miners, and the second exposed the opportunity that jihadis have spotted in the under-regulated gold trade to help finance their operations. 

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Planet Fox
    The judges found The New York Times’ “Planet Fox” to be a compelling examination of how three generations of the Murdoch family turned a news organization into an international, right wing political force, using their platform to help promote and elect preferred candidates and attack those on the other side. The fascinating struggles between the Murdoch sons and their father are woven into the broader roles played by the company’s media outlets. 

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; This is not the way everybody behaves
    This is a deeply reported, often wild, tale of the trials and tribulations of WeWork co-founder and CEO Adam Neumann. Details of his reckless ambition, arrogance and outlandish personal behavior were jarring and alarming, especially for a company that was on the brink of going public. 

    Feature – Medium division

    Winner – E&E News; The most dangerous malware
    The Most Dangerous Malware is a tense and frightening tale of how Russian-launched malware nearly caused catastrophe at a Saudi petrochemical plant.  Dogged reporting across three continents exposed the risk of the rapid adoption of digital technology, a story with potentially huge implications.  What pushed this entry to the top was its superb storytelling on an extremely complex topic.

    Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    This two-part series uncovered how pharmaceutical companies are moving into India to push the same pain drugs that caused the opioid crisis in the U.S.  The reporter spent time in India’s slums to see how pain clinics are popping up, creating thousands of new addicts.  This is great, on-the-ground reporting that raises alarms about a potential catastrophe brewing in the world’s second-largest country.

    Honorable Mention – Report on Business Magazine; A long road
    Extensive reporting went into this effort, including on-the-ground reporting in Guatemala and Northern Ontario, as well as extensive document research. At its heart, this is a very human story about Canadian mining companies who have winked at social responsibility, running roughshod over indigenous communities – all in the pursuit of mining silver.

    Feature – Small division

    Winner – The Counter; The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store
    In “The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store,” reporter Joe Fassler comes to grips with the desperation of longtime regional grocers who, while reluctant to change, must face up to the reality of customers abandoning their brick-and-mortar stores to buy food online. Fassler writes not only of the dilemmas they face, but also of the solutions provided by architect Kevin Kelley, the “supermarket ghostwriter,” who offers them a lifeline. A compelling story beginning to end, it lays out in fascinating detail the concept of grocery shopping for pleasure. It even manages to tug at the heartstrings with the story of a jaded, third-generation grocer, Rich Niemann, who is driven to tears of joy when during the reinvention process Kelley captures the emotional core of his business.

    Honorable Mention – STAT; The medicine hunters
    “The Medicine Hunters” is a devastating dispatch from an extreme edge of America’s health care system. Reporter Eric Boodman documents a startling consequence of the business world’s control over U.S. drug development: that a potentially transformative, lifesaving treatment might only be affordable while it’s still experimental and be priced out of patients’ reach once it’s been approved for sale. Boodman’s moving look at one woman’s impossible choice offers a warning to us all.

    Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Atlanta rising
    In “Atlanta Rising,” reporter J.J. McCorvey delivered a deeply reported, engagingly written examination of how the “reverse Great Migration” of black Americans to the South has played out in the world of entrepreneurship. The piece combines rich character portraits with extensive use of data to capture the transformational effect that shift is having on both Atlanta and the tech industry.


    General Excellence – Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    Winner – Financial Planning
    There’s a lot to admire here but the judges especially appreciated the nice, smooth writing and solid reporting. The presentation is sharp, and the video and audio are integrated into the storytelling. The piece on financial advisors considering striking out as independents is a thoughtful feature with pace and a kind of pragmatic set of conclusions for the professional audience it targets. The judges agreed that the accompanying charts and graphics really made the stories sing.

    General Excellence – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal
    In 2019, the Wall Street Journal gave readers high-profile scoops, dazzling infographics, and in-depth reports on tech’s biggest players. In September, the paper published the year’s definitive account of WeWork founder Adam Neumann’s high-flying lifestyle, replete with details about drug use on private jets, trays of tequila shots and enabling bankers. The paper flexed its investigative chops with stories about Amazon’s questionable third-party sales practices and yet another worrisome Facebook data-grab. An arresting infographic about the Max 737 showed how the plane’s faulty design led to repeated catastrophes and an ongoing crisis for Boeing. The Journal topped off the entry with a first-rate scoop about the $135 billion merger of United Technologies and Raytheon, the year’s big M&A deal. The scope and authority of the work made it an exceptional entry.

    General Excellence – Medium division

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    The judges commend the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for a powerful entry that demonstrated strong work across the board. Their reporters held Foxconn and Wisconsin government officials accountable for failing to live up to their job promises. They unearthed a faulty drug approved by the FDA. They got people to go on the record about the exploitation of a visa loophole to bring Mexican veterinarians to the U.S. to work menial jobs on farms. And their amazing visual storytelling of the mass closures of dairy farms in the state was some of the best work in the country on the devastation of the industry. 

    Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press
    The judges commend the Detroit Free Press for taking on the powerful auto industry in their hometown. Their investigative work unveiled not just that Ford Focus and Fiesta cars had faulty transmissions but that the company knew about it. Their reporters were also on the front lines of covering the GM strike with thorough reporting and gripping photos that helped the nation understand how unique and well supported the strike was.

    General Excellence – Small division

    Winner – Portland Business Journal
    Outstanding work, the kind of journalism that can make important people sit up and take notice. The writers were not afraid to take on one of the iconic companies of its area, Nike, over not only its taxes but also its toxic culture, with new reporting. It also featured illuminating and sensitive coverage of social issues (diversity, suicide) and a probing look at a questionable do-over in awarding a city contract.

    Honorable Mention – American Banker
    The depth of reporting, the obvious expertise with the subject matter and the overall quality of presentation is excellent.


    Government – Large division

    Winner – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Miami Herald, La Posta and 16 other media partners; The bribery division  
    The Bribery Division delivered international results from an impressive collaboration across 17 media entities and 50 journalists on different continents and in 10 countries. The company in question and governments it bribed were already under scrutiny, and this reporting deepened the investigation and showed how the corruption extended to public works projects. The package delivered clear writing about a complicated web of topics, and the stories were accompanied by an interactive graphic. The package shows the power of investigative journalism through thorough and unbiased reporting and writing.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY; Copy. Paste. Legislate.
    Copy. Paste. Legislate. brought together two years of reporting and well-researched data collection to deliver groundbreaking stories about how state-level legislation is made — by businesses and industries advancing their own interests. The accountability reporting tells readers things they don’t already know and explains clearly why they should care about how legislation is made. The package includes visual elements to show readers how the reporting was done, and assembled reams of data readers can search for themselves.

    Government – Medium division

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Hidden Harm is an outstanding investigation that exposed a hidden trove of reports about problems with medical devices. The reporting had an equally extraordinary impact and may well have saved lives. The Kaiser Health News stories prompted the FDA to release the reports and shutter the hidden program altogether. Seldom does the work of one journalist have such impact on the wellbeing of so many people. Judges liked the use of multimedia, especially the video explaining how the reporter got the story; an excellent example of how transparency can help the media build trust in our work.

    Honorable Mention – ProPublica; The TurboTax trap
    ProPublica demonstrated with dogged reporting and pursuit of emails from the IRS – even resorting to suing the agency – that the tax preparation industry, particularly Intuit’s TurboTax, misled the public with bogus offers of free online tax preparation. The series spurred the IRS to reform its rules. Judges particularly liked the story showing readers step-by-step screenshots of how Intuit duped taxpayers searching for free tax preparation to pay for it.

    Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Elaine Chao used her cabinet post to help Mitch McConnell
    Politico deftly used a Freedom of Information Act request and in-depth street reporting to document a cozy pipeline between local governments in Kentucky and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao – whose husband is Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell – that led to $78 million in grants for transportation projects in that state. Politico used documents, emails and interviews to show the connections between McConnell’s staff and a local political operative, Todd Inman, who worked for Chao and was giving preference to the Kentucky projects. Politico documented well this highly unusual conflict of interest case between an influential cabinet member and a powerful legislator.

    Government – Small division

    Winner – Crain’s New York Business; Will Bredderman’s coverage of New York City government        
    Will Bredderman’s reporting package stood out from the competition in this category. The standout piece in his entry, the Black Car Fund’s irresponsible spending is a fine example of the sort of ongoing corruption that would continue undetected were not journalists like Bredderman around to detect it.  Judges were impressed by the details in his reporting, and how solidly the stories were constructed.

    Honorable Mention – Albany Business Review; How Cuomo’s strategy stalled Albany’s nanotech dream
    An ambitious topic and a hard case to make, but this reporting well detailed the ongoing stumbles and dimming ambitions of Albany’s nanotech sector.

    Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    It’s not easy to write something compelling about accounting regulation but Project on Government Oversight managed to do it. Judges also noted the simple-yet-effective use of charts that showed the gap in fines and ambition of the regulator in ways that words never could.


    Health/Science – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); Bodies of evidence
    Extremely well-done investigation that brought to light a major problem and a great example of what journalism is all about.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Martin Shkreli: Business behind bars
    It is a very good story that broke and sparked investigations, something that should make any crusading journalist proud or jealous. It’s obvious the reporting was thorough and the story was not overwritten. It’s a great feature with a lead that painted a vivid picture.

    Health/Science – Medium division

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; UVA lawsuits
    Kaiser Health News showed how devastating unchecked hospital policies can be and the importance of bringing them to light. With their relentless digging, the reporters exposed how the center’s overly aggressive billing and collection policies were ruining people’s lives. Shining a public light on that forced changes to fix the unfair practices, including the CEO’s exit. This piece underscores the best of journalism, uncovering truths to make a difference.

    Honorable Mention – ProPublica; Newark Beth Israel Hospital
     ProPublica’s deep reporting at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center provided a significant public service by uncovering unscrupulous practices that some on that hospital’s staff thought they could pursue in secret.

    Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Turned away
    Turned Away brought light to a critically important practice that seemed to have expanded without curbs until the paper’s reporting brought it to the attention of authorities who were quick to act once they knew.

    Health/Science – Small division

    Winner – STAT; The medicine hunters
    This series takes the reader on an insightful and truly unique journey into the world of rare diseases and the medicines being developed to fight them. Along the way, it becomes clear the patients suffering from such ailments face challenges known and unknown as they navigate the world of specialized medicines and drug trials to develop them — including, most notably, whether they will even be able to afford the drugs they played a part in bringing to market. Using comprehensive reporting and research, combined with the human touch that reaches out through the portraits of those involved in the efforts on all sides, The Medicine Hunters was an unexpected story that was not only a great read, but a thought-provoking piece of journalism that stayed with the judges long after reading it.

    Honorable Mention – The Counter; The bowls at Chipotle and Sweetgreen are supposed to be compostable. They contain cancer-linked “forever chemicals”
    In a reminder that some of the best stories may be hiding in plain sight, just waiting for an intrepid journalist to begin asking the right questions, this remarkable story by the nonprofit newsroom The Counter discovered the so-called “compostable” bowls that have become ubiquitous at fast-casual places like Sweetgreen actually contain toxic chemicals. Marketed to customers as helping to save the environment, the bowls actually were treated with PFAS chemicals, the investigation found. The judges felt this story deserved special recognition for the impact it had on the fast-food marketplace, prompting many affected companies to publicly state they would stop using bowls and other packaging containing PFAS. It even led to potential Congressional legislation. 


    Innovation – Large division

    Winner – The New York Times; Data visualizations
    The New York Times’ data visualizations won the category for their boundary-pushing use of visual storytelling. What unites the pieces, and sets the bar for other news organizations, is how each piece used tangible illustrations to tell otherwise complex stories in a clear and elegant way. “The Dangerous Flaws in Boeing’s Automated System” was a particular standout. Its stellar use of reporting, publicly available information, and animation showed, with precision and clarity, how rushed engineering decisions could cause the worst-case scenario for any flier: an airplane suddenly falling out of the sky. “How Trump Reshaped the Presidency in Over 11,000 Tweets” gave due weight to the impact of the President’s use of social media throughout his term. And “Cities Start to Question an American Idea: A House With a Yard on Every Lot” was a smart look at land use and density in the country’s largest cities. 

    Innovation – Medium division

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    There was no debate among the judges. “Dairyland in Distress,” from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, was the top choice of all of us. We were impressed by the variety of ways that the paper told its readers about a signature business in Wisconsin — the dairy farming industry. In fact, it told its story without any story. Instead, it offered two sets of graphics — one showing the accelerating decline in the number of farms from 2014 to 2019 and the other looking at the reasons behind the steep fall. It gave more than three dozen dairy farmers their own voices on their reasons for getting out of the business. And it offered a clever “game” in which readers could look at the forces working against the farmers.

    Innovation – Small division

    Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Crain’s special project
    The Crain’s team exemplified the power of service journalism at a local level. The objective was to “raise the conversation” around important issues, and reporters and editors on the project delivered.


    International Reporting – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); The war against Huawei
    This is a compelling take on a technology story that continues to make headlines around the world. The U.S. continues to fuel fears about Huawei, its opaque origins, appropriation of technology, and alleged connections with the Chinese state, and the danger of providing Beijing with backdoor access to critical national infrastructure. This article makes a valiant attempt to address those worries head-on in interviews with the founder as well as company insiders and outsiders. It lays out nicely the arguments of Huawei’s supporters and its critics without rushing to judgment. Plenty of governments are yet to make decisions about the supplier of their 5G network gear, so there still is plenty riding on the outcome of this story.

    Honorable Mention – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    This is a very engaging series that clearly has involved planning and critical thinking. The detail is rich and the use of data is impressive in demonstrating that the United Arab Emirates imports more African gold than is officially exported by African nations.

    International Reporting – Medium and small divisions

    Winner – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney uncovered a trend in India of sweeping importance: the relatively new cultural acceptance of pain medication and the pharmaceutical companies, largely chased away from places like the United States, that are looking to capitalize on the trend. Varney takes the reader to the busy streets and medical offices of New Delhi to provide elegant coverage that’s consequential for American and international audiences. The judges felt it could be a streaming documentary series — hopefully, Netflix takes note. 

    Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How big tech beat Europe’s tough new privacy rules
    Nick Vinocur insightfully reframed tiny Ireland as a powerhouse of global influence over some of the most important devices and media resources of our times. Vinocur’s piece showed how the world’s tech giants gained sway over Ireland and have used that power to undermine privacy protections in Europe, and by extension, the world. No wonder the piece was the talk of the EU tech community.


    Investigative – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times; Bodies of evidence
    As readers, the LA Times entry stood out for its visceral and financial detail, depth and accessibility. As judges, it was the entry we were telling our families about. It is the clear winner in a category of incredibly important work and well deserving of first place.

    Honorable Mention – Reuters; Ambushed at home
    The Reuters series presents in gripping detail systemic corruption so callous and bald faced that Congress was compelled to take sweeping action. It is everything investigative journalism should be. 

    Investigative – Medium division

    Co-Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett’s stories unearthed a Dr. Evil-scale cover-up of hidden FDA data on millions of medical device malfunctions, injuries and deaths. Her coverage forced the administration to open this vital data to both doctors who perform procedures as well as public scrutiny, and in the process, no doubt saved countless lives.

    Co-Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX – Flawed design, failed oversight at Boeing and FAA
    The Times investigation was stunning in its thorough, deeply reported and damning coverage of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft, the flaws the company had been warned about, and the utter failure of the FAA to do its job. For the flying public, the story was breathtaking in displaying how pilots were placed in planes without proper training or even understanding how changes in controls, meant to be helpful, could doom their aircraft.

    Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    A magnificent and impressive package, including a 40-minute documentary, that showed how Long Island real estate agents discriminate against people of color. Careful, methodical and indisputable – this is a story that shouldn’t be missed. Much credit as well for devising methods to capture irrefutable and extraordinarily damning anecdotes.

    Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press; Out of gear
    Reporter Phoebe Wall Howard held Ford Motor Company’s feet to the fire in a series of stories that began with a sentence at the end of an SEC filing, and led to revelations about what the company knew (quite a lot) before it decided to sell Ford Focus and Fiesta cars that slipped gears while in operation. 

    Investigative – Small division

    Winner – A collaboration of Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting and Associated Press; Caregivers and takers
    Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting wrote a gripping account of overworked and underpaid employees in the multibillion-dollar industry that operates residential care facilities for the elderly. The report details 1,400 cases in which U.S. facility operators broke labor laws, with workers making as little as $2 an hour to work around the clock. Reveal makes masterful use of graphics, video, audio and maps to help bring the story to life. Journalist Jennifer Gollan negotiated more than 50 FOIA requests and interviewed reluctant workers who feared the consequences of telling their stories. The overall package is powerful.

    Honorable Mention – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    The story was a powerfully written account of how JPMorgan manufactured false evidence in a private arbitration proceeding against a financial advisor who blew the whistle on investment practices. Judges were impressed with the writer’s ability to weave a strong, personal narrative alongside legal details. The story makes clear that the JPM’s shocking behavior brought no consequences to the bank. The sidebar article offers a strong analysis of the shortcomings of arbitration and whistleblower protections.

    Honorable Mention – ReligionUnplugged.com; Whistleblower alleges $100 billion secret stockpile by Mormon church
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints is among the most secretive and closed religious organizations. Paul Glader of religionunplugged.com got access to an IRS whistleblower complaint that shed new light on an important aspect of the Church’s finances and its links to Ensign Peak Advisors. The story suggests that the Church has funneled some part of the money received from its members into the fund, which has grown from $10 billion to $100 billion over the past 22 years. The complaint made clear that part of the money from the fund went to pay for a mall in Salt Lake City, despite claims to the contrary by the Church. The story was picked up widely by major news outlets across the country.


    Markets – Large division

    Winner – CNN Business; A crack in overnight lending markets
    CNN Business tackled breaking news about the overnight lending markets quickly and impressively, earning the top prize for its clear, engaging and consumer-friendly account of what happened in the repo markets, why it matters and what the turmoil indicates about potential future problems with liquidity and investor confidence.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Muni-bond mess
    The Wall Street Journal brought thorough data analysis and exhaustive reporting to bear on the longstanding dysfunction in the municipal bond markets. The coverage detailed problems with bond pricing, interest rates and ratings, along with an eye-popping look at an obscure Wisconsin agency that has issued billions of dollars in tax-exempt financing for projects across the country, some of which could expose investors to unanticipated levels of risk. The stories have prompted calls for increased oversight of the municipal bond market.

    Markets – Medium and Small divisions

    Winner – Fortune; Wall Street’s contact high
    This profile of Brendan Kennedy, the co-founder of marijuana maker Tilray, expertly explores the complicated path to the company’s 2018 IPO and the challenges Kennedy faces running a company whose product is still federally illegal. The story benefits from the hours the author spent with her subject, offering compelling anecdotes crisply written.


    Media/Entertainment – Large division

    Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); CBS MeToo
    After the firing of the CBS chief executive over claims of sexual misconduct, Meg James spent months checking to see whether the harassment and retaliation were pervasive within the company.  CBS said they were not. James’ reporting found problems in Miami, Dallas and other cities where CBS has bureaus. James used documents, interviews and extraordinary reporting skills to provide great details. James’ first story on Jill Arrington showed an ability to build trust with victims who were reluctant to talk. Excellent work.

    Honorable Mention – Associated Press; Local news deserts
    These are engaging and important stories on what happens to a community when its newspaper dies. With nearly 1,400 cities and towns losing news coverage in America, the Associated Press team examines what has been lost in these growing local news deserts. The stories also chronicle different efforts to resurrect news coverage – many unsuccessful and some successful – and the efforts of private philanthropy to be of assistance. One of the many strengths of these stories is excellent and insightful, on-the-ground coverage.

    Media/Entertainment – Medium and Small divisions

    Winner – A collaboration of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project and the Guardian; America’s rural radio stations are vanishing – and taking the country’s soul with them
    The Guardian article wins best story in the category of Media/entertainment for small- and medium-sized staff.  In clear, accessible language, the story elegantly links the Telecommunication Act of 1996 to the financial collapse of a local radio station in Arizona. Debbie Weingarten goes beyond just explaining how the law led to consolidation of the radio industry; she dives into the cost to communities, which are losing a key source of information and cultural identity as stations are turned into homogenized satellites of corporations. Beautiful pictures also enhance the article’s bold, empathetic storytelling.

    Honorable Mention – The Information; Media and entertainment industry transformation
    The Information’s package of stories deserves honorable mention as demonstrating deep and persistent reporting on the waves made by digital media. Jessica Toonkel and Tom Dotan found sources inside guarded bastions, like Disney and Netflix, to show readers how important decisions are made. The articles delivered good value to The Information’s subscribers, telling them things that the subject companies don’t want told– as when Disney whines: “This story is pure fiction…”


    Newsletter – Large division

    Winner – The Financial Times; Moral Money
    Launched in June, the FT’s Moral Money newsletter showed what creativity and flexibility could produce for readers with an interest in corporate governance and social responsibility, topics that animate investor decisions more and more but are overlooked in the day-to-day tumble of market coverage. The newsletter is packaged well with commentary, extended blurbs, photos, graphics and then roundups of headlines that provide a sweep of ESG developments over a week. Notably, Moral Money is not just a vehicle to promote FT content but to put the publication at the center of the ESG conversation. The newsletter routinely had links to articles that are produced by other publications, including direct competitors like the Wall Street Journal. It’s interactive too; the newsletter’s readers are invited to comment, and writers respond. The FT used the newsletter in September to round up coverage of the U.N.’s General Assembly meeting and focus on climate change. And in another demonstration of the flexible approach to the newsletter, writers took one issue to feature a Q&A with Leo Strine, the Delaware judge with enormous influence on U.S. corporate law. Great imagination, few wasted words and incredibly useful to readers; what a terrific debut.

    Newsletter – Medium division

    Winner – Barron’s; Review & preview
    Barron’s Review & Preview is the clear winner in a category where the entries demonstrated that a newsletter has many meanings. The best ones, though, are those with a good format, design and tone, lively writing, and which offer a good read on multiple subjects both for insiders and novices. Barron’s checks all these boxes.

    Newsletter – Small division

    Winner – Al-Monitor; Middle East lobbying
    This newsletter, covering almost everything imaginable in the golden niche of Middle East political influence, is unique accountability journalism, done by a staff of two, on an issue of great importance that no one else covers at this level of intensity. It breaks a ton of news and it’s all extremely well documented, with good use of the newsletter format. We can’t imagine their typical workday given the amount of time, effort and detail this takes.


    Personal Finance – Large division

    Winner – The New York Post; Earnin series
    The NY Post’s Kevin Dugan took on one of Silicon Valley’s darlings — Earnin — a rapidly growing, privately held company that quickly attained near-unicorn status (meaning a recent startup with a valuation of more than $1 billion). One of Silicon Valley’s largest venture firms, Andressen Horwitz, has a major stake in Earnin. Dugan found that Earnin’s popular cash-advance app resembles payday lending schemes with annual percentage rate loans that have been banned in 15 states. His reporting sparked investigations by regulators in 11 states. This was personal finance reporting with a demonstrable impact.

    Personal Finance – Medium division

    Winner – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; All she wanted was to pay her health insurance
    Solid reporting and a good story well told.

    Personal Finance – Small division

    Winner – Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Watch out for the elder fraud web
    Elder fraud isn’t a new topic, but this was well-reported, conveyed expertise and was full of actionable, practical tips for adult children who don’t know what they need to watch for or do.


    Real Estate – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; The WeWork delusion
    This exhaustively reported investigative series exposed WeWork founder and CEO Adam Neumann’s increasingly eccentric and unethical behavior. The report helped to derail WeWork’s initial public offering, sparring investors from billions of dollars in losses had they bought into the company’s planned stock-market debut.

    Honorable Mention – CNN Business; The internet didn’t shrink 6% real estate commissions. But this lawsuit might
    This story was comprehensive in explaining how technology is giving more knowledge and autonomy to home-buying consumers, which is threatening to disrupt the financial power structure of the real estate industry. It is a thorough, interesting and clearly explained report of the reasons for the shifts in the industry.

    Real Estate – Medium division

    Winner – The Miami Herald; Priced out of paradise
    In the aftermath of the Great Recession a decade ago, few cities have seen housing rents soar as dramatically as Miami. With painstaking diligence, the Miami Herald explores the economic and social factors that made Miami-Dade America’s most expensive market for renters in a four-part series titled, “Priced Out of Paradise.” Consisting of more than a dozen stories and videos as well as an interactive tool, the series “tackles a big-picture real estate topic in a big-picture way” and also explores “the local context of related trends that have much broader implications across the country, including income inequality and class issues,” as one of the judges wrote. The Miami Herald team effectively used the “human-interest elements of storytelling to draw in average readers who might not otherwise be inclined to read a deep study on a business topic.” The Miami Herald journalists deserve special praise for reaching out to experts in high-rent markets in different parts of the world to explain how other metro areas are dealing with rising rental costs. To help readers further, the newspaper developed an “interactive tool that allows users to input their budget to determine where they can afford to rent or buy, and how schools and crime rank from neighborhood to neighborhood. The tool is easy to use, informative in the context of someone’s individual circumstances and broadly applicable for many readers. This gives the package a news-you-can-use advantage when weighed against some other entries,” the judges noted. The Miami Herald team deserves congratulations for an extraordinary achievement.

    Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    This is extraordinary and impactful work. It reflects a deep commitment to being a community watchdog in every measurable way – time, effort and resources. The project involved 25 undercover testers in a three-year investigation. The resulting coverage is rolled out in 16 parts that detail the results, look at the underlying issues from many angles and hold individuals accountable. There is even a 45-minute documentary about the investigation. Among those spurred to action by this deeply reported and well-written series were: Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Attorney General Letitia James, three State Senate committees, the New York Association of Realtors, the National Association of Realtors and the county executives of Nassau and Suffolk.

    Real Estate – Small division

    Winner – McClatchy, Washington bureau; Epstein’s mystery island
    Incredible digging, well-organized and framed, and doesn’t hurt that it’s on one of the biggest stories of 2019.

    Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal; Collection of real estate stories
    The first story by Sichko about the young developer who allegedly stole millions from investors is compelling, deeply researched, and a qualifying entry on its own.

    Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; The standoff at Pope Resources: Deconstructing Dargey; HQ, too
    The Stiles piece, “Deconstructing Dargey,” was especially impressive. The piece offers insights into how a disgraced developer ripped off immigrant investors to enrich himself and put the investors into immigration limbo.


    Retail – Large division

    Winner – NPR; Lives Upended: Workers thrown into turmoil by faraway corporate bosses
    NPR’s Phyllis Fletcher and Will Chase contributed to one of the reports. This is excellent investigative reporting. Alina Selyukh found the issue, investigated the policy, explored how it hurt employees by telling their personal stories, then prompted change by Walmart to a policy fairer to employees.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Fast fashion
    Remarkably comprehensive spade-work and dogged determinism characterizes the storytelling and revelations in this trio of Fast Fashion investigations. Each piece surprises with the reporters’ success at getting elusive sources, such as the garment workers in Los Angeles, on the record to reveal the truth behind all-but-unknown brand names in the transitory world of low-cost, but celebrity driven fashion. The portrait of the family behind the H&M brand surprises with its depiction of seemingly heedless stewardship of a brand that was everywhere for some time and is now evaporated. The deep dive into partially successful and otherwise inadequate efforts to bring accountability into the global garment making industry offers an unforgettable, helpful window in the difficulties in introducing reforms and transparency into this rapidly changing market. A bravura scope of work.

    Retail – Medium division

    Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and BuzzFeed News; The final mile
    ProPublica and BuzzFeed deliver deep, meaningful, fearless reporting on the biggest name in retail. Their work uncovers the human costs of a secretive culture hellbent on delivery speed and efficiency.

    Honorable Mention – Newsday; Changing landscape
    Newsday’s coverage of the evolving retail landscape, from movie theaters to gyms to bridal shops, is a model for marrying on-the-ground color with national context and data.

    Honorable Mention – Fortune; Seven decades of self-destruction
    Fortune delivers new insights on Sears’ troubled past, with short, punchy sidebars.

    Retail – Small division

    Winner – Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Behind the smiles
    The scope of the project, combined with the accounts from employees, was impressive. This is important journalism, especially as Amazon pops up all over the country with warehouses and last-mile delivery centers. The judges found it particularly clever how the reporter circumvented the lack of transparency by having employees request injury data.

    Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Collection of retail stories
    The pieces were well written, engaging and informative.


    Small Business/Management/Career – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Labor squeeze
    This series was compellingly written; it did an excellent job looking at overall market trends impacting small business, manufacturing and employment, grounding it all in very immediate and human stories. The human elements of all three stories pull the complex issues into focus without oversimplifying them. These stories are local, they are global, they are small business, they are representational, and they are as much about manufacturing and trade as about workers and people. We also appreciated the tone of all three features in the package: Ruth Simon did an excellent job avoiding treating the focal points for her stories as quaint, sweet, inspirational, or pitiable—traps a less masterful writer could easily have fallen into. We were pulled into each story, and the whole series stood together as a cohesive whole.

    Honorable Mention – NBC News Investigations; In the hot seat: UPS delivery drivers at risk of heat-related illnesses
    This is an impressive investigation on an important topic, but one that would likely never have come to light if not for these reporters’ efforts. It’s clear that the reporting team took a lot of care in reporting these stories, especially in the face of resistance from UPS, using tactics like records requests and heat trackers—way beyond interviewing drivers—and the added perspectives of government regulations and other data round it out. The team did a great job of articulating the human cost of e-commerce and the strain in the logistics industry, and showing the perspectives of parties involved—workers, UPS, government, health experts and others. The result was very well reported, well written and very impactful.

    Small Business/Management/Career – Medium division

    Winner – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Excellent reporting. The reporting team did a great job telling the first-person stories about what the real business impact of Hurricane Michael was and a great job connecting the judge, the reader, to these people and their plights.

    Small Business/Management/Career – Small division

    Winner – Portland Business Journal; Diversity in the workplace
    Solid reporting and writing on a worthwhile topic.


    Student Journalism – Stories for Professional Media Outlets

    Winner – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; 123 have unexpectedly died in nursing homes, but Arizona still gives them top grades
    These four ASU students did a good job of identifying an important problem. The judges appreciated the human lede and the interviews with affected individuals in Arizona. This is a well-organized and clearly written piece.

    Honorable Mention – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; Arizona charges less than almost anyone else to graze cattle. Public schools miss out on the money.
    These five ASU students identified an egregious situation in which state business interests are harming residents and provided a nice comparison with other states. The story was well done overall.


    Student Journalism – Stories for Student Media Outlets

    Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication; With Venezuela in turmoil, migrants and refugees turn to Peru
    It’s not easy to parachute into an international crisis and come back with a cogent story, but Ethan Millman did just that with his reporting from Peru. The crisis in Venzuela has been well publicized, but this story shines a light onto what has been described as the largest mass migration in the history of the Western Hemisphere. The reporting offers nice sketches of the mostly well-educated refugees seeking to rebuild their lives and gives an overview of the many challenges facing the host country.


    Technology – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Big tech’s hidden costs
    The Journal did an extraordinary job of establishing how rickety the quality standards have become on some of the world’s biggest digital marketplaces. Reporters not only documented problems, they invited companies to fix them and then took a fresh look at the companies’ conduct afterward. Even with the chance for a do-over, problems persisted, to a shocking degree. It takes courage and a big-picture view to spend months digging that deep. But the payoff is landmark coverage of an issue that won’t fade from sight. This is the type of vital watchdog journalism that makes an immediate impact, prompting people who work at big consumer internet companies to address obvious problems they had not bothered to fix or consider before.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Google’s power and peril
    This is an important document exposing the dissonance between public statements and private realities, and it goes deeper on this topic than any prior effort. It is a lucid, comprehensive example of explanatory journalism at its best. The Wall Street Journal’s reporters pull back the curtain on the profoundly important role that Google’s search engine plays in our society — and the ways that the digital sausage gets made. In doing so, they perform a great public service, balancing the ledger between the huge amount that Google knows about us vs. the very little that we know about Google.

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; YouTube managers ignored warnings
    For years, YouTube has been one of the noisiest, most visible parts of the Internet — and also one of the most secretive, hard-to-understand businesses. Bloomberg’s reporters dig deep to explore YouTube’s inconsistent, often troubling, approach to the responsibilities of being the world’s largest platform for video content. Undoubtedly, this work of journalism spurred conversations at the company and put more pressure on leadership to take action. By getting such issues out in the open, YouTube and its corporate owner, Google, at last are thinking twice about how to handle deceitful or hateful content. Once again, we see that sunlight can be the best disinfectant.

    Technology – Medium division

    Winner – ProPublica; The extortion economy
    ProPublica’s “The extortion economy” exemplifies the best of watchdog business reporting. Compellingly written, these stories not only trace ransomware attacks to their international sources, they also shed important light on the failure of officials at publicly traded companies to adequately disclose their companies’ victimization by these internet pirates. While it’s been reported that these cases often require exorbitant sums of money to resolve, the ProPublica series illuminates the way insurance companies tend to push clients to pay out, rather than use costly data recovery systems. These stories have already led to executive and legislative action to address lack of corporate transparency and weak regulations.

    Honorable Mention – Forbes Magazine; Bumble’s Sexism Problem
    Forbes’ Angel Au-Yeung snagged an interview with a reclusive and powerful Russian magnate. She then used her interviewing skills and powers of observation to paint us a picture of a booze-fueled, misogynistic work culture accompanied by the snazzy lifestyle and the lack of self-awareness that is prevalent among many tech millionaires/billionaires behind buzzy tech startups. A fantastic story that also produced results. 

    Technology – Small division

    Winner – The Counter; Grubhub’s shadow sites
    Terrific enterprise to expose practices that Grubhub’s own partners didn’t fully understand. The coverage unleashed real-world consequences, with politicians pressuring the company and — most significantly — Grubhub itself, amending its policies.

    Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; HQ, Too; One company, two Americas; The education of Brad Smith
    The Puget Sound Business Journal scooped everyone in predicting where Amazon’s footprint would expand most after the collapse of the New York HQ2 project. Two Americas and Brad Smith were well-researched, ambitious stories in their own right, and especially so for a weekly publication.


    Travel/Transportation – Large division

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Boeing’s deadly failure
    There were dozens of stories written about the failures within Boeing that contributed to the tragic crashes of two 737 Max jets. The WSJ’s reporting was among the best. Not only did the reporters successfully explain the almost criminal lack of information provided to pilots on the MCAS system and how to disconnect it, they also used powerful graphics and illustrations to help readers understand how the system failures affected the trajectory of the planes. Photos and stories about the pilots also drove home the human loss associated with the crashes and the devastation left in their wake.

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Taken for a ride
    The reporting on this story was fantastic: 450 interviews plus building the database, yeoman’s work for a single reporter. The storytelling kept the judges hooked and included powerful personal stories of vulnerable individuals whose lives were devastated. This is classic journalism in sticking up for those with no voice.  The story structure was also spot on – opening with anecdotes that drew the reader in and that were threaded throughout the stories. People were at the center of this series and illuminated the dark history of the taxi business and the failings of those in government in a memorable way. 

    Travel/Transportation – Medium division

    Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX Crisis – How failures at Boeing and FAA caused 346 deaths
    This series is well reported and sourced. The writing is clear which is no easy task when you are trying to describe something as technically challenging as software systems and how they help pilot (or crash) airplanes. The Seattle Times’ series lays bare how the erosion of procedures designed to analyze and approve safety assessments contributed to the crashes of two 737 MAX airplanes. The series shows how the FAA has, over time, relinquished much of its certification responsibility to Boeing itself. Boeing has been able to exert control over the individuals it has charged with making compliance findings, meaning they are strongly incentivized to make approvals and move projects forward. Although it doesn’t seem anything will change under the current administration, this type of reporting will eventually force the FAA to reconsider the way it’s running its oversight.

    Honorable Mention – Globe and Mail; Blind spots: How Canada’s reliance on U.S. aviation policy kept regulators from seeing the fatal flaws in Boeing’s 737 Max
    Wow. This was a feat of reporting. The story is horrifying and so well done. The Globe and Mail was able to show the systemic issues that caused a delay in response from Canada’s transport authorities and went deeper into Boeing’s role in it. It’s clear who’s responsible backed by deep, thorough reporting and tells the story in a compelling way. What an indictment of Boeing and the regulatory bodies that are supposed to be helping the public but instead appear to be run by the organizations they are supposed to regulate. This thoroughly researched and reported article shines a light into how these bodies acted in the aftermath of the second deadly crash and offers lessons into the need for better oversight and information.

    Travel/Transportation – Small division

    Winner – The Information; Autonomous driving’s ambitious promises
    Amir Efrati and Matt Drange cover an issue that feels relatively new to the transportation space and do so in a way that holds big automakers (even new ones like Tesla) to account. This is excellent shoe-leather reporting where a small paper scoops major media – impressive. This story is on-target for a wider business audience.

    Honorable Mention – Baltimore Business Journal; Navigating Baltimore: A two-part series
    The series told stories of real people and shed light on the challenges of commuting. Navigating Baltimore is really strong – it told the story so thoroughly and from so many different vantage points with compelling visuals and fresh interviews.


    Video – Large division

    Winner – NBC News Investigations; ‘Zone Rouge’: An army of children toils in African mine
    What more networks should be doing: high-quality reporting, that is immersive and character driven. This is truly professional journalism at its finest.

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; How Huawei employees helped governments spy on people
    This content is top notch reporting. Excellent writing but the content is king here. The judges would love to see more reporting like this in the United States because there is so much out there that is unknown, from cameras to recordings to listening devices. This was an inspiring story.

    Video – Medium division and Small division

    Winner – Quartz; Because China
    All the judges agreed that this entry is fantastic. They loved the detailed examination of censorship and how conformity is knit into contracts and social media, which is enforceable outside of China. Excellent production. This series was some of the best, most thoughtful video reporting the judges have seen this year and they particularly loved the deep dive into the impacts of Chinese demand for soybeans on Brazil’s indigenous people and environment.

    Honorable Mention – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Considering the topic — insurance — it was interesting. It explained the nuances of what gets covered and why being insured against some portion of your crop over several years can wipe you out. Who knew crop insurance could be so interesting? As someone who had family and friends impacted by Hurricane Michael, one judge found this video particularly special. The hurricane and its effects had very little coverage, and the judges thought this was a powerful and interesting piece that tackled a complex and heartbreaking subject.

  • 2019 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday March 30, 2020

    Congratulations to the 2019 Best in Business contest honorees!

    Submissions came from 183 news organizations across all platforms representing the breadth of business journalism, from international, national and regional news outlets to specialized business publications.

    See judging comments and the list of judges.

    Best in Business past honorees.

    Audio

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Wall Street Journal and Gimlet Media; WeWork trilogy
    Eliot Brown, Maureen Farrell, Kate Linebaugh, Ryan Knutson, Annie Minoff, Rikki Novetsky, Sarah Platt, Willa Rubin, Pia Gadkari, Annie-Rose Strasser, Griffin Tanner and Jarrard Cole

    • Honorable Mention – NPR; Profiles of America in full employment
    Jim Zarroli, Scott Horsley, Alina Selyukh, Uri Berliner, Pallavi Gogoi and Avie Schneider

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker; Bankshot
    John Heltman and Rob Blackwell


    Banking/Finance, Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Covert operation
    Mark Maremont and Leslie Scism

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and 16 media partners; Mauritius Leaks
    Will Fitzgibbon, Antonio Cucho, Amy Wilson-Chapman and Marwen Ben Mustapha

    Banking/Finance, Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; Trump’s taxes
    Heather Vogell and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of American Banker and ProPublica; How Trump’s political appointees thwarted tougher settlements with two big banks
    Kevin Wack, Alan Kline, Jesse Eisinger and Nick Varchaver

    Banking/Finance, Small division

    • Winner – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase Private Client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.         
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – The Real Deal; Trouble in the land of OZK
    David Jeans, Keith Larsen and Hiten Samtani


    Breaking News, Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; U.S.-China trade war        
    David Lawder, Jeff Mason, Michael Martina and Chris Prentice

    • Honorable Mention – The Financial Times; WeWork
    James Fontanella-Khan, Eric Platt, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, Laura Noonan and Elaine Moore

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; PG&E files for bankruptcy
    Mark Chediak, Christopher Martin, Allison McNeely, Katherine Doherty and David Baker

    Breaking News, Medium division

    • Winner – Dallas Morning News; U.S. pilots faulted 737 Max jets
    Dom DiFurio, Cary Aspinwall and Ariana Giorgi

    Breaking News, Small division

    • Winner – Baltimore Business Journal; Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding
    Melody Simmons


    Commentary/Opinion, Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; China-Think
    Li Yuan

    • Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times (CA); Michael Hiltzik opinion/commentary
    Michael Hiltzik

    Commentary/Opinion, Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; America’s broken health care system
    Elisabeth Rosenthal

    • Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle; Accountability
    Chris Tomlinson

    Commentary/Opinion, Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Holding Chicago companies accountable
    Joe Cahill

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; Commentary on drug pricing and development
    Matthew Herper


    Economics, Large division

    • Winner – Bloomberg News; Addicted to debt
    Christopher Maloney, Adam Tempkin, Ben Holland and Shahien Nasiripour

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; How Trump’s trade war went from method to madness
    Jenny Leonard and Shawn Donnan

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; TOPLive
    Chris Anstey, Marcus Ashworth, James Callan, Andrew Cinko, Crystal Chui, Eric Coleman, Mark Cranfield, Enda Curran, Neil Denslow, Andrew Dunn, Tim Farrand, David Finnerty, Tal Barak Harif, Andrew Harrer, Takaaki Iwabu, Ira Jersey, Stephen Jonathan, Alex Jones, Tony Jordan, Luke Kawa, Adrian Kennedy, Geoff King, Maria Kolesnikova, Anny Kuo, Scott Lanman, Carolynn Look, Sara Marley, Yuki Masujima, Steve Matthews, Galen Meyer, Chikako Mogi, Shoko Oda, Marc Perrier, Carl Riccadonna, Emma Ross-Thomas, Kurt Schussler, Arran Scott, Subramaniam Sharma, Piotr Skolimowski, Molly Smith, Yuko Takeo, Eddie van der Walt, Eliza Winger, Foster Wong, Doug Zehr

    Economics – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Rick Barrett and Maria Perez

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; No mercy
    Sarah Jane Tribble


    Energy/Natural Resources – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Brazil’s deadly dam collapse
    Samantha Pearson, Patricia Kowsmann, Luciana Magalhaes and Scott Patterson

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; Is one of the world’s biggest lawsuits built on a sham?
    Kit Chellel, Joe Light and Ruth Olurounbi

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; PG&E’s disconnect
    Ivan Penn, Peter Eavis and James Glanz

    Energy/Natural Resources – Medium division

    • Winner – The Arizona Republic; Arizona’s next water crisis
    Ian James, Rob O’Dell and Mark Henle

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity and “The World”; Pushing plastic
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tik Root and Patrick Winn

    Energy/Natural Resources – Small division

    • Winner – Honolulu Civil Beat; Reeling it in
    Nathan Eagle and Patti Epler

    • Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent; Dicey deals kept English Station dirty
    Christopher Peak


    Explanatory – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Hidden injustice
    Dan Levine, Benjamin Lesser, Jaimi Dowdell, Lisa Girion and Michelle Conlin

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; New red scare
    Peter Waldman

    Explanatory – Medium division

    • Winner – Fortune; Epidemic of fear
    Erika Fry

    • Honorable Mention – E&E News; Dealing with disasters
    Thomas Frank

    • Honorable Mention – Chronicle of Higher Education; How America’s college-closure crisis leaves families devastated
    Michael Vasquez, Dan Bauman, Erica Lusk, Janeen Jones, Jacquelyn Elias and Bridget Bennett

    Explanatory – Small division

    • Winner – Marker; The cutthroat battle between S’well and its bougie water bottle copycats
    Stephanie Clifford and Danielle Sacks

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay

    • Honorable Mention – Denver Business Journal; Why Molson Coors had to leave Denver
    Ed Sealover


    Feature – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Planet Fox
    Jonathan Mahler and Jim Rutenberg

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; This is not the way everybody behaves
    Eliot Brown

    Feature – Medium division

    • Winner – E&E News; The most dangerous malware
    Blake Sobczak

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – Report on Business Magazine; A long road
    Paul Christopher Webster

    Feature – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store
    Joe Fassler

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Atlanta rising
    J.J. McCorvey


    General Excellence – Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    • Winner – Financial Planning
    Scott Wenger, Chelsea Emery, Ann Marsh, Jessica Mathews, Andrew Welsch, Maddy Perkins

    General Excellence – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal
    The Wall Street Journal staff

    General Excellence – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel staff 

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press
    Phoebe Wall Howard, Jamie LaReau, Susan Tompor and Ryan Garza

    General Excellence – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal
    Portland Business Journal staff

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker
    Rob Blackwell, Dean Anason, Alan Kline, Bonnie McGeer, Joe Adler, Paul Davis, Penny Crosman and Suleman Din


    Government – Large division

    • Winner – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, The Miami Herald, La Posta and 16 other media partners; The bribery division  
    Staffs of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, La Posta, McClatchy/Miami Herald and 16 other media partners

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY; Copy. Paste. Legislate.
    Staffs of the Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY

    Government – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; The TurboTax trap
    Justin Elliott, Paul Kiel and Lucas Waldron

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Elaine Chao used her cabinet post to help Mitch McConnell
    Tucker Doherty, Tanya Snyder and Arren Kimbel-Sannit

    Government – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s New York Business; Will Bredderman’s coverage of New York City government        
    Will Bredderman

    • Honorable Mention – Albany Business Review; How Cuomo’s strategy stalled Albany’s nanotech dream
    Chelsea Diana and Liz Young

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay


    Health/Science – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Martin Shkreli: Business behind bars
    Rob Copeland and Bradley Hope

    Health/Science – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; UVA lawsuits
    Jay Hancock and Elizabeth Lucas

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; Newark Beth Israel Hospital
    Caroline Chen

    • Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Turned away
    John Diedrich and Kevin Crowe

    Health/Science – Small division

    • Winner – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – The Counter; The bowls at Chipotle and Sweetgreen are supposed to be compostable. They contain cancer-linked “forever chemicals.”
    Joe Fassler


    Innovation – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; Data visualizations
    Emily Badger, Larry Buchanan, Quoctrung Bui, Keith Collins, Nicholas Confessore, James Glanz, Mika Gröndahl, Maggie Haberman, Michael D. Shear and Karen Yourish

    Innovation – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Erin Caughey, Andrew Mollica and Bill Schulz

    Innovation – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Crain’s special project
    Jason McGregor, Hugh Dellios, Stephen Serio, Pat Nabong and Claire Bushey


    International Reporting – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); The war against Huawei
    Norman Pearlstine, David Pierson, Robyn Dixon, David S. Cloud, Alice Su, Max Hao Lu and Priya Krishnakumar

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    International Reporting – Medium and small divisions

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Big Tech beat Europe’s tough new privacy rules
    Nick Vinocur


    Investigative – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times; Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Ambushed at home
    M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer

    Investigative – Medium division

    • Co-Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Co-Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX – Flawed design, failed oversight at Boeing and FAA
    Dominic Gates and Mike Baker

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press; Out of gear
    Phoebe Wall Howard

    Investigative – Small division

    • Winner – A collaboration of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting and Associated Press; Caregivers and takers
    Jennifer Gollan and Melissa Lewis

    • Honorable Mention – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – ReligionUnplugged.com; Whistleblower alleges $100 billion secret stockpile by Mormon church
    Paul Glader and Emma Penrod


    Markets – Large division

    • Winner – CNN Business; A crack in overnight lending markets
    Matt Egan

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Muni-bond mess
    Heather Gillers, Gunjan Banerji and Tom McGinty

    Markets – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – Fortune; Wall Street’s contact high
    Jen Wieczner


    Media/Entertainment – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); CBS MeToo
    Meg James

    • Honorable Mention – Associated Press; Local news deserts
    David Bauder, David Lieb, Alexandra Olson and Janie Har

    Media/Entertainment – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Economic Hardship Reporting Project and The Guardian; America’s rural radio stations are vanishing – and taking the country’s soul with them
    Debbie Weingarten

    • Honorable Mention – The Information; Media and entertainment industry transformation
    Tom Dotan and Jessica Toonkel


    Newsletter – Large division

    • Winner – The Financial Times; Moral money
    Gillian Tett, Billy Nauman, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson and Patrick Temple-West

    Newsletter – Medium division

    • Winner – Barron’s; Review & preview
    Alex Eule, Nicholas Jasinski, Ben Walsh and Jeffrey Cane

    Newsletter – Small division

    • Winner – Al-Monitor; Middle East lobbying
    Julian Pecquet and Aaron Schaffer


    Personal Finance – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Post; Earnin series
    Kevin Dugan

    Personal Finance – Medium division

    • Winner – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; All she wanted was to pay her health insurance
    Tim Grant

    Personal Finance – Small division

    • Winner – Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Watch out for the elder fraud web
    Miriam Cross


    Real Estate – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; The WeWork delusion
    Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell

    • Honorable Mention – CNN Business; The internet didn’t shrink 6% real estate commissions. But this lawsuit might
    Lydia DePillis and Bronte Lord

    Real Estate – Medium division

    • Winner – The Miami Herald; Priced out of paradise
    Andres Viglucci, Rene Rodriguez, Rob Wile, Jane Wooldridge, Aaron Albright and Taylor Dolven

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    Real Estate – Small division

    • Winner – McClatchy, Washington bureau; Epstein’s mystery island
    Kevin G. Hall and Julie K. Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal; Collection of real estate stories
    Adam Sichko and Meg Garner

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; The standoff at Pope Resources: Deconstructing Dargey; HQ, too
    Marc Stiles and Ashley Stewart


    Retail – Large division

    • Winner – NPR; Lives Upended: Workers thrown into turmoil by faraway corporate bosses
    Alina Selyukh, Jennifer Liberto, Pallavi Gogoi, Uri Berliner and Avie Schneider.

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Fast fashion
    Sapna Maheshwari, Natalie Kitroeff and Elizabeth Paton

    Retail – Medium division

    • Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and BuzzFeed News; The final mile
    Ken Bensinger, Caroline O’Donovan, Patricia Callahan, James Bandler and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Changing landscape
    Tory N. Parrish

    • Honorable Mention – Fortune; Seven decades of self-destruction
    Geoff Colvin and Phil Wahba

    Retail – Small division

    • Winner – Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Behind the smiles
    Will Evans, Rachel de Leon, Byard Duncan, Melissa Lewis, Katharine Mieszkowski and Hannah Young

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Collection of retail stories
    Elizabeth Segran


    Small Business/Management/Career – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Labor squeeze
    Ruth Simon

    • Honorable Mention – NBC News Investigations; In the hot seat: UPS delivery drivers at risk of heat-related illnesses
    Lisa Riordan Seville, Adiel Kaplan, Kenzi Abou-Sabe and Cynthia McFadden

    Small Business/Management/Career – Medium division

    • Winner – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Marcus Stern, Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright and Charlotte Kesl

    Small Business/Management/Career – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal; Diversity in the workplace
    Malia Spencer


    Student Journalism – Stories for Professional Media Outlets

    • Winner – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; 123 have unexpectedly died in nursing homes, but Arizona still gives them top grades
    Ethan Millman, Molly Stellino, Erica Block and Megan Boyanton

    • Honorable Mention – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; Arizona charges less than almost anyone else to graze cattle. Public schools miss out on the money.
    Mackenzie Shuman, Harrison Mantas, Yael Grauer, Molly Duerig and Grayson Schmidt


    Student Journalism – Stories for Student Media Outlets

    • Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication; With Venezuela in turmoil, migrants and refugees turn to Peru
    Ethan Millman


    Technology – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Big tech’s hidden costs
    Kirsten Grind, Gregory Zuckerman, Shane Shifflett, Alexandra Berzon and Justin Scheck

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Google’s power and peril
    Keach Hagey, Vivien Ngo, Kirsten Grind, Sam Schechner, Robert McMillan, John West, Rob Copeland and Katherine Bindley

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; YouTube managers ignored warnings
    Mark Bergen and Lucas Shaw

    Technology – Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; The extortion economy
    Renee Dudley and Jeff Kao

    • Honorable Mention – Forbes Magazine; Bumble’s Sexism Problem
    Angel Au-Yeung

    Technology – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; Grubhub’s shadow sites
    H. Claire Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; HQ, too: One company, two Americas – The education of Brad Smith
    Marc Stiles, Ashley Stewart and Paxtyn Merten


    Travel/Transportation – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Boeing’s deadly failure
    Andrew Tangel, Andy Pasztor, Mark Maremont, Mariano Zafra, Robert Wall, Elliot Bentley, Merrill Sherman, Matina Stevis-Gridneff and Yonathan Menkir Kassa

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Taken for a ride
    Brian M. Rosenthal

    Travel/Transportation – Medium division

    • Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX Crisis – How failures at Boeing and FAA caused 346 deaths
    Dominic Gates, Mike Baker, Steve Miletich and Lewis Kamb

    • Honorable Mention – Globe and Mail; Blind spots: How Canada’s reliance on U.S. aviation policy kept regulators from seeing the fatal flaws in Boeing’s 737 Max
    Grant Robertson and Eric Atkins

    Travel/Transportation – Small division

    • Winner – The Information; Autonomous driving’s ambitious promises
    Amir Efrati and Matt Drange

    • Honorable Mention – Baltimore Business Journal; Navigating Baltimore: A two-part series
    Baltimore Business Journal staff


    Video – Large division

    • Winner – NBC News Investigations; ‘Zone Rouge’: An army of children toils in African mine
    Cynthia McFadden, Christine Romo, Lisa Cavazuti, Bill Angelucci, Sean Keane, Rich Schapiro, Jiachuan Wu, Robin Mucarri, Anna Brand, Shahrzad Elghanayan, Kara Haupt, Dan Nagin, Brandon Barbosa, Richard Greenberg, Robert Dembo, Mark Schone, David Verdi and Adrienne Mong

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; How Huawei employees helped governments spy on people
    Clément Bürge, Josh Chin, Nicholas Bariyo, Joe Parkinson and Sharon Shi

    Video – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Quartz; Because China
    Isabelle Niu, Tony Lin, Nikhil Sonnad, Arielle Ray, Eduardo Araujo, Molly Rubin, Jacob Templin and Emily Watson

    • Honorable Mention – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright, Marcus Stern and Charlotte Kesl

  • 2018 Best in Business Contest Winners and Honorees

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday March 25, 2020

    Congratulations to the 2018 Best in Business award winners! Many thanks to our 205 member judges for their time and thoughtfulness in reviewing entries and meeting to select honorees.

    Audio; All News Organizations

    Winner – Indianapolis Business Journal: The IBJ podcast
    Contributors – Mason King, Lesley Weidenbener

    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal: The next battlefield
    Contributors – Jennifer Strong, Robert McMillan, Steven Rosenbush, Garrett Crowe, Kristin Schwab, Anthony Green, John Wordock, Jacob Gorski

    Banking/Finance; Large

    Winner – Bloomberg: Sign here to lose everything
    Contributors – Zachary Mider, Zeke Faux, David Ingold, Demetrios Pogkas

    Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times: The hidden costs of high-interest rate installment lending
    Contributors – James Rufus Koren, Andrew Khouri

    Banking/Finance; Medium

    Winner – The Charlotte Observer: Wells Fargo’s controversies continue
    Contributors – Deon Roberts, Bruce Henderson, Adam Bell

    Banking/Finance; Small

    Winner – American Banker: Bank CEO’s fire-and-rehire maneuver reaps windfall at taxpayer expense
    Contributors – Kevin Wack, Alan Kline

    Honorable Mention – Sacramento Business Journal: After a decade, banks returning to Sacramento
    Contributor – Mark Anderson

    Honorable Mention – Financial Planning: Keep quiet
    Contributors – Ann Marsh, Scott Wenger

    Breaking News; Large

    Winner – Los Angeles Times: Toyota held accountable for a defect in its Prius
    Contributor – Ralph Vartabedian

    Breaking News; Medium

    Winner – Forbes.com: The inside story of Papa John’s toxic culture
    Contributor – Noah Kirsch

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Law: Ben Penn tip sharing rule
    Contributor – Ben Penn

    Breaking News; Small

    Winner – American Banker: Comerica scrambles to address fraud in prepaid benefits program
    Contributor – Kate Berry, Joe Adler

    Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal: AllianceBernstein’s move to Nashville
    Contributor – Adam Sichko

    Commentary/Opinion; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Tech and policies
    Contributor – Rana Foroohar

    Commentary/Opinion; Medium

    Winner – The Detroit News: Daniel Howes opinion/commentary
    Contributor – Daniel Howes

    Honorable Mention – The Boston Globe: Shirley Leung opinion/commentary
    Contributor – Shirley Leung

    Commentary/Opinion; Small

    Winner – Fast Company: Rick Wartzman opinion/commentary
    Contributor – Rick Wartzman

    Honorable Mention – STAT: Adam Feuerstein biotech industry commentary
    Contributor – Adam Feuerstein

    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business: 2018 editorial board
    Contributor – Ann Dwyer

    Economics; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The trade equation
    Contributors – Nelson Schwartz, Jim Tankersley, Natalie Kitroeff

    Economics; Medium

    Winner – Mother Jones: Frozen assets
    Contributor – Katia Savchuk

    Honorable Mention – Quartz: Remaking economics series
    Contributor– Eshe Nelson

    Economics; Small

    Winner – Indianapolis Business Journal: One city, worlds apart
    Contributors – Hayleigh Colombo, Jill Doyle

    Energy/Natural Resources; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock
    Contributor – Maurice Tamman

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity, The Texas Tribune, The Associated Press and Newsy: Blowout
    Contributor – Jim Morris

    Energy/Natural Resources; Medium

    Winner – CNN: Dirty energy
    Contributors – Nima Elbagir, Dominique van Heerden, Eliza Mackintosh

    Honorable Mention – The Dallas Morning News: Atmos Energy
    Contributors – Holly Hacker, Cary Aspinwall, Allan Vestal

    Energy/Natural Resources; Small

    Winner – Providence Business News: Rising waters
    Contributor – Eli Sherman

    Honorable Mention – Debtwire: Appalachia’s coal comeback collides with grim opioid reality
    Contributors – Kyle Younker, Taylor Harrison

    Explanatory; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock
    Contributors – Maurice Tamman, Matthew Green, Mari Saito, Sarah Slobin, Maryanne Murray

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: Immigration, Inc.
    Contributors – Lauren Etter, Michael Smith, Monte Reel

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times: Pregnancy discrimination
    Contributors – Natalie Kitroeff, Jessica Silver-Greenberg

    Explanatory; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: What the hell happened at GE?
    Contributor – Geoff Colvin

    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle: The miracle molecule
    Contributor – Jordan Blum

    Honorable Mention – Minneapolis Star Tribune: Aging parents, stressed families
    Contributor – Jackie Crosby

    Explanatory; Small

    Winner – InsideClimate News: Harvesting peril
    Contributors – Georgina Gustin, Neela Banerjee, John H. Cushman Jr., Paul Horn, Anna Belle Peevey

    Winner – Project on Government Oversight: Drilling down series
    Contributors – David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Pacifico

    Honorable Mention – The Desert Sun: Poisoned cities, deadly border
    Contributor – Ian James, Zoë Meyers

    Honorable Mention – McClatchy DC Bureau: Ancestry DNA: Privacy for sale
    Contributor – Stuart Leavenworth

    Feature; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The itsy-bitsy, teenie-weenie, very litigious bikini
    Contributor – Katherine Rosman

    Honorable Mention – Businessweek: Two Towns Forged an Unlikely Bond. Now, ICE Is Severing the Connection
    Contributor – Monte Reel

    Feature; Medium

    Winner – Minneapolis Star Tribune: Legal war engulfs 3M device
    Contributor – Joe Carlson

    Honorable Mention – Forbes.com: Wilbur Ross series
    Contributor – Dan Alexander

    Feature; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal: Mapping the new Nashville
    Contributor – Eleanor Kennedy

    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Kansas is dying
    Contributor – Corie Brown

    Honorable Mention – Debtwire Investigations: How Burger King fed storm-ravaged Puerto Rico, and made a killing
    Contributors – Seth Brumby, Javier Balmaceda, Xavira Neggers Crescioni

    General Excellence; Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    Winner – American Banker
    Contributors – Editorial Staff

    General Excellence; Large

    Winner – Financial Times
    Contributors – Arash Massoudi, James Fontanella-Khan, Madison Marriage, Steven Bernard, Sujeet Indap, Amy Kazmin

    General Excellence; Medium

    Winner – The Dallas Morning News
    Contributor – The Dallas Morning News staff

    Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Contributor – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    General Excellence; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal
    Contributor – Lori Becker

    Honorable Mention – Triangle Business Journal
    Contributor – Lauren Ohnesorge, Ben Graham, Cameron Snipes, Dane Huffman, Dathan Kazsuk

    Government; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ambushed at home
    Contributors – Joshua Schneyer, Michael Pell, Andrea Januta, Deborah Nelson

    Government; Medium

    Winner – Politico: Investigation of Ryan Zinke
    Contributors – Ben Lefebvre, Nick Juliano

    Honorable Mention – The Plain Dealer: Do wage theft laws in Ohio harm or help workers?
    Contributor – Olivera Perkin

    Government; Small

    Winner – InsideClimate News: Dangers without borders
    Contributor – Neela Banerjee, Sabrina Shankman, Nicholas Kusnetz, Paul Horn and Anna Belle Peevey

    Honorable Mention – Capital & Main: Battery blood: How California health agencies failed Exide workers
    Contributor – Joe Rubi

    Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent: ‘Scoops & tosses’ $160M in old debt
    Contributor – Christopher Peak

    Health/Science; Large

    Winner – A collaboration of ICIJ, NBC News Investigative Unit, The Associated Press and partners: The implant files
    Contributor – Reporting & Data Teams

    Honorable Mention – Financial Times: Opioid crisis and the Sackler family
    Contributor – David Crow

    Health/Science; Medium

    Winner – ProPublica: Health Insurance Hustle
    Contributor – Marshall Allen

    Honorable Mention – ProPublica: Black Patients Miss Out On Promising Cancer Drugs
    Contributors – Caroline Chen and Riley Wong

    Health/Science; Small

    Winner – Kaiser Health News: Drug price shenanigans
    Contributors – Jay Hancock, Sarah Jane Tribble, Emily Kopp, Sydney Lupkin, Elizabeth Lucas

    Honorable Mention – InsideClimate News: Surrounded by oil fields, an Alaska village fears for its health
    Contributor – Sabrina Shankman

    Innovation; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Visual narratives
    Contributors – Nicholas Confessore, Gabriel Dance, Richard Harris, Mark Hansen, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Natasha Singer, Michael Keller, Aaron Krolik, Matthew Goldstein, Robert Gebeloff, Ross Mantle, Matt Ruby

    Innovation; Medium

    Winner – GateHouse Media: Failure to deliver
    Contributors – Emily Le Coz, Josh Salman, Lucille Sherman, Tony Elkins, Mara Corbett, Tyson Bird, Jennifer Borresen

    Innovation; Small

    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business: Chicago’s opioid crisis series
    Contributors – Kristen Schorsch, Manuel Martinez, Jason McGregor, Cassie Walker Burke

    International Reporting; Large

    Winner – The Associated Press: China’s internment camps
    Contributors – Dake Kang, Martha Mendoza, Yanan Wang

    Honorable Mention – Businessweek: Brexit’s big short
    Contributors – Cam Simpson, Gavin Finch, Kit Chellel

    International Reporting; Medium

    Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and Time Magazine: Unprotected
    Contributors – Finlay Young, Kathleen Flynn

    International Reporting; Small

    Winner – A collaboration of ICIJ, Norbert Zongo Cell for Investigative Journalism in West Africa (CENOZO) and 11 media partners from West Africa: West Africa Leaks

    Investigative; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: The fall of Steve Wynn
    Contributors – Alexandra Berzon, Chris Kirkham, Elizabeth Bernstein, Kate O’Keeffe

    Honorable Mention – The New York Times and The Guardian/The Observer of London: Facebook, disinformation and privacy
    Contributors – New York Times staff with contributions from Carole Cadwalladr for The Guardian/The Observer of London, Matthew Rosenberg, Nicholas Confessore, Paul Mozur, Sheera Frenkel, Cecilia Kang and Jack Nicas

    Investigative; Medium

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Bad medicine
    Contributor – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Winner – The Dallas Morning News: Pain & profit
    Contributor – J. David McSwane and Andrew Chavez

    Honorable Mention – Forbes.com: Wilbur Ross series
    Contributor– Dan Alexander

    Investigative; Small

    Winner – A collaboration of The New Republic and The Investigative Fund: Political corruption and the art of the deal

    Contributor – Anjali Kamat
    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Intercept and The Investigative Fund: FINRA’s black hole
    Contributor – Susan Antilla

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ: Driven into debt
    Contributors – Melissa Sanchez, Elliott Ramos, David Eads, Sandhya Kambhampati and WBEZ

    Markets; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Explaining the financial markets
    Contributors – Matt Phillips, Peter Eavis

    Markets; Medium

    Winner – Bloomberg Law: SEC Wall Street cops see staff drop since Trump election
    Contributors – Andrew Ramonas, Jennifer Bennett

    Markets; Small

    Winner – RTO Insider: The GreenHat Energy story: Doubling down — with other people’s money
    Contributor – Rory Sweeney

    Media/Entertainment; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Moonves and CBS exposed
    Contributors – Rachel Abrams, James B. Stewart, Ellen Gabler, Edmund Lee, John Koblin

    Media/Entertainment; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Tronc chairman sexual harassment
    Contributors – Kristen Bellstrom, Beth Kowitt

    Media/Entertainment; Small

    Winner – The Center for Public Integrity: The NBA and MLB quietly hustle for a cut of the sports betting jackpot
    Contributor – Rui Kaneya

    Newsletter; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Due Diligence
    Contributors – James Fontanella-Khan, Arash Massoudi, Sujeet Indap, Mark Vandevelde, Eric Platt, Javier Espinoza, Don Weinland, Jennifer Bissell-Linsk, Neil Munshi and Lindsay Fortado

    Newsletter; Medium

    Winner – Barron’s: Review & Preview
    Contributors – Alex Eule, Nicholas Jasinski

    Newsletter; Small

    Winner – Communications Daily on 911
    Contributor – Adam Bender

    Personal Finance; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Click to donate
    Contributor – Barney Jopson

    Personal Finance; Medium

    Winner – The Chronicle of Higher Education: Drew Cloud is a well-known expert on student loans. One problem: He isn’t real.
    Contributors – Chris Quintana, Dan Bauman

    Personal Finance; Small

    Winner – The Marshall Project: Petty charges, princely profit
    Contributor – Joseph Neff

    Honorable Mention – McClatchy DC Bureau: Non-bank lending targets weakest borrowers
    Contributors – Kevin G. Hall, Mike Woodel, Laura Corley, Ben Wieder, Paul Hampton

    Real Estate; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Trump taxes
    Contributors – David Barstow, Susanne Craig, Russ Buettner

    Real Estate; Medium

    Winner – The Globe and Mail: Inside the fall of Fortress
    Contributor – Janet McFarland

    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle: Real estate in the aftermath of Harvey
    Contributors – Nancy Sarnoff, Mark Collette, David Hunn, Matt Dempsey

    Real Estate; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal: Project Stella and Why Tony Giarratana gets a Metro park (and you don’t)
    Contributors – Adam Sichko, Meg Garner

    Honorable Mention – Realtor.com: Life in the flood zone
    Contributor – Clare Trapasso

    Retail; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The human side of the retail shakeout
    Contributors – Michael Corkery, Nelson D. Schwartz

    Retail; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Michelle Gass is cracking the code at Kohl’s
    Contributor – Phil Wahba

    Honorable Mention – Chicago Tribune: Sears’ demise
    Contributor – Lauren Zumbach

    Retail; Small

    Winner – Capital & Main: The ‘Amazon Tax’ Ruling: Disrupting the Disruptors?
    Contributor– David Dayen

    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Foreign beef can legally be labeled “Product of U.S.A.”
    Contributor– Joe Fassler

    Small Business/Management/Career; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: Burned out
    Contributors – Thomas Gryta, Ted Mann

    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: In Trump’s America, bosses are accused of weaponizing the ICE crackdown
    Contributors – Kartikay Mehrotra, Peter Waldman, Jonathan Levin

    Small Business/Management/Career; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Second to none, but still number two
    Contributor – Leigh Gallagher

    Small Business/Management/Career; Small

    Winner – McClatchy DC Bureau: Merchant cash death spiral
    Contributor – Ben Wieder

    Student Journalism; Projects and Collaborations

    Winner – Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY) and Dollars & Sense of Maine
    Contributors – Caroline Leddy, Victoria Merlino, Anne Ehart, Andre Beganski, Anderson Calderon, Bruce Dent, Polina Fishof, Edgar Llivisupa, Rommel Ojeda, Jonathan Sperling, Phoebe Taylor-Vuolo

    Student Journalism; Stories Written for Professional Publications

    Winner – Washington and Lee University published in the Tampa Bay Times: SunPass investigation
    Contributors – Hannah Denham, Washington and Lee University

    Honorable Mention – UNC Chapel Hill published in the Triangle Business Journal: Where every penny is earned
    Contributor – Ryan Haar, UNC Chapel Hill

    Student Journalism; Stories produced for Student News Organizations

    Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication: Hurricane provides opportunity for Puerto Rico’s battered tourism industry
    Contributor – Cronkite News is the news division of Arizona PBS. The daily news products are produced by the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at ASU. Contributor – Andres Guerra Luz, Arizona State University

    Technology; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: Elon Musk
    Contributors –Tim Higgins, Susan Pulliam, Liz Hoffman, Tripp Mickle, Rolfe Winkler

    Technology; Medium

    Winner – Politico: The least connected people in America
    Contributor – Margaret Harding McGill

    Honorable Mention – Forbes: WhatsApp
    Contributor – Parmy Olson

    Technology; Small

    Winner – The Weekly Standard: Telemarketers, ahoy
    Contributor – Tony Mecia

    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Silicon Valley wants to give us eggs without chickens. Do we want that?
    Contributor – Joe Fassler

    Travel/Transportation; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: The middle seat
    Contributor – Scott McCartney

    Travel/Transportation; Medium

    Winner CNN Business: Uber sexual assault investigation
    Contributors – Sara Ashley O’Brien, Nelli Black, Curt Devine, Drew Griffin

    Honorable Mention – The Seattle Times: Stolen Horizon passenger jet crashes outside Seattle
    Contributors – Matt Day, Evan Bush, Hal Bernton, Lewis Kamb, Christine Clarridge, Daniel Beekman, Argueda Pacheco-Flores, Ellen Banner

    Travel/Transportation; Small

    Winner – The Information: The self-driving car industry
    Contributor – Amir Efrati

    Video; Large

    Winner – Bloomberg: The drone delivery operator in Rwanda
    Contributors – Aki Ito, Gloria Kurnik, Leila Hussain, Alan Jeffries, Victoria Blackburne-Daniell, David Nicholson

    Honorable Mention – Financial Times: Argentina: A life of boom and bust
    Contributors – Benedict Mander, Vanessa Kortekaas, Ben Marino

    Video; Medium and Small

    Winner – The Story Exchange: A Sandy Hook mom’s nonprofit hopes to stop school shootings
    Contributors– Victoria Wang, Sue Williams, Christina Kelly, Jerry Risius, Noel Flego, Colleen DeBaise

  • Thanks to our 2019 BIB Judges!

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday March 20, 2020

    *SABEW Board Member
    **Former SABEW President

    Tami Abdollah, dot.LA
    Saqib Iqbal Ahmed, Reuters
    Bill Alpert, Barron’s
    George Anders, LinkedIn
    Katerina Ang, Freelance
    Susan Antilla, Type Investigations
    *Cesca Antonelli, Bloomberg Law
    Silvia Ascarelli, MarketWatch
    Doug Banks, Boston Business Journal
    *Robert Barba, Dow Jones Newswires/The Wall Street Journal

    *Rich Barbieri, The New York Times
    **David Beal, Retired
    Brian Beers, Bankrate
    Jeffrey Bercovici, Los Angeles Times
    Ben Berkowitz, WNBC
    Dan Beucke, Los Angeles Times
    Johana Bhuiyan, Los Angeles Times
    Jennifer Bissell-Linsk, Bloomberg
    Jonathan Blum, Blumsday
    Peter Bohan, Retired, formerly Reuters

    Donna Borak, CNN Business
    *Bryan Borzykowski, Freelance and SABEW President
    David Brinkerhoff, USA Today
    Brandon Brown, Phoenix Business Journal
    Jon Buck, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Jonathan Burton, MarketWatch
    Jon Chesto, Boston Globe
    Dana Coffield, The Colorado Sun
    Ronnie Crocker, Beaumont Enterprise
    Paul Curcio, Investment News

    Kevin Dale, CPR News
    *Megan Davies, Reuters
    Lance Davis, Bankrate
    Lydia DePillis, CNN Business
    Esme Deprez, Bloomberg
    Alan Deutschman, University of Nevada-Reno
    Jonathan Diamond, Houston Chronicle
    Moira Dickinson, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Katia Dmitrieva, Bloomberg
    Christine Dobby, Globe and Mail

    Allan Dodds Frank, Freelance
    **Henry Dubroff, Pacific Cost Business Times
    Ed Dufner, Bloomberg News
    Kevin Dugan, The Information
    Amir Efrati, The Information
    Richard Eisenberg, PBS Nextavenue.org
    Clay Eltzroth, Bloomberg
    Chelsea Emery, Arizent (formerly SourceMedia)
    Greg Farrell, Bloomberg News
    *Brad Foss, Associated Press

    Dennis Fulton, Retired
    David Gaffen, Reuters
    Melita Garza, Texas Christian University
    Rob Gavin, Houston Chronicle
    Tanya Gazdik, MediaPost
    *Pallavi Gogoi, NPR
    Bruce Goldberg, BG Writes
    Matthew Goldberg, Bankrate
    Howard Goller, Reuters
    Angela Greiling Keane, Politico

    Justine Griffin, Tampa Bay Times
    Bill Grueskin, Columbia University
    Rami Grunbaum, Seattle Times
    Dan Haar, Hearst Connecticut Media
    **Kevin Hall, McClatchy
    *Glenn Hall, Dow Jones Newswires/The Wall Street Journal
    Kristen Hallam, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    **Mark Hamrick, Bankrate.com
    *Desiree Hanford, Medill Northwestern University
    Clint Henderson, The Points Guy

    Keith Herndon, Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Georgia
    Dan Hertzberg, Retired from WSJ and Bloomberg News
    Maureen Hoch, Harvard Business Review
    Allison Hoffman, CNN Politics
    Bill Holland, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Julia Horowitz, CNN Business
    Scott Horsley, NPR
    Jeff Horwitz, The Wall Street Journal
    Clark Hoyt, Retired, Knight Ridder
    John Hughes, Bloomberg News

    Andre Jackson, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Peter Jeffrey, Bloomberg
    Brenn Jones, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    **Jill Jorden Spitz, Arizona Daily Star
    **Dave Kansas, American Public Media
    Mark Kass, Milwaukee Business Journal
    Tim Kelly, Retired
    Janet Kersnar, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Dimitra Kessenides, Bloomberg News
    Aaron Kessler, Bloomberg Industry Group

    Silvia Killingsworth, Bloomberg Businessweek
    Ron Kirkwood, Retired, author
    Matthew Kish, Portland Business Journal
    **Bernie Kohn, Bloomberg Law
    Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Globe and Mail
    Kevin Krolicki, Reuters
    Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press
    Rachel Layne, Freelance
    Andrew Leckey, Donald W. Reynolds National Center
    Al Lewis, CNBC

    Madeleine Lim, Bloomberg News
    Anya Litvak, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    *Heather Long, Washington Post
    *James Madore, Newsday
    Jonathan Make, Communications Daily
    Joe Mantone, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Felice Maranz, Bloomberg News
    Lynne Marek, Crain’s Chicago Business
    David Marino-Nachison, The Wall Street Journal
    Ann Marsh, Arizent (formerly SourceMedia)

    Steve Matthews, Bloomberg News
    Scott Mayerowitz, The Points Guy
    Philip McClellan, Reuters
    **Greg McCune, Retired
    Maura McDermott, Newsday
    Bonnie McGeer, Arizent (formerly SourceMedia)
    Sarah McGregor, Bloomberg
    Bill McGuire, Bankrate.com
    Kevin McKenna, The New York Times
    Flynn McRoberts, Bloomberg News

    Mark McSherry, The University of Edinburgh
    Renae Merle, The Washington Post
    Phyllis Messinger, The New York Times
    Fred Monyak, Associated Press
    George Moriarty, InvestmentNews
    Daniel Moss, Bloomberg Opinion
    *Dean Murphy, The New York Times
    Jeff Muskus, Bloomberg Businessweek
    Raju Narisetti, McKinsey & Company
    *Jim Nelson, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

    Rick Newman, Yahoo Finance
    Lananh Nguyen, Bloomberg
    Paul O’Donnell, Dallas Morning News
    Victor Ocasio, Newsday
    Holly Ojalvo, Quartz
    Susan Orr, Indianapolis Business Journal
    **Joanna Ossinger, Bloomberg
    Jeremy Owens, MarketWatch
    Mukul Pandya, Wharton School
    Tory Parrish, Newsday

    Jan Paschal, IPOScoop
    *Jenny Paurys, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Martin Peers, The Information
    Martin Pengelly, The Guardian
    Jim Pensiero, Retired, The Wall Street Journal
    Maddy Perkins, Arizent (formerly SourceMedia)
    *Cindy Perman, CNBC
    Jesse Pesta, The New York Times
    Aimee Picchi, Freelance
    Reade Pickert, Bloomberg

    Mary Ellen Podmolik, Chicago Tribune
    Ken Pringle, Freelance, formerly with Bloomberg and WSJ
    *Kim Quillen, Chicago Tribune and SABEW Vice President
    Tim Quinson, Bloomberg News
    Glenn Rabinowitz, Pacific Coast Business Times
    Evan Ramstad, Minneapolis Star-Tribune
    Robert Ray, Freelance
    Mike Regan, Bloomberg News
    Gary Regenstreif, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    **Rob Reuteman, Colorado State University

    Stephanie Ritenbaugh, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    Alberto Riva, The Points Guy
    Ceci Rodgers, Medill Northwestern University
    Ned Russell, The Points Guy
    Jane Sasseen, McGraw Center for Business Journalism
    Ernest Scheyder, Reuters
    **Cory Schouten, The Wall Street Journal
    Anita Sharpe, Bloomberg News
    *Caleb Silver, Investopedia/IAC and SABEW Secretary/Treasurer
    Akash Sinha, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Allan Sloan, Washington Post/ProPublica
    Jeanna Smialek, The New York Times
    **Randall Smith, University of Missouri
    Josh Smith, Gotta Be Mobile
    Oliver Staley, Quartz
    *Marty Steffens, University of Missouri and SABEW Chair
    Suzanne Stevens, Portland Business Journal
    Marina Strauss, retired from The Globe and Mail
    Maggie Swensen, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Cheryl W. Thompson, NPR

    Edward Tobin, Reuters
    Fatima Tomas, S&P Global Ratings
    Craig Torres, Bloomberg News
    Matt Turner, Business Insider
    David Voreacos, Bloomberg News
    John Voskuhl, Bloomberg News
    Joseph Wade, The Film Magazine
    Victoria Walker, The Points Guy
    Derek Wallbank, Bloomberg News
    Allen Wastler, Mass Mutual

    Joseph Weber, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Rob Wells, University of Arkansas
    Andrew Welsch, Arizent (formerly SourceMedia)
    *Scott Wenger, Arizent (formerly SourceMedia)
    Mark Wert, Cincinnati Enquirer
    Lindsey White, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Danielle Wiener-Bronner, CNN Business
    Dave Wilson, Bloomberg News
    Lorraine Woellert, Politico
    **Marty Wolk, Freelance

    Elana Zak, CNN Business
    Jim Zarroli, NPR

    The Best in Business judges do not evaluate entries from their own news organizations and are asked to declare any conflicts of interest to the BIB Committee. When it is determined that there is a conflict, the judges are reassigned.

  • June 4, 1-2 p.m. EDT: Local Economic Stories Using Data from the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW)

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Saturday March 14, 2020

    View the recording.

    The BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages program publishes a quarterly count of employment and wages covering more than 95 percent of U.S. jobs. It’s available at the county, metro, state and national levels by industry.

    In this webinar, we’ll focus on county data and how it can be used in several types of economic stories about the local industries in your community.

    By the end of the webinar, you’ll be able to:
    • Understand how the data is collected and organized.
    • Find your county’s data in various QCEW reports.
    • Place local industries in state and national context.
    • Come up with several story ideas using the data.

    This webinar is free to business journalists thanks to the sponsorship of the American Statistical Association.

    Moderator

    Kimberly Adams
    Kimberly Adams is a host/ correspondent at Marketplace, America’s largest broadcast business program. She covers politics and general news for Marketplace from the Washington, D.C. Bureau, where she also serves on the Board of Governors of the National Press Club. Before moving to D.C., Kimberly reported on the political, social and economic upheaval in Egypt following the Arab Spring as a freelance journalist based in Cairo. Her work aired on multiple networks in the U.S., Canada, U.K., Ireland, Germany, Hong Kong and elsewhere. While reporting in Cairo, she received awards from the National Association of Black Journalists, the Religion Communicators Council, and the Association for Women in Communication. She previously participated in IWMF’s “Great Lakes” Reporting fellowship to Uganda. Prior to freelancing, Kimberly worked as a producer for NPR from the D.C. headquarters, covering politics, arts, culture, and breaking news as a producer for “Weekend Edition” and the Washington Political Unit.

    Speakers

    Paul Overberg, data reporter, The Wall Street Journal

    Paul Overberg is a data reporter at The Wall Street Journal and a member of its investigative team. He focuses on economic and demographic stories but helps reporters working on many beats. He previously worked at USA TODAY as a member of its data team. He has taught at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and served as a senior fellow for the Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California.


    David Hiles, Bureau of Labor Statistics

    David Hiles publishes the County Employment and Wages release for the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW). He started at BLS in 1986, working on the national payroll survey (CES). In 1997 he moved to the QCEW and led its switch from annual to quarterly publication. He has overseen several accelerations of the QCEW release. Mr. Hiles lives in Hyattsville MD with his wife and two children where he served for four years as a city council member.

  • March 11: SABEW’s NYC journalist health care briefing – cancelled due to coronavirus

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Tuesday February 11, 2020

    SABEW has cancelled the March 11 health care briefing at the Commonwealth Fund in NYC. We understand the pressing demands health care journalists are under to cover the coronavirus. Now is not the time to be away from the newsroom.  We are working to offer a virtual alternative or program at a later date.

    SABEW is hosting a free health care briefing, including a luncheon and networking cocktail reception, at a historic Upper East Side mansion.

    On the agenda:

    • Sara Collins and David Blumenthal of The Commonwealth Fund will dig into the latest in health care coverage.
    • Professor Abbe Gluck of Yale Law School will discuss the legal state of play with the Affordable Care Act and Texas v. United States.
    • Author Katherine Eban will discuss her findings on the generic drug industry in her best-selling book Bottle of Lies.
    • Stefanie Ilgenfritz, The Wall Street Journal’s health and science bureau chief, will lead the group in a story-generating session.

    Space is limited to 15 journalists. Participants are responsible for their own travel and lodging costs.

    The briefing is made possible through a grant to SABEW from The Commonwealth Fund. The events will be held at their historic headquarters building, the Harkness House, located on One East 75th Street in New York City.

  • June 9, 2-3 p.m. EDT: Covering the Election on the Business Desk

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Tuesday February 4, 2020

    Listen to the recording.

    It’s one of the big stories of the year, and business journalists can play an important role in the coverage. In this virtual training, we’ll talk about the November elections and the election-related stories that can be assigned on the business desk. We’ll also dive into campaign finance and the stories that can be mined from this data. Whether your organization is covering the White House or City Hall, this session will be packed with practical tips and advice for you.

    Moderator
    Fred Monyak, business news editor, The Associated Press
    Fred is a Washington news editor who oversees coverage of the global economy. He has a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s in journalism, both from Northwestern University. He began his career in Norfolk, Virginia, where he covered local news, before moving to Washington, where he initially helped oversee coverage of politics, diplomacy and other areas as news editor in The Baltimore Sun’s Washington bureau. After a stint managing personal finance coverage for USA Today, he joined the AP’s Washington bureau. For more than 10 years, he has supervised AP reporters who cover the economy, the housing industry, the Federal Reserve, the Treasury and financial regulatory institutions.

     

     

    Panelists
    Carrie Levine, senior reporter, The Center for Public Integrity
    Carrie Levine joined the Center for Public Integrity in October 2014, where she investigates the influence of money in politics. For four years before joining the center, she worked as research director at Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, where she managed a five-person staff that exposed the activities of politically active “dark money” nonprofits and uncovered instances of congressional self-dealing.

    Carrie previously worked as a reporter and associate editor for The National Law Journal, where she covered the inner workings of lobbying firms and lobbyists’ strategies. Carrie also previously reported for the Charlotte Observer, the Patriot Ledger of Quincy, Mass., and The Sun in Lowell, Mass. She is a graduate of Boston University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

     

    Bill Steiden, investigative and business editor, Des Moines Register
    Bill Steiden is the investigative and business editor at the Des Moines Register, where he participated in coverage of the Iowa Caucuses. His career has also included stops at the Columbus Dispatch, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

    Bill earned a bachelor’s in journalism from the University of Kentucky  and a master’s in public administration from Georgia State University.

  • Is paying for graduate school worth it?

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday November 19, 2019

    By Jada Bowman. University of Georgia

    As graduation approaches many undergraduates contemplate continuing their education at the master’s level, but inevitably that decision involves determining if the benefits outweigh the additional costs.

    According to Mary Carlson, a University of Georgia professor whose field of study is personal financial planning with an emphasis in financial therapy, the answer should be straightforward: increasing student loan debt is not advisable if your intended career is not lucrative enough to pay those loans back.

    “We have to be careful on just going back school simply for the sake of going back to school to accumulate more education when there really isn’t a drive behind it,” Carlson said.

    She occasionally works with psychologists and veterinarians who are looking to pay back student loans that can be as much as $400,000.

    “Veterinarians actually come out of vet school with the same amount of debt that a doctor has but, a veterinarian does not make nearly as much money as a doctor makes,” she said.

    Carlson explained veterinarians that work with small animals on average make $70,000 to $80,000 a year and for large animals, they make $40,000 to $50,000 a year. Carlson said people should go into debt sensibly and try to minimize the amount of loans needed to pursue their passion.

    “Everyone should think about what the end term is going to be. What is your net result from gaining that education? Are you working on your third bachelor’s degree?” Carlson said. “Well, maybe we should look at a master’s or maybe we should look at actually working in the industry for a while before continuing to go back to get more education.”

    Colin Luck, a recent graduate from the University of Georgia, agrees with this sentiment. He is currently employed at Amazon as a business analyst in Seattle, Washington, but is planning to get a graduate degree.

    Luck was able to pay off his entire undergraduate student loan balance before graduating in December 2018. His student loan debt had reached $12,000, but he paid it off in August 2018.

    “I think people lose visibility in how much they’re taking out,” he said, referring to the amount of loans they have. After paying off his balance, Luck said he remains motivated to keep student loans at bay.

    Luck thinks the best way to do so is to continue his education through an online master’s program in business administration at Washington State University. He plans to pay for the program out of pocket, using his 10% discount the university provides for Amazon employees. He also plans to apply for scholarships to help lessen the financial burden.

    Meanwhile, he said he understands what the costs will be, explaining that in total, the degree is about $27,000. It’s a two-year program, allowing him to spread the costs over several months.

    Luck said obtaining his MBA will allow him to negotiate a higher salary, making the degree worth his time.

    Jada Bowman is a journalism major in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia.

  • Workplace navigation for the professionally inexperienced

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday October 15, 2019

    By Samuel Leal, Arizona State University

    The pursuit of legally taxable income has taken me to some interesting places. Just after my high school graduation, for example, I had thought proving myself in the real world meant getting a job in the deli department of a nearby grocery store – but quit after a while because the free chicken wings no longer seemed to make that particular job worthwhile overall.

    The summer after I had just wrapped up my junior year of college was more interesting. Money was short and financial obligations were high. I had gotten by for a couple of months through a combination of political canvassing and paid online transcription projects. But now that school had let out, I found myself with enough free time for a full-time job.

    After an evening dedicated to scanning job ads, I found myself in an interview. It was by no means a glamorous position: A call center. But it gave me 40 hours a week and the business model was interesting because it was the customer service arm of a collection of fledgling newspapers.

    As someone studying journalism, it was nice to phone home and tell my mom I was officially “in the industry.” Many days melted into one another punctuated by 9-hour blocks of time which consisted of me endlessly reassuring subscribers that their missing papers would soon be replaced.

    One such afternoon, there was the following exchange with a typical irate subscriber:

    Subscriber: “I just can’t believe that this is the third time I’ve had to call in this week!”

    Me: “I do apologize for the inconvenience. If you could please provide…”

    Subscriber: “I am just sick and tired of having to deal with this!”

    In order to stem the subscriber’s extended tirade, as a change of pace I decided to respond with my very own lengthy, dramatic and highly empathetic response. My ingenuity seemed to work well and got the desired result.  But then, no more than an hour later, I found myself explaining my actions to an absolutely irate supervisor, who had gone through the recordings of all my previous calls and soon discovered my personal creativity had resulted in a pandora’s box of what the company considered protocol violations and improper conduct of its rules.

    So I was jobless the next day. Protocol matters.

    Thankfully, my work life didn’t end there. Since then I have had the pleasure of working as a Spanish language interpreter for workers. And, honestly, it’s pretty nice to be making money, helping people and gaining relevant experience.

    My advice: If you’re young and inexperienced, many jobs you pick up in the fight for economic survival are going to seem miserable. If you’re not going to be living the dream, you might as well be making money. But when an opportunity to make money and set yourself up for a better future presents itself, you better know how to recognize it.

    Samuel Leal is a student at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

  • Make public records part of your beat reporting

    Posted By sabew on Monday October 14, 2019

    View the recording.

    Matt Drange, recently an investigative reporter, left The Information in October to pursue a new project. He has spent much of his career reporting at the intersection of the tech industry and government. At SABEW’s next webinar, he’ll show you how to harness state and federal FOI laws to generate a consistent flow of documents you can use on any beat. Please come with an open mind and questions — specific examples of roadblocks you’ve run into offer great learning opportunities for your colleagues.

    Presenter

    Matt Drange, most recently an investigative reporter at The Information, is the 2019 of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists under the age of 30. Drange will receive the Birger award, a $1,500 honorarium and travel stipend to New York made possible by a gift from rbb Communications of Miami. Previously Drange was a staff writer at Forbes magazine and a business reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Drange graduated from Humboldt State University and earned a master’s degree from the Columbia Journalism School.
    @MattDrange

    About the Birger Award and this virtual training sponsor: rbb Communications
    rbb is an integrated communications firm and four-time U.S. Agency of the Year. As the Champion of Breakout Brands, rbb inspires companies to create customer passion that delivers bottom-line results. rbb’s family of brands offers media relations, marketing, corporate communications, digital/social media and creative services/advertising. Specialty practices include consumer products/services, travel and leisure, health, sports and entertainment, professional services/B2B and higher education. The firm’s global network extends across more than 50 countries through its partnership in PROI Worldwide, the largest global network of independent public relations agencies. For more information, visit www.rbbcommunications.com.

  • Workplace navigation for the professionally inexperienced

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday September 25, 2019

    by Samuel Leal, Arizona State University

    The pursuit of legally taxable income has taken me to some interesting places.

    In the summer of 2016, I decided to move out of Yuma, AZ on an afternoon whim that ended with me taking the midnight train going anywhere. Of course, “midnight train” can here be described as a nom de plume for “Greyhound Departing at 3PM” and “anywhere” refers to my brother’s former apartment in the Main St./Alma School region of Mesa, Arizona.

    It’d been two weeks since my high-school graduation. I was anxious to be out in the real world and getting to work on proving myself. For some reason, I thought this meant getting a job in the deli of a nearby Safeway and quitting after a month because the free chicken wings no longer made being miserable worth it.

    In the years since, I’ve managed to bolster my curriculum vitae through a number of stints – both lengthy and fleeting – undertaken at radically different establishments. Now, I would love to be a reliable employee. But, there’s just one problem: I’m chronically unemployable. Just, indecently distractible. Teachers used to call me a “social butterfly,” but most corporations prefer the term “non-rehireable.”

    Summer 2019 was an interesting place.

    I’d just wrapped up my Junior year of college. Money was short and financial obligations were high. I’d gotten by for the past couple of months through a combination of political canvassing gigs and paid online transcription projects. But now that school had let out, I found myself with enough free time for a full-time job.

    After an evening dedicated to scanning Craigslist, I found myself an interview and a chair with a missing leg. By the next day, I’d gotten myself a job and a spare chair leg. It was by no means a glamorous position; just a dingy call center in one of those strip malls where all the buildings are colored the same shade of despair.

    But they gave me 40 hours a week. And the business model was interesting. We were the Customer Service arm for a collection of fledgling newspapers housed in California. As someone studying Journalism, it was nice to phone home and tell my mom I was officially in the industry.

    Thus, the summer dragged on in despicable (but profitable) fashion. Days melted into one another punctuated by 9-hour blocks consisting of reassuring octogenarians that their missing papers would soon be replaced.

    One such afternoon, I found myself incapable of taking it any longer. Then, the following exchange:

    Valued Subscriber: “…always say the same thing and I just can’t believe that this is the third time I’ve had to call in this week!”

    Me: “I do apologize for the inconvenience, ma’am. If you could please provide -”

    Valued Subscriber: “I am just sick and tired of having to deal with this!”

    Then, a thought:

    Passive interjection would stand no chance to the wrath of Valued Subscriber. No. The situation called for a more creative measure.

    For the next three minutes, I listened as Valued Subscriber’s tirade came to a sputtering standstill as I feigned an impassioned bout of sobbing and weeping right into the mouthpiece. It must have been a riveting performance, because no more than an hour later, I found myself explaining my actions to an absolutely irate supervisor.

    The Subscriber had called in under the guise of “making sure [I] was okay.” Prompted by this, my supervisor had gone through recordings of my previous calls and discovered a pandora’s box of protocol violation, improper conduct, “ridiculous” voices, and (1) episode of exaggerated crying.

    I was jobless the next day. Then, by next week, I wasn’t. Since then, I’ve had the pleasure of working as an Interpreter for the Spanish-speaking masses of the working world. And, honestly, it’s pretty nice to be making money, helping people, and gaining relevant experience.

    The newspaper call center rarely crosses my mind. But, when it does, the only thing I can remember is leaving that place with a memorable anecdote. It does great at parties. You might be wondering what any of this has to do with money. Well, here’s what:

    If you’re young and inexperienced, most jobs you pick up in the fight for economic survival are going to be miserable. So, go and get yourself a nice little mound of taxable sadness you can hack away at until you can’t. If you’re not going to be living the dream, you might as well be making money.

    But when an opportunity to make money and set yourself up for a better future presents itself, you better know how to recognize it. Take it from an Interpreter.

    Samuel Leal is a student at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

  • Surviving the growing gig economy

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday September 25, 2019

    By Austin Fast, Arizona State University

    It’s no news that young journalists can find it tough to land that first job. At the Online News Association’s annual conference held in New Orleans this September, I met a millennial who’d completed 13 internships and said potential employers still told her she “didn’t have enough experience” for entry-level positions. Let’s hope that’s an extreme case, but it illustrates the Catch-22 many journalists encounter when starting out in their careers.

    Finding work in the “gig economy” can be one stopgap to help make ends meet while searching for that first job or waiting for the next step along your career path. I found myself in that position in fall 2018 after rounds of layoffs left me with a severance deal from a medium-market television station. Just because your employment situation has changed, that unfortunately does not mean rent, car payments or medical bills can be put on hold.

    Earlier in the year I’d signed up with Upshift, a local startup in Ohio that connects companies that need temporary workers with people who are looking for shifts. At first, it was just a way to supplement my income from the TV station, but it became a lifesaver when those layoffs hit. The Upshift app’s concept is simple: You can sort work options by amount paid per hour, shift location, duration or company rating to pick shifts that fit with your schedule. Apply for the shift, and you’ll get a notification once a company has approved or denied your request. Show up on time, do a good job, and you’ll get paid every Friday for the previous week’s shifts.

    I’m not going to lie – working for Upshift was not glamorous. I was serving meals and waiting tables at banquet centers, folding sheets and towels for hotels and packing boxes at local distribution centers. Wages ranged from $10 to $20 per hour, mostly falling on the lower end of that spectrum. Some of the shifts were long drives from home, and my social calendar took a serious hit since banquet servers work mostly nights and weekends by default.

    Despite those drawbacks, I’m incredibly thankful Upshift and similar gig economy options exist across the country. I could have chosen to find full-time work as a bartender or server, but Upshift provided a far greater amount of flexibility to create my own schedule that fit around the interviews I was landing as I went through several months of applying for new journalism jobs. Plus, even though I was working at several different companies throughout the course of each week, Upshift handled all the salary and taxation details. That meant I only had one extra W-9 to worry about at tax time that covered all those various work locations.

    The final lesson I’d like to impart readers with is this: Tip your wait staff. I left my Upshift experience convinced that every American should work in the service industry at some point in their life to gain an appreciation for the long hours, grueling physical demands and extreme patience required to fulfill every whim of diners and bar patrons. The least you could do is slide an extra buck or two their way at the end of your Friday night to show your gratitude.

    Austin Fast is a student at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

  • SABEW mourns the loss of Paul Ingrassia

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Monday September 16, 2019

    Portrait of Reuters staffer Paul Ingrassia, in New York, July 7, 2011. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES)

    SABEW mourns the loss of Paul Ingrassia, a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and author of numerous articles and books on the auto industry.  He died after battling cancer at 69.

    ​Ingrassia held senior posts at The Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones Newswires and Thomson Reuters, and for more than three decades was one of the leading journalists of the auto industry. During his time at the Journal as bureau chief, Ingrassia won a Pulitzer Prize, along with his deputy, Joseph White, for coverage of a boardroom revolt at General Motors. He was also the recipient of a Gerald Loeb award for lifetime achievement in financial journalism in 2016.

    Ingrassia participated in SABEW training program and conferences.

    Our condolences go out to Paul’s family, including his brother, Larry Ingrassia, who was honored in 2017 with SABEW’s Distinguished Achievement award.

  • The Information’s Matt Drange Wins SABEW’s Birger Award for Young Business Journalists

    Posted By sabew on Friday September 13, 2019

    Matt Drange, a staff reporter for The Information, is the 2019 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists under 30. Additionally, the judging panel chose to honor two finalists: Ellen Huet, reporter for Bloomberg, and Casey Fabris, reporter for The Roanoke Times.

    Drange will receive the award, a $1,500 honorarium and travel stipend to New York made possible by a gift from rbb Communications of Miami. The award commemorates Larry Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998.

    Josh Merkin, vice president of rbb Communications, will present the award to Drange at SABEW’s New York Fall Conference on Nov. 12.

    “In the face of many challenges, journalists continue to operate with courage and deliver quality work that shines light on the most important issues facing our world today,” said Merkin. “We appreciate the opportunity to work with SABEW to honor Larry’s legacy and offer support to the next generation of business journalists.”

    2019 is the sixth year for the competition. Past winners include Alex HeathJillian BermanWilliam AldenCezary Podkul and Mina Kimes.

    Drange, 30, graduated from Columbia University with a master’s degree from the school of journalism in 2012 after receiving his bachelor’s degree in journalism from Humboldt State University in 2011. He turned 30 in March, meeting the award age eligibility requirements.

    Drange has worked for media outlets, such as The Center for Investigative Reporting as a staff reporter covering technology, the business of guns and the environment. As a staff writer for Forbes Magazine, he covered Donald Trump’s business dealings and the technology industry. With The Information, Drange covers money and power in Silicon Valley.

    “I’m humbled to be recognized alongside such stellar journalists, including both past and present honorees. I’ve been fortunate to spend the early part of my career at newsrooms like The Information, which provides the time and resources to pursue stories worth telling,” Drange said. “I’m especially grateful for the support of my mentor and longtime business journalist, Marcy Burstiner, who taught me to report with tenacity and humility.”

    “Matt impressed all the judges with his persistence at digging up great stories. He displayed an incredible sense of how to mine for features on a particular beat and to tell those stories in an interesting way,” said head judge Jon Chesto of The Boston Globe. “His investigative piece on the decline in Big Tech prosecutions by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Northern California was noteworthy in its scope, and he deserves credit for ferreting out a loophole at eBay that allowed assault rifle parts to be sold on the site despite rules supposedly preventing such sales.”

    Chesto continued: “His tale about a saga involving a too-high hedge around Donald Trump’s Beverly Hills mansion was particularly entertaining, and he showed enterprise by explaining the pitfalls surrounding a company that sells gunfire-location technology. The competition was tough this year, but Matt’s the whole deal — a clear writer, an ambitious reporter, an ambitious thinker — which is why the judges selected him to be the new winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award.”

    A total of 31 young journalists submitted entries. The judging team was made up of SABEW members: Jon Chesto, The Boston Globe; James Madore, Newsday; Marty Steffens, University of Missouri-Columbia; Robert Barba, The Wall Street Journal; and Cindy Perman, CNBC.

    About SABEW:
    SABEW is the largest organization of business journalists in the world. For more information, contact Aimée O’Grady at [email protected].

    About rbb Communications:
    rbb is an integrated communications firm and four-time U.S. Agency of the Year. As the Champion of Breakout Brands, rbb inspires companies to create customer passion that delivers bottom-line results. rbb’s family of brands offers media relations, marketing, corporate communications, digital/social media and creative services/advertising. Specialty practices include consumer products/services, travel and leisure, health, sports and entertainment, professional services/B2B and higher education. The firm’s global network extends across more than 50 countries through its partnership in PROI Worldwide, the largest global network of independent public relations agencies. For more information, visit www.rbbcommunications.com or call 305-448-7450.

  • Learning about the Fed virtual training, Sept. 9

    Posted By sabew on Wednesday August 28, 2019

    Listen to the recording. 

    The Federal Reserve has been in the news a lot lately. It could be because it recently lowered the federal funds rate for the first time in a decade. Or because President Donald Trump has mentioned the Fed many times.

    It’s important to know what the Fed does, because the Fed’s actions affect nearly everyone. If you have a credit card balance, a home equity line of credit or a savings account, the Fed’s actions likely affect you. 

    This training is for reporters who don’t cover the Fed so that you can have a basic understanding of what the Fed does and how it may impact your beat.

    Moderator

    Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com
    Mark Hamrick is Washington bureau chief and senior economic analyst for Bankrate.com, operating out of the National Press Building in the shadow of the White House and U.S. Treasury. He is best known for his analysis of the economy, including the job market, and the Federal Reserve and writes about those subjects for Bankrate. You might see him asking a question at a Washington news conference, hear him discussing these topics and more on the radio or read his name and analysis in print. He is a national award-winning business and financial news journalist who came to Bankrate after leading business news for broadcast at The Associated Press in Washington for nearly 20 years.
    @hamrickisms

    Panelists

    Donna Borak, senior economics writer, CNN
    Donna Borak is a veteran journalist with more than 15 years of experience reporting on national business and economic policy stories. As a senior economics writer at CNN, she covers the Trump administration’s economic policy, including ongoing trade negotiations with China, tax policy and the Federal Reserve. She has traveled extensively with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin for CNN, covering economic summits around the world. Donna previously covered bank regulation following the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis for The Wall Street Journal and the American Banker newspaper. She’s also been a business reporter for The Associated Press and United Press International, covering defense and international trade, respectively. In 2014, she was selected as a John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.
    @donnaborak

    Nancy Marshall-Genzer, senior reporter, Marketplace
    Nancy Marshall-Genzer is a senior reporter for Marketplace, working from the Washington, D.C. bureau. She started with Marketplace in spring 2007 after filing freelance pieces for the program for years prior. Covering the daily news from the nation’s capital, Nancy has reported many special features. She has a long history in radio. Before joining the Marketplace portfolio, she worked at NPR, where her duties included producing, editing and reporting. Her previous experience also includes stints at WAMU 88.5 public radio in Washington, D.C., Monitor Radio and NBC radio and television, where she served as bureau chief for NBC TV in Tuzla, Bosnia. In 1999, Nancy won an American Medical Writers Association Award for her freelance contribution to the Marketplace series “Wanted for Questioning: America’s Most Profitable Drug Companies.”
    @MarshallGenzer

    Polo Rocha, Federal Reserve reporter, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Polo Rocha reports on the Federal Reserve at S&P Global Market Intelligence, covering the Fed’s monetary policy actions and its regulation of the banking industry. He previously reported on Wisconsin politics and the state economy for WisPolitics.com and WisBusiness.com.
    @polorocha18

  • Past Boards of Governors: 2014-2019

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Wednesday June 26, 2019


    2019-20 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Vice President, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Secretary/Treasurer, Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief and SVP content, Investopedia

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2020
    • Cesca Antonelli, editor-in-chief, Bloomberg BNA
    • Robert Barba, spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires
    • Pallavi Gogoi, chief business editor, NPR
    • Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires
    • Dean Murphy, associate editor, The New York Times
    • James B. Nelson, reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Business journalism instructor, Marquette University

    Term Ending 2021
    • Xana Antunes (deceased), executive editor, Quartz
    • Rich Barbieri, deputy business editor, The New York Times
    • Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press
    • Andrew Leckey, President/Business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU
    • Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post
    • Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Term Ending 2022
    • Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Reuters
    • Alan Deutschman, professor and Reynolds Endowed Chair of Business Journalsim, Univ. of Nevada, Reno
    • Desiree Hanford, lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University
    • James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday
    • Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    • Scott Wenger, group editorial director, Arizent

    Ex-Officio
    • Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com
    • Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News
    • Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair, School of Journalism at the University of Missouri


    2018-19 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief, Bankrate.com

    Vice President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Secretary/Treasurer, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2019
    • Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters
    • Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia
    • Amy Gleason, senior director of news, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    • James T. Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday
    • Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report
    • Caleb Silver, vice president of content, Investopedia/IAC

    Term Ending 2020
    • Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires
    • Shobhana Chandra (deceased), economics reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Marilyn Geewax, former senior business editor, NPR, Cox Institute’s Industry Fellow
    • Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires
    • Dean Murphy, associate editor, The New York Times
    • James B. Nelson, reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Business journalism instructor, Marquette University

    Term Ending 2021
    • Xana Antunes (deceased), executive editor, Quartz
    • Rich Barbieri, deputy business editor, The New York Times
    • Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press
    • Andrew Leckey, President/Business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU
    • Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post
    • Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Ex-Officio
    • Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News
    • Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair, School of Journalism at the University of Missouri
    • Marty Wolk, freelance


    2017-18 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief, Bankrate.com

    Vice President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Secretary/Treasurer, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2018
    • Xana Antunes (deceased), executive editor, Quartz
    • Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNNMoney
    • Suzanne Barlyn, correspondent, Reuters
    • Jonathan Blum, freelance journalist/author
    • Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press
    • Andrew Leckey, president/business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU

    Term Ending 2019
    • Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia
    • Amy Gleason, senior director of news, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    • James T. Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday
    • Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report
    • Caleb Silver, vice president of content, Investopedia/IAC

    Term Ending 2020
    • Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires
    • Shobhana Chandra (deceased), economics reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Marilyn Geewax, former senior business editor, NPR, Cox Institute’s Industry Fellow
    • Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires
    • Dean Murphy, associate editor, The New York Times
    • James B. Nelson, reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Business journalism instructor, Marquette University

    Ex-Officio
    • Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News
    • Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair, School of Journalism at the University of Missouri
    • Marty Wolk, freelance


    2016-17 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President, Cory Schouten, senior editor, Columbia Journalism Review

    Vice President/Treasurer, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief, Bankrate.com

    Secretary, Xana Antunes (deceased), executive editor, Quartz

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2017
    • Robert Barba, technology editor, American Banker
    • Shobhana Chandra (deceased), economics reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Glenn Hall, U.S. news editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Dean Murphy, associate editor, The New York Times
    • Mary Jane Pardue, professor of journalism, Missouri State University
    • Jim Pensiero, consultant, Gannett Co.
    • Allen Wastler, eead of digital content, MassMutual Financial Group

    Term Ending 2018
    • Suzanne Barlyn, correspondent, Reuters
    • Jonathan Blum, freelance journalist/author
    • Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer
    • Brad Foss, deputy business editor, Associated Press
    • Andrew Leckey, President/Business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU
    • Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Term Ending 2019
    • Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia
    • Amy Gleason, senior director of news, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    • James T. Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday
    • Apna Maheshwari, advertising industry reporter, The New York Times
    • Patrick Sanders, senior editor for investing, U.S. News & World Report
    • Caleb Silver, vice president of content, Investopedia/IAC

    Ex-Officio
    • Kevin G. Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers
    • Joanna Ossinger, team leader, Global Curation Bloomberg News
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair, School of Journalism at the University of Missouri
    • Marty Wolk, senior editorial manager, Amazon


    2015-16 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President, Joanna Ossinger, team leader, First Word Americas FX at Bloomberg News

    Vice President, Cory Schouten, Knight-Bagehot fellow, Columbia University

    Treasurer, Glenn Hall, U.S. news editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Secretary, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief, Bankrate.com

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2016
    • Xana Antunes (deceased), editor, new initiatives, Quartz
    • Diana Henriques, contributing writer, The New York Times
    • James T. Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday
    • Sapna Maheshwari, business reporter, Buzzfeed News
    • Chris Peacock, independent journalist
    • Gary Silverman, U.S. deputy managing editor, Financial Times

    Term Ending 2017
    • Robert Barba, technology editor, American Banker
    • Shobhana Chandra (deceased), economics reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Dean Murphy, business editor, The New York Times
    • Mary Jane Pardue, professor of journalism, Missouri State University
    • Jim Pensiero, consultant, Gannett Co.
    • Allen Wastler, head of digital content, MassMutual Financial Group

    Term Ending 2018
    • Suzanne Barlyn, correspondent, Reuters
    • Jonathan Blum, freelance journalist/author
    • Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer
    • Brad Foss, deputy business editor, Associated Press
    • Andrew Leckey, President/Business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU
    • Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Ex-Officio
    • Kevin G. Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers
    • Jill Jordan Spitz, senior editor, Arizona Daily Star
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair, School of Journalism at the University of Missouri
    • Marty Wolk, freelance writer and editor


    2014-15 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President, Marty Wolk, MSN Money

    Vice President, David Milstead, freelance

    Treasurer, Joanna Ossinger, team leader, First Word Americas FX at Bloomberg News

    Secretary, Cory Schouten, Indianapolis Business Journal

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2015
    • Jonathan Blum, freelance journalists/author
    • Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer
    • Brad Foss, deputy business editor, Associated Press
    • Andrew Leckey, President/Business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU
    • Kim Quillen, East Valley editor, Arizona Republic
    • Aaron Task, Yahoo Finance

    Term Ending 2016
    • Diana Henriques, contributing writer, The New York Times
    • James T. Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday
    • Gail MarksJarvis, Chicago Tribune
    • Chris Peacock, independent journalist
    • Gary Silverman, U.S Deputy managing editor, Financial Times
    • Pamela Yip (deceased), Dallas Morning News

    Term Ending 2017
    • Glenn Hall, U.S. news editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief, Bankrate.com
    • Mary Jane Pardue, professor of journalism, Missouri State University
    • Jim Pensiero, The Wall Street Journal
    • Karey Van Hall, Reuters
    • Allen Wastler, head of digital content, MassMutual Financial Group

    Ex-Officio
    • Kevin G. Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers
    • Mary Jane Pardue, professor of journalism, Missouri State University
    • Jill Jordan Spitz, senior editor, Arizona Daily Star
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair, School of Journalism at the University of Missouri

  • Virtual Training June 2019: How to Cover One of the Newest Beats on the Business Desk: Marijuana

    Posted By sabew on Wednesday May 29, 2019

    As more states consider legalizing recreational marijuana, the nation’s cannabis industry has emerged as one of today’s hot business stories. The fast-growing marijuana sector is creating jobs, generating new business opportunities and, increasingly, justifying its own beat on the business desk. SABEW’s next virtual training session will do a deep dive into the growing cannabis industry. Our panel will talk about how to cover the business of cannabis beat, the nuances associated with that coverage and potential big stories on the horizon. We’ll also look at what’s ahead for this burgeoning sector.

    Listen to the recording.

     

    Moderator
    John Schroyer, Marijuana Business Daily. A Sacramento-based journalist, John Schroyer has focused on Colorado politics for most of his career, which included covering the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver. In 2012, he covered the Amendment 64 campaign to legalize recreational marijuana for the Colorado Springs Gazette. As then-video editor for The Gazette, he was on hand for the first-ever legal recreational marijuana sale in Denver on Jan. 1, 2014. He’s been writing about the cannabis industry since joining Marijuana Business Daily over the summer of 2014.

     

     

     

    Panelists
    Dan Adams, The Boston Globe. Dan Adams is a cannabis reporter at The Boston Globe and author of the “This Week in Weed” email newsletter — the irreverent and definitive insider’s diary of legalization in Massachusetts. A graduate of Emerson College and eight-year veteran of the Globe, Dan previously covered breaking news, municipal politics, business and the alcohol industry. He was a member of the team that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in breaking news reporting for its coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings and manhunt and drew acclaim for his investigation into illegal pay-to-play tactics by major brewers and beer distributors. Since being named the Globe’s first-ever dedicated cannabis journalist in 2017, Dan has embedded himself in the marijuana community and spotlighted the concerns of marginalized groups, while holding the industry and government officials to account.

    Kris Krane, 4Front Advisors. Having founded 4Front Advisors in 2011, Kris Krane is now president of the firm. Prior to forming 4Front, Kris served as director of client services for CannBe, a pioneer in developing best practices within the medical cannabis industry. Kris has dedicated his career to reforming the nation’s drug policies, working as associate director of NORML from 2000 to 2005 and executive director of Students for Sensible Drug Policy from 2006 to 2009. He serves on the National Cannabis Industry Association board of directors as well as the New Jersey Cannabis Industry Association Board, the largest nonprofit association in the state dedicated to the legal cannabis industry.

     

     

     

    Brooke Edwards Staggs, Orange County Register. Brooke Edwards Staggs is a reporter based at the Orange County Register in Anaheim, Calif. She covers the politics, business, health and culture of cannabis for her company’s chain of newspapers and websites throughout California. That coverage has led to multiple TV and radio appearances plus a number of awards, including a win for explanatory writing in the 2017 Best of the West competition, honoring the best journalism in the western United States, and best enterprise news series in the recent 2018 California Journalism Awards. Brooke also covers state and federal politics through an Orange County lens. The Big Bear native earned her bachelor’s degree in English from California Baptist University, then got her master’s in education as she taught high school English in the Inland Empire. She left in 2006 to be a student again herself, earning a master’s degree in journalism from New York University while freelancing for a variety of publications.

     

     

    Linn Washington, Temple University. Linn Washington Jr. is a professor of journalism at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pa. He continues to work as a professional journalist, specializing in investigative news coverage and analytical commentary. Linn’s reporting and research examine issues involving race-based inequities impacting both the criminal justice system and the news media. His reporting career has involved news coverage across the U.S. and on four of the world’s seven continents. He has held positions ranging from general assignment reporter to executive editor.

  • Innovation in fact checking – SABEW19

    Posted By David Wilhite on Sunday May 19, 2019

    In a session moderated by NPR’s Pallavi Gogoi, fact checkers Bill Adair, the creator of PolitiFact, Karen Mahabir, head of fact-checking at the Associated Press and Wyatt Buchanan, an editor at The Arizona Republic, each went into some of the innovative ways they’re keeping up with misinformation.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    May, 2019

    By Madeline Ackley
    The Cronkite School

    In the digital age, misinformation can travel at warp speed, making fact checking absolutely vital for an informed public.

    Luckily, fact checkers in the industry have come prepared with incredible innovations they discussed at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing spring conference in Phoenix on Saturday.

    The session, moderated by NPR’s Pallavi Gogoi, featured a few of the news industry fact-checking heavyweights.

    Bill Adair, the creator of PolitiFact, Karen Mahabir, head of fact-checking at the Associated Press and Wyatt Buchanan, an editor at The Arizona Republic each went into their methods of fact-checking and some of the innovative ways they’re keeping up with misinformation.

    “Fact checking is at the heart of journalism,” Gogoi said as she introduced the panel.

    Wyatt Buchanan, manages the Arizona Republic’s fact checking operation known as AZ Fact Check, which was modeled after Adair’s PolitiFact — a site which assesses political claims and assigns them a rating based on their level of truthfulness.

    The version Buchanan works with focuses more heavily on issues relevant to the state of Arizona. Like PolitiFact, the site will take on a dubious claim, analyze the claim and lets the readers know if it’s true, false or simply in need of context—and to what degree.

    Unlike PolitiFact, AZ Fact Check now includes a video component to make the site more engaging and social-media friendly.

    Karen Mahabir does something similar at the Associated Press without assigning a rating.

    “One of the things we do is get right to the heart of what we’re saying about the claim immediately,” Mahabir said.

    She and her team neatly lay out the claim, its context and origins in a way that’s organized similar to a news article.

    “We really are looking at all public figures…candidates for local office, the governor of a state, the president,” Mahabir said. “Then we drill down into that claim to determine if it true if it’s false or it’s somewhere in the middle.”

    Mahabir also laid out some tips for how to check fact effectively, starting with a journalists own reporting.

    “Put everything away for a second, and just tell me verbally in two sentences what you would say about that claim, said Mahabir. “Generally, if folks can do that, they have something to move forward with.”

    Successful fact checking is a collaborative effort, said Mahabir. It requires good sourcing, context and a willingness to double and triple check your own work.

    “It’s so, so, so important to empower your readers or your viewers or your listeners of the source of where that material came from so that if they wanted to they could go back and look at those primary documents,” said Mahabir.

    Bill Adair, the PolitiFact founder, currently teaching at Duke University, is now working on something he was told would be impossible.

    “When I started PolitiFact in 2007 people started very quickly to say wouldn’t it be cool if when a campaign commercial came on TV or there was a speech,  a fact check popped up immediately..and that was a great dream,” said Adair.

    Time and time again he revisited the idea, but it wasn’t until he began working on a project with Google that was essentially a “dewey decimal system” of misinformation, that the possibility became a reality.

    Because public figures often repeat claims again and again, the technology attempts to match what is being said to claims that have been made at an earlier date. It’s essentially an aggregator of claims that have already been analyzed by fact checkers online.

    “It’s not telling you what the person just said is false” but “similar to a fact check that was [made] before,” said Adair.

    Sometimes it works and other times it fails hilariously, but Adair believes he is coming closer and closer to debunking false claims in real time.  

    “Think of it more as annotation…here is some related information about what they just said. That has tremendous value… Politicians are more careful about what they say when they know they’re being fact checked,” said Adair.

    Fact checking may not be an exact science just yet, but journalists and researchers are making great strides in holding public figures accountable to the truth.

  • Despite challenges, Stelter sees bright future for journalism – SABEW19

    Posted By David Wilhite on Saturday May 18, 2019

    CNN’s Brian Stelter discussed his optimism for the future of the news industry, despite numerous disruptions and challenges in recent years.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    By Derek Hall
    The Cronkite School

    News outlets and journalists continue to face an uncertain future in the wake of the digital revolution, an issue CNN’s Brian Stelter addressed at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing spring conference Friday in Phoenix.

    “It is an outstanding time to be a journalist,” Stelter said. “It’s also a really unsettling, unnerving, confusing time because we’re all swimming in this sea of information.”

    The speed at which information is disseminated in the digital age has forced journalists to find new and innovative ways of reporting and telling stories in less time and often with fewer resources than ever before.

    Stelter discussed the reality of practicing journalism in a time of disruption during SABEW’s state of the media session. It’s a topic that’s “perfect for Brian,” said Rich Barbieri, executive editor of CNN Business.

    “Brian embodies this I think more than anyone in our field,” Barbieri said.

    Stelter has covered the media industry for more than 15 years, beginning with the TV Newser blog that he created while a freshman in college. He later worked as a media reporter for The New York Times before joining CNN in 2013 as the anchor of “Reliable Sources” and the chief media correspondent for CNN Worldwide.

    While speaking to a room full of journalists Friday at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Stelter briefly highlighted some of the current problems facing the industry, like the rise of disinformation and the denigration of the media.

    “There is an impact from that daily, repetitive lie about the press being the enemy,” he said. “I think, as a result, we are getting better at explaining why we do what we do…and explaining why the business model’s been turned upside down.”

    Americans are largely unaware of the financial struggles many local news operations face, according to a Pew Research Center survey, which Stelter referenced.

    Of the 34,897 U.S. adults that Pew surveyed in 2018, 71% thought their local news outlets were “doing very or somewhat well financially,” despite revenues that continue to fall and a drop in employment at newsrooms across the country.

    Only 14% of those surveyed said they had paid for local news in the past year.

    Reporters are keenly aware of the challenges facing journalism, but Stelter sees a bright future for the profession.

    He said social media tools that have disrupted the news industry, like Facebook and Twitter, have also bolstered the marketing efforts of journalists and newsrooms in explaining the role of the press.

    But the primary reasons for optimism and hope rest in the pillars of journalism, Stelter said. Many of the profession’s foundational principles such as doing no harm and advocating for the truth are as strong today as they’ve ever been.

    “What’s exciting for all of us in this room is that we get to help solve the problems that we’re all facing, and we get to help explain to the audience why press freedom is also their freedom at a foundational level,” Stelter said. “People want and need that day-to-day journalism.”

  • SABEW19 Student Newsroom

    Posted By sabew on Friday May 10, 2019

    Miss the SABEW19 conference? Check out our ASU student coverage at #SABEW19 and below. Click here for the student bios.

    Despite challenges, Stelter sees bright future for journalism

    While there are a number of challenges affecting the industry, journalists continue to find new and innovative ways of reporting and telling stories, said CNN’s Brian Stelter at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing spring conference Friday in Phoenix. Click here to read more.

    Gov. Ducey: Arizona leads the way in business climate

    Discussing a number of topics ranging from taxes to the state’s relationship with Mexico, Gov. Doug Ducey highlighted the role pro-business policies played in growing Arizona. Click here to read more.

    Covering health care important as ever for business reporters

    Stephanie Innes, a health care reporter at The Arizona Republic, and health care experts Swapna Reddy, clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery, College of Health Solutions, and Colin Baillio, director of policy and communications at Health Action New Mexico discussed the ramifications of the ACA and how it affects health care. Click here to read more.

    Susanne Craig provides a look into The New York Times’ Trump tax exposé

    New York Times reporter Susanne Craig gave a glimpse inside the 18-month investigation that allowed her team to develop a definitive narrative on how President Donal Trump made his riches. Click here to read more.

    Data reporting and the backbone of investigative journalism

    Reporters Maurice Tamman of Reuters, David Ingold of Bloomberg and John Hillkirk of Kaiser Health News outlined how they use data on a daily basis and for larger investigative pieces. At a time when empirical evidence is more important than ever for reporters, data can constitute the hard facts in any story. Click here to read more.

    U.S. Sens. Sinema and McSally talk trade, immigration

    Talks of immigration and trade in Arizona consumed much of U.S. Sens. Kyrsten Sinema and Martha McSally’s SABEW sessions in Phoenix. Click here to read more.

    Women continue to break barriers in newsrooms

    Two longtime newsroom leaders spoke about what it means to be a woman in the news industry at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing spring conference in Phoenix on Friday. Click here to read more.

    Michelle Singletary, SABEWS’s Distinguished Achievement Award winner

    Michelle Singletary of The Washington Post accepted SABEW’s Distinguished Achievement Award on Saturday. Singletary credited the financial and life lessons she learned from her grandmother, “Big Mama,” for setting her on her career path. Click here to read more.

    How to write an award-winning business story

    Both student journalists and veteran reporters spoke about the projects that caught the attention of SABEW judges and earned them recognition at this year’s Best in Business Awards. Click here to read more.

    Innovation in fact checking

    In a session moderated by NPR’s Pallavi Gogoi, fact checkers Bill Adair, the creator of PolitiFact, Karen Mahabir, head of fact-checking at the Associated Press and Wyatt Buchanan, an editor at The Arizona Republic, each went into some of the innovative ways they’re keeping up with misinformation. Click here to read more.

    Parsons brings message of perseverance to SABEW journalists

    GoDaddy founder Bob Parsons closed the SABEW 2019 spring conference with a keynote imparting words of advice based on personal highs and lows in his business and personal life. Click here to read more.

  • SABEW Board of Governors Elections 2019

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday April 30, 2019

    Ballots will be cast during SABEW19 for six open SABEW Board of Governors seats with three-year terms ending in 2022. If you are interested in running send your statement of intent, bio and photo to Aimee O’Grady at [email protected] by next Tuesday May 7.

    Voting members will receive their ballot information directly from online voting service provider Opavote.org.

    Board Candidates as of 4/30/19 (listed in alphabetical order)

    Megan Davies
    Editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters
    I’d be honored to serve a term as a SABEW board member. I’m passionate about journalism and dedicated to the field of business reporting. I’ve held various leadership roles within Reuters in the United States and Russia and reported on a wide variety of business topics. I’m particularly passionate about enterprise reporting. I’d be keen to be involved in SABEW to further high standards of business journalism and try and encourage the next generation of reporters.

    Alan Deutschman
    Professor and Reynolds Endowed Chair of Business Journalism
    University of Nevada, Reno
    I have enjoyed chairing committees as a judge for the Best in Business Awards, and I would like to get more involved with SABEW by serving on the board. For the past eight years I’ve been a professor of business journalism, and I would like to help expand SABEW’s outreach efforts to students and faculty on college campuses. We’ve seen rising interest in business journalism at universities, and I think that SABEW is the perfect organization for bringing together practitioners and professors. We can do a lot more to attract talented newcomers into our field and to provide valuable training and resources for teachers at j-schools and liberal-arts programs. We can also help to lead the public conversations on campuses about many issues.

    Before joining the faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno, I spent 22 years working as a business journalist in New York and San Francisco. I covered Silicon Valley for Fortune and Fast Company, wrote the “Profit Motive” column for GQ, and contributed to Vanity Fair and New York Magazine. I’m also the author of four books including The Second Coming of Steve Jobs. In my current position as a business journalism professor, I can spend as much as 20% of my time on service to my field. It would be an honor to devote that time and energy to serving on the SABEW board.

    Desiree Hanford
    Lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University
    I would like to be a member of SABEW’s board because I have a great amount of respect for SABEW’s mission and my fellow members, and I would like to collaborate with fellow board members to further the organization’s mission. I think it’s important to cultivate and nurture the next generation of business reporters – those who are in college and just beginning their careers – in addition to supporting veteran business reporters and editors.

    I’ve been involved in SABEW for a few years, helping to run the student newsroom during past spring conferences and judging the Best in Business Awards. I recently joined the Training Committee and look forward to contributing to its work. I can also contribute through member recruitment, conference and workshop planning and more. I am happy to lend a hand wherever it is needed.

    I teach a number of undergraduate and graduate courses at Medill, including business and money reporting, and I was a business reporter at Dow Jones Newswires before joining Medill’s faculty. In addition to Chicago and Evanston, Medill has a presence in Washington, San Francisco and Qatar.

    I’ve been fortunate to bring Medill students to SABEW’s fall and spring conferences, and each time the students have been grateful for the connections they’ve made and inspired by the work of fellow SABEW members. They’ve left the conferences excited about their futures in business reporting, and I’ve left invigorated by their enthusiasm and humbled to spend time with the best in the industry.

    I would be honored to serve as a SABEW board member. Thank you for considering me in the upcoming election.

    James Madore
    Economics writer, Newsday
    I’m seeking re-election to the SABEW Board of Governors to continue my work on the group’s finances and advocacy of the First Amendment.

    I have had the privilege these past three years to chair the Finance Committee and to serve on the Executive Committee.

    The Finance Committee, which includes rank-and-file members and board governors, meets monthly with the executive director and bookkeeper to review income and expense reports. The committee also reviews the proposed budget and audit every year.

    Thanks to the fine work of many, I can report that SABEW’s finances are strong and our reporting is transparent. The Finance Committee provides advice and oversight to the executive director on all financial matters.

    I have found my work as vice chairman of the First Amendment Committee to be very rewarding, particularly SABEW’s support for the independence of federal statistical agencies.

    I hope to continue this important work should I be fortunate enough to win re-election.

    In addition, I hope to work with other governors to increase the involvement of rank-and-file members in SABEW activities. The organization’s greatest strength is its membership, which on a daily basis provides news that’s essential to the financial lives of millions of people in the United States and Canada.

    Thank you for your consideration.

    Jenny Paurys
    Managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    When I became a business journalist in 2005, I discovered a profession that prized curiosity, analytical thinking and explanatory prose. I feel these remain the central attributes of business journalism, but the importance of the craft has grown considerably in the intervening years. Globalization, driven by the information age, is now the shaping force of the world economy; markets, investors and business owners depend more than ever on finding trusted sources of information to help them navigate this increasingly complex ecosystem.

    I still work for the newsroom I joined in 2005, though it has more than quadrupled in size since then. Our news organization is fortunate to be expanding while others are contracting, based in part on our dedicated audience, sector-focused approach to journalism and the longtime practice of integrating data into our reporting. I feel these attributes of our newsroom provide me with a unique perspective that I can bring to my role at SABEW.

    Further, my position as managing editor provides me with the opportunity to travel widely and utilize that travel to help SABEW continue to build its membership, especially outside of the U.S. I would like to use my base in Arlington, Va., to help build participation by D.C.-area journalists. Finally, I would like to support SABEW’s ongoing work to modernize its website and collateral to help attract new business media to our ranks.

    My initial half-year on the SABEW board offered me a set of peers I had not found before: a group of professionals from competing newsrooms who volunteer their time and resources to collaborate for the singular purpose of elevating business journalism. These initial months have so inspired me that I am seeking your support for election to the board, in the hopes that I can work with you to move SABEW forward into its next chapter.

    Scott Wenger
    Group Editorial Director, SourceMedia
    I look forward to helping my fellow business journalists bolster and develop new skills and connections to make the work we do even more relevant and valuable to our readers.

    I am eager to help build on what I see as SABEW’s core competencies: training, networking, inspiring and recruiting. And, most crucially, developing practical ideas to share so we can best engage and grow our readerships. I also look forward to helping SABEW advance its mission of global expansion.

    A core goal of mine will be to strengthen SABEW at a time of revolutionary and exciting changes in our field, which have seen the creation of small organizations that have proved so potent, digital journalism powerhouses and industry-specific content organizations like my own that aspire to deliver savvy analysis, thoughtful enterprise and deeply reported multimedia investigative projects.

    Over the years — from my current role as a group editorial director at SourceMedia, where I manage Financial Planning, Employee Benefit News and four additional brands, to earlier years at The Wall Street Journal, The Hartford Courant, CNBC, CNN, the New York Daily News and as a health care analyst at Alex. Brown & Sons — I’ve seen just how impactful business journalism can be, and needs to be.

     

  • Winners announced for the 5th Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Awards

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday April 23, 2019

    TORONTO, April 22, 2019 — Last week, SABEW Canada announced the winners of the Best in Business Awards, celebrating excellence in Canadian journalism.

    This is the fifth year for the awards, which are sponsored by the Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW). The BIB Awards are the only journalism awards program in Canada that specifically recognizes exemplary works of journalism that relate to business, finance and the economy.

    Thanks to our sponsors, who helped make the event possible: TD Bank, Facebook, Accenture, Fidelity Canada, BusinessWire, Manulife Financial and Longview Communications.

    Audio or visual storytelling
    Gold: WTFinance video series, Prajakta Dhopade (MoneySense)
    Silver: Pot supply, Timothy Moore and Chris Manza (The Globe and Mail)

    Beat reporting, presented by TD Bank
    Gold: Janet McFarland on real estate (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: Naomi Powell on trade (Financial Post)

    Commentary
    Gold: Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)
    Silver: Rita Trichur (Report on Business magazine)

    Breaking news, presented by Accenture
    Gold: NAFTA coverage by Adrian Morrow, Robert Fife, Stephanie Nolen, Barrie McKenna, Eric Atkins, James Bradshaw, Andrew Willis, Tim Kiladze, David Parkinson, Josh O’Kane, Sean Silcoff, Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Rob Carrick, John Ibbitson and Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: USMCA coverage by Kevin Carmichael, Tom Blackwell, Naomi Powell, James McLeod and Emily Jackson (Financial Post) 

    Editorial newsletter
    Gold: Daily briefing (The Logic)
    Silver: Cannabis Professional (The Globe and Mail)

    Feature (long-form), presented by Longview Communications
    Gold: “The unsolved murder of an unusual billionaire,” Matthew Campbell (Bloomberg)
    Silver: “The city that had too much money,” Matthew Campbell and Natalie Obiko Pearson (Bloomberg)

    Feature (short-form)
    Gold: “Toronto website Providr bets it can beat Facebook’s algorithm change” by Susan Krashinsky Robertson and Shane Dingman (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: “How to lose big money in Toronto real estate” by Joe Castaldo (Maclean’s)

    Investigative
    Gold: “Hustle in the oil patch” by Jeffrey Jones, Jeff Lewis, Renata D’Aliesio and Chen Wang (The Globe and Mail)
    Silver: “The high cost of low corporate taxes” by Marco Chown Oved, Toby Heaps and Michael Yow (Corporate Knights)

    Personal finance and investing, presented by Fidelity
    Gold: “Go out on top” by Frances Bula (BC Business)
    Silver: “The Year of Fear” by Bryan Borzykowski, Joe Castaldo and John Daly (Report on Business magazine)

    Package
    Gold: Innovation (Financial Post)
    Silver: #MeToo by Armina Ligaya (Canadian Press)

    Profile
    Gold: “Darren Entwistle’s long goodbye” by Christine Dobby (Report on Business magazine)
    Silver: “The Decider” by Luc Rinaldi (Pivot)

    Scoop, presented by BusinessWire
    Gold: “How the government could net $200 billion selling off airports, major highways, utilities and Canada Post” by Zane Schwartz (The Logic)
    Silver: “Oil-sands outage upends global oil market, overshadowing OPEC” by Robert Tuttle and Kevin Orland (Bloomberg)

    Trade article
    Gold: “In the dark” by Daniel Fish (Precedent)
    Silver: “Selling out” by Tristan Bronca (The Medical Post)

    Outstanding Achievement Award
    Claudia Cattaneo (Financial Post)

    As Financial Post editor Nicole MacAdam put it in her nomination letter: “Claudia has been one of the most influential voices in Western Canada for nearly three decades. She is one of those rare journalists who earned the respect of both her peers and the energy industry due to her thorough, balanced reporting and deep understanding of the issues that matter to Albertans. But it wasn’t just her ability to break news that made her a must-read; it was her ability to bring context and analysis to these stories. Claudia was also the ultimate colleague, generously giving of her time to all who asked. Claudia was an editor’s dream right till the day she retired in May 2018: Deeply experienced but with the keenness of a rookie ready for the day—pitching something nearly every day; unflinching reporting, but with a delightful turn of phrase; blunt in her critique but with an acute sense of fairness.”

    CONGRATULATIONS, CLAUDIA!

    Best Young Journalist, presented by Manulife Financial
    Zane Schwartz (The Logic)

    In just four years, Zane has gathered an impressive body of work. As the 2017 Michelle Lang Fellow in journalism at the National Post and Calgary Herald, he ​created the first searchable database of more than five million political donations in every province and territory—a project that won him a Data Journalism Award from the Global Editors Network in 2018. He helped modernize Maclean’s 25-year-old university rankings system, a project that saw him hire and manage 23 freelancers to work on a 400,000-point database. He has been with The Logic since Day 1, where he has had a hand in everything from design to hiring new staff to editing investigations on Canada’s innovation economy and, as a reporter, consistently breaking national news. This prize comes with a trip to the SABEW fall conference in New York City in October.

  • SABEW Canada Announces the Finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday April 2, 2019

    TORONTO, April 2, 2019 – The Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is excited to announce the list of finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published in 2018. For this year’s contest, we expanded the number of categories to 15 (including beat reporting, investigative, commentary, trade article, editorial newsletter and scoop), and the finalists represent the most diverse array of Canadian publications we’ve seen yet, including names both old and new. Their stories shone a spotlight on a wide range of stories, including the legalization of recreational cannabis, real estate fraud, trade wars, mental illness, and even murder.

    SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges (listed below), chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

    The winners were announced at the Best in Business Awards reception on April 17 at Baro in Toronto.

    The finalists for SABEW Canada’s 5th Annual Best in Business are:

    Audio or visual storytelling

    • Pot supply (The Globe and Mail)
    • No strings attached (HuffPost Canada)
    • WTFinance video series (MoneySense)

    Beat reporting

    • David George-Cosh on cannabis (BNN Bloomberg)
    • Janet McFarland on real estate (The Globe and Mail)
    • Naomi Powell on trade (Financial Post)

    Breaking news

    • NAFTA coverage by Adrian Morrow, Robert Fife, Stephanie Nolen, Barrie McKenna, Eric Atkins, James Bradshaw, Andrew Willis, Tim Kiladze, David Parkinson, Josh O’Kane, Sean Silcoff, Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Rob Carrick, John Ibbitson and Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail)
    • USMCA coverage by Kevin Carmichael, Tom Blackwell, Naomi Powell, James McLeod and Emily Jackson (Financial Post)
    • NAFTA coverage by Josh Wingrove, Jennifer Jacobs, Kristine Owram, Eric Martin, Jen Skerritt and Lydia Mulvaney (Bloomberg)

    Commentary

    • Barrie McKenna (The Globe and Mail)
    • Rita Trichur (Report on Business magazine)
    • Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)

    Editorial newsletter

    • Daily briefing (The Logic)
    • Cannabis Professional (The Globe and Mail)

    Feature (long-form)

    • “Conquered by demons” by Kelly Cryderman and Jeffrey Jones (Report on Business magazine)
    • “The city that had too much money” by Matt Campbell and Natalie Obiko Pearson (Bloomberg)
    • “The unsolved murder of an unusual billionaire” by Matt Campbell (Bloomberg)

    Feature (short-form)

    • “How to lose big money in Toronto real estate” by Joe Castaldo (Maclean’s)
    • “Toronto website Providr bets it can beat Facebook’s algorithm change” by Susan Krashinsky Robertson and Shane Dingman (The Globe and Mail)
    • “Weed is serious business for Canada’s go-to pot banker” by Doug Alexander (Bloomberg)

    Investigative

    • “Inside the fall of Fortress” by Janet McFarland (The Globe and Mail)
    • “The high cost of low corporate taxes” by Marco Chown Oved, Toby Heaps and Michael Yow (Corporate Knights)
    • “Hustle in the oil patch” by Jeffrey Jones, Jeff Lewis, Renata D’Aliesio and Chen Wang (The Globe and Mail)

    Package

    • “No strings attached” (HuffPost Canada)
    • Innovation (Financial Post)
    • #MeToo (Canadian Press)

    ­­

    Personal finance and investing

    • “The Year of Fear” by Bryan Borzykowski, Joe Castaldo and John Daly (Report on Business magazine)
    • Mutual funds by Rob Carrick (The Globe and Mail)
    • “Go out on top” by Francis Bula (BCBusiness)

    Profile

    • “Darren Entwistle’s long goodbye” by Christine Dobby (Report on Business magazine)
    • “The Decider” by Luc Rinaldi (Pivot)
    • “The Instigator” by Katie Lamb and Joanna Pachner (Report on Business magazine)

    Scoop

    • “Oil-sands outage upends global oil market, overshadowing OPEC” by Robert Tuttle and Kevin Orland (Bloomberg)
    • “Coca-Cola’s cannabis drink deal with Aurora” by David George-Cosh (BNN Bloomberg)
    • “How the government could net $200 billion selling off airports, major highways, utilities and Canada Post” by Zane Schwartz (The Logic)

    Trade article

    • “Selling out” by Tristan Bronca (The Medical Post)
    • “In the dark” by Daniel Fish (Precedent)
    • “Help your client prepare a will” by Michelle Schriver (Advisor’s Edge)

    Our first-ever award for Best Young Journalist goes to Zane Schwartz of The Logic. In the four years since he graduated from the University of Toronto, Zane has gathered an impressive body of work. As the 2017 Michelle Lang Fellow in journalism at the National Post and Calgary Herald, he ​created the first searchable database of more than five million political donations in every province and territory—a project that won him a Data Journalism Award from the Global Editors Network in 2018. He helped modernize Maclean’s 25-year-old university rankings system, a project that saw him hire and manage 23 freelancers to work on a 400,000-point database. He has been with The Logic since Day 1, where he has had a hand in everything from design to hiring new staff to editing investigations on Canada’s innovation economy. As a reporter, he has consistently broken national news, including Amazon lobbying governments across Canada for billions in contracts after shortlisting Toronto for its HQ2 to revealing the government’s private assessment that there’s no downside to letting an American telecom come north.

    Our inaugural Outstanding Achievement Award goes to the Financial Post’s Claudia Cattaneo, who retired in May 2018. As FP editor Nicole MacAdam put it in her nomination letter: “Claudia has been one of the most influential voices in Western Canada for nearly three decades, through bust, boom and bust. She is one of those rare journalists who earned the respect of both her peers and the energy industry due to her thorough, balanced reporting and deep understanding of the issues that matter to Albertans. But it wasn’t just her ability to break news that made her a must-read; it was her ability to bring context and analysis to these stories. Her columns suffered no fools and offered a clear-eyed view that often punctured the Ottawa bubble. At the same time, she was quick to criticize the oil patch for its high-profile problems, such as corporate governance and handling of the environment file. Bureau reporters who work from home can often be isolated, but Claudia was the ultimate colleague, taking junior reporters under her wing, meeting her Calgary colleagues weekly to discuss story ideas, participating in weekly features pitch meetings by phone, generously giving of her time to all who asked. Claudia was an editor’s dream right till the day she retired in May, 2018: Deeply experienced but with the keenness of a rookie ready for the day—pitching something nearly every day; unflinching reporting, but with a delightful turn of phrase; blunt in her critique but with an acute sense of fairness.”

    Thank you to our judges, without whom we could not do this: Gavin Adamson, Vikram Barhat, Laura Bobak, Greg Bonnell, Bryan Borzykowski, Mark Brown, Dawn Calleja Henry Dubroff, Tim Falconer, Max Fawcett, David Friend, Howard Green, Megan Griffith-Greene, Kevin Hall, Brian Hutchinson, Jason Kirby, Peter Kuitenbrouwer, Steve Ladurantaye, Andree Lau, Katie Lobosco, Nicole MacAdam, James Madore, Garry Marr, Susan Nerberg, Mira Oberman, Matt O’Grady, Joanna Ossinger, Rachel Pulfer, David Scanlan, Anna Sharratt, David Topping, Andrew Wahl, Tom Watson, Jennifer Wells and Renée Williams.

    If you have anything questions about the contents of this press release, please contact SABEW Canada chair Dawn Calleja at [email protected].

  • Canada Best in Business

    Posted By sabew_admin on Tuesday April 2, 2019

    2019 Winners and finalists

    Jeff Sanford Best Young Journalist Award

    Our second annual Best Young Journalist Award (named after former Financial Post and Canadian Business journalist Jeff Sanford) goes to Natalie Wong of Bloomberg News. Soon after joining Bloomberg in 2017, Natalie broke news about the Canadian government’s plan to impose steel tariffs on importers, which moved the loonie and shares of some of the biggest steel companies. Last year, she penned a feature about college kids living in Vancouver mansions amid a luxury housing upheaval, which garnered global attention. It was the most-read Bloomberg Canada story of 2019. She also scooped her competitors on some of the biggest real estate stories in Canada last year, including Oxford’s sale of its Fairmont portfolio and the state of talks between Waterfront and Sidewalk Labs.

    Natalie’s impact extends beyond real estate: She wrote a profile on the co-inventor of BlackBerry for Bloomberg Businessweek magazine and spent days in a courthouse digging up documents essential for the feature, “The Unsolved Murder of an Unusual Billionaire,” which chronicled the mysterious circumstances behind the deaths of Barry and Honey Sherman and won a 2019 Best in Business Canada Award. She also broke news about NBA player Steph Curry’s investment in a Canadian travel startup, landing an exclusive TV interview with him.

    When a commercial property reporter position opened in New York late last year, the U.S. team snatched Natalie up and gave her ownership over one of the biggest real estate markets in the world. She has approached that beat with gusto and has already developed an array of sources that led to scoops about the fallout from WeWork’s botched IPO and the impact of the retail apocalypse on iconic high-streets, among other stories.


    Outstanding Achievement Award

    The winner of our second annual Outstanding Achievement Award is Marina Strauss, who retired from The Globe and Mail last summer. Marina has been among the most important voices in Canadian retailing over the past two decades, gaining the respect of both her peers and industry executives (who often dreaded her phone calls but took them anyway). She was known for her tenacious probing, critical eye and profound knowledge of the sector, bringing analysis and context to her stories, but with an easy-to-understand style that broadened her appeal beyond the business pages. As a beat reporter, she consistently broke news but also delved deep into big stories, providing definitive coverage on the collapse of Sears Canada, early troubles at Target Canada, the ups and downs of Hudson’s Bay Co., tensions between Tim Hortons franchisees and their new Brazilian owner, and so much more. She won Best in Business Awards in both the U.S. and Canada in 2019 for her story, “Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons,” and won best beat reporter at SABEW Canada’s inaugural awards in 2015.

    Beyond her writing, Marina was the model citizen in the office, often collaborating on stories and helping mentor other journalists. Internally at The Globe, she led workshops on writing business stories, developing sources and covering bankruptcies. She loved her work, and her enthusiasm rubbed off on her colleagues. Even after retiring, she took time to prepare her successor for the beat and still provides counsel—a mark of her commitment to her craft.


    Audio or Visual Storytelling

    Scott Gill and James McLeod (Financial Post), “Focals by north”

    Sean Stanleigh, Stephanie Chan, Laura Regehr, Ann Lang and Tara Deschamps (The Globe and Mail), “Industry interrupted”

    Matt Lundy (The Globe and Mail), data visualizations


    Beat Reporting

    Brent Jang, The Globe and Mail (natural gas industry)

    Eric Atkins, The Globe and Mail (transportation)

    Catherine McIntyre, The Logic (the gig economy)


    Breaking News

    The Logic (Amanda Roth and Catherine McIntyre), “Sidewalk Labs and Waterfront Toronto reach a deal”

    The Globe and Mail (Josh O’Kane, Alex Bozikovic, Jeff Gray, Rachelle Younglai and Tom Cardoso), Sidewalk Lab negotiations

    The Globe and Mail (Emma Graney, Jeffrey Jones, Carrie Tait, Kelly Cryderman, Gary Mason, James Bradshaw, Christine Dobby, Andrew Willis, Ian McGugan, David Milstead and David Berman), “Encana to move its headquarters to U.S.”


    Commentary

    Kevin Carmichael (Financial Post)

    David Parkinson (The Globe and Mail)

    Rita Trichur (The Globe and Mail)


    Editorial Newsletter

    HuffPost Canada (Daniel Tencer), HuffPost Canada Housing Newsletter

    The Logic (The Logic staff), Daily Briefing

    Financial Post (Yadullah Hussein and Pam Heaven), Posthaste


    Feature (Long-Form)

    Charles Wilkins (Report on Business magazine), “Castaways”

    Zander Sherman (Report on Business magazine), “Forged by fire”

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Jessica Leeder and Lindsay Jones (The Globe and Mail), “Crypto chaos”


    Feature (Short-Form)

    Joe O’Connor (Financial Post), “An historic gold mine in a tiny Ontario town…”

    Danielle Bochove (Bloomberg News), “In planet’s fastest-warming region, jobs come with thaw”

    Sean Silcoff (The Globe and Mail), “Montreal analytics startup uses AI to play a big role
    in NHL playoffs”


    Investigative

    Matthew McClearn, Geoffrey York and Stephanie Nolen (The Globe and Mail),
    “See No Evil”

    Gordon Hoekstra and Kim Bolan (Vancouver Sun), money laundering

    Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki, Nathan VanderKlippe and Jessica Leeder
    (The Globe and Mail), “How did Gerald Cotton die?”


    Package

    Geoffrey Morgan and Vanmala Subramaniam (Financial Post), “Rural Alberta (dis)advantage”

    Ryan Stuart (BCBusiness Magazine), “The future of work”

    Chris Fournier, Erik Hertzberg, Natalie Wong, Kevin Orland and Paula Sambo (Bloomberg News), consumer debt


    Personal Finance and Investing

    Victor Ferreira (Financial Post), “The inconvenient truth about responsible investing”

    Tim Shufelt (The Globe and Mail), “The data game”

    Mark Brown, Sandra E. Martin, Julie Cazzin, Chris Richard and Daisy Barette (MoneySense), “Canada’s best dividend stocks 2020”


    Profile

    Kristine Owram and Susan Berfield (Bloomberg News), Bruce Linton

    Steve Kupferman (Pivot), “Toy Story”

    Jason Kirby (Report on Business magazine), “Trash talking”


    Scoop

    Geoffrey Morgan (Financial Post), “Billionaire Koch brothers dump Canada’s
    oil sands leases…”

    Niall McGee and Rachelle Younglai (The Globe and Mail), “Barrick eyes hostile bid…”

    Mark Rendell and Jeffrey Jones (The Globe and Mail), “CannTrust allegedly used fake walls to hide pot…”


    Trade Article

    Kelsey Rolfe (Benefits Canada), “Rise of the machines”

    Daniel Fish (Precedent Magazine), “Paying the partners”

    Leah Golob (Investment executive), “Singles: a growing demographic”

  • May 21, 2019: Deadline for Applications to the Health Care Symposium, Washington, D.C.

    Posted By sabew on Wednesday March 27, 2019

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is seeking applications for a symposium to help journalists better understand and get ahead of the many, complicated health care issues in the news that are sure to dominate the upcoming election season.

    Space is limited to 15 journalists. Selected journalists will receive a stipend to offset travel and hotel for out-of-town attendees.

    The symposium will provide journalists a timely, in-depth update on a variety of issues, including:

    • The ACA: Following a federal judge’s ruling declaring the Affordable Care Act illegal, what is the future of the ACA as it hurtles toward the Supreme Court? What has been the impact of administration policies on the ACA?
    • Medicaid expansion: What has been the financial impact of Medicaid expansion? What are the implications of work requirements some states have tried to impose?
    • Medicare for All: With an election season underway, what can we learn about the many Democratic proposals and how much will they cost?
    • Prescription drug prices: President Trump is expected to deliver his first major speech on drug prices in early May. Will it have any impact on an industry in which costs continue to escalate?
    • Marijuana: As more states expand medical and recreational marijuana use, how is the industry shaping up and what kind of oversight is?

    Symposium attendees will be able to share and test out story ideas at this seventh annual Business of Health Care Summit. The program begins the evening of Thursday, June 27 with a mixer and dinner at the National Press Club and ends midday Saturday, June 29. Friday and Saturday events will be held at the Bloomberg newsroom on New York Ave. in Washington, D.C.

    Made possible by a grant from The Commonwealth Fund, a national, private foundation based in New York City that supports independent research on health care issues and makes grants to improve health care practice and policy.

  • 2019 Best in Business Awards Honorees

    Posted By admin on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Congratulations to our 2019 honorees! Submissions came from 183 news organizations across all platforms representing the breadth of business journalism, from international, national and regional news outlets to specialized business publications.

    Press release

    Judges’ comments

    List of judges

    Previous Best in Business honorees

    Audio

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Wall Street Journal and Gimlet Media; WeWork trilogy
    Eliot Brown, Maureen Farrell, Kate Linebaugh, Ryan Knutson, Annie Minoff, Rikki Novetsky, Sarah Platt, Willa Rubin, Pia Gadkari, Annie-Rose Strasser, Griffin Tanner and Jarrard Cole

    • Honorable Mention – NPR; Profiles of America in full employment
    Jim Zarroli, Scott Horsley, Alina Selyukh, Uri Berliner, Pallavi Gogoi and Avie Schneider

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker; Bankshot
    John Heltman and Rob Blackwell


    Banking/Finance, Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Covert operation
    Mark Maremont and Leslie Scism

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and 16 media partners; Mauritius Leaks
    Will Fitzgibbon, Antonio Cucho, Amy Wilson-Chapman and Marwen Ben Mustapha

    Banking/Finance, Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; Trump’s taxes
    Heather Vogell and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of American Banker and ProPublica; How Trump’s political appointees thwarted tougher settlements with two big banks
    Kevin Wack, Alan Kline, Jesse Eisinger and Nick Varchaver

    Banking/Finance, Small division

    • Winner – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase Private Client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.         
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – The Real Deal; Trouble in the land of OZK
    David Jeans, Keith Larsen and Hiten Samtani


    Breaking News, Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; U.S.-China trade war        
    David Lawder, Jeff Mason, Michael Martina and Chris Prentice

    • Honorable Mention – The Financial Times; WeWork
    James Fontanella-Khan, Eric Platt, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, Laura Noonan and Elaine Moore

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; PG&E files for bankruptcy
    Mark Chediak, Christopher Martin, Allison McNeely, Katherine Doherty and David Baker

    Breaking News, Medium division

    • Winner – Dallas Morning News; U.S. pilots faulted 737 Max jets
    Dom DiFurio, Cary Aspinwall and Ariana Giorgi

    Breaking News, Small division

    • Winner – Baltimore Business Journal; Nonprofit with ties to Mayor Pugh, top aides received city funding
    Melody Simmons


    Commentary/Opinion, Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; China-Think
    Li Yuan

    • Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times (CA); Michael Hiltzik opinion/commentary
    Michael Hiltzik

    Commentary/Opinion, Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; America’s broken health care system
    Elisabeth Rosenthal

    • Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle; Accountability
    Chris Tomlinson

    Commentary/Opinion, Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Holding Chicago companies accountable
    Joe Cahill

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; Commentary on drug pricing and development
    Matthew Herper


    Economics, Large division

    • Winner – Bloomberg News; Addicted to debt
    Christopher Maloney, Adam Tempkin, Ben Holland and Shahien Nasiripour

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; How Trump’s trade war went from method to madness
    Jenny Leonard and Shawn Donnan

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; TOPLive
    Chris Anstey, Marcus Ashworth, James Callan, Andrew Cinko, Crystal Chui, Eric Coleman, Mark Cranfield, Enda Curran, Neil Denslow, Andrew Dunn, Tim Farrand, David Finnerty, Tal Barak Harif, Andrew Harrer, Takaaki Iwabu, Ira Jersey, Stephen Jonathan, Alex Jones, Tony Jordan, Luke Kawa, Adrian Kennedy, Geoff King, Maria Kolesnikova, Anny Kuo, Scott Lanman, Carolynn Look, Sara Marley, Yuki Masujima, Steve Matthews, Galen Meyer, Chikako Mogi, Shoko Oda, Marc Perrier, Carl Riccadonna, Emma Ross-Thomas, Kurt Schussler, Arran Scott, Subramaniam Sharma, Piotr Skolimowski, Molly Smith, Yuko Takeo, Eddie van der Walt, Eliza Winger, Foster Wong, Doug Zehr

    Economics – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Rick Barrett and Maria Perez

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; No mercy
    Sarah Jane Tribble


    Energy/Natural Resources – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Brazil’s deadly dam collapse
    Samantha Pearson, Patricia Kowsmann, Luciana Magalhaes and Scott Patterson

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; Is one of the world’s biggest lawsuits built on a sham?
    Kit Chellel, Joe Light and Ruth Olurounbi

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; PG&E’s disconnect
    Ivan Penn, Peter Eavis and James Glanz

    Energy/Natural Resources – Medium division

    • Winner – The Arizona Republic; Arizona’s next water crisis
    Ian James, Rob O’Dell and Mark Henle

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity and “The World”; Pushing plastic
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tik Root and Patrick Winn

    Energy/Natural Resources – Small division

    • Winner – Honolulu Civil Beat; Reeling it in
    Nathan Eagle and Patti Epler

    • Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent; Dicey deals kept English Station dirty
    Christopher Peak


    Explanatory – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Hidden injustice
    Dan Levine, Benjamin Lesser, Jaimi Dowdell, Lisa Girion and Michelle Conlin

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Businessweek; New red scare
    Peter Waldman

    Explanatory – Medium division

    • Winner – Fortune; Epidemic of fear
    Erika Fry

    • Honorable Mention – E&E News; Dealing with disasters
    Thomas Frank

    • Honorable Mention – Chronicle of Higher Education; How America’s college-closure crisis leaves families devastated
    Michael Vasquez, Dan Bauman, Erica Lusk, Janeen Jones, Jacquelyn Elias and Bridget Bennett

    Explanatory – Small division

    • Winner – Marker; The cutthroat battle between S’well and its bougie water bottle copycats
    Stephanie Clifford and Danielle Sacks

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay

    • Honorable Mention – Denver Business Journal; Why Molson Coors had to leave Denver
    Ed Sealover


    Feature – Large division

    • Winner – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Planet Fox
    Jonathan Mahler and Jim Rutenberg

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; This is not the way everybody behaves
    Eliot Brown

    Feature – Medium division

    • Winner – E&E News; The most dangerous malware
    Blake Sobczak

    • Honorable Mention – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – Report on Business Magazine; A long road
    Paul Christopher Webster

    Feature – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; The man who’s going to save your neighborhood grocery store
    Joe Fassler

    • Honorable Mention – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Atlanta rising
    J.J. McCorvey


    General Excellence – Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    • Winner – Financial Planning
    Scott Wenger, Chelsea Emery, Ann Marsh, Jessica Mathews, Andrew Welsch, Maddy Perkins

    General Excellence – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal
    The Wall Street Journal staff

    General Excellence – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel staff 

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press
    Phoebe Wall Howard, Jamie LaReau, Susan Tompor and Ryan Garza

    General Excellence – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal
    Portland Business Journal staff

    • Honorable Mention – American Banker
    Rob Blackwell, Dean Anason, Alan Kline, Bonnie McGeer, Joe Adler, Paul Davis, Penny Crosman and Suleman Din


    Government – Large division

    • Winner – A collaboration of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, The Miami Herald, La Posta and 16 other media partners; The bribery division  
    Staffs of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, La Posta, McClatchy/Miami Herald and 16 other media partners

    • Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY; Copy. Paste. Legislate.
    Staffs of the Center for Public Integrity, The Arizona Republic and USA TODAY

    Government – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; The TurboTax trap
    Justin Elliott, Paul Kiel and Lucas Waldron

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Elaine Chao used her cabinet post to help Mitch McConnell
    Tucker Doherty, Tanya Snyder and Arren Kimbel-Sannit

    Government – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s New York Business; Will Bredderman’s coverage of New York City government        
    Will Bredderman

    • Honorable Mention – Albany Business Review; How Cuomo’s strategy stalled Albany’s nanotech dream
    Chelsea Diana and Liz Young

    • Honorable Mention – Project on Government Oversight; Captured regulator imperils investors
    David Hilzenrath, Nicholas Trevino, Kai Bernier-Chen and Aadam Barclay


    Health/Science – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Martin Shkreli: Business behind bars
    Rob Copeland and Bradley Hope

    Health/Science – Medium division

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; UVA lawsuits
    Jay Hancock and Elizabeth Lucas

    • Honorable Mention – ProPublica; Newark Beth Israel Hospital
    Caroline Chen

    • Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Turned away
    John Diedrich and Kevin Crowe

    Health/Science – Small division

    • Winner – STAT; The medicine hunters
    Eric Boodman

    • Honorable Mention – The Counter; The bowls at Chipotle and Sweetgreen are supposed to be compostable. They contain cancer-linked “forever chemicals.”
    Joe Fassler


    Innovation – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Times; Data visualizations
    Emily Badger, Larry Buchanan, Quoctrung Bui, Keith Collins, Nicholas Confessore, James Glanz, Mika Gröndahl, Maggie Haberman, Michael D. Shear and Karen Yourish

    Innovation – Medium division

    • Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dairyland in distress
    Erin Caughey, Andrew Mollica and Bill Schulz

    Innovation – Small division

    • Winner – Crain’s Chicago Business; Crain’s special project
    Jason McGregor, Hugh Dellios, Stephen Serio, Pat Nabong and Claire Bushey


    International Reporting – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); The war against Huawei
    Norman Pearlstine, David Pierson, Robyn Dixon, David S. Cloud, Alice Su, Max Hao Lu and Priya Krishnakumar

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Africa’s gold
    David Lewis, Ryan McNeill, Zandi Shabalala and Tim Cocks

    International Reporting – Medium and small divisions

    • Winner – Kaiser Health News; In India’s burgeoning pain market, U.S. drugmakers stand to gain
    Sarah Varney

    • Honorable Mention – POLITICO; How Big Tech beat Europe’s tough new privacy rules
    Nick Vinocur


    Investigative – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times; Bodies of evidence
    Melody Petersen, David Willman and Gus Garcia-Roberts

    • Honorable Mention – Reuters; Ambushed at home
    M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer

    Investigative – Medium division

    • Co-Winner – Kaiser Health News; Hidden harm
    Christina Jewett

    • Co-Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX – Flawed design, failed oversight at Boeing and FAA
    Dominic Gates and Mike Baker

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    • Honorable Mention – Detroit Free Press; Out of gear
    Phoebe Wall Howard

    Investigative – Small division

    • Winner – A collaboration of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting and Associated Press; Caregivers and takers
    Jennifer Gollan and Melissa Lewis

    • Honorable Mention – Financial Planning; JPMorgan’s Chase private client group used false evidence to get rid of an advisor. This is how the firm tried to make sure no one knew.
    Ann Marsh and Scott Wenger

    • Honorable Mention – ReligionUnplugged.com; Whistleblower alleges $100 billion secret stockpile by Mormon church
    Paul Glader and Emma Penrod


    Markets – Large division

    • Winner – CNN Business; A crack in overnight lending markets
    Matt Egan

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Muni-bond mess
    Heather Gillers, Gunjan Banerji and Tom McGinty

    Markets – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – Fortune; Wall Street’s contact high
    Jen Wieczner


    Media/Entertainment – Large division

    • Winner – Los Angeles Times (CA); CBS MeToo
    Meg James

    • Honorable Mention – Associated Press; Local news deserts
    David Bauder, David Lieb, Alexandra Olson and Janie Har

    Media/Entertainment – Medium and Small divisions

    • Winner – A collaboration of The Economic Hardship Reporting Project and The Guardian; America’s rural radio stations are vanishing – and taking the country’s soul with them
    Debbie Weingarten

    • Honorable Mention – The Information; Media and entertainment industry transformation
    Tom Dotan and Jessica Toonkel


    Newsletter – Large division

    • Winner – The Financial Times; Moral money
    Gillian Tett, Billy Nauman, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson and Patrick Temple-West

    Newsletter – Medium division

    • Winner – Barron’s; Review & preview
    Alex Eule, Nicholas Jasinski, Ben Walsh and Jeffrey Cane

    Newsletter – Small division

    • Winner – Al-Monitor; Middle East lobbying
    Julian Pecquet and Aaron Schaffer


    Personal Finance – Large division

    • Winner – The New York Post; Earnin series
    Kevin Dugan

    Personal Finance – Medium division

    • Winner – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; All she wanted was to pay her health insurance
    Tim Grant

    Personal Finance – Small division

    • Winner – Kiplinger’s Personal Finance; Watch out for the elder fraud web
    Miriam Cross


    Real Estate – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; The WeWork delusion
    Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell

    • Honorable Mention – CNN Business; The internet didn’t shrink 6% real estate commissions. But this lawsuit might
    Lydia DePillis and Bronte Lord

    Real Estate – Medium division

    • Winner – The Miami Herald; Priced out of paradise
    Andres Viglucci, Rene Rodriguez, Rob Wile, Jane Wooldridge, Aaron Albright and Taylor Dolven

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Long Island divided
    Staff

    Real Estate – Small division

    • Winner – McClatchy, Washington bureau; Epstein’s mystery island
    Kevin G. Hall and Julie K. Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal; Collection of real estate stories
    Adam Sichko and Meg Garner

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; The standoff at Pope Resources: Deconstructing Dargey; HQ, too
    Marc Stiles and Ashley Stewart


    Retail – Large division

    • Winner – NPR; Lives Upended: Workers thrown into turmoil by faraway corporate bosses
    Alina Selyukh, Jennifer Liberto, Pallavi Gogoi, Uri Berliner and Avie Schneider.

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Fast fashion
    Sapna Maheshwari, Natalie Kitroeff and Elizabeth Paton

    Retail – Medium division

    • Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and BuzzFeed News; The final mile
    Ken Bensinger, Caroline O’Donovan, Patricia Callahan, James Bandler and Doris Burke

    • Honorable Mention – Newsday; Changing landscape
    Tory N. Parrish

    • Honorable Mention – Fortune; Seven decades of self-destruction
    Geoff Colvin and Phil Wahba

    Retail – Small division

    • Winner – Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Behind the smiles
    Will Evans, Rachel de Leon, Byard Duncan, Melissa Lewis, Katharine Mieszkowski and Hannah Young

    • Honorable Mention – Fast Company; Collection of retail stories
    Elizabeth Segran


    Small Business/Management/Career – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Labor squeeze
    Ruth Simon

    • Honorable Mention – NBC News Investigations; In the hot seat: UPS delivery drivers at risk of heat-related illnesses
    Lisa Riordan Seville, Adiel Kaplan, Kenzi Abou-Sabe and Cynthia McFadden

    Small Business/Management/Career – Medium division

    • Winner – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Marcus Stern, Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright and Charlotte Kesl

    Small Business/Management/Career – Small division

    • Winner – Portland Business Journal; Diversity in the workplace
    Malia Spencer


    Student Journalism – Stories for Professional Media Outlets

    • Winner – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; 123 have unexpectedly died in nursing homes, but Arizona still gives them top grades
    Ethan Millman, Molly Stellino, Erica Block and Megan Boyanton

    • Honorable Mention – ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication published in The Arizona Republic; Arizona charges less than almost anyone else to graze cattle. Public schools miss out on the money.
    Mackenzie Shuman, Harrison Mantas, Yael Grauer, Molly Duerig and Grayson Schmidt


    Student Journalism – Stories for Student Media Outlets

    • Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication; With Venezuela in turmoil, migrants and refugees turn to Peru
    Ethan Millman


    Technology – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Big tech’s hidden costs
    Kirsten Grind, Gregory Zuckerman, Shane Shifflett, Alexandra Berzon and Justin Scheck

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; Google’s power and peril
    Keach Hagey, Vivien Ngo, Kirsten Grind, Sam Schechner, Robert McMillan, John West, Rob Copeland and Katherine Bindley

    • Honorable Mention – Bloomberg News; YouTube managers ignored warnings
    Mark Bergen and Lucas Shaw

    Technology – Medium division

    • Winner – ProPublica; The extortion economy
    Renee Dudley and Jeff Kao

    • Honorable Mention – Forbes Magazine; Bumble’s Sexism Problem
    Angel Au-Yeung

    Technology – Small division

    • Winner – The Counter; Grubhub’s shadow sites
    H. Claire Brown

    • Honorable Mention – Puget Sound Business Journal; HQ, too: One company, two Americas – The education of Brad Smith
    Marc Stiles, Ashley Stewart and Paxtyn Merten


    Travel/Transportation – Large division

    • Winner – The Wall Street Journal; Boeing’s deadly failure
    Andrew Tangel, Andy Pasztor, Mark Maremont, Mariano Zafra, Robert Wall, Elliot Bentley, Merrill Sherman, Matina Stevis-Gridneff and Yonathan Menkir Kassa

    • Honorable Mention – The New York Times; Taken for a ride
    Brian M. Rosenthal

    Travel/Transportation – Medium division

    • Winner – The Seattle Times; 737 MAX Crisis – How failures at Boeing and FAA caused 346 deaths
    Dominic Gates, Mike Baker, Steve Miletich and Lewis Kamb

    • Honorable Mention – Globe and Mail; Blind spots: How Canada’s reliance on U.S. aviation policy kept regulators from seeing the fatal flaws in Boeing’s 737 Max
    Grant Robertson and Eric Atkins

    Travel/Transportation – Small division

    • Winner – The Information; Autonomous driving’s ambitious promises
    Amir Efrati and Matt Drange

    • Honorable Mention – Baltimore Business Journal; Navigating Baltimore: A two-part series
    Baltimore Business Journal staff


    Video – Large division

    • Winner – NBC News Investigations; ‘Zone Rouge’: An army of children toils in African mine
    Cynthia McFadden, Christine Romo, Lisa Cavazuti, Bill Angelucci, Sean Keane, Rich Schapiro, Jiachuan Wu, Robin Mucarri, Anna Brand, Shahrzad Elghanayan, Kara Haupt, Dan Nagin, Brandon Barbosa, Richard Greenberg, Robert Dembo, Mark Schone, David Verdi and Adrienne Mong

    • Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal; How Huawei employees helped governments spy on people
    Clément Bürge, Josh Chin, Nicholas Bariyo, Joe Parkinson and Sharon Shi

    Video – Medium division and Small division

    • Winner – Quartz; Because China
    Isabelle Niu, Tony Lin, Nikhil Sonnad, Arielle Ray, Eduardo Araujo, Molly Rubin, Jacob Templin and Emily Watson

    • Honorable Mention – The Weather Channel Digital; Harvest: Recovery and risk after Hurricane Michael
    Pat Maddox, Kait Parker, Dan Wright, Marcus Stern and Charlotte Kesl

  • Complete list of BIB winning entries and newsrooms

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Review the names of the winning contributors.

     

    Audio; All News Organizations

    Winner – Indianapolis Business Journal: The IBJ podcast
    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal: The next battlefield

    Banking/Finance; Large

    Winner – Bloomberg: Sign here to lose everything
    Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times: The hidden costs of high-interest rate installment lending

    Banking/Finance; Medium

    Winner – The Charlotte Observer: Wells Fargo’s controversies continue

    Banking/Finance; Small

    Winner – American Banker: Bank CEO’s fire-and-rehire maneuver reaps windfall at taxpayer expense
    Honorable Mention – Sacramento Business Journal: After a decade, banks returning to Sacramento
    Honorable Mention – Financial Planning: Keep quiet

    Breaking News; Large

    Winner – Los Angeles Times: Toyota held accountable for a defect in its Prius

    Breaking News; Medium

    Winner – Forbes.com: The inside story of Papa John’s toxic culture
    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Law: Ben Penn tip sharing rule

    Breaking News; Small

    Winner – American Banker: Comerica scrambles to address fraud in prepaid benefits program
    Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal: AllianceBernstein’s move to Nashville

    Commentary/Opinion; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Tech and policies

    Commentary/Opinion; Medium

    Winner – The Detroit News: Daniel Howes opinion/commentary
    Honorable Mention – The Boston Globe: Shirley Leung opinion/commentary

    Commentary/Opinion; Small

    Winner – Fast Company: Rick Wartzman opinion/commentary
    Honorable Mention – STAT: Adam Feuerstein biotech industry commentary
    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business:  2018 editorial board

    Economics; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The trade equation

    Economics; Medium

    Winner – Mother Jones: Frozen assets
    Honorable Mention – Quartz: Remaking economics series

    Economics; Small

    Winner – Indianapolis Business Journal: One city, worlds apart

    Energy/Natural Resources; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock
    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity, The Texas Tribune, The Associated Press and Newsy: Blowout

    Energy/Natural Resources; Medium

    Winner – CNN: Dirty energy
    Honorable Mention – The Dallas Morning News: Atmos Energy

    Energy/Natural Resources; Small

    Winner – Providence Business News: Rising waters
    Honorable Mention – Debtwire: Appalachia’s coal comeback collides with grim opioid reality

    Explanatory; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock
    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: Immigration, Inc.
    Honorable Mention – The New York Times: Pregnancy discrimination

    Explanatory; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: What the hell happened at GE?
    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle: The miracle molecule
    Honorable Mention – Minneapolis Star Tribune: Aging parents, stressed families

    Explanatory; Small

    Winner – InsideClimate News: Harvesting peril
    Winner – Project on Government Oversight: Drilling down series
    Honorable Mention – The Desert Sun: Poisoned cities, deadly border
    Honorable Mention – McClatchy DC Bureau: Ancestry DNA: Privacy for sale

    Feature; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The itsy-bitsy, teenie-weenie, very litigious bikini
    Honorable Mention – Businessweek: Two Towns Forged an Unlikely Bond. Now, ICE Is Severing the Connection.

    Feature; Medium

    Winner – Minneapolis Star Tribune: Legal war engulfs 3M device
    Honorable Mention – Forbes.com: Wilbur Ross series

    Feature; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal: Mapping the new Nashville
    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Kansas is dying
    Honorable Mention – Debtwire Investigations: How Burger King fed storm-ravaged Puerto Rico, and made a killing

    General Excellence; Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    Winner – American Banker

    General Excellence; Large

    Winner – Financial Times

    General Excellence; Medium

    Winner – The Dallas Morning News
    Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    General Excellence; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal
    Honorable Mention – Triangle Business Journal

    Government; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ambushed at home

    Government; Medium

    Winner – Politico: Investigation of Ryan Zinke
    Honorable Mention – The Plain Dealer: Do wage theft laws in Ohio harm or help workers?

    Government; Small

    Winner – InsideClimate News: Dangers without borders
    Honorable MentionCapital & Main: Battery blood: How California health agencies failed Exide workers
    Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent: ‘Scoops & tosses’ $160M in old debt

    Health/Science; Large

    Winner – A collaboration of ICIJ, NBC News Investigative Unit, The Associated Press and partners: The implant files
    Honorable Mention – Financial Times: Opioid crisis and the Sackler family

    Health/Science; Medium

    Winner – ProPublica:  Health Insurance Hustle
    Honorable Mention – ProPublica: Black Patients Miss Out On Promising Cancer Drugs

    Health/Science; Small

    Winner – Kaiser Health News: Drug price shenanigans
    Honorable Mention – InsideClimate News: Surrounded by oil fields, an Alaska village fears for its health

    Innovation; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Visual narratives

    Innovation; Medium

    Winner – GateHouse Media: Failure to deliver

    Innovation; Small

    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business: Chicago’s opioid crisis series

    International Reporting; Large

    Winner – The Associated Press: China’s internment camps
    Honorable Mention – Businessweek: Brexit’s big short

    International Reporting; Medium

    Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and Time Magazine: Unprotected

    International Reporting; Small

    Winner – A collaboration of ICIJ, Norbert Zongo Cell for Investigative Journalism in West Africa (CENOZO) and 11 media partners from West Africa: West Africa Leaks

    Investigative; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: The fall of Steve Wynn
    Honorable Mention – The New York Times and The Guardian/The Observer of London: Facebook, disinformation and privacy

    Investigative; Medium

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Bad medicine
    Winner – The Dallas Morning News: Pain & profit
    Honorable Mention – Forbes.com: Wilbur Ross series

    Investigative; Small

    Winner – A collaboration of The New Republic and The Investigative Fund: Political corruption and the art of the deal
    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Intercept and The Investigative Fund: FINRA’s black hole
    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ: Driven into debt

    Markets; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Explaining the financial markets

    Markets; Medium

    Winner – Bloomberg Law: SEC Wall Street cops see staff drop since Trump election

    Markets; Small

    Winner – RTO Insider: The GreenHat Energy story: Doubling down — with other people’s money

    Media/Entertainment; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Moonves and CBS exposed

    Media/Entertainment; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Tronc chairman sexual harassment

    Media/Entertainment; Small

    Winner – The Center for Public Integrity: The NBA and MLB quietly hustle for a cut of the sports betting jackpot

    Newsletter; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Due Diligence

    Newsletter; Medium

    Winner – Barron’s: Review & Preview

    Newsletter; Small

    Winner – Communications Daily on 911

    Personal Finance; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Click to donate

    Personal Finance; Medium

    Winner – The Chronicle of Higher Education: Drew Cloud is a well-known expert on student loans. One problem: He isn’t real.

    Personal Finance; Small

    Winner – The Marshall Project: Petty charges, princely profit

    Honorable Mention – McClatchy DC Bureau: Non-bank lending targets weakest borrowers

    Real Estate; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Trump taxes

    Real Estate; Medium

    Winner – The Globe and Mail: Inside the fall of Fortress
    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle: Real estate in the aftermath of Harvey

    Real Estate; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal: Project Stella and Why Tony Giarratana gets a Metro park (and you don’t)
    Honorable Mention – Realtor.com: Life in the flood zone

    Retail; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The human side of the retail shakeout

    Retail; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Michelle Gass is cracking the code at Kohl’s
    Honorable Mention – Chicago Tribune: Sears’ demise

    Retail; Small

    Winner – Capital & Main: The ‘Amazon Tax’ Ruling: Disrupting the Disruptors?
    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Foreign beef can legally be labeled “Product of U.S.A.”

    Small Business/Management/Career; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: Burned out
    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: In Trump’s America, bosses are accused of weaponizing the ICE crackdown

    Small Business/Management/Career; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Second to none, but still number two

    Small Business/Management/Career; Small

    Winner – McClatchy DC Bureau: Merchant cash death spiral

    Student Journalism; Projects and Collaborations

    Winner – Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY) and Dollars & Sense of Maine

    Student Journalism; Stories Written for Professional Publications

    Winner – Washington and Lee University published in the Tampa Bay Times: SunPass investigation
    Honorable Mention – UNC Chapel Hill published in the Triangle Business Journal: Where every penny is earned

    Student Journalism; Stories produced for Student News Organizations

    Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication: Hurricane provides opportunity for Puerto Rico’s battered tourism industry

    Technology; Large

    Winner The Wall Street Journal: Elon Musk

    Technology; Medium

    Winner – Politico: The least connected people in America
    Honorable Mention – Forbes: WhatsApp

    Technology; Small

    Winner – The Weekly Standard: Telemarketers, ahoy
    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Silicon Valley wants to give us eggs without chickens. Do we want that?

    Travel/Transportation; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: The middle seat

    Travel/Transportation; Medium

    Winner CNN Business: Uber sexual assault investigation
    Honorable Mention – The Seattle Times: Stolen Horizon passenger jet crashes outside Seattle

    Travel/Transportation; Small

    Winner – The Information: The self-driving car industry

    Video; Large

    Winner – Bloomberg: The drone delivery operator in Rwanda
    Honorable Mention – Financial Times: Argentina: A life of boom and bust

    Video; Medium and Small

    Winner – The Story Exchange: A Sandy Hook mom’s nonprofit hopes to stop school shootings

  • Student Journalism; Stories produced for Student News Organizations

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication: Hurricane provides opportunity for Puerto Rico’s battered tourism industry

    • Contributor – Cronkite News is the news division of Arizona PBS. The daily news products are produced by the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at ASU. Contributor – Andres Guerra Luz, Arizona State University
    • Judges’ Comments – This piece offers a different angle on the widely reported devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico: the opportunity for the tourism industry to play a larger role in the economy. The reporter did a lot of legwork, and wisely ventured outside San Juan to interview B&B owners in other tourist destinations. Bravo on providing readers with relevant data and historical context.
  • Investigative; Small

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Winner – A collaboration of The New Republic and Type Investigations: Political corruption and the art of the deal

    • Contributor – Anjali Kamat
    • Judges’ Comments – Anjali Kamat’s fresh and groundbreaking reporting on corrupt practices in Trump Organization real-estate projects in India dove deep into the murky world of Indian politics and business. It emerged with a colorful and compelling tale of a big company tied to Indian politicians and business partners with a long history of lawsuits and investigations that yielded evidence of potential bribery, fraud, intimidation, illegal land acquisition and money laundering — much of which enriched the president of the United States.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Intercept and Type Investigations: FINRA’s black hole

    • Contributor – Susan Antilla
    • Judges’ Comments – Sexual misconduct on Wall Street doesn’t get a fraction of the attention it does in Hollywood, politics and the tech industry, and closed-door arbitration by the financial industry’s own watchdog is one big reason. The Intercept’s detailed investigation of FINRA, which releases almost no information about its arbitrations, revealed that out of 55,000 complaints it decided over the past 30 years, only 97 involved harassment claims by women, who won just 17 of them. It’s a striking picture of the dysfunction that results when a private justice system tries to regulate sexual misconduct in the workplace.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ: Driven into debt

    • Contributors – Melissa Sanchez, Elliott Ramos, David Eads, Sandhya Kambhampati and WBEZ
    • Judges’ Comments – A shocking package with tremendous detail and a great visualization lays out how the city of Chicago raised ticket fees to yield more revenue — but with disastrous effects on the city’s poorer and minority populations. Highlights included compelling personal stories, an interactive graphic based on the city’s entire traffic ticket database and the amazing figure that Chicago residents owe a total of $1.45 billion in ticket debt — many times more than in cities such as New York and Los Angeles, and a burden that often forces people into personal bankruptcy in order to restore their driver licenses.
  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 24th Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By sabew on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) announces the results of its 24th annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding business journalism of 2018.

    Panels of judges selected 74 winners and 48 honorable mentions from 946 entries. Submissions came from 175 news organizations across all platforms representing the breadth of business journalism, from international, national and regional news outlets to specialized business publications.

    View the complete list of honorees and read the judges’ comments and journalists who contributed to the honored work.

    Highlights of the #SABEWBIB include:

    – The Financial Times, The Dallas Morning News, the Nashville Business Journal and American Banker earned general excellence honors.

    – Overall, The New York Times took home the most honors, including seven winners and two honorable mentions (one a collaborative effort with The Guardian/The Observer).

    – Bloomberg News and Bloomberg BNA had eight honors, including three winners.

    – The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal and Fortune Magazine each had four top-place awards, in addition to honorable mentions.

    – In the student categories, top honors went to Andres Guerra Luz of Arizona State University’s Cronkite News Bureau; Ryan Haar of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for a piece in the Triangle Business Journal; Hannah Denham of Washington and Lee University, for stories in the Tampa Bay Times; and a student team from Baruch College – City University of New York for work produced in Dollars & Sense.

    – Among smaller newsrooms, the Nashville Business Journal won three awards and one honorable mention, American Banker won three awards and InsideClimate News had two winners plus an honorable mention.

    – The contest reflected the growing trend of newsroom collaboration. Four collaborative projects won and two partnerships received honorable mentions, representing the combined work of 15 news organizations. The Associated Press, The Investigative Fund and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists partnered on more than one honored project.

    – A robust variety of winners in the medium and small newsroom categories included The Story Exchange, The Marshall Project, GateHouse Media, ProPublica, the Project on Government Oversight, RTO Insider, The Globe and Mail and Kaiser Health News.

    – Winners for commentary/opinion included Rana Foroohar of the Financial Times (large), Daniel Howes of The Detroit News (medium) and Rick Wartzman of Fast Company (small).

    “The winners of this year’s Best in Business contest are truly outstanding examples of business journalism, and SABEW is proud to recognize them,” said Joanna Ossinger, chair of the Best in Business Awards contest and an editor at Bloomberg News. “I’d also like to thank all the judges for volunteering their time to make this possible.”

    The journalists will receive awards at a celebratory dinner at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix on May 17 at SABEW’s 56th annual conference. Arizona State University’s Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication is hosting the conference at its Phoenix campus. Best in Business honorees are eligible to attend the conference at a discounted rate.

    SABEW is the world’s largest and oldest organization of business and financial journalists. It launched the Best in Business competition in 1995 to recognize excellence in the industry. SABEW Canada’s BIB winners will be announced next month.

    For more information on the contest, contact Aimée O’Grady at [email protected].

  • Jenny Paurys

    Posted By sabew on Friday September 21, 2018

    Jenny Paurys is Head of News at S&P Global Market Intelligence, where she oversees the newsroom’s reporters and editors worldwide: more than 300 professional journalists producing 550+ articles each day covering every major sector of the global economy.

    Jenny is a longtime veteran of the newsroom, joining as a Real Estate reporter in 2005 and quickly advancing to team manager. She then moved over to the Data Journalism team as a senior industry analyst, working with analysts from every sector to produce the newsroom’s flagship Data Dispatch feature. In 2017, she oversaw the newsroom’s launch of Consumer Staples & Discretionary sector coverage. Her work on that project led to her promotion to Managing Editor in 2018.

    Jenny serves on the Board of Governors of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing and as secretary and treasurer of S&P Global’s Virginia WINS chapter. She is the author of six books, including four on Virginia’s local food artisans. Jenny lives in Arlington, Virginia, with her family.

    Follow her on Twitter: @jennypaurys.

     

  • August 13 – How to mine government contracting data for stories in your own backyard

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday August 6, 2018

    A key lesson for business reporters is to follow the money to get the story. Nowhere is this truer than with federal, state, and local governments, which spend hundreds of billions of dollars annually on goods and services. They are the primary buyers of technology of all shapes and sizes, ranging from IT services to cloud-based software, electronic warfare and blockchain data storage. Companies large and small compete for this work, and business reporters who know how to follow the money will find the government contract beat chock full of stories waiting to be told.

    This month’s training session features a panel of experts who will discuss where reporters can find information on companies that pursue federal, state, and local government contracts, and how they can turn that data into stories that are relevant for readers and listeners.

    Monday, August 13
    2 – 3 p.m. EDT

    Register for the training.

    Instructions: Dial (512) 879-2134. When prompted enter access code 846394#.

    Questions: Callers may submit questions to the panelists at [email protected].

     

    Moderator:

    Nick Wakeman has been editor-in-chief of Washington Technology, an online publication focused on government contractors, since June 2005 after serving as senior editor for four years. He joined the publication as a staff writer in 1996. Nick currently writes about systems integrators, procurement trends, and major contracts. His daily blog “Business Beat” offers commentary and news about what’s going on in the government market. He also oversees Washington Technology’s annual Top 100 project, which ranks the largest IT and systems integrators in the federal market.

     

     

     

    Panelists:

    Sara Friedman is a reporter and producer at the online publication Government Computer News, where she covers cloud computing, cybersecurity, and a wide range of other public-sector IT topics. Before joining GCN, she was a reporter for Gambling Compliance, where she covered state issues related to casinos, lotteries and fantasy sports. Sara has also written for Communications Daily and Washington Internet Daily on state telecom and cloud computing. She is particularly interested in how emerging technology can help federal, state, and local agencies improve their everyday operations.

     

     

    Paul Murphy is senior data analyst with Bloomberg Government in Washington, D.C. Before Bloomberg acquired his company in 2010, he spent 25 years as president of Eagle Eye Publishers, where he brought the first-ever desktop-based contracts database to market. He has also spoken and published extensively about federal market trends and small-business issues.

     

     

     

    Tom Temin has been the host of Washington, D.C.-based Federal News Radio’s the “Federal Drive” since 2006 and writes a regular column on government IT. He has reported on and provided insight into technology markets for more than 30 years. Prior to joining Federal News Radio, Tom was a long-serving editor-in-chief of Government Computer News and Washington Technology magazines.

     

     

     

    Rob Terry is the FedBiz writer for the Washington Business Journal, covering an industry that straddles official Washington — the White House, Capitol Hill, and the Pentagon — and the local business community. He focuses on the public and private companies providing services to the federal government, with an emphasis on defense, IT, and other government contractors. Rob’sworked in local business journalism for 20 years in a variety of reporting and editing roles, including a five-year stint as the Washington Business Journal’s managing editor. In 2016 and 2017, he worked at Booz Allen Hamilton as its editor-in-chief.

  • How to mine government contracting data for stories in your own backyard

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday July 24, 2018

    A key lesson for business reporters is to follow the money to get the story. Nowhere is this truer than with federal, state, and local governments, which spend hundreds of billions of dollars annually on goods and services. They are the primary buyers of technology of all shapes and sizes, ranging from IT services to cloud-based software, electronic warfare and blockchain data storage. Companies large and small compete for this work, and business reporters who know how to follow the money will find the government contract beat chock full of stories waiting to be told.

    This month’s training session features a panel of experts who will discuss where reporters can find information on companies that pursue federal, state, and local government contracts, and how they can turn that data into stories that are relevant for readers and listeners.

    Monday, August 13
    2 – 3 p.m. EDT

    Listen to the recording.

    Moderator:

    Nick Wakeman has been editor-in-chief of Washington Technology, an online publication focused on government contractors, since June 2005 after serving as senior editor for four years. He joined the publication as a staff writer in 1996. Nick currently writes about systems integrators, procurement trends, and major contracts. His daily blog “Business Beat” offers commentary and news about what’s going on in the government market. He also oversees Washington Technology’s annual Top 100 project, which ranks the largest IT and systems integrators in the federal market.

     

    Panelists:

    Sara Friedman is a reporter and producer at the online publication Government Computer News, where she covers cloud computing, cybersecurity, and a wide range of other public-sector IT topics. Before joining GCN, she was a reporter for Gambling Compliance, where she covered state issues related to casinos, lotteries and fantasy sports. Sara has also written for Communications Daily and Washington Internet Daily on state telecom and cloud computing. She is particularly interested in how emerging technology can help federal, state, and local agencies improve their everyday operations.

     

     

    Paul Murphy is senior data analyst with Bloomberg Government in Washington, D.C. Before Bloomberg acquired his company in 2010, he spent 25 years as president of Eagle Eye Publishers, where he brought the first-ever desktop-based contracts database to market. He has also spoken and published extensively about federal market trends and small-business issues.

     

     

     

    Rob Terry is the FedBiz writer for the Washington Business Journal, covering an industry that straddles official Washington — the White House, Capitol Hill, and the Pentagon — and the local business community. He focuses on the public and private companies providing services to the federal government, with an emphasis on defense, IT, and other government contractors. Rob’sworked in local business journalism for 20 years in a variety of reporting and editing roles, including a five-year stint as the Washington Business Journal’s managing editor. In 2016 and 2017, he worked at Booz Allen Hamilton as its editor-in-chief.

  • Remembering Warren Watson, former SABEW executive director

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday May 29, 2018

    SABEW mourns the loss of Warren Watson. This obituary is written by his longtime friend and SABEW Chair Marty Steffens, a professor at the University of Missouri

     

    Former SABEW executive director Warren Watson died May 27 at MaineGeneral Medical Center in Augusta, where he had been hospitalized since mid-December with complications of diabetes. The longtime journalist and nonprofit executive was 67.

    Watson was executive director from 2009 to 2014 at SABEW’s Phoenix headquarters at Arizona State University, where he also taught reporting. The organization had just moved to Phoenix and Warren hired new staff and reorganized the office. Watson saw the organization through difficult times in the journalism industry when recession hit news organizations struggled to pay for training and conferences.

    After leaving SABEW, he was executive editor of the Alton (IL) Telegraph. He was laid off after only eight months on the job, and moved to Columbia, MO to reconnect with longtime friend Maggie Walter. He taught news reporting at the Missouri School of Journalism for one year before moving back to his beloved Maine in 2016. He was teaching journalism at a community college when he fell ill. Because semester grades were due, Watson marked papers in his hospital bed, still taking care to offer suggestions for improvement.

    Born in New Hampshire in 1950, Watson relished his New England roots and was a lifelong fan of the New England Patriots and Boston Red Sox. A sports journalist early in his career, Watson loved just about any sporting event and never gave up on a comeback for golfer Tiger Woods.

    Watson often signed personal emails with W2 – W squared – a nod to his alliterative name.   Few professional colleagues knew that there was a second W2 – as Warren was a few minutes older than twin brother Wayne, his only sibling.

    Tributes poured in from journalism friends who noted Watson’s passion and dedication to the craft.

    Mark Scarp, who was SABEW membership director from 2009-2012, said “Warren was always a journalist, with a journalist’s fascination with getting to the truth of matters. He understood the need for organizations like SABEW to support journalists during the difficult years of the Great Recession and worked very hard to provide that support.”

    “Warren had an open, warm way about him that made him a pleasure to be around,” said Jill Jorden Spitz, editor of the Arizona Daily Star and SABEW president in 2012-2013. “Working alongside him for a year to serve SABEW, an organization we both loved, was a pleasure.” Former SABEW president Kevin Hall, a senior reporter with McClatchy’s Washington bureau, worked with Watson closely from 2013-2014.  He said “Warren was an upbeat person who always had a kind word for others. His good nature rubbed off on others and will be his legacy.”

    SABEW Chair Marty Steffens, a professor at the University of Missouri, and her husband, Brian, knew Watson for some 30 years.  “When Warren was still in Phoenix, we’d talk three to four times a week,” she said.  “He was always hustling for SABEW – figuring out training, donations, or how to do conferences on a meager budget – and often asked for my help.” When Watson moved to Columbia, he was a frequent companion for golf, dinner and football.  Steffens invited Watson and Walter to Thanksgiving in 2015, and he requested she make mashed turnips.  “He recalled that his late mother made them every Thanksgiving – I was more than happy to rekindle that cherished memory,” she said.

    In his long career, Watson was director of J-Ideas for high school journalists at Ball State University and was a vice president of the American Press Institute in suburban Washington. He was editor of the Kennebec Journal and Central Maine Morning Sentinel as well as managing editor for the Portland (ME) Press Herald.  He was graphics editor for The St. Petersburg Times, and also was president of the Society of News Design in 2003.

    He will be buried next to his parents in New Hampshire, a fitting end as Watson spent the last year of his life researching and writing “Claire and Charlie: An Unlikely Love Story,” published in October 2017 by Hilltop30 Publishers. The story recalls his immigrant parents (Charlie born in England, and Claire in Canada) who met and married during World War II. A second book, “Surviving Journalism” – about how to “fireproof” a career in the changing news industry — will be published in September.

    A memorial service will be held in Dover, NH, in mid-June. Besides his brother, he is survived by his former wife, Terri Watson, and sons James and Sam.

    He was a 1973 graduate of the University of New Hampshire and earned a masters from Ball State University in 2008.

  • College Connect: The Rise of Venmo and Electronic Payment Methods

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday May 8, 2018

    By Logan Krenik

    “Hey bro, do you want to go get some ice cream?”

    “Sorry man — I’m out of cash.”

    “Dude it’s all good! I’ll cover you and you can just Venmo me later.”

    “That sounds good! Thanks man!”

    Not once would anyone a decade ago think that something like this was possible. The concept of paying someone by using a phone app connected to your credit card account would be considered absolutely insane.

    We now have payment apps like Paypal, Zelle, Square Cash, Apple Pay and Google Wallet. These apps have become immensely popular over the past 3-4 years as people are looking for easier ways to pay their bills or just pay their friends.

    I read an article on USA Today: and in this article it talks about the rapid growth that has already happened and the rapid growth that is expected to continue in the mobile payment industry. The article stated that “In July, research firm eMarketer projected more than 91 million people will use these services by 2019, up from 31.4 million in 2015. Meanwhile, the value of transactions processed via mobile payment apps will surge from more than $46 billion in 2015 to more than $187 billion in two years.”
    The part that separates Venmo from the others is the way that it’s almost like its own social media site. You can go on there to see which of your friends has paid someone else and get to see a little description of what they paid them.

    I was talking about Venmo-ing one of my friends once and they said to me that sometimes when they’re bored, they’ll just scroll through Venmo.

    “Honestly, sometimes if I’m bored and I’ve already looked through Twitter, Insta and Snapchat, I’ll just go on Venmo and see who’s paying who and what they’re paying them for. It’s very entertaining to see what some of the descriptions are sometimes.”

    This has led me to sometimes do the same. When I get bored, I’ll just go on Venmo and see what people are paying other people. It’s interesting and even funny sometimes to see what people are doing.

    However, Venmo isn’t the only mobile payment app available. PayPal, Zelle, Square Cash and Google Market are also mobile payment apps which each have their own thing that separates them from the others.

    The unique thing about PayPal is that it allows the user to make transactions using 25 different currencies. Zelle is a pretty standard mobile money app, but one of the perks, according to USA Today is that “For those users reluctant to offer their banking info to a third-party app, Zelle is a solid alternative.” For the more conservative people who like to keep their information closer to them, this is a great option. Square Cash has a bonus that allows the user to have a Visa debit card that has your Square Cash balance that you use for your physical transactions. Google Wallet offers their users 24/7 protection from fraud as well as connect to either a bank account or a credit card.

    However, Apple has entered the electronic payment market as well as they have released Apple Pay, which allows users to pay with their phone or Apple Watch and not even have to take out their wallet. Apple Pay will also allow users to “send and receive payments through messages,” according to USA Today.

    Some people will always prefer to do things the old-fashioned way when it comes to money, but as long as these mobile payments are offered and being improved, the industry and population of people that use them will continue to grow.

    Logan Krenik is a freshman at the University of Missouri.

  • Executive Director’s Report May 2018

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday May 2, 2018

    SABEW18
    This year’s conference was all about getting back to the basics and building skills. We’ve seen a number of ground-breaking stories over the past year, and all were done the old-fashioned way — by cultivating sources, digging into documents and data, collaborating with editors, and finding angles that matter most to people. Hats off to SABEW18 conference chairs Bernie Kohn and Bryan Borzykowski and the committee that worked hard to create solid programming and networking opportunities.

    New name
    SABEW’s familiar acronym remains the same, but the organization has changed its name to the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. The change is part of a broader effort to embrace a global focus on business journalism. Having “American” in the name implied that we did not offer membership or training to international journalists. The rebrand is about engaging and encouraging news professionals from across the globe to become members.

    First Amendment Committee
    SABEW wants to lead members in efforts to band together to fight fake news, support the credibility of journalism, protect access to information and pursue the truth. To that end, SABEW created the First Amendment Committee to address members’ needs and desires, including advocacy of journalism, at this challenging time for the industry. Over the past year, it has released public statements in support of press freedom, partnered with other groups concerned about protecting the quality of government data, advocated for safety as journalists have experienced unprecedented risks and threats, and offered programming opportunities related to press freedom, transparency and access to data.

    AWARD HIGHLIGHTS

    2017 Best in Business Awards
    We celebrated the 2017 BIB Award honorees at a ceremony on Friday evening, April 27, 2018. The 121 winners and honorable mentions came from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. SABEW18 conference attendees were encouraged to attend the “BIB Winners: How They Did It” session to learn from this year’s winners. The 2018 BIB contest opens Dec. 1, 2018.

    SABEW Distinguished Achievement Award
    Congratulations to Gretchen Morgenson, senior special writer in the investigations unit at The Wall Street Journal, who received the Distinguished Achievement Award at the Best in Business ceremony Friday evening, April 27. The award is given to an individual who has made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who has served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession. Morgenson shared insights, career highlights and thoughts on journalism during a special Q&A session led by Lisa Gibbs, director of news partnerships at The Associated Press.

    Larry Birger Young Business Journalist of the Year Award
    Jillian Berman, 28, a New York-based reporter for MarketWatch, was the 2017 winner of the Larry Birger contest. It is the fourth year of the competition. Berman received the award and a $1,500 honorarium at the 2017 SABEW New York fall conference. Thanks to rbb Communications for funding this award and to Josh Merkin for his help shepherding the grant. Deadline for this year’s applications is July 31, 2018.

    Membership
    We have just over 3,000 members. This includes 2,637 institutional members from 132 media outlets, 51 institutional members from six academic institutions, 175 journalist members, 135 student members and 12 associate members. Keep your membership current and share your Twitter handle by updating your profile in the membership database.

    TRAINING HIGHLIGHTS

    Monthly training calls
    The training calls continue to be extremely popular – since last year’s spring conference, we’ve held 13 calls for over 500 participants. The calls are archived and can be accessed at any time on SABEW.org. Highlights include sessions on freelancing, international trade in the Trump era, the state of press freedom, and how to cover cryptocurrency. We strive to offer a variety of topics and to recruit presenters who represent diverse backgrounds and organizations. Thanks to SABEW members Kim Quillen and Patrick Sanders for leading this effort.

    Data-immersion workshop
    Our fifth annual Goldschmidt fellowship week in Washington, D.C., was a huge success. Twenty-two business journalists participated in the seminar that immersed them in data and accounting skills. Janet Yellen, then-chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, addressed the group in the historic Fed boardroom. Journalists also heard from experts at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Participants received special briefings from the Council of Economic Advisers and the Federal Reserve. Many thanks for the continued work of SABEW leaders Marty Steffens and Kevin Hall and donor Jim Goldschmidt of the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation for supporting this initiative. The application process for the winter 2019 workshop begins in November.

    SABEWNYC17 fall conference
    The October 2017 event in New York was a huge success. It attracted some 200 people over the course of two days of programming including a daylong personal-finance reporting workshop produced by NEFE’s Paul Golden.

    College Connect
    Check out SABEW’s student-written personal-finance blogs on SABEW.org. Topics range from family financial crises to how much outside employment a student should undertake during the academic year. The ongoing program is funded by NEFE. Students from the University of Missouri, Arizona State University and the University of Georgia are the bloggers.

    Sixth annual Business of Health Care Summit in Washington, D.C., June 28-30
    SABEW is seeking applications for a workshop that will help journalists better understand health-care economics and will provide an update on the Affordable Care Act. Attendees will be able to share and test out story ideas at this summit. Space is limited to 15 journalists. Selected participants will receive a stipend to offset travel-related expenses. Go to SABEW.org to apply. Made possible by a grant from The Commonwealth Fund.

    SABEW Canada
    SABEW Canada continues to expand and thrive with new members, social events, programs and BIB awards! Bryan Borzykowski, SABEW’s well-known Canadian board member who has been instrumental in leading expansion, now serves as vice president of SABEW.

    Finance
    In keeping with best practices for non-profits, SABEW conducted an independent audit of our 2016 financials, and we will do so again for the 2017 financials. The audit will help set the table for future financial growth since audits are a requirement of many grant-giving organizations. SABEW will end 2017 with $447,337 in net assets

  • Cryptocurrency and blockchain pose challenges for news organizations

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Monday April 30, 2018

    By Ang Gao
    Medill News Service

    New and arcane technologies such as blockchain and cryptocurrency pose challenges and opportunities for major news organizations that are scrambling to meet reader demand for more coverage.

    Among the biggest challenges are how to help readers understand the burgeoning technology and guide coverage of a world that few people, including themselves, fully understand, according to top editors interviewed at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s spring conference in Washington, D.C.

    “It’s a challenge for us every day to decide how much do we report on this, because it is a very exciting opportunity, and there are a lot of people interested in it,” said Glenn Hall, chief editor of Dow Jones Newswires. “But if you cover it too much, you can be part of the hype.”

    Blockchain, which has been making headlines since last year, is a decentralized and distributed ledger that can record transactions in a permanent way. Its best-known application is cryptocurrency, including the volatile digital currency Bitcoin.

    Reader interest in the technologies is growing exponentially. Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief at investing educational website Investopedia, said page views for blockchain and cryptocurrency content now make up around 10 percent of total page views on Investopedia.com, up from 0.5 percent in June, 2017.

    Because investor interest in blockchain and cryptocurrency is growing rapidly, news organizations are moving quickly to establish themselves as reliable sources for such content.

    The New York Times has four reporters covering blockchain and cryptocurrency, said Dean Murphy, the associate editor at the Times. All four are based in San Francisco to be closer to the hub of the technologies and include a former Wired magazine reporter who spent years covering artificial intelligence and machine learning.

    “One of the hardest parts of that world is trying to figure out when something is important or not,” Murphy said.

    Sourcing is critically important and notoriously difficult, both in the larger tech world and in the smaller niche of blockchain and cryptocurrency. Reporters mainly talk to analysts, venture capitalists and academics, but they work hard to find people who are more deeply involved with blockchain, Murphy said.

    “To get people to talk critically about that industry is very different and a lot of them [employees] have non-disclosure agreements,” Murphy said. “You can’t cover this area without really strong reporters who have very good sources.”

    Another challenge is with sources who try to use the media as a method of marketing, Murphy said. Some security analysts promote companies to the Times, hoping to be quoted and then get hired by those companies. Because blockchain is such a new technology, there is a greater risk of reporters being manipulated in this way.

    Reporters must be well-versed in both finance and technology, because blockchain is an important intersection of these two, said Rich Barbieri, executive editor of CNNMoney.

    “Blockchain is constantly changing,” Barbieri said. “You have to make smart decisions about what stories are not worth covering.”

    Dow Jones’s Hall said reporters need to understand not only blockchain and its potential applications, but also the regulatory environment in which the technology is operating.

    “There are a lot of risks to the future of this technology,” Hall said. “And any kind of change in the regulatory environment could instantly decrease or increase the value of a player in the market.”

    There’s also not enough reporting that helps people to fundamentally understand how blockchain works, and what risks there may be in the technology, he said.

    “Right now there is a lot of enthusiasm, but there’s not a lot of knowledge around for the average person about what this technology is capable of,” Hall said.

    Investopedia uses subject matter experts to explain blockchain to its readers, Silver said. One of the editors has been writing about blockchain for five years, he added.

    Separating the euphoria from reality is central to the coverage strategy at S&P Global Market Intelligence, said Gary Regenstreif, executive editor. He requires reporters to get quotes from both those who are enthusiastic and those who are cynical about blockchain and cryptocurrency.

    The fact that a digital currency is popular now “doesn’t mean that it’s sustainable or it’s a viable security instrument in the very long term,” Regenstreif said.

    While cryptocurrency is getting the most attention right now, it is just one expression of blockchain, Hall said. The blockchain technology is already being used in banking and could transform real estate, financial and other industries, he said.

    Others agree that blockchain has not yet reached full potential.

    “We see it being big for a long time because the notion of a decentralized system for everything from payments to tracking assets to supply chain management can all be improved through the use of blockchain,” he said.

  • SABEW18-BEA director: County-by-county GDP to roll out this fall  

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Friday April 27, 2018

    By Roxanne (Yanchun) Liu
    Medill News Service

    The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis said it plans to develop county-by-county gross domestic product data and expects to have prototype statistics available by this fall, Director Brian Moyer said on Friday.

    The GDP statistics will cover more than 3,000 counties in the U.S. and may include breakouts by major industry sector for each county, Moyer said in a panel discussion in Washington, D.C., with the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing.

    “If you want to make decisions at the local level, you really need this information to gauge policy [and] return on investment,” Moyer said.

    Brian Moyer, center, talks about the Bureau of Economic Analysis’ county-level GDP project at a session during the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s spring conference.

    The BEA has been collecting localized statistics by working with private-sector companies that provide credit card transaction data and real estate data. Such information requires thorough data processing before it becomes part of the accurate GDP number, said Tara Sinclair, a professor of economics and international affairs at George Washington University.

    “This information doesn’t come to [BEA] cleanly, so it takes a lot of effort on their part to be able to translate the information they are feeding in into a measure that matches GDP,” Sinclair said.

    Whether the locally collected data aggregates up to the national level is an important question, Sinclair said.

    “This isn’t going to be just a pure counting exercise,” she said. “There’s no way that they could count at the county level and do a different count at the national level and have that match up exactly without some kind of adjustment.”

  • SABEW18-Ross, Hassett address policy impact on economy

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Friday April 27, 2018

    By Danielle Chemtob and Brian Baker
    University of North Carolina and Medill News Service

    Trump administration officials defended recent tax reform and tariffs Friday at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s spring conference in Washington, D.C.

    In two separate sessions, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers Kevin Hassett attributed recent economic growth to tax cuts and deregulation and played down concerns of an escalating trade war over tariffs.

    “Some of these other countries have done a far better job at talking free trade, I would call it pretending to be free trade, than we have,” Ross said. “But simultaneously, they have been practicing extremely protectionist behavior. Our objective is to try to have their behavior match their rhetoric.”

    Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, left, talks with Heather Long of The Washington Post at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s spring conference on Friday. Ross spoke about the economic policies of the Trump administration.

    First-quarter gross domestic product, announced Friday, increased 2.3 percent, driven by strong business investment, but slowed from the pace of recent quarters. Hassett said the first-quarter rate exceeded his expectations, and he continues to anticipate growth for the full year of about 3 percent.

    Ross said the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, passed in late December, helped drive growth in business spending during the quarter, and he noted companies are starting to bring manufacturing plants back to the U.S. from places like Mexico.

    Responding to criticism that the tax cuts only benefited the wealthy and corporations, he blamed the media for causing confusion.

    “You keep telling them that the tax cuts are only for wealthy people, not for average working people,” he said to a room of reporters.

    Instead, Ross pointed to examples of workers that received a one-time bonus stemming from the tax cuts. The Trump administration claimed in January that 3 million workers had already gotten a bonus as a result of the tax cuts, in line with the findings of Americans for Tax Reform, a group that advocates for lower taxes.

    Ross said one of the major objectives of the tariff policy was to provide a boost to a stagnant middle class. But when asked about whether he believed income inequality was a problem in the United States, he didn’t provide a direct answer.

    “Our primary objective is [to] make the pie bigger so everybody will get more of it to eat, regardless of what happens to the share,” he said.

    The trade deficit fell 10.3 percent to $68 billion during March, according to a report released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau.

    “Do we think China’s trade surpluses were good for their economy?” Ross said. “Well if trade surpluses are good, how can trade deficits be good, too?”

    But in response to the tariffs, China has proposed its own levies on American goods, and they are expected to affect some of Trump’s most loyal supporters: farmers.

    “It clearly is not great to have one industry be hit by retaliation for efforts to help other parts of the economy,” Ross said. “On the other hand, if you never take any action because you’re afraid of retaliation, you’re ending up back where you started.”

    Austan Goolsbee, who served as an economic advisor to President Obama, once told Hassett that an economist’s trade deal would be one line: free trade.

    “The trade deals that we see are thousands and thousands of pages,” Hassett said.

    Tariff negotiations are still underway with countries such as Germany and China, and the uncertainty is fueling recent stock market volatility.

    “When you see policy uncertainty, you’re going to see volatility,” Hassett said.

  • SABEW Board of Governors Elections 2018

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday April 5, 2018

    Ballots will be cast during SABEW18 for seven on the SABEW Board of Governors, six with a term ending in 2021 and one ending in 2019. Voting members will receive their ballot information directly from online voting service provider Opavote.org.

    Board Candidates (listed in alphabetical order)

    Xana Antunes
    Executive editor, Quartz
    My two-plus years on the SABEW board have afforded me a close-up appreciation of the vital role the organization plays in the business journalism community. SABEW is an ideal forum to advance excellence in coverage of the global economy, nurture and share best practices, set high ethical standards, and provide networking opportunities for members. Its annual Best in Business awards offer both a measuring stick and a guidepost for our profession as it navigates evolving platforms of choice, quicksilver audiences, and prevailing values and standards that are routinely reapplied and reinterpreted.

    These are all areas in which I can make a real, and I hope, lasting contribution, in the spirit of giving back. I bring deep experience in our profession to the task, having worked in leadership roles across newspapers (NY Post), magazines (Fortune, Fortune.com), and television (CNBC Digital). Today, as Executive Editor at Quartz, I’m able to put that experience at the service of a young and innovative business publication that’s quickly established a reputation for smart, thoughtful coverage.

    And that’s the perspective I bring to the SABEW board. The globalization of business — and the digitization of everything — calls for a professional body that’s especially attuned to the challenges and opportunities before us. As board secretary, a position I served in for a year, and as a member of the team that modernized our BIB Awards, I have shown that I can both help infuse the organization with a deeper digital sensibility, and support members’ efforts to develop the tools and skills they need as they transition to a fully digital future.

    I would be honored to have your support in the upcoming SABEW board election.

    Rich Barbieri
    Executive editor, CNNMoney
    As a longtime business journalist, I have a lot vested in the profession. SABEW holds an important place in as a thought leader in the field. As executive editor of CNNMoney, I spend considerable effort mentoring the next generation of business journalists as well as leading coverage of a major business news outlet. Those two roles make me well suited to serving on the board of SABEW.

    I can contribute to SABEW as judge in contests, recruiting new members, championing the organization within the profession and helping to shape conference content. I’d be honored to serve another term.

    Megan Davies
    Editor and reporter, Thomson Reuters
    I’d be honored to serve a term as a SABEW board member. I’m passionate about journalism and dedicated to the field of business reporting. I’ve held various leadership roles within Reuters in the United States and Russia and reported on a wide variety of business topics. I’m particularly passionate about enterprise reporting. I’d be keen to be involved in SABEW to further high standards of business journalism and try and encourage the next generation of reporters.

    Brad Foss
    Global business editor, Associated Press
    My first full term as a SABEW board member has been rewarding and productive. Being part of the team that revamped the BIB contest to make it more relevant in the digital era was a great way to learn about the organization and the needs and concerns of its members. While SABEW’s challenges are significant, so are its opportunities.

    It would be a privilege to remain part of the leadership team that helps SABEW transform itself further and thrive — although not just by expanding its membership and strengthening its financial foundation. Whether it is developing training programs, running contests or speaking out on ethics, SABEW’s role in setting high standards matters. I want to help steer SABEW toward decisions and actions that will benefit business journalists and their readers, and help sustain the organization for the long run.

    For the past four months, I have been global business editor at The Associated Press, guiding the business news agenda for the world’s largest news organization. AP caters to a general-news audience and the experience I have gained while working there shapes the perspective I bring to SABEW’s diverse and talented board, and to its members.

    I will do my best to marshal any resources and newsroom expertise that will further SABEW’s goals. And I am happy to serve as an ambassador for SABEW in any way needed.

    Thank you for considering me to serve again as a SABEW board member.

    Andrew Leckey
    Chair in Business Journalism, ASU Cronkite School
    President, Reynolds Center 
    As a long-time business journalist and SABEW member, I understood the importance of our professional organization to the momentum and integrity of our field. The honor of serving on its Board of Governors, however, has since given me opportunity to join with outstanding board members in promoting SABEW’s high ideals.

    My primary areas of focus on the board have been promoting international goals, organizing Speed Networking sessions for students at conferences and providing an assist in sponsorship of SABEW events. I’d be honored to serve another term to continue our international expansion building upon the success in Canada, bolstering SABEW finances, attracting young people to our field and seeking new members from a variety of newsrooms.

    I was a syndicated investment columnist for Chicago Tribune for many years, an author and long-time broadcaster whose positions included CNBC anchor and reporter. This led to my  position as Chair in Business Journalism at Arizona State University Cronkite School and President of Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. Receiving Fulbrights in business journalism in China and Uganda reinforced my belief that SABEW can expand its much-needed influence beyond North America.

    Heather Long
    Economics correspondent, The Washington Post
    SABEW is as important as ever for two reasons: Training and networking. I am running for SABEW board member because this organization has been critical for me to strengthen my network and skill set, and I have a lot of ideas on how to enhance that even more for SABEW members in the coming years. I was part of the team that put together SABEW’s Spring 2018 Conference in Washington D.C., helping to secure great speakers including Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. I would also love to see SABEW organize more mini-networking nights and send out a newsletter to members every other week highlighting job openings and sharing the stories of some of SABEW’s members so we can get to know each other better. Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to getting to know more amazing SABEW members at the Spring Conference and finding ways to collaborate.

    Cindy Perman
    Partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com
    I think connecting with each other and sharing ideas is the key for us as individuals and as an industry to grow and thrive – that’s why I want to be a part of SABEW and the board. I think I bring a unique digital background to the table, having been a part of the growth of two major digital operations, as well as CNBC’s integration of its TV and digital operations, and navigating new platforms like Apple News. I’m really creative and am excited about the prospect of helping to craft panels and events that inform and inspire our members. One of my most rewarding career experiences was managing CNBC.com’s intern program. I loved being a part of their development, giving them advice and encouragement – but also hearing their insight. I think we don’t bring young people to the table often enough and say, “Hey, what do you think?” So, one of the things I would like to focus on as a board member is recruiting more young people to the organization, having more events that are geared toward them and really integrating them with more experienced journalists. One thing I think would be cool would be to do some pairings of young journalists with experienced journalists but not in the traditional mentoring way. Set it up in a way where both are asking questions and learning from each other. Let some younger journalists do panels – whether it’s mixed or an all-millennial panel. I’m really inspired by the idea of a two-way flow. I hope to have the opportunity to share these ideas and brainstorm others with the board! I would welcome the opportunity and I think I have a lot to contribute.

  • College Connect: Income Levels Directly Impact the Health of Americans

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday March 29, 2018

    By Alyssa Alves

    Americans with higher incomes are healthier because of their ability to afford better health insurance plans, medications and diagnostic tests.

    “There are a lot of problems in the American healthcare system. Compared to other countries, we are purchasing the same amount and quality of healthcare but paying much more,” said Patryk Babiarz, a professor in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Georgia.

    Babiarz said the high costs of healthcare gradually impact the physical health of those with lower incomes. Research has found that Americans with lower incomes tend to be less healthy than those with higher incomes. Overall, the socioeconomic status of Americans directly impacts both their physical and mental health.

    The effects of socioeconomic status on health are partially determined by the American healthcare system. Those of lower socioeconomic status have lower life expectancy, suffer from more chronic illnesses and have worse overall health than those of a higher socioeconomic status, according to a 2017 research article published in the Journal of Private Care & Community Health.

    Jackie Kimball, 19, a management major at the University of Georgia, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 3. Living with diabetes requires many daily means of preventative healthcare.

    “I have to constantly make sure I keep my supplies stocked up- from blood sugar testing strips to site changes. All of the supplies and new technology that helps me, adds up,” Kimball said. “My dad has a good job in sales, so he gets us insurance through work. Our insurance partially covers dealing with my Type 1 diabetes. However, our yearly expenses are in the thousands still.”

    Kimball said she is thankful her family has adequate health insurance. “I could not imagine the stress it would add if my dad did not have a job that can provide us with what we need,” she said.

    Babiarz said a significant contributor to illness is decreases in income, adding this “usually this happens over time.”  He said when people’s income decreases, they find themselves unable to afford preventative healthcare and it ultimately may lead to disease.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that Americans use preventative healthcare measures at half of the recommended rate. The treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease accounts for 75 percent of American healthcare spending, according to the CDC.

    Mental health is also impacted by socioeconomic status. “The psychological state is easier to document. Those whose income goes down or lose their job score much higher for depression- it’s hard to recover financially,” said Babiarz.

    He explained that while physical illnesses related to lower socioeconomic status develop over time, psychological impact can occur immediately with a change in income or loss of job.

    The industry in which one works also impacts overall health. Those who work in higher-paid jobs tend to face fewer occupational hazards in the workplace, and they generally have better access to healthcare through their job.

    Blue-collar workers face more stressors in the workplace due to hazardous conditions and less job security which can lead to hypertension, diabetes, chronic pain and cardiovascular issues, according to the American Psychological Association. These factors cause significant stress on the body over time.

    “When studying financial status and its impact on health we have to consider many factors including various financial vulnerabilities and their effects,” said Babiarz.

    Alyssa Alves is a student at the University of Georgia.

  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 23rd Annual Best in Business Competition

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday March 8, 2018

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) announces the results of its 23rd annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding journalism of 2017.

    The 121 winners and honorable mentions come from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. For a complete list of honorees, click here. To read the judges’ comments, click here.

    The Los Angeles Times received 11 honors, while The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal each earned seven. Fortune also earned seven, including one it shared with Quartz. ProPublica won five awards; the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, InsideClimate News and The Center for Public Integrity each got four.

    “This year’s contest was incredibly competitive across all categories,” said Joanna Ossinger, chair of the Best in Business Awards contest and an editor at Bloomberg News. “The strong field shows just how much business journalism is thriving. Congratulations to all the winners, and thank you to the nearly 200 judges who volunteered their time and without whom the contest couldn’t succeed.”

    The winners for General Excellence were The New York Times in the Large category, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel in Medium, health-focused publication STAT in Small, and The Real Deal in industry-specific publications.

    Winners included The New York Times in Investigative for “Culture of Harassment,” ProPublica and NPR in Explanatory for “Sold for Parts,” and The Wall Street Journal in Commentary/ Opinion for the technology columns of Christopher Mims. Honorees in Innovation included the Los Angeles Times for “Disneyland Wait Times” and GateHouse Media for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms.” Organizations as diverse as Crain’s Chicago Business, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Reuters, Portland Business Journal, Bloomberg News and The Motley Fool also garnered prizes.

    In the Student categories, top honors went to Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic; Danielle Chemtob of the University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal; and Shen Lu from Northwestern University’s Medill News Service.

    Contest honorees will be celebrated at a ceremony April 27, 2018, during the 55th annual SABEW conference at the Capital Hilton hotel in Washington, D.C. Honorees are eligible to attend the conference at a discounted rate. This year’s conference will feature notable names from the worlds of politics and business, as well as training sessions and a discussion of journalistic ethics through the lens of the #MeToo movement.

    SABEW is the largest association of business journalists, with more than 3,000 members. The SABEW Canada Best in Business finalists will be announced April 3. For more information, email Crystal Beasley at [email protected].

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