Robert Hackett Larry Birger Award 2018 Finalist

Posted By sabew on Monday September 10, 2018

The 2018 judging panel chose to honor Robert Hackett of Fortune as one of two finalists for the 2018 Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award.

Robert Hackett is a senior writer at Fortune, where he covers technology and business. He is a cofounding editor of The Ledger, Fortune’s fintech franchise, and a co-chair of Fortune’s Brainstorm Finance conference in Montauk. He co-hosts two weekly video series, Tech Debate and Balancing The Ledger, and writes Cyber Saturday, the weekend edition of Fortune’s tech newsletter.

Hackett has written cover stories on hacking, Bitcoin, and blockchain technology. Prior to joining Fortune, Hackett worked for Nautilus Magazine, TED Conferences, and Johnson & Johnson. He graduated from Columbia Journalism School in 2014, and he earlier received a dual degree in chemistry and English with minors in history and science & technology studies from Cornell University.

  • Dani Burger Larry Birger Award 2018 Finalist

    Posted By sabew on Monday September 10, 2018

    The 2018 judging panel chose to honor Dani Burger of Bloomberg News as one of two finalists for the 2018 Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award.

    Burger is a London-based markets reporter, focusing on global cross-asset trends and rules-based investing since joining Bloomberg in 2014. She leads Bloomberg’s coverage of quantitative investing, specializing in strategies that are rapidly changing investor behavior and global markets. Additionally, she is a regular contributor to Bloomberg television, covering European markets on-air.

  • Cheddar’s Alex Heath is the 2018 Birger Award winner

    Posted By sabew on Monday September 10, 2018

    Alex Heath, 25, a senior reporter for Cheddar, is the 2018 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists younger than 30. Additionally, the judging panel chose to honor two finalists Dani Burger of Bloomberg News and Robert Hackett of Fortune. 

    Made possible by a $7,500 gift from rbb Communications of Miami, the award commemorates Larry Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998.

    Josh Merkin, vice president of rbb Communications, will present the award to Heath at SABEW’s New York Fall Conference on Oct. 25. “As we mark our fifth anniversary of this award, the importance of recognizing the contributions of journalists has never been more important. We must continue to encourage a free press and do what it necessary to ensure the future of the journalism profession,” said Merkin. “We know Larry would be proud of the outstanding work being done today and it gives us great pleasure to honor his legacy by providing opportunities for the next generation.” Merkin said.   

    2018 is the fifth year for the competition, past winners include Jillian BermanWilliam AldenCezary Podkul and Mina Kimes 

    Alex Heath is a senior reporter for Cheddar. He regularly breaks news on the biggest players in tech and media. Before Cheddar, he was a senior reporter for Business Insider covering the likes of Facebook, Snap, and Twitter. He first started writing professionally for tech blogs at the ripe age of 15. He’s currently based in New York City and originally hails from Louisville, Kentucky.  

    “It’s an honor to be recognized by SABEW in a competitive field that includes many peers who I admire and learn from every day. I want to thank my former colleagues at Business Insider and my current colleagues at Cheddar for giving me the support to pursue the kind of journalism I love to do,” Heath said. 

    The judges were impressed by Heath’s thorough reporting of companies such as Snapchat and Facebook that are notoriously secretive. His shoe-leather reporting was evident in the fascinating piece about Snapchat’s purchase of Vergence Labs. Health also writes clearly about complex issues, taking the reader inside businesses that aren’t easy to comprehend.  

    A total of 23 young journalists submitted entries. The judging team was made up of SABEW members Jon Chesto (chair), James Madore, Marty Steffens, Robert Barba and Cindy Perman.  

    About SABEW: 
    SABEW is the largest organization of business journalists in the world. For more information, contact Aimée O’Grady at [email protected]. 

    About rbb Communications: 
    rbb is an integrated communications firm and four-time U.S. Agency of the Year. As the Champion of Breakout Brands, rbb inspires companies to create customer passion that delivers bottom-line results. rbb’s family of brands offers media relations, marketing, corporate communications, digital/social media and creative services/advertising. Specialty practices include consumer products/services, travel and leisure, health, sports and entertainment, professional services/B2B, and higher education. The firm’s global network extends across more than 50 countries through its partnership in PROI Worldwide, the largest global network of independent public-relations agencies. For more information, visit ww.rbbcommunications.com or call 305-448-7450. 

  • Jillian Berman wins 2017 Birger Award

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday September 28, 2017

    Jillian Berman, 28, a New York-based reporter for MarketWatch, is the 2017 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists younger than 30.

    It is the fourth year of the competition. The past winners were William Alden, Cezary Podkul and Mina Kimes.

    Additionally this year, the judging panel chose to honor two finalists: Jen Wieczner of Fortune and Sarah Frier of Bloomberg News.

    Made possible by a $7,500 gift from rbb Communications, the award commemorates Larry Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal at rbb until his death in 1998. Josh Merkin, vice president of rbb Communications, will present the award to Berman at SABEW’s New York Fall Conference on Oct. 13.

    “Journalism is a vital part of our democratic society and it gives us great pleasure to recognize the critical work being done by the next generation of reporters. There is no better way to honor Larry’s contributions than by supporting, respecting and appreciating the herculean efforts journalists make in telling the stories our society needs to hear.” Merkin said.

    Berman is a reporter at MarketWatch, where she focuses on student debt. Previously, she worked as a business reporter for HuffPost, covering retail and food companies as well as gender politics at work. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Bloomberg.

    “It’s an honor to be recognized in a field where many are doing such inspiring work and in particular for coverage of student debt, a topic that affects my peers and their families,” Berman said. “I’m especially grateful to my colleagues and editors at MarketWatch, who nurture my career and those of other young business reporters on a daily basis.”

    The judges noted that just when it seemed every angle of the student-debt crisis had been covered, Berman had uncovered five more. She impressed them with her deep knowledge of her higher-education beat, with a specific focus on student debt.

    A total of 29 journalists submitted entries. The judging team was made up of SABEW members Jon Chesto (chair), James T. Madore, Marty Steffens, Rick Rothacker and Cindy Perman.

    “Jillian took a complex topic that we’ve all read a lot about — student debt — and continued to uncover new and interesting angles. She analyzed mountains of student-loan data, while finding the people affected by the issues in her stories and sharing their tales. The competition was tough this year, but the judges were uniformly impressed with her work,” said Chesto, a business reporter for The Boston Globe.

    About SABEW:

    SABEW is the largest organization of business journalists in the world. For more information, contact Crystal Beasley at [email protected].

    About rbb Communications:

    rbb is an integrated communications firm and four-time U.S. Agency of the Year winner. For more information, visit rbbcommunications.com.

  • William Alden wins 2016 Birger Award for Young Business Journalists

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday September 15, 2016

    buzzfeedheadshotsquareWilliam Alden, 27, a San Francisco-based business reporter for BuzzFeed News covering the technology industry, is the 2016 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize, honoring journalists younger than 30. He will receive the award and a $1,500 honorarium Oct. 7 at SABEW’s New York Fall Conference in midtown Manhattan.

    It is the third year for the competition. The past two years’ winners, Cezary Podkul and Mina Kimes, will also be in New York to congratulate Alden.

    Additionally, the judging panel chose to honor three finalists:

    • Alison Griswold, reporter, Quartz
    • David Benoit, reporter, Wall Street Journal
    • Emily Glazer, reporter, Wall Street Journal

    Made possible by a $7,500 gift from rbb Communications of Miami, the award commemorates Larry Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998. Josh Merkin, vice president of rbb Communications, will present the award to Alden in New York on Oct. 7. “Business journalism plays a vital role in our society, and we feel it’s important to support the next generation of great reporters. With this award, we honor Larry’s legacy while showing our appreciation for the great quality of work being produced today,” Merkin said.

    Alden is a senior business reporter at BuzzFeed News, where he covers Silicon Valley startups and venture capital. His articles have pulled back the curtain on Palantir Technologies, the secretive data-analysis company, and exposed legal problems at Zenefits that led to the resignation of the startup insurance broker’s CEO. Previously, he covered Wall Street for the DealBook section of The New York Times.

    “This is a serious honor, and one that I share with my editors and colleagues at BuzzFeed News,” Alden said. “I’m grateful for the many talented journalists in our industry, whose knockout work inspires me to keep trying harder.”

    The judges noted that Alden covers Silicon Valley for BuzzFeed News with a shoe-leather approach to reporting: working sources, hunting down documents, and putting the pieces together. They cited his work on Palantir Technologies and Zenefits. Judges also stated that on a competitive, high-profile beat, Alden truly shines.

    A total of 23 young journalists submitted entries. The judging team was made up of SABEW members Jon Chesto (judging team chair), James Madore, Marty Steffens, Rick Rothacker and Cindy Perman. “The judges were impressed with the way Will took command of the issues he covered, using exhaustive reporting and a conversational writing style. He exemplifies the old-school journalism skills that remain crucial as readers consume more of their news online and on their phones. A CEO who is hiding something definitely wouldn’t want to hear that Will is onto the story,” said Chesto, a business reporter for The Boston Globe.

    “We are grateful to rbb Communications for this opportunity to advance SABEW’s commitment to supporting the next generation of business journalists. Alden has already agreed to pay it forward by helping SABEW train and recruit other young professionals,” said Kathleen Graham, executive director of SABEW.

    About SABEW:

    SABEW is the largest organization of business journalists in the world. For more information, contact Crystal Beasley at [email protected].

    About rbb Communications:

    rbb is an integrated communications firm and four-time U.S. Agency of the Year. As the Champion of Breakout Brands, rbb inspires companies to create customer passion that delivers bottom-line results. rbb’s family of brands offers media relations, marketing, corporate communications, digital/social media and creative services/advertising. Specialty practices include consumer products/services, travel and leisure, health, sports and entertainment, professional services/B2B, and higher education. The firm’s global network extends across more than 50 countries through its partnership in PROI Worldwide, the largest global network of independent public-relations agencies. For more information, visit www.rbbcommunications.com or call 305-448-7450.

  • 2015 Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award Winner, Cezary Podkul

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday February 16, 2016

    ec1caa28-6c57-4419-bd74-2604b6e15713Cezary Podkul is the winner of the 2015 Larry Birger Young Business Journalist competition, which recognizes talented reporters under 30. The inaugural winner was Mina Kimes, then a reporter for Bloomberg News. Podkul, now 32, was selected as the second annual winner. (Cezary turned 30 during 2014 meeting the award eligibly requirements). Birger was SABEW president in 1977 and was a former Miami Herald business editor. He later went on to establish rbb public relations (now rbb Communications) in Miami. Podkul was selected among 34 entrants who submitted portfolios of their work. Podkul led a SABEW Teletraining session in January that attracted 50 plus listeners.

    By Marty Steffens
    University of Missouri

    Cezary Podkul had never seen a story have such immediate impact. In January 2016, he published a story for ProPublica’s “Rent Racket” series, which showed that as many as 200,000 New York City apartments were not in compliance with the state’s rent-stabilization laws.

    Those rules make apartments more affordable and protect tenants from evictions and unlimited rent increases. The “Rent Racket” series found that tens of thousands of New Yorkers might be paying more rent than the law allowed.

    New York residents were outraged, and in less than a week, a bill was introduced in Albany that would increase penalties on landlords who overcharge tenants. “I’ve never had anything have such a quick impact,” said Podkul an investigative reporter who covers finance for the non-profit investigative website ProPublica.

    An earlier story in the series also got lawmakers’ notice. In November 2015, Podkul and ProPublica reporting fellow Marcelo Rochabrun found that landlords had failed to register about 50,000 New York City apartments for rent stabilization while collecting more than $100 million in property tax breaks in exchange for doing so. Within about a month, a bill was introduced in City Hall to tighten oversight.

    Podkul was somewhat a late starter in the journalism world. He thought he wanted a career as a financial analyst, and soon after graduation from the Wharton School, the University of Pennsylvania’s business school, he began working for an Australian investment bank in New York.

    As he combed through financial and economic data, he saw stories everywhere. As the financial crisis deepened in 2008, he would spend his night blogging about what he saw as disturbing or notable trends. Forbes took notice and soon included his blog in its business and financial blog network. That led him to work for an investor magazine while he attended the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism part time. His work so impressed his instructors that Columbia awarded him the Melvin Mencher Prize for Superior Reporting. He graduated with a master’s degree in 2011.

    One of Podkul’s 2014 investigations also created an outcry. During his time at Reuters he had come upon a data set which listed all municipal debt sold by state and local governments. He figured out a way to calculate the repayment ratios on the debt and began to notice a pattern: The most egregious repayment terms – as much as 44 times the amount borrowed – were by “tobacco settlement” corporations. He did some research and realized these were entities created by governments to sell bonds backed by their annual payments from the historic 1998 settlement with Big Tobacco – often for pennies on the dollar.

    Once he got to ProPublica, he found a news hook to interest his new editors in the project: New Jersey had just pledged more cash toward one of its tobacco bonds to avoid default. Cash-hungry states like New Jersey, had sold the bonds to give them money upfront in exchange for giant balloon payments in the future — long after most of the politicians who took on those debts would leave office. In his 2014 series, Podkul identified $64 billion politicians had promised in exchange for just $3 billion of upfront cash.

    The Birger competition judging panel noted Podkul’s stellar work with a variety of publications and news services, including Reuters, where he worked before joining ProPublica in 2014. His work with Carrick Mollenkamp for Reuters’ “Uneasy Money” series was a finalist for the Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism. During his career, he has also covered energy and commodities and the private equity industry.

    How is Podkul able to write investigative stories that have such impact? A curious mind and strong organizational habits.

    His best tip for investigative reporters is to keep meticulous files on each aspect of reporting, such as raw data, analyzed data, interviews and supporting material. He builds files as the story progresses, and he spends part of each day keeping the system in place. Because investigative pieces can be complex, and occasionally appear dull on the surface, he has honed the art of the pitch, including writing the “nut graf” for the series as part of his outline that he submits to editors. “Explain it to yourself,” he said, “then get your editor to understand it.”

    He offers other tips for new reporters:

    • Become a high-level Google searcher. Learn how to phrase searches to yield solid results; the outcome might surprise you.
    • Use LinkedIn to track down sources. Searching by industry or finding former employers who might want to be whistleblowers yields results.
    • Stories have impact when you use real-life examples. They also have impact if you use current events as a news peg.
    • Keep your eyes open, and look for the humor. “If you find something so ridiculous it makes you laugh,” then it’s likely a great story,” he says.

    The judging team also honored three finalists: Jeanna Smialek, Washington Bureau, Bloomberg; Dana Mattioli, mergers and acquisition reporter, The Wall Street Journal; and Casey Sullivan, Bloomberg BNA, Big Law Business. Judges included SABEW members Jon Chesto (chair), The Boston Globe; James Madore, Newsday; Marty Steffens, University of Missouri; John Arwood, The Charlotte Observer, and Cindy Perman, NBC.

  • Podkul wins 2015 Birger Award for Young Business Journalists

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday September 16, 2015

    PHOENIX — Cezary Podkul, a financial investigative reporter for ProPublica is this year’s winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize, honoring journalists under age 30. He will receive the award and a $1,500 honorarium Oct. 9 at SABEW’s New York Fall Conference in midtown Manhattan.

    It is the second year for the competition. Last year’s winner, Mina Kimes, will also be in New York to congratulate Podkul.

    The judging panel also chose to honor three finalists:

    • Jeanna Smialek, Washington Bureau, Bloomberg
    • Dana Mattioli, mergers and acquisition reporter, Wall Street Journal
    • Casey Sullivan, Bloomberg BNA, Big Law Business

    Made possible by a $7,500 gift from rbb Communications of Miami, Fla., the award commemorates Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998. Josh Merkin, Vice President, rbb will present the award to Podkul in New York, Oct. 9. “Larry Birger played an important role in the development of business journalism and it gives us great pleasure to recognize his legacy through this award to Podkul,” said Merkin.

    The judges noted Podkul’s stellar work over a variety of publications, including USA Today, The Washington Post and Reuters, where he worked most recently before joining ProPublica last year. His work for USA Today helped free-up hundreds of millions in unspent highway funds earmarked by Congress for pet projects. He has covered energy and commodities and the private equity industry, among other beats, after leaving investment banking in 2008 to pursue journalism.

    Cezary, 31, earned a B.S. in economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and is a 2011 alumnus of the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia Journalism School, where his master’s thesis on unspent highway earmarks developed into the eventual USA Today report and was featured on NBC Nightly News. Cezary turned 30 during 2014 meeting the award eligibly requirements. In addition to being a SABEW member, he also serves on the board of the New York Financial Writers’ Association.

    “I’ve never wanted to do anything but business and financial journalism, so being able to follow Larry’s footsteps is a true honor. I’m thrilled and humbled to be this year’s winner,” Podkul said.

    A total of 34 young journalists submitted entries. The judging team included SABEW members Jon Chesto (chair), James Madore, Marty Steffens, John Arwood and Cindy Perman.

    “The SABEW judges were impressed by the high level of writing and reporting skills shown by this year’s candidates for the Birger award. It wasn’t easy for us to narrow down the list,” said Jon Chesto, the judging panel chair and a business reporter for the Boston Globe. “There’s obviously plenty of concern and cynicism about the overall direction that journalism is taking, in an era of budget cutbacks and declining ad sales. But this crop of candidates shows that talented young journalists can still find plenty of ways to do great work, the kind of stories that leave a lasting impression,” said Chesto.

    “We are grateful to rbb Communications for this opportunity to advance SABEW’s commitment to supporting the next generation of business journalists. Podkul has already agreed to pay-it-forward by helping SABEW train and recruit other young professionals,” said Kathleen Graham, Executive Director, SABEW.

    About SABEW:
    SABEW is the largest organization of business journalists in the world. For more information, contact Kathleen Graham at [email protected].

    About rbb Communications
    rbb Communications is a national marketing PR firm with a reputation for delivering award-winning results to clients who appreciate the individual attention only a boutique agency can provide. The bilingual staff offers best practices in media relations, corporate and crisis communications, product introductions and digital/social media. For more information, call (305) 448-7450 or visit www.rbbcommunications.com.

  • Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award

    Posted By admin on Thursday May 14, 2015

    Three young journalists | SABEW

    The Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award is funded by a gift from rbb Communications of Miami, Fla., commemorating Birger. He was the former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998.

    This summer contest will be announced in late spring. The award will be decided by a panel of five judges – a SABEW officer and four others — and is presented at SABEW’s fall conference.  An individual’s body of work over a five-year period will be considered.

    SABEW will award a cash prize of $1,500 plus a stipend towards travel expenses for a trip to SABEW’s next conference where the award will be presented.

    Who was Larry Birger?

    Passionate about the importance of covering the local business community, Birger launched Business Monday at the Herald in July 1980, creating a publication whose format was copied by dozens of newspapers across the country.

    “He was a guy who wasn’t afraid to pound his fist on the table with the higher-ups to devote more resources to local business coverage,’’ said David Satterfield, who worked as a reporter at the business section for Birger and later became business editor. “He was a very strong proponent of local business coverage.”

    He also mentored many. That aspect of his personality surprised Bruce Rubin after Birger became a partner in Rubin Barney & Birger the precursor to rbb in 1994. Rubin remembers young associates at the firm, many of whom had never worked at newspapers, spending sessions with Birger on Friday mornings in the conference room.

    “You could have blown me over with a feather how the young kids and Larry liked each other,” said Rubin.

    Shortly after being diagnosed with cancer, Birger died Dec. 18, 1998, at age 71. The conference room at rbb still bears his name and a scholarship at the School of Business at the University of Miami was established in his honor.

    Past Contest Winners

    2019 – Matt Drange.
    2018 – Alex Heath
    2017 – Jillian Berman
    2016 – William Alden
    2015 – Cezary Podkul
    2014 – Mina Kimes

    About rbb Communications

    rbb Communications sponsors the Birger Award. It is a leading integrated communications agency that champions breakout brands. Through proprietary research, rbb inspires companies with insights to create customer passion that delivers bottom line results. rbb offers media relations, digital marketing, influencer engagement, corporate communications, social media management and creative services/advertising. Specialty practices include consumer products/services, travel, health, entertainment, professional services, real estate, higher education and reputation management. With offices in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, New York and Los Angeles, the firm also has international reach across more than 100 cities in 50 countries through its partnership in PROI Worldwide, the largest global network of independent communications agencies. For more information, visit www.rbbcommunications.com or call (305) 448-7450.

  • Bloomberg’s Mina Kimes wins first Birger Award for Young Business Journalists

    Posted By admin on Thursday February 27, 2014

    Mina Kimes photographed in Williamsburg at her favorite coffee shop

    Mina Kimes

    PHOENIX —  Mina Kimes, 28, an enterprise investigative reporter for Bloomberg News, is the inaugural winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize, honoring journalists under age 30. She will receive her award March 29 at the 51st SABEW Annual Conference in Phoenix.

    The judging panel also chose to honor four finalists:

    • Chris Kirkham, 30, projects reporter, the Huffington Post
    • Sean Sposito, 29, reporter and data journalist, Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    • Max Abelson, 29, Wall Street reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Kristen Painter, 28, airline and aerospace reporter, The Denver Post

    Made possible by a $5,000 gift from rbb Public Relations of Miami, Fla., the award commemorates Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977.  Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998. “Larry was a business-minded person who explored business solutions and communications,” said Christine Barney, CEO of rbb, who will present the award to Kimes in Phoenix. “We want this to a be a reminder of the importance of good journalism.”

    Kimes joined Bloomberg in 2013, after eight years at Fortune magazine, first working for its Small Business publication before moving to Fortune. She graduated summa cum laude from Yale University, where she studied English.

    The judges noted Kimes’ stellar work over her seven-year career, including her “Bad to the Bone” investigation for Fortune that details abuses in the medical device industry. Kimes’ piece for Fortune in 2010 attributed a spate of product recalls by consumer giant Johnson & Johnson to reorganization and cost-cutting.

    The Columbia Journalism Review has called the piece “a virtual case study in the deterioration of a once-exemplary corporate culture and one of the better-reported business stories you’ll see.”   More recently, Kimes wrote two pieces for Bloomberg BusinessWeek, “King Cat” and “The Sun Tzu at Sears.” The stories revealed how CEOs of two iconic American companies, Caterpillar Inc.’s Doug Oberhelman and Sears Holding Corp.’s Eddie Lampert, exploit underlings in the quest for profit.

    In 2009, Kimes won New York Press Club’s Nellie Bly Cub Reporter Award.

    A total of 48 young journalists submitted entries. The judging team included SABEW members Jon Chesto (chair), Joanna Ossinger, Marty Steffens, John Arwood and Cindy Perman.

    (For more information on the contest and scholarships, contact SABEW Executive Director Warren Watson at [email protected] or call 1-602-496-7862.)

  • SABEW starts Young Journalist Award in honor of late past president Larry Birger (1977), who mentored many

    Posted By admin on Thursday September 5, 2013

    Larry Birger,

    Larry Birger, former business editor of the Miami Herald and SABEW past president

    SPECIAL TO SABEW

    PHOENIX — The Society of American Business Editors and Writers will honor the nation’s top young business journalist with a new award named after one of its past presidents.

    The Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award will be presented March 29 at SABEW’s annual spring conference at the Cronkite School in Phoenix.

    Made possible by a $5,000 gift from rbb Public Relations of Miami, Fla., the award will commemorate Birger, the former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977.  Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998.

    “Larry was a business-minded person who explored business solutions and communications,” said Christine Barney, CEO of rbb. “We want this to a be a reminder of the importance of good journalism.”

    The award is defined for professional journalists up to age 30.

    “We’re pleased to do this in Larry’s honor,” said Kevin G. Hall, SABEW president. “This supports the next generation of great business journalists. More than ever, we are committed to spotlighting the best in business journalism.”

    The initial award will be decided by a panel of four judges – a SABEW officer and three others — and presented at the 2014 SABEW conference.  SABEW will award a cash prize of $500 to the winner and pay for that journalist’s expenses to pick up the award. Consideration will be for an individual’s body of work.

    Applicants will be asked to write a letter detailing their work.  They would also be asked to include a letter of recommendation from a supervising editor.

    Jurors would consider applicants during January and determine the winner the first week of February.

    “Besides this being a fitting tribute to Larry Birger, this is a recognition of the essential role that journalists (and journalism) play in our business, in our society and in our everyday life,” said Lisa Ross, president at rbb.

    Respected by his peers and revered by younger journalists who worked with him, the cigar-chomping Birger was a pioneer in business journalism, recalls Gail DeGeorge, who was a reporter at the Miami Herald and later a SABEW president.

    Passionate about the importance of covering the local business community, Birger launched Business Monday at the Herald in July 1980, creating a publication whose format was copied by dozens of newspapers across the country.

    “He was a guy who wasn’t afraid to pound his fist on the table with the higher-ups to devote more resources to local business coverage,’’ said David Satterfield, who worked as a reporter at the business section for Birger and later became business editor. “He was a very strong proponent of local business coverage.”

    He also mentored many. That aspect of his personality surprised Bruce Rubin after Birger became a partner in Rubin Barney & Birger the precursor to rbb in 1994.  Rubin remembers young associates at the firm, many of whom had never worked at newspapers, spending sessions with Birger on Friday mornings in the conference room.

    “You could have blown me over with a feather how the young kids and Larry liked each other,” said Rubin.

    Shortly after being diagnosed with cancer, Birger died Dec. 18, 1998, at age 71. The conference room at rbb still bears his name and a scholarship at the School of Business at the University of Miami was established in his honor.

    About rbb Public Relations and SABEW:

    SABEW is the largest organization of business journalists in the world.  For more information, contact Warren Watson, executive director, at [email protected], or call (602) 496-5186.

    rbb Public Relations is a national marketing PR firm with a reputation for delivering award-winning results to clients who appreciate the individual attention only a boutique agency can provide. The firm supports companies that want to challenge market leaders and fuels brands that are already category leaders, but want to redefine the status quo and break out from traditional marketing techniques.

    rbb’s bilingual staff offers best practices in media relations, corporate and crisis communications, product introductions and digital/social media.  For more information, call (305) 448-7450 or visit www.rbbpr.com.

  • 2019 State of the Business Journalism Industry survey released

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Saturday November 9, 2019

    SABEW and rbb Communications conducted a Snapshot Survey about the State of Business Journalism Today in late October that engaged 78 members. rbb is an integrated communications agency in Miami, Florida, which generously sponsors the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award contest.

    The survey is designed to capture a “read” of how members feel rather than be scientifically perfect. We asked about digital content manipulation, attacks on the media, the most important skill young journalists need, today’s journalism environment and unionization. The following are the answers from 78 survey participants; 27 of them chose to make comments at the end of the survey.

    Here are the results of the 2018 Snapshot Survey.

    Question 1 Answers
    * Because of “bad actors” and other digital content manipulation, people are facing an onslaught of false or misleading information. Which of the following do you believe to be most true?
    The platforms that are publishing this information, i.e. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, must be held to higher standards and be accountable for policing this content. 31
    It is impossible to stop the flow of misleading information and it is up to the consumer to pay more attention to the source of their news. 12
    News organizations should take a more proactive role and devote more resources to debunking false information and producing media literacy. 35
    78
    Question 2
    * The media continues to be at the center of attacks with regards to its credibility and perceived bias. Which of the following most reflects your feelings on this topic?
    1. The attacks have made me more concerned for my overall safety and I am now paying more attention to my surroundings when working. 31
    2. The questions about bias and “fake news” has made me more aware of the need to source and double check my reporting and the information I receive from sources. 12
    3. It’s had zero effect on me and I continue to do my job the same way as I always have. 35
    78
    Question 3
    * Which of the following is the most important skill young journalists (those with 1-3 years of experience) should be learning?
    1. Mining data for stories. 15
    2. Building relationships with sources. 21
    3. Building their own individual brand by focusing on a beat and an individual marketing plan. 3
    4. Generating and pursuing story ideas. 34
    5. Understanding the business aspects of your news organization. 5
    78
     Question 4
      * In thinking about today’s journalism environment, which of the following do you find the least pleasant?
    The pressure of producing content for any platform (produce an audio story/podcast, write several iterations of a story for a website and social media sites such Facebook and Twitter, shoot video, create graphics, report on-air). 8
    The continued uncertainty and instability in terms of jobs. 19
    Journalists are continually being asked to do more with less, sacrificing depth and nuance in favor of brevity and click-friendly content. 51
    78
    Question 5
    * Which of the following best describes your feelings toward unionization in the journalism industry?
    I fully support news organization unions and feel they are necessary to protect my interests. 57
    The formation of unions is detrimental to the journalism profession and is likely to hasten more news organization closures because profits will be squeezed even more than they already are. 21
    78
    Question 6
    *Any comments about the state of the industry?
    Question 5 is not an either-or question. 1
    I’m not sure if this is me getting older and having worked in the industry longer, but I’ve never been more depressed by media news than I was in the past year or two. The layoffs, closings, drama around purchases, attacks on credibility, push to do dumbed-down stories for clicks, job instability… 2
    The industry has mostly itself to blame for shifting from objective reporting to more-of-less participatory (a.k.a. “advocacy”) journalism. While this latter approach is an acceptable business model (primarily from the entertainment perspective), it hurts us traditional journalists who only care about the numbers, not the politics, of the story. 3
    In some ways, I feel the giant news organizations — NYTimes, WAPO, WSJ — are strong. But it’s the newsrooms in our big and medium-sized cities that are at peril. We need to be more vigilant and relevant than ever as our nation reels under a government and leaders — in both political parties — who exaggerate and manipulate information. 4
    The industry needs to find a way to support the continued production of quality journalism. This requires establishing standards of pay that will make journalism a field that talented young professionals want to enter– not one you can only afford to work in if you have a well-to-do family or spouse behind you. We cannot develop a diverse newsroom and freelance group if we underpay staff and especially freelancers. My company (a website) pays staff OK, but pays freelancers one-tenth of what freelancers used to make writing for print outlets, say 10-15 years ago. It makes it difficult to recommend the field to talented young people. This also means that writers cannot “afford” to spend as much time developing stories and reporting as they could when they were paid better. 5
    Regarding unions: The union effort at my paper has been incredibly disruptive, and the guild has used incredibly misleading statements that would never pass muster for a news story. It’s incredibly sad and disappointing that “journalists” would essentially lie and mislead others in order to get a union passed. 6
    I answered the first two questions with the closest answers I could find to what I think. But the phrasing of the questions and the options provided as answers tells me this survey isn’t interested in finding out the truth. “Fake news” isn’t an accusation, it’s a product, pumped out by far too many of my colleagues at name-brand national media. It’s clearly a one-party industry that has dropped all pretense of objectivity — and, just as clearly, can’t see that fact because of groupthink. We have largely earned this contempt. 7
    Every day I think of leaving, but every day I decide its important to stay. 8
    I’d like more than an either/or option for question 5, because I think it depends on the employer. I see both advantages and disadvantages with unions. 9
    You bet: There is a social breakdown underway – which I call DMR – Digital Mob Rule. Its the underlying societal change driving social which is in process of breaking everything. Balance is gone, depth is at the airport getting ready to leave, and attribution to credible sources was shot at the wall some years back. The pups today are “vics” who don’t see who the “perps” are and have blindly accepted the new corporate “rent your life” business model that predominates in the asset-stripping of individual assets and the “community” response (communism/socialism) which has inculcated at deep levels by the hysterical revisionists in education. (cranky George of UrbanSurvival.com whined in passing. As much of his 2012 book Broken Web is now coming to pass…) 10
    I can’t help but feel like journalism as profession is being devalued because anyone with a camera and YouTube/Instagram account now is considered a writer and part of the ‘working media.’ Some of the content is great, but I feel like it can be detrimental to the industry overall. 11
    Business journalists need to get back to the job of following the business niches they focus on — and learning its ins and outs. They should grease the skids of commerce in those niches by providing value to the B2B or B2C buyers and sellers. Translate the value proposition of the sellers into language the buyers understand — and become the objective source of info that brings together buyers and sellers. And it can be done with zero coverage of what normally goes for “news”. The news buyers want to hear is “how do I get ahead in my profession? How can what a solution provider sells allow me to reach my goals.” Fraud and social justice issues should play a valuable but only minor role in everyday business journalism. A biz journalist can succeed as a moderately paid independent if they learn a particular industry niche well, develop contacts, and can position themselves as an essential info provider and indirectly be “in the middle of a sale”. What I’m advocating is to become a combined industry journalist and analyst — not in Fortune 500 markets, but serving B2B professional niches where pros buy software, services, data analysis, and productivity enhancing tools. Would be happy to develop a podcast program (or other educational tool) for SABEW to provide tips on how I position myself in the telecom industry as a good example of what can be done elsewhere. I have listened to several of the podcasts regarding freelance journalism and I think I’ve developed a more realistic program of personal branding in an industry niche — as opposed to relying on cultivating editors. Calling your own shots and your own editorial niche is more fun and motivating. And i calculated there are something like 4,000 B2B niches out there in the US market that could support a journalist. My journal is Black Swan Telecom Journal (bswan.org). My name is Dan Baker and my email is [email protected] 12
    The gradual evisceration of mid-sized dailies makes me very sad. I feel we’re going to be left with a few national newspapers and specialty pubs for lobbyists/industry, and it is very worrying for civic health. 13
    The way the current administration denigrates facts and normalizes lies makes journalism as important as it has ever been. Yet the resources to hold elected officials accountable to the majority of their constituents shrinks and leaves Americans increasingly vulnerable to exploitation and manipulation by those with power. 14
    If the question about paying reporters more isn’t on the table then journalism as a whole faces an existential threat. A young talented professional who could be a great asset to a newsroom will go to other professions that pay them more competitive wages. 15
    Any statistics from this survey are going to be distorted by the lack of alternate answers available to many of the questions…including a none of the above 16
    It is really bad out there. the ability to do real, good journalism has been violently circumscribed. everywhere i have worked has hired me with the promise of time and space to do investigations, failed to publish most of those investigations when I’ve done them, and demanded daily sums of 500 words on Bill Ackman’s latest equity stake, for some reason. AI can’t come soon enough. 17
    There clearly needs to be more investigative journalism in business coverage. That has clearly gone by the wayside as more of the profitable publications in existence depend on premium subscriptions (so don’t bite the hand that feeds you) while traditional newspapers, struggling to find a profitable business model, seem to be cutting back on exactly this. 18
    Concerned that some readers don’t differentiate between objective news and sponsored. And I see it at the newspaper with management pushing those boundaries. I get google alerts on a story with the name of our paper but it is written by the advertising division. First residential areas that new home buyers should look at, then home sections, now some other sections. there has been talk of getting grants to hire reporters who will write only positive business stories while we can write the objective ones etc. VERY concerning. Slippery slope
    19
    Practically every story is about Trump, or needs to relate back to Trump in some way according to editors. This will ultimately backfire and erode public trust in the media even further. Also, the industry needs much more diversity of thought and background. The fact that practically no professional news organization saw the 2016 election outcome coming underscores how far removed journalists are from the every day reality of Americans. 20
    Your union question isn’t black and white. 21
    I did not want to answer question 1 because all the answers are equally important holistically in the real world. As a researcher, I find that question to be poorly written. 22
    The concentration of advertising revenue in a few digital platforms worries me more than unionization. 23
    I would have rather had a third option on Question 5. I’m pretty ambivalent to unions but the answers offered require a very black-and-white response. I support unions, but I DO NOT believe they are necessary to protect my interests. 24
    God help us all. We are more important than ever. 25
     To thrive, it will be essential to move quickly and pivot to adjust to the vast changes ahead in the industry. At the same time, certain rules continue to apply: Treat people fairly, be passionate about the truth, and engage readers and viewers. Short cuts, layoffs and one poorly thought out new idea after another won’t ring the register. 26
    Too damn many agenda pushers, reporters who really are stenographers. 27
  • Make public records part of your beat reporting

    Posted By sabew on Monday October 14, 2019

    View the recording.

    Matt Drange, recently an investigative reporter, left The Information in October to pursue a new project. He has spent much of his career reporting at the intersection of the tech industry and government. At SABEW’s next webinar, he’ll show you how to harness state and federal FOI laws to generate a consistent flow of documents you can use on any beat. Please come with an open mind and questions — specific examples of roadblocks you’ve run into offer great learning opportunities for your colleagues.

    Presenter

    Matt Drange, most recently an investigative reporter at The Information, is the 2019 of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists under the age of 30. Drange will receive the Birger award, a $1,500 honorarium and travel stipend to New York made possible by a gift from rbb Communications of Miami. Previously Drange was a staff writer at Forbes magazine and a business reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Drange graduated from Humboldt State University and earned a master’s degree from the Columbia Journalism School.
    @MattDrange

    About the Birger Award and this virtual training sponsor: rbb Communications
    rbb is an integrated communications firm and four-time U.S. Agency of the Year. As the Champion of Breakout Brands, rbb inspires companies to create customer passion that delivers bottom-line results. rbb’s family of brands offers media relations, marketing, corporate communications, digital/social media and creative services/advertising. Specialty practices include consumer products/services, travel and leisure, health, sports and entertainment, professional services/B2B and higher education. The firm’s global network extends across more than 50 countries through its partnership in PROI Worldwide, the largest global network of independent public relations agencies. For more information, visit www.rbbcommunications.com.

  • How to Write for a Millennial Audience

    Posted By sabew on Friday April 12, 2019

    Listen to the recording.

    They’ve gotten a bum wrap for their news consumption habits. But millennials are regular consumers of news, and research shows that they often are willing to pay for content. Just how do you develop coverage for millennials and, even better, sell them a subscription? SABEW’s May virtual training session will do a deep dive on this generation and its impact on the news business. Our expert panel will also explain how Americans age 18 to 34 like to consume information and share tips on writing for a millennial audience.

    MODERATOR
    Alex Heath
    Alex is a senior reporter for Cheddar, where he regularly breaks news on the biggest players in consumer tech and media. Before Cheddar, he was a senior reporter for Business Insider. He was the 2018 recipient of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award from The Society of Advancing Business Editing and Writing. He’s currently based in New York City and originally hails from Louisville, Kentucky. Follow him on Twitter at @alexeheath

     

    PANELISTS
    Jennifer Benz
    Jennifer Benz is a principal research scientist and Deputy Director of The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, which collaborated with the American Press Institute on a nationwide survey and study of the news habits of millennials. Benz is a political scientist whose research focuses on the connection between public policy and citizen engagement. With training and experience in political science, social psychology, and public health, Benz’s research uses an interdisciplinary approach in both theory and method. Prior to joining the AP-NORC Center, Benz worked as a research scientist for NORC’s Public Health research department. She earned her Ph.D. In political science from the University of North Carolina. Follow her on Twitter @jennybenz

    Jennifer provided these links to studies on millennials and news by the Media Insight Project:
    How Millennials Get News: Inside the Habits of America’s First Digital Generation
    Breaking Down the Millennial Generation: A Typology of Young News Consumers
    How Millennials Use Technology to Get News: Differences by Race and Ethnicity
    How Millennials Get News: Paying for Content

    Susannah Snider
    Susannah Snider is the Senior Editor for Personal Finance at U.S. News & World Report, where she covers a range of personal finance topics, from taxes to college financial aid and budgeting strategies. In addition to her reporting duties, Snider oversees and edits the My Money blog, which publishes financial advice from outside money experts, including tax preparers, shopping experts, financial planners and cord-cutters. Snider is the recipient of the 2018 RTDNA/NEFE Excellence in Personal Finance Reporting Award in the Digital category and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Southern California. She has appeared as a personal finance expert on television, radio and in print, including on Cheddar, Fox & Friends, The Tavis Smiley Show, Your Money on Wharton Business Radio and Fox Business News. Follow her on Twitter at @sussnider

    Gerry Spratt
    Gerry Spratt is the Director of Content at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. He joined the San Francisco-based startup in 2014 after a 16-year career in traditional journalism. Since 2014, he and the rest of Content leadership have built an in-house team of 70+ writers and editors to cover all aspects of personal finance from a consumer-facing perspective. Gerry previously worked at the Santa Barbara News-Press, Seattle Post-Intelligencer and San Francisco Chronicle. His newspaper roles included copy editor, reporter, sports editor and metro editor. He lives in Seattle with his wife and two young children. Follow him on Twitter at @gspratt76

     

  • Beat Basics for New Reporters

    Posted By sabew on Thursday December 27, 2018

    Description

    Alex Heath, senior reporter for Cheddar and 2018 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists younger than 30 will lead this beat basics for new reporters training. SABEW chair Marty Steffens will facilitate a conversation with Heath on how to build and cultivate sources, standout in a crowded beat (like covering Facebook), get over the millennial fear of interviewing in an email world and pitch unique story ideas.

    Sponsor rbb Communications. rbb is an integrated communications firm inspiring companies with insights on creating customer passion to increase sales.

    Listen to the recording.

    Presenter: Alex Heath is a senior reporter for Cheddar. He regularly breaks news on the biggest players in tech and media. Before Cheddar, he was a senior reporter for Business Insider covering the likes of Facebook, Snap, and Twitter. He first started writing professionally for tech blogs at the ripe age of 15. He’s currently based in New York City and originally hails from Louisville, Kentucky.

  • Executive Director’s Report May 2018

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday May 2, 2018

    SABEW18
    This year’s conference was all about getting back to the basics and building skills. We’ve seen a number of ground-breaking stories over the past year, and all were done the old-fashioned way — by cultivating sources, digging into documents and data, collaborating with editors, and finding angles that matter most to people. Hats off to SABEW18 conference chairs Bernie Kohn and Bryan Borzykowski and the committee that worked hard to create solid programming and networking opportunities.

    New name
    SABEW’s familiar acronym remains the same, but the organization has changed its name to the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. The change is part of a broader effort to embrace a global focus on business journalism. Having “American” in the name implied that we did not offer membership or training to international journalists. The rebrand is about engaging and encouraging news professionals from across the globe to become members.

    First Amendment Committee
    SABEW wants to lead members in efforts to band together to fight fake news, support the credibility of journalism, protect access to information and pursue the truth. To that end, SABEW created the First Amendment Committee to address members’ needs and desires, including advocacy of journalism, at this challenging time for the industry. Over the past year, it has released public statements in support of press freedom, partnered with other groups concerned about protecting the quality of government data, advocated for safety as journalists have experienced unprecedented risks and threats, and offered programming opportunities related to press freedom, transparency and access to data.

    AWARD HIGHLIGHTS

    2017 Best in Business Awards
    We celebrated the 2017 BIB Award honorees at a ceremony on Friday evening, April 27, 2018. The 121 winners and honorable mentions came from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. SABEW18 conference attendees were encouraged to attend the “BIB Winners: How They Did It” session to learn from this year’s winners. The 2018 BIB contest opens Dec. 1, 2018.

    SABEW Distinguished Achievement Award
    Congratulations to Gretchen Morgenson, senior special writer in the investigations unit at The Wall Street Journal, who received the Distinguished Achievement Award at the Best in Business ceremony Friday evening, April 27. The award is given to an individual who has made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who has served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession. Morgenson shared insights, career highlights and thoughts on journalism during a special Q&A session led by Lisa Gibbs, director of news partnerships at The Associated Press.

    Larry Birger Young Business Journalist of the Year Award
    Jillian Berman, 28, a New York-based reporter for MarketWatch, was the 2017 winner of the Larry Birger contest. It is the fourth year of the competition. Berman received the award and a $1,500 honorarium at the 2017 SABEW New York fall conference. Thanks to rbb Communications for funding this award and to Josh Merkin for his help shepherding the grant. Deadline for this year’s applications is July 31, 2018.

    Membership
    We have just over 3,000 members. This includes 2,637 institutional members from 132 media outlets, 51 institutional members from six academic institutions, 175 journalist members, 135 student members and 12 associate members. Keep your membership current and share your Twitter handle by updating your profile in the membership database.

    TRAINING HIGHLIGHTS

    Monthly training calls
    The training calls continue to be extremely popular – since last year’s spring conference, we’ve held 13 calls for over 500 participants. The calls are archived and can be accessed at any time on SABEW.org. Highlights include sessions on freelancing, international trade in the Trump era, the state of press freedom, and how to cover cryptocurrency. We strive to offer a variety of topics and to recruit presenters who represent diverse backgrounds and organizations. Thanks to SABEW members Kim Quillen and Patrick Sanders for leading this effort.

    Data-immersion workshop
    Our fifth annual Goldschmidt fellowship week in Washington, D.C., was a huge success. Twenty-two business journalists participated in the seminar that immersed them in data and accounting skills. Janet Yellen, then-chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, addressed the group in the historic Fed boardroom. Journalists also heard from experts at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Participants received special briefings from the Council of Economic Advisers and the Federal Reserve. Many thanks for the continued work of SABEW leaders Marty Steffens and Kevin Hall and donor Jim Goldschmidt of the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation for supporting this initiative. The application process for the winter 2019 workshop begins in November.

    SABEWNYC17 fall conference
    The October 2017 event in New York was a huge success. It attracted some 200 people over the course of two days of programming including a daylong personal-finance reporting workshop produced by NEFE’s Paul Golden.

    College Connect
    Check out SABEW’s student-written personal-finance blogs on SABEW.org. Topics range from family financial crises to how much outside employment a student should undertake during the academic year. The ongoing program is funded by NEFE. Students from the University of Missouri, Arizona State University and the University of Georgia are the bloggers.

    Sixth annual Business of Health Care Summit in Washington, D.C., June 28-30
    SABEW is seeking applications for a workshop that will help journalists better understand health-care economics and will provide an update on the Affordable Care Act. Attendees will be able to share and test out story ideas at this summit. Space is limited to 15 journalists. Selected participants will receive a stipend to offset travel-related expenses. Go to SABEW.org to apply. Made possible by a grant from The Commonwealth Fund.

    SABEW Canada
    SABEW Canada continues to expand and thrive with new members, social events, programs and BIB awards! Bryan Borzykowski, SABEW’s well-known Canadian board member who has been instrumental in leading expansion, now serves as vice president of SABEW.

    Finance
    In keeping with best practices for non-profits, SABEW conducted an independent audit of our 2016 financials, and we will do so again for the 2017 financials. The audit will help set the table for future financial growth since audits are a requirement of many grant-giving organizations. SABEW will end 2017 with $447,337 in net assets

  • Young Journalists, Big Impact

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday October 19, 2017

    Monday, October 30
    2 p.m. EDT

    There’s a lot to be learned from today’s young financial journalists through their strong beat reporting.

    Take Jillian Berman, 28, of MarketWatch, for example. Her work covering the student-debt crisis earned her this year’s Larry Birger Young Journalist Award, which honors journalists under the age of 30. The judges of the contest noted that on this extensively covered topic, Berman repeatedly found new story angles. She dug through mounds of data, distilled complex information and told compelling stories of those affected by this crisis.

    On SABEW’s next teletraining session, hear from Berman, as well as our Birger award finalists Sarah Freir of Bloomberg and Jen Wieczner of Fortune, as they discuss how they work sources, develop their beats and uncover unique ways to tell important stories.

    Moderator

    Jon Chesto, a business reporter for the Boston Globe, served as Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize judging team chair. Jon covers the leaders who shape Boston’s business community. He has been reporting on business and politics in New England for the past two decades. Before joining the Globe, he was managing editor at the Boston Business Journal. Prior to that role, he was the business editor at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy. His weekly Ledger column, “Mass. Market,” won several national awards with SABEW. A graduate of Wesleyan University and Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism, he has also worked as a business reporter at the Boston Herald and as a political reporter with Ottaway Newspapers.

    Panelists

    Jillian Berman, a New York-based reporter for MarketWatch, is the 2017 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists younger than 30. Berman focuses on student debt. Previously, she worked as a business reporter for HuffPost, covering retail and food companies as well as gender politics at work. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Bloomberg.

    Sarah Frier is a technology reporter at Bloomberg News, where she is focused on breaking news and writing features about social media companies including Facebook and Snap. Her work appears on Bloomberg.com, in Bloomberg Businessweek and on Bloomberg Television. In her more than six years at Bloomberg, she has received several awards from SABEW. Sarah’s most praised award was for her in depth investigation into the online flourishing fake id card market. Doing undercover orders from numerous id makers and finding one site that made an identical to real scannable fake id. Was amazing to watch how easy it was to use this identity card to enter and pass everywhere Sarah tested.

    Jen Wieczner is a senior writer at Fortune covering Wall Street, finance and cryptocurrency. She has profiled business leaders including two-time Fortune 500 CEO Meg Whitman; controversial Mylan CEO Heather Bresch; and hedge fund billionaire Steve Cohen, featuring his first interview since his involvement in a record-breaking insider trading case. Recently, she launched The Ledger, a publication within Fortune dedicated to covering the intersection of money and technology. Previously, Jen covered health care for MarketWatch and The Wall Street Journal. Her work has also appeared in SmartMoney, The Atlantic, Fast Company, New York, Edible Manhattan, Boston, Glamour and Marie Claire. In 2017, she received the American Society of Magazine Editors “Next” Award honoring journalists under 30. Originally from Boston, Jen graduated from Northwestern University with a B.S. in journalism.

  • Executive Director’s Report May 2017

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday May 11, 2017

    AWARD HIGHLIGHTS

    SABEW Distinguished Achievement Award

    Larry Ingrassia, managing editor of the Los Angeles Times, received the Distinguished Achievement Award at the Best in Business ceremony at SABEW17 in Seattle on Saturday, April 29.

    2016 Best in Business Awards

    This year’s transition to a platform-agnostic contest went smoothly thanks to SABEW board members Brad Foss and Xana Antunes and SABEW staff member Crystal Beasley. The contest remains popular, attracting more than 1,000 entries in the U.S and Canada. The 2017 BIB contest opens Dec. 1.

    Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award

    William Alden, 27, a San Francisco-based business reporter for BuzzFeed News who covers the technology industry, was the 2016 winner of the Birger prize, honoring journalists younger than 30. He received the award and a $1,500 honorarium on Oct. 7, 2016, at SABEW’s New York fall conference. Thanks to rbb Communications for funding this award and to Josh Merkin for his help shepherding the grant. Deadline for this year’s applications is July 31, 2017.

    New First Amendment Committee

    New SABEW President Mark Hamrick is creating a SABEW First Amendment Committee to help address members’ needs and desires, including advocacy of journalism, at this challenging time for the industry. We’re currently investing in professional training and have joined 80 journalism groups in an effort to raise press-freedom issues. The First Amendment Committee will be looking for opportunities to be engaged on the press-freedom front, especially as it relates to business journalism. SABEW wants to lead members in efforts to band together to fight fake news, support the credibility of journalism, protect access to information and pursue the truth.

    Finance

    In keeping with best practices for non-profits, SABEW conducted an independent audit of our 2015 financials and we will do so again for the 2016 financials. The audit will help set the table for future financial growth since audits are a requirement of many grant-giving organizations.

    SABEW will end 2016 with a positive net operating income and $370,800 in net assets.

    TRAINING HIGHLIGHTS

    Monthly training calls

    The training calls continue to be extremely popular – since last year’s spring conference, we’ve held 10 calls for just under 500 participants. Calls, including past sessions, can be accessed on the SABEW site. The focus has been to help members develop digital skills and navigate the changing media landscape. The Twitter training was our most popular call this year. Thanks to SABEW members Mary Jane Pardue and Kim Quillen for producing this fantastic program.

    Data-immersion workshop

    Our fourth annual Goldschmidt fellowship week in Washington, D.C., made possible by a generous grant from the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, was a huge success. Twenty-two business journalists participated in the seminar that immersed them in data and accounting skills. Journalists heard from experts at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Participants received special briefings from the Council of Economic Advisers and the Federal Reserve as well as briefings on new investment data from the Investment Company Institute. Many thanks for the continued work of SABEW leaders Marty Steffens and Kevin Hall and donor Jim Goldschmidt for supporting this initiative. The application process for the next workshop begins in November.

    College Connect

    Check out SABEW’s student-written personal-finance blogs on sabew.org. Topics range from family financial crises to how much outside employment a student should undertake during the academic year. The ongoing program is funded by NEFE. Students from the University of Missouri, Arizona State University and the University of Georgia are the bloggers.

    Health-care training for business journalists

    Following the election of Donald Trump, who vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, SABEW was able to provide tele-training less than a week later. Less than a month later, SABEW held a three-day symposium at the Bloomberg offices in Washington, D.C., for 15 fellows. The Dec. 1-3, 2016, symposium focused heavily on helping reporters understand what ACA changes might occur. This also followed a panel discussion at the SABEW New York fall conference in October titled Affordable Care Act Under Duress: What’s Next? Through the generosity of The Commonwealth Fund, this annual program is in its fifth year.

    SABEWNYC16 fall conference

    The October event in New York was a huge success, attracting some 200 people over the course of two days of programming. The executive director of CUNY’s McGraw Center for Business Journalism, Jane Sasseen, produced the third annual symposium on the challenges and opportunities news executives face in reshaping their newsrooms – and their coverage – amidst the rapid mobile, social and video changes underway. NEFE’s Paul Golden produced a daylong personal-finance reporting workshop. The 2017 workshop is Oct. 12-13 at CUNY.

    SABEW18

    We’re back to Washington, D.C., for the 2018 conference. Submit your program ideas during our call for sessions, and please take the SABEW17 post-conference survey!

    MEMBERSHIP

    Membership numbers

    We have just over 3,000 members. This includes 2,721 institutional members from 132 media outlets, 186 journalist members, 122 student members and 15 associate members. Keep your membership current and share your Twitter handle by updating your profile in the membership database.

    SABEW Canada

    SABEW Canada continues to expand and thrive with new members, social events, programs and more BIB entries than last year! Bryan Borzykowski, SABEW’s well-known Canadian board member who has been instrumental in leading expansion, has joined the executive ladder as SABEW secretary.

  • Mark Hamrick of Bankrate.com takes the helm at SABEW; seven are elected to the Board of Governors

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday May 1, 2017

    Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief at Bankrate.com, was installed as the new president of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) at its annual conference on April 29, 2017, in Seattle. Hamrick succeeds Cory Schouten, senior editor at the Columbia Journalism Review.

    “I’m humbled and honored to have the opportunity to serve SABEW members and the profession at this critically important time for our industry and our nation. The rapid pace of change, including the ongoing digital transition affords opportunity for new and agile media enterprises, but is also prompting others to downsize,” said Hamrick. “Our priorities include providing support, including networking opportunities and training, sought by our colleagues in business and financial journalism as well as other stakeholders. We’ll also look to advocate where appropriate for our profession at a time when legitimate and respected news outlets are under unprecedented attack.”

    In addition to Hamrick (@hamrickisms), SABEW’s officer ladder comprises Xana Antunes (@xantunesx), executive editor of Quartz, and Bryan Borzykowski (@bborzyko), freelance business writer.

    Ballots were cast during the SABEW17 conference for seven additional seats on the SABEW Board of Governors, six with a term ending in 2020 and one ending in 2018.
    Candidates elected to the board were:

    • Robert Barba, technology editor, American Banker (@Barba_AB)
    • Shobhana Chandra, Economics reporter, Bloomberg News (@ShoChandra)
    • Glenn Hall, U.S. news editor, The Wall Street Journal (@GlennHall)
    • Dean Murphy, associate editor, The New York Times (@deanemurphy)
    • Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNNMoney (@richbarbieri)
    • Marilyn Geewax, senior business news editor, National Public Radio (@geewaxnpr)‏
    • James B. Nelson, deputy business editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (@jamesbnelson)

    SABEW has many upcoming events that the board will be working on in coordination with SABEW’s Executive Director, Kathleen Graham. On June 1, the 2017 Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award contest will open. On Oct. 12-13, SABEWNYC17, the organization’s fall conference, will be held at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. The conference will include the SABEW/NEFE personal finance reporting workshop and the SABEW/McGraw Symposium. The 2017 Best in Business Awards contest opens December 1. In the spring, the SABEW18 conference will be in Washington, D.C.

    SABEW, the largest association of business journalists, encourages comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and upgrades the skills and knowledge of business journalists through continuous professional development and educational efforts.

    For more information, contact [email protected]. Follow @sabew on twitter.

  • Investigative reporting tips from SABEW honorees

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Saturday April 29, 2017

    By Urvashi Verma
    Medill News Service

    Journalists play a critical role in holding corporations, governments, and others to account by creating powerful stories using investigative journalism.

    BuzzFeed reporter Rosalind Adams and ProPublica’s Cezary Podkul shared how they investigated and produced award-winning stories at a session titled “Best in Business Investigative Awards: How They Did It” at the Society of American Business Editors and Writers spring conference in Seattle.

    “I really just started by looking at 10K filings of corporations under their litigation disclosures and then focused on just one hospital out of the 200,” said Adams, recipient of the SABEW’s Best in Business Award for Investigative Journalism for “Locked on the Psych Ward.”

    Adams spent a year making more than 1,000 phone calls and conducting 300 interviews to complete her reporting on how Universal Health Systems, the nation’s largest chain of psychiatric hospitals, locked patients up for money.

    “The handwriting was already on the glass wall. There was already a whistleblower and litigation pending,” Adams said. “BuzzFeed just happened to be the one to distribute the information.”

    BuzzFeed reporter Rosalind Adams and ProPublica’s Cezary Podkul share insights and tips in investigative journalism at the SABEW spring conference in Seattle.

    Podkul was winner of the 2015 Larry Birger Young Journalist competition for a series of stories, “Rent Racket”, about landlords collecting tax breaks without registering their apartments for rent control in New York City. He said he was tipped off to the story after an employee at the city’s Housing Preservation and Development Department emailed him.

    “The first takeaway I want to share with you is quite simple.  It is to read your email,” Podkul told the audience of business journalists, students, and educators. Many emails are under aliases using a fake identity that can lead to a great story. I also strongly recommend this fake id maker as every great journalist will need a quality fake id when conducting many investigations.

    Having the right data and knowing how to ask for information from government agencies using the Freedom of Information Act was also key.

    “Be strategic with your FOIA requests. Instead of asking them to give you an entire query, it’s better if you ask them to provide documents or records giving evidence of the items you are interested in,” said Podkul.

    Both Adams and Podkul said they used websites such as LinkedIn, Yelp and Wayback Machine, and created tip lines and surveys to collect documents.

    Through these techniques, they were able to collect company files from former hospital CEOs, in the case of Adams, and leases from tenants, in the case of Podkul, that would otherwise have been difficult to find.

    Podkul described how he persisted in the face of sources who said “no comment” to his repeated attempts to get answers to his questions by turning to court records and depositions.

  • Oct. Teletraining: Young journalists, big impact

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday October 18, 2016

    Young journalists, big impact
    Monday, October 17
    2 p.m. Eastern

    Today’s young business journalists show us that decades of experience are not required to have a major influence in the industry.

    At 27 years old, Buzzfeed’s William Alden’s reporting has taken him inside the secretive Palantir Technologies and caused an executive shake-up at insurance broker Zenefits. William has been honored with the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize, which recognizes outstanding work by business journalists under the age of 30.

    On SABEW’s next teletraining session, hear from William, as well as our Birger award finalists Alison Griswold of Quartz, and David Benoit and Emily Glazer, both of The Wall Street Journal, as they discuss how they work sources, develop their beats and write important news that brings transparency to the marketplace.

    Listen to the recording

    Moderator

    Jon Chesto, a business reporter for the Boston Globe, served as Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize judging team chair. Jon covers the leaders who shape Boston’s business community. He has been reporting on business and politics in New England for the past two decades. Before joining the Globe, he was managing editor at the Boston Business Journal. Prior to that role, he was the business editor at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy. His weekly Ledger column, “Mass. Market,” won several national awards with the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. A graduate of Wesleyan University and Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism, he has also worked as a business reporter at the Boston Herald and as a political reporter with Ottaway Newspapers.

    Panelists

    William Alden is a senior business reporter at BuzzFeed News, where he covers Silicon Valley startups and venture capital. His articles have pulled back the curtain on Palantir Technologies, the secretive data-analysis company, and exposed legal problems at Zenefits that led to the resignation of the startup insurance broker’s CEO. Previously, he covered Wall Street for the DealBook section of The New York Times. He is based in San Francisco.

    Alison Griswold, a reporter for Quartz covering the sharing economy and other “startup-y things,” is a finalist for the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize.

    David Benoit, a reporter for New York MoneyBeat at The Wall Street Journal, is a finalist for the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize.

    Emily Glazer, a reporter covering JP Morgan and Wells Fargo at The Wall Street Journal, is a finalist for the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize.

    Questions about teletraining? Please contact Mary Jane Pardue at [email protected] or Kimberly Quillen at [email protected].

  • Top investigative tips for beginning business journalists

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Friday January 29, 2016

    Top investigative tips for beginning business journalists
    Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016
    2:00 p.m. EST

    In this one-hour session, Cezary Podkul of ProPublica will share the formula behind prize-winning investigative pieces. Podkul was this year’s winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist award.

    Listen to the recording here

    Training Links:
    How Wall Street Tobacco Deals Left States with Billions in Toxic Debt
    Landlords Fail to List 50,000 N.Y.C. Apartments for Rent Limits
    NYC Bill Targets Landlords Who Get Tax Breaks, Duck Rent Limits
    NY State Data Indicates Even More Landlords Duck Rent Limits
    NY Lawmakers Want Stiffer Penalties for Landlords Who Ignore Rent Limits

    Panelists:
    ec1caa28-6c57-4419-bd74-2604b6e15713Cezary Podkul
    Financial investigative reporter
    ProPublica

    Cezary is this year’s winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize, honoring journalists under age 30. Cezary earned a B.S. in economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and is a 2011 alumnus of the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia Journalism School, where his master’s thesis on unspent highway earmarks developed into the eventual USA Today report and was featured on NBC Nightly News. In addition to being a SABEW member, he also serves on the board of the New York Financial Writers’ Association.

    Special Guest:
    AAEAAQAAAAAAAAKqAAAAJDA1MjllYTkzLTAxODgtNGY3Zi05MzlmLTM0Y2Q5ZDIxYzUwNwRoy Harris
    Journalist and Author

    Roy Harris is a veteran business journalist and author of “Pulitzer’s Gold,” telling stories behind the stories that have won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.  His newest edition, recently published by Columbia University Press, includes stories written by younger journalists. In the chapter, “Prizing Youth,” Harris talks about recent Pulitzer-winners under 30—Alexandra Berzon for her Las Vegas Sun stories on construction-worker deaths on the Strip, and Daniel Gilbert for the small-town-Virginia Bristol Herald Courier, for his deep study of how landowners who were mineral-rights holders were getting cheated out of royalties by the state.

    Harris worked for The Wall Street Journal from 1971 to 1995, including six years as deputy Los Angeles bureau chief. He then moved to The Economist Group’s CFO Magazine as senior editor. Early in his career he also worked for the Los Angeles Times, and his hometown St. Louis Post-Dispatch, where his late father was a Pulitzer-winning reporter. Roy, who also is president of the American Society of Business Publication Editors Foundation, lives in Hingham, Mass.

    Moderator:
    Marty Steffens
    SABEW Chair
    University of Missouri

    As the Society of American Business Editors and Writers endowed chair, Martha Steffens teaches business and financial journalism, as well as organizing seminars for business journalism professionals. Steffens has taught more than 450 professional in business workshops sponsored the Southern Newspaper Publishers Assn. and SABEW. She assumed the chair in 2002, after a 30-year career in newspapers, including executive editor of the San Francisco Examiner, and earlier the Press & Sun Bulletin in Binghamton, N.Y.

     

    RBB_logo_icon_hiresThe Larry Birger Young Business Journalist award and teletraining are made possible by a gift from rbb Communications of Miami, Fla. The award commemorates Birger, a former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998.

     

    Questions about teletraining?
    Please contact SABEW at [email protected].

    Presented as a member service by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

  • Training Archive

    Posted By admin on Tuesday August 26, 2014

    2020

    June 9: Covering the Election on the Business Desk

    June 4: Local Economic Stories Using Data from the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW)

    May 20: Losing Your Job/ Losing Your Health Insurance – Health care insecurity among jobless workers during the pandemic

    May 14: COVID-19’s economic impact on the resiliency of the American household with the St. Louis Fed

    May 7: Taking the pulse of your county economy

    April 27: COVID-19 – Taking care of journalists and journalism and you

    April 14: Covering the business impact of the coronavirus pandemic

    April 8: Protecting your physical and mental health while covering COVID-19

    April 2: What do 100 million fund investors do when markets go sideways

    February: Building a Better Infographic – How to tell stories visually

    January: Texas v. The U.S. and the ACA – One more time with feeling

    January: Using data to create powerful stories

    2019

    November: Make public records part of your beat reporting

    October: How to harness technology for innovative journalism

    September: Learning about the Fed

    August: Covering the nation’s trade disputes

    July: The business of freelancing: How to chart a course for success

    July: Will the ACA Live or Will It Die? Texas v. the U.S. Sponsored by The Commonwealth Fund

    June: How to Cover One of the Newest Beats on the Business Desk: Marijuana

    May: How to Write for a Millennial Audience

    March: Copyright and fair use in a digital age: How to break news, produce lively coverage and keep it legal

    February: Business Reporting on Natural Disasters

    January: Beat Basics for New Reporters

    2018

    November: Behind the lens: How to shoot video for business stories

    October: How to use social media to build a beat and break news

    August: How to mine government contracting data for stories in your own backyard

    July: Dig Deep into Health Care Data

    July: Freelance Journalism – Getting down to business

    June: Metrics to Magnify Your Journalism

    May: Understanding economic indicators

    April: Optimizing your professional brand on LinkedIn

    March: Digital Strategy: Put together an e-newsletter that readers can’t resist

    February: Covering Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Technology

    January: Behind the lens: How to snap photos and videos that make business stories shine

    2017

    December: The ACA –  Still alive or on life support?, Thursday, Dec. 7

    December: Under Siege –  The State of Press Freedom under the Trump Administration, Monday, Dec. 4

    November: Digital Strategy – How to Use SEO to Hook an Audience, Monday, Nov. 6

    October: Young Journalists, Big Impact – Monday, Oct. 30

    September: International Trade in the Era of Trump – Monday, Sept. 11

    August: 10 Great Digital Tools for Business Journalists – Monday, Aug. 21

    July: Going Public: Reporting on IPOs” – Monday, July 17

    June: “Reporting on Sports Business” – Monday, June 26

    May: “Teenage Financial Literacy” – Wednesday, May 24

    May: “Freelancing Your Way to Success” – Monday, May 22

    April: “Investigating Nonprofit Organizations” – Monday, April 17

    March: “Fighting Fake News” – Monday, March 20

    February: “Digital Bootcamp: Telling Business Stories through Podcasts” – Monday, Feb. 27

    January: “Personal Finance in 2017” – Monday, Jan. 23

    2016

    November: “What will happen to the ACA now?” Monday, Nov. 14, 2016

    October: “Young journalists, big impact” Monday, Oct. 17, 2016

    September: “Covering the election on the business desk” Monday, Sept. 19, 2016

    July: “Coaching journalists toward their best work” Monday, July 18, 2016

    May: “Breaking news: Make your coverage overshadow the competition” Monday, May 9, 2016

    March: “Digital business writing – How to hook an audience” Monday, March 14, 2016

    February: “The First Amendment in the Digital Age” Monday, Feb. 22, 2016

    Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Teletraining: “Top investigative tips for beginning business journalists” Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016

    January: “Digital Strategy – The rise of the emailed newsletter” Monday, Jan. 11, 2016

     

    View earlier virtual training topics.

  • Warren Watson resigning as SABEW executive director

    Posted By admin on Monday June 2, 2014

    warren

    Watson: Will be working on book.

    Warren Watson, executive director of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers since 2009, announced Monday that he is resigning effective June 30.

    He plans to move back to his native New England to complete a book on the state of journalism, “Surviving Journalism,” (Marion Street Press) and pursue other journalism endeavors.

    “It’s been a gratifying five years,” said Watson, a reporter, editor, executive and teacher at newspaper-media companies and universities since 1973.   “I am honored to have been able to work with so many fine business journalists.  I’m appreciative and wish SABEW the very best.”

    “On behalf of the board of governors, I want to thank Warren for his dedicated service,” said Marty Wolk, SABEW president and managing editor of MSN Money. “He has been instrumental in everything we have done for the past five years, and he will be missed.”

    SABEW is launching a search for a new executive director and will be posting a detailed job description soon.

    Watson was hired to relocate the SABEW headquarters office from the University of Missouri to Arizona State University’s Cronkite School during the height of the recession in September 2009.  He helped solidify SABEW’s finances during times that were tough for many journalism membership organizations, which were hit hard by cutbacks in the industry.   SABEW’s membership has risen from 3,200 to more than 4,000 during Watson’s tenure.

    In all, Watson helped organize and coordinate nine national SABEW conferences and expanded the group’s education offerings through grants from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, National Endowment for Financial Education, the McCormick Foundation and The Commonwealth Fund.  He also expanded SABEW’s donor database and attracted a record number of sponsors for the most recent spring conference in Phoenix in March.

    In its golden anniversary year in 2013, SABEW held 10 live training events with Watson on site as organizer and program moderator for most.

    Watson also developed SABEW’s inaugural Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award in 2013.  Mina Kimes of Bloomberg News was winner, beating out 40 other candidates in a juried competition, named in memory of a  SABEW past president.  Watson recruited RBB Public Relations of Miami as the award sponsor.

    Watson’s book “Surviving Journalism” will be published by Marion Street Press in 2015.  Aimed at professionals and students, the book examines how changes in the journalism business have affected career journalists.

    In his 40-year career, Watson has managed daily newspaper newsrooms in Portland, Augusta, and Waterville, Maine, as well as Peabody, Mass.  In addition, he has been president of the 2,600-member Society for News Design (2003) and acting president of the American Press Institute (2003-04).    At API, Watson was active in business journalism, developing education programs and serving as co-founder of the Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at API.

    SABEW is the world’s largest organization dedicated to business and financial journalism.

     

     

  • Distinguished Achievement Award

    Posted By admin on Thursday June 10, 2010

    The Distinguished Achievement Award was established in 1993 to single out individuals who have made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who have served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession.

    Recipients

    2020James B. Stewart, author, columnist, The New York Times,

    2019Michelle Singletary, personal finance columnist, The Washington Post

    2018Gretchen Morgenson, senior special writer – investigations unit, The Wall Street Journal

    2017Lawrence Ingrassia, managing editor, Los Angeles Times

    2015 – Michael R. Bloomberg, founder, Bloomberg LP

    2013 – Michael Lewis, author/contributing editor, Vanity Fair

    2012Diana Henriques, The New York Times

    2011 – Donald Barlett and James Steele, Vanity Fair

    2009Ray Shaw*, American City Business Journals

    2008Floyd Norris, The New York Times

    2007 – Paul Steiger, ProPublica

    2006 – Carol Junge Loomis, Fortune magazine

    2005 – Stephen B. Shepard, City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism

    2004 – Linda O’Bryon, PBS’ “Nightly Business Report”

    2003 – James K. “Jimmy” Gentry, University of Kansas School of Journalism

    2003 – Randy Smith, The Kansas City Star

    2002 – Byron “Barney” Calame, The Wall Street Journal

    2001 – Allan Sloan, ProPublica

    2000 – Ernest Holsendolph, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    1999 – Chet Currier*, The Associated Press and Bloomberg News

    1999 – John Cuniff*, The Associated Press

    1998 – Marshall Loeb*, Money magazine, Fortune magazine

    1997 – Chris Welles*, BusinessWeek

    1996 – Cheryl Hall, Dallas Morning News

    1995 – Larry Birger*, Miami Herald

    1994 – Myron Kandel, CNN Business News

    1993 – Hobart Rowan*, The Washington Post

    *Deceased

     

  • SABEW History & Past Presidents

    Posted By admin on Tuesday August 18, 2009

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing was formed in 1964 to promote superior coverage of business and economic events and issues. Originally called the Society of American Business Editors and Writers, SABEW changed its name in 2018 as part of a broader effort to embrace a global focus on business journalism.

    Less than a half century ago the very idea that business news would ever emerge from behind the classified advertisement section would have been preposterous. But in the late 1950s, business news began to make the climb from obscurity.

    The movement began when the late R.K.T. (Kit) Larson, former associate editor of the Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star in Norfolk, Va., began talking with Charles C. Abbott of the University of Virginia about “the generally poor reporting of business news in the country’s press.”

    Larson organized several small seminars, and in 1961 put together a three-day session that attracted 60 business editors and writers. The success of that seminar resulted in another in 1963.

    A permanent organization took shape in 1964 when SABEW held its first meeting in New York City. In 1984, the Society took a major step by voting to place its offices at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. In 2009, the Board of Governors voted to move the Society’s headquarters to Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in downtown Phoenix, where it was established in September of that year.

    Today, its more than 3,400 members are from North America and several countries. In 1990, SABEW began offering institutional memberships, and now entire business staffs at major newspapers, business journals, business weeklies, wire services, online publications and broadcast outlets are members.

    As part of its educational mission, SABEW sponsors an annual convention and specialized reporting conference. It also confers business journalism awards for excellence in business journalism, as well as honors individuals who have made long-standing contributions to business journalism.

    In an era when business news routinely tops the front pages, leads the network news and results in the creation of new magazines, it seems hard to imagine a time when things were different. To make sure that business journalism keeps its new-found-popularity, SABEW has worked closely with the University of Missouri to raise $1.1 million to endow a chair for business journalism education.

    This list indicates the media with which the president worked during his/her term. (An * following a president’s name indicates the person is deceased.)

    2019 President: Bryan Borzykowski

    2017-2019 SABEW President: Mark Hamrick

    2016 SABEW President: Cory Schouten

    2015 SABEW President: Joanna Ossinger

    2014 SABEW President: Marty Wolk

    2013 SABEW President: Kevin G. Hall

    2012 SABEW President: Jill Jorden Spitz

    spitz

    2011 SABEW President: Kevin Noblet

    2010 SABEW President: Rob Reuteman

    2009 SABEW President: Greg McCune

    2008 SABEW President: Bernie Kohn

    2007 SABEW President: Gail DeGeorge

    2006 SABEW President: Dave Kansas

    2005 SABEW President: Jonathan Lansner

    2004 SABEW President: Rex Seline

    2003 SABEW President: Kathy Kristof

    2002 SABEW President: Chuck Jaffe

    2001 SABEW President: Bill Barnhart

    2000 SABEW President: Barney Calame

    1999 SABEW President: Charley Blaine

    1998 SABEW President: Susan Wells

    1997 SABEW President: Henry Dubroff

    1996 and 1976 SABEW President: Myron Kandel

    1995 SABEW President: Jodi Schneider

    1994 SABEW President: Gary Klott*

    1993 SABEW President: James M. Kennedy

    1992 SABEW President: Randall D. Smith

    1991 SABEW President: Sandra J. Duerr

    1990 SABEW President: Sue Thomson

    1989 SABEW President: Larry Werner

    1988 SABEW President: Philip Moeller

    1987 SABEW President: Cheryl Hall

    1986 SABEW President: Fred Monk

    1985 SABEW President: Mike Millican

    1984 SABEW President: James J. Mitchell*

    1983 SABEW President: David L. Beal

    1982 SABEW President: John Rumsey

    1981 SABEW President: Jerry Heaster*

    1980 SABEW President: Margaret Daly*

    1979 SABEW President: Ray Kenney*

    1978 SABEW President: Robert Corya

    1977 SABEW President: Larry Birger*

    1976 and 1996 SABEW President: Myron Kandel

    1975 SABEW President: Dick Griffin*

    1974 and 1973 SABEW President: Hobart Rowen*

    1972 SABEW President: David Smith

    1971 SABEW President: Al Altwegg*

    1970 SABEW President: John D. Henry*

    1969 SABEW President: William A. Doyle*

    1968 SABEW President: Ross M. Dick*

    1967 SABEW President:Robert E. Nichols*

    1966 SABEW President: Ben Schifman*

    1965 and 1964 SABEW President: J.A. Livingston*

  • 2001 News: SABEW 2001 Distinguished Achievement Award Recipient Announced

    Posted By admin on Monday April 30, 2001

    Veteran Wall Street Editor Receives Business Journalism AwardColumbia, Mo., April 30, 2001–Allan Sloan, Wall Street editor for Newsweek magazine, has been selected as the Society of American Business Editors and Writers’ Distinguished Achievement Award winner for 2001. He will receive SABEW’s top honor tomorrow at its 38th annual convention in New York City at the Marriott World Trade Center.

    Established in 1993, the Distinguished Achievement Award singles out individuals who have made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who have served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession. The late Hobart Rowen of The Washington Post was the first recipient.

    “Allan Sloan is an aggressive business sleuth who can turn the complex into the comprehendible,” said Cheryl Hall, business columnist for The Dallas Morning News, who chairs the awards committee and is also a past recipient. “Young reporters can learn more by watching him in action than from any seminar they might attend.”

    “I’m very flattered that people who actually know me – and many of whom are my competitors – have chosen me for this lifetime honor, and I’m not even dead yet,” said Sloan, whose columns run regularly in Newsweek and The Washington Post.

    Sloan’s 30-year career in business journalism began at The Charlotte Observer in 1970, and continued through stints at The Detroit Free Press, Forbes, Money and Newsday before he joined Newsweek in 1995. In 1984, while at Forbes, Sloan and coauthor Howard Rudnitsky published the first definitive profile of Drexel Burnham Lambert’s Michael Milken and his network of junk bond buyers.

    Sloan has won five Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism.

    “The thing I’m proudest of is I’ve won them in three different categories in three different decades for four different employers,” Sloan said. “That defines versatility.”

    Past recipients of SABEW’s Distinguished Achievement Award also include: Myron Kandel, financial editor at Cable News Network; the late Larry Birger of the Miami Herald; Chris Welles, a former senior editor of BusinessWeek; Marshall Loeb, formerly of Money and Fortune magazines, now with CBSMarketWatch.com; John Cuniff of the Associated Press; Chet Currier, formerly of the Associated Press, now with Bloomberg News; and Ernest Holsendolph, business columnist at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

    Sloan will accept his award at SABEW’s Distinguished Award Luncheon, May 1 at the Marriott World Trade Center hotel. To obtain tickets, please call 573-882-7862.

    SABEW is a tax-exempt educational organization representing more than 3,000 print, broadcast and electronic business journalists and based at the Missouri School of Journalism. For more information about SABEW and the convention, see the SABEW web site, www.sabew.org.

    Contact: Carolyn Guniss, SABEW executive director, 573-882-8985, or Calame, 212-416-2624.

     

     

  • SABEW - Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication,
    Arizona State University

    555 North Central Ave, Suite 406 E, Phoenix, AZ 85004-1248

    E-mail: [email protected]

    Phone: (602) 496-7862

    ©2001 - 2020 Society of American Business Editors and Writers, Inc.

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