Senior Content Editor at Chicago Tribune

Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday May 21, 2019

Job Description: The Chicago Tribune is seeking a digital-first senior content editor to help lead our business, financial and consumer coverage. The successful editor thinks both creatively and critically and is a tested manager. The senior content editor supervises reporters on both breaking news and enterprise stories, working with them from story planning to posting stories online and promoting them on social media. We seek a go-getter who’s a team player, willing to roll up his/her sleeves and pitch in wherever needed, able to multitask and work fast for digital.

Job Qualifications: Candidates should have a bachelor’s degree and a minimum of five years of editing experience.

How to Apply: Applicants should send a resume, cover letter and five clips you’re most proud of to Business Editor Mary Ellen Podmolik by emailing [email protected]

  • Rahm sells Chicago (minus the warts) to visiting journalists

    Posted By admin on Saturday April 25, 2015

    By Ryan Sachetta
    Medill News Service

    CHICAGO – Mayor Rahm Emanuel presented a glowing picture of the city of Chicago, emphasizing his push for expanding access to education and job gains in a keynote address to the Society of American Business Editors and Writers  Friday evening.

    Left on the cutting floor was any mention of the city’s pension crisis, looming teacher negotiations and gang violence exemplified by Spike Lee’s working title for his next film, “Chiraq,” slated to start filming in Chicago’s roughest South Side neighborhoods this summer.

    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Frontier Airlines, Carnival Corp. CEOs talk oil at Chicago conference

    Posted By admin on Friday April 24, 2015

    IMG_2700-1

    From left – Arnold Donald, CEO of Carnival Corp., David Siegel, CEO of Frontier Airlines, and Mark Hoplamazian, CEO of Hyatt Hotels. (Photo by Alysha Khan/Medill School of Journalism)

    By Brian MacIver
    Medill News Service

    CHICAGO – Frontier Airlines President and CEO David Siegel said Friday that the airline took a multi-million dollar loss on oil derivatives in its first quarter as hedges meant to protect the company from rising oil prices backfired when prices instead declined.

    In an interview following a breakfast panel at the Society of American Business Editors and Writers, Siegel said the loss is a “manageable number” that is “below $50 million.”

    Frontier, owned by private equity firm Indigo Partners, is well-positioned for the rest of 2015 “and our hedges for 2016 are in the money,” or profitable, Siegel said.

    In the first three months of the year, crude oil prices fell 1.7 percent. From the June 19 high of $114.96, prices are down 43 percent. In early afternoon trading Friday, the June West Texas Intermediate crude oil futures contract stood at $56.94 per barrel.

    United Airlines reported Thursday that it had lost $161 million dollars in fuel hedging in the quarter ended March 31. Delta Airlines reported a loss of $411 million in fuel hedging in the quarter, compared with a fuel hedge gain of $78 million in the same period of 2014.

    Southwest Airlines’ revenues were knocked down by $47 million. American Airlines does not enter into futures contracts for fuel and are, as a result, at the mercy of market fluctuation in prices.

    Carnival Corp., parent of Carnival Cruises and Costa Crociere among others, reported it lost $169 million on oil derivatives, including $112 million in unrealized losses, in the first quarter.

    “Lower fuel costs are definitely good for us in the long haul,” said Carnival Corp. CEO Arnold Donald in an interview following the breakfast panel. “Having said that, the realities in how they impact our finances, they have impacted them directly versus the guidance we’ve given. And so far in ‘15, we anticipated the lower costs, but the reality is about 50 percent of our fuel is [hedged.]”

    Donald noted the relationship between the low oil prices and the strong U.S. dollar. He said the strong U.S. dollar has created headwinds in both “transactional and translational currency impact.”

  • University of Chicago economists don’t see Fed raising rates before Sept.

    Posted By admin on Friday April 24, 2015

    SABEW2015 Opening Reception

    From left – Austan Goolsbee and Randall S. Kroszner, University of Chicago professors. (Alysha Khan/Medill School of Journalism)

    By Lucy Ren and Ryan Sachetta
    Medill News Service

    CHICAGO – The Federal Reserve is unlikely to raise interest rates before its September meeting and instead will wait into the summer to get a better assessment of the economy before making any decisions, according to two University of Chicago economists.

    Former Federal Reserve governor and University of Chicago professor Randall Kroszner and University of Chicago economics professor and former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers Austan Goolsbee spoke in a wide-ranging discussion on the economy Thursday evening.

    Factors such as low inflation, employment and uncertainty abroad will continue to influence the Federal Reserve’s thinking, Kroszner said at the opening reception of the 52nd Annual Conference for the Society of American Business Editors and Writers at the University of Chicago’s Gleacher Center.

    “I don’t see why the Fed would move early rather than wait a few months to see the economic situation,” Kroszner said.

    The Federal Open Market Committee will meet Tuesday and Wednesday, and the Commerce Department will release its first estimate of first-quarter economic growth on Wednesday. The final fourth-quarter estimate showed that gross domestic product grew at an annualized rate of 2.2 percent.

    There is a chance that the upcoming GDP numbers could “really stink up the joint,” Goolsbee said.

    For Goolsbee, economic growth expectations need refreshing. He pointed to the housing market as one example. In the 107 years of home price data, prices appreciated slowly and steadily, increasing 40 basis points a year. Home prices then shot up, growing 13.5 percent a year and reaching an apex in the mid-2000s. Prices are slowly recovering but there are still more than 6 million vacant homes in the U.S., he said.

    “I don’t think it’s any surprise that we get housing coming back less strong than it was,” he said. “If you have something growing at 13.5 percent per year, it solves every problems you could ever have. Do you think we’re going back to 40 basis points a year or the go-go days?”

    In discussing the labor market, Goolsbee and Kroszner agreed that education and skills are paramount for young people, with statistics pointing to the pair leading to higher incomes and lower unemployment.

    To Goolsbee, a shrinking labor force is the new reality despite an “epically good year for the job market” in 2014. The question is why GDP didn’t correspond to growth in the job market. “In my opinion, the only reason we were able to have that differential is because we had negative productivity growth,” Goolsbee said.

    Near the end of the evening, an audience member asked Goolsbee what, in hindsight, he would change about the White House’s recovery efforts. “I said when we got there in 2009, it felt like running into a hotel on fire, grabbing kids and throwing them into the pool,” he said. “Now, we are looking back and judging it like it was an Olympic diving contest.”

  • SABEW’s 2015 conference to highlight Chicago strengths- Nobel-winning economists, high-tech startups and advanced training

    Posted By admin on Thursday November 13, 2014

    737x415xHYATT-Chicago-Magnificent-Mile-P021-Exterior-Dawn-1280x720.jpg.pagespeed.ic.b9kfbF9ZbbCHICAGO – SABEW’s 2015 conference will kick off Thursday, April 23, with an all-star panel of economists, and that is just the start of what promises to be an exciting weekend in the Windy City.

    The opening night panel, sponsored by the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, will feature economists Austan Goolsbee, Randal Kroszner and Richard Thaler. US Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel have also agreed to speak at SABEW’s 52nd annual conference, which concludes with the Best in Business awards banquet April 25.

    View the schedule and other conference information here.

    Register for the conference here.

    IT’S ALL ABOUT THE FUTURE – AND DIGITAL

    •      The Future of Business Journalism. How it’s changing, where it’s thriving and what new challenges lie ahead. Experts will explain innovations that make business journalism more dynamic …but it may “change” your job.
    •      Covering Start-Ups and Emerging Companies. Every city wants to see start-ups take root and grow. Yet some business reporters don’t really know how to evaluate entrepreneurs and start-ups. This panel will help you understand the difference between a real business and a pipe dream, and offer story suggestions for covering emerging companies in your area.
    •      The Intersection of Global Politics and Business. With politics influencing more than just the price of oil, we will offer a “can’t miss” panel on how to cover politics and business in a global economy. And, we’ll explore whether the ROI is there for taxpayers when states pay businesses for their business.
    •      Newsroom Diversity.  Will your future newsroom reflect the changing communities you cover?

    IT’S ABOUT HOW BUSINESS WORKS – IN A CITY THAT WORKS

    •      Main Street Fights Back. Find out how traditional Main Street retailers and shopping malls are innovating by completely changing the shopping experience to drive traffic and sales.
    •      The State of Manufacturing. President Barack Obama has said that US Manufacturing can be saved. Here is how to get beyond the hype to cover the real story.
    •      Travel’s New Trends. Featuring CEOs of some of travel’s biggest brands
    •      Crosstown Rivalries. The business end of sports in a uniquely sports-oriented town.

    WE’LL TRAIN YOU FOR TOMORROW … AND THE NEXT FIVE YEARS

    •      In-depth training sessions on using the latest tech tools to enhance your storytelling and social media skills.
    •      A workshopping/mentoring session where the pros will help you sharpen your focus and a panel discussion on identifying the crook (and white-collar criminal) next door.
    •      How to build a potent and meaningful career even while the industry struggles.

    HOTEL INFORMATION

    The host hotel Hyatt Chicago Magnificent Mile located at 633 North St. Clair. A short walk from Michigan Avenue, it is one of the busiest and most famous retail areas in the world. SABEW has discounted room rates available until March 23, 2015.
    Rates for Wednesday, April 22 through Monday, April 27: Single/Double$189 per night, Triple $209 per night, Quadruple $229 per night.

    For reservations, please contact the Hyatt Chicago Magnificent Mile at (888) 591-1234 or visit our personalized reservation page.

    Questions regarding the spring conference? Please contact Ilyce Glink, 2015 Spring Conference Chair, at [email protected].

    For sponsorship opportunities, please contact Kathleen Graham, SABEW Executive Director, at [email protected].

    So, join us in Chicago for SABEW 2015 – you won’t want to miss this one.

     

  • 2015 Spring Conference- Chicago, April 23-25

    Posted By admin on Thursday November 6, 2014

    SABEWChicago2015 Schedule
  • SABEW15 – Chicago, April 23-25

    Posted By admin on Tuesday January 21, 2014

    2015 Spring Conference- Chicago, April 23-25

  • 2013 Health Care Symposium- Chicago

    Posted By admin on Wednesday October 16, 2013

       FellowsSpeakers Schedule

     

    The Commonwealth Fund awarded a grant to the Society of American Business Editors and Writers to develop a two-day symposium in Chicago.

    The session, which will be limited to 17 journalists selected through an application process, will be held Nov. 7-8 at Reuters headquarters in downtown Chicago.

    It is being sponsored by The Commonwealth Fund.

    The Commonwealth Fund awarded a $35,000 grant to the Society of American Business Editors and Writers to develop the symposium, as well as three other education events in the second half of 2013.

    SABEW and Commonwealth have teamed up before to offer specialized education in healthcare reporting.  It is the sixth such grant the Commonwealth Fund has awarded to SABEW, which has conducted a dozen open workshops and other activities on the business of health care under Commonwealth’s sponsorship since 2007.

    The symposium, like one that SABEW developed with Commonwealth Jan. 17-18 in New York, will be styled for experienced reporters in the topic from media companies nationwide.  Participants will be selected by SABEW with input from an advisory committee, and be given fellowships that cover travel, hotel and other costs for the New York program.

    Topic areas expected to be included: Affordable Care Act implementation, marketing of the changes, healthcare bundling, state-based healthcare exchanges, Medicare and Medicaid reform, Medicaid, healthcare payment innovation and reform, and how businesses will deal with insurance plans for employees.

    The program is one of four training events SABEW will conduct on the topic in 2013.  The first will be a panel discussion on the ACA Oct. 4 at SABEW’s New York conference.  A tele-training event and a webinar are scheduled for Oct. 28 and Nov. 26, respectively.

    commonwealth_fund_logoAbout The Commonwealth Fund:

    With offices in New York City and Washington, D.C., The Commonwealth Fund is a private foundation that aims to promote a high-performing health care system that achieves better access, improved quality, and greater efficiency, particularly for society’s most vulnerable, including low-income people, the uninsured, minority Americans, young children, and elderly adults.

    The Commonwealth Fund carries out this mandate by supporting independent research on health care issues and making grants to improve health care practice and policy. An international program in health policy is designed to stimulate innovative policies and practices in the United States and other industrialized countries.


     

    • Symposium organizers: Warren Watson, SABEW executive director; John Wasik, author & contributor, Reuters, The New York Times and Forbes
    • Symposium associate: Marty Steffens, SABEW chair, University of Missouri
    • Program: Marty Steffens

     

     

  • 17 chosen as fellows for SABEW healthcare workshop in Chicago, Nov. 7-8

    Posted By admin on Tuesday October 8, 2013

    Special to SABEW

    PHOENIX – Seventeen journalists have been chosen as fellows to attend a special symposium on the business of health care Nov. 7-8.

    The fellows chosen through an application process, represent 10 states and the District of Columbia.

    The fellows are:

    Kristen Scholrich/Crain’s Chicago Business/Chicago

    Catherine Larkin/Bloomberg/Chicago/Chicago

    Jim Spencer/Minneapolis Star Tribune/Washington, D.C.

    Jay Greene/Crain’s Detroit Business/Detroit

    Vanessa Renderman/Times of NW Indiana/Munster, Ind.

    Wooty Sixel/Houston Chronicle/Houston

    John Wasik/Forbes,Reuters/Grayslake, Ill.

    Tia Mitchell/Tampa Bay Times/Tallahassee, Fla.

    Tami Luhby/CNN Money/New York

    Doug Whiteman/Bankrate.com/N. Palm Beach, Fla.

    Dennis Domrzalska/Albuquerque Business First/Albuquerque

    Kevin McKenzie/Memphis Commercial Appeal/Memphis

    Hilary Lau/D CEO Magazine/Dallas

    Kate Smith/Financial Times/New York

    Tom Murphy/The Associated Press/Indianapolis

    Laurence Hammack/RoanokeTimes/Roanoke, Va.

    J.K. Wall/Indianapolis Business Journal/Indianapolis

    The session, sponsored by The Commonwealth Fund, will be held at Reuters headquarters in downtown Chicago.

    The Commonwealth Fund awarded a $35,000 grant to the Society of American Business Editors and Writers to develop the symposium, as well as three other education events in the second half of 2013. The first event, a live panel discussion on the Affordable Care Act and its enrollment process, was held Oct. 4 at SABEW’s annual fall conference in New York City.

    A tele-training event and a webinar are scheduled for Oct. 28 and Nov. 26, respectively. Each will explore the Affordable Care Act and health reform.

    SABEW and Commonwealth have teamed up before to offer specialized education in healthcare reporting. It is the sixth such grant the Commonwealth Fund has awarded to SABEW, which has conducted a dozen open workshops and other activities on the business of health care under Commonwealth’s sponsorship since 2007.

    The Chicago symposium, like one that SABEW developed with Commonwealth Jan. 17-18 in New York, will be styled for experienced reporters in the topic.  Participants will be selected by SABEW with input from an advisory committee.  They will be given fellowships that cover travel, hotel and other costs for the New York program.

    Topic areas expected to be included: Affordable Care Act implementation, marketing of the changes, healthcare bundling, state-based healthcare exchanges, Medicare and Medicaid reform, Medicaid, healthcare payment innovation and reform, and how businesses will deal with insurance plans for employees.

    About The Commonwealth Fund:

    With offices in New York City and Washington, D.C., The Commonwealth Fund is a private foundation that aims to promote a high-performing health care system that achieves better access, improved quality, and greater efficiency, particularly for society’s most vulnerable, including low-income people, the uninsured, minority Americans, young children, and elderly adults.

    The Commonwealth Fund carries out this mandate by supporting independent research on health care issues and making grants to improve health care practice and policy. An international program in health policy is designed to stimulate innovative policies and practices in the United States and other industrialized countries.

  • Posted By admin on Friday August 30, 2019

    Students who write for the College Connect blog describe their own experiences handling and managing money and credit. Blog topics include family financial crises, working while going to school, financial aid, managing debt and more.

    The blog writers attend Arizona State University, the University of Missouri School of Journalism and the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

    This personal finance blog project is funded by Denver-based National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE).

    Fall 2019

    Coming soon!

    Spring 2019

    Planning for Study Abroad: How to finance your semester BEFORE you get there

    By Mimi Wright

    If there is one piece of advice that I would give to any college student, it would be this: study abroad. The experiences, connections and sights you see are priceless. But unfortunately, the trip is not. Studying abroad is a hefty financial undertaking. It can be extremely overwhelming when you are faced with the program fee, because I know I was. A helpful tip: PLAN AHEAD. I worked a lot the summer before my spring study abroad so that I had some cushion for the blow. But even that wasn’t enough for what my program fee was. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How to travel cheaply while studying abroad

    By Chloe Thornberry

    Arriving in the country that’s you’ve chosen to do your study abroad is a thrill.  But it’s just the start – now that you’ve taken this big leap, you might as well see as much of the world as possible. If there are alarms going off in your head telling you that sounds off-the-wall expensive, take a breath. There are ways to travel abroad without breaking the bank. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Learning about financial aid, right from the source!

    By Sydney Calhoun

    Who would have thought that a journalism major would be working in a university financial aid office, but I’m glad I do!  In today’s world of student loans and repayment plans, life can get the best of your wallet. After all, two-thirds of students at public universities like mine have student loans. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: What to do when your campus job is a brain drain

    By Payton Cousins

    What do you do when your job is intellectually and mentally exhausting? What do you do when you need more hours to make more money, but you don’t have the brain power to keep working? This is a problem that I experience all the time. I currently work as a writing tutor at the University of Missouri, which means that my job is basically helping students at any stage in the writing process. It can be in any topic, from Engineering, English, Political Science… I have even edited creative writing pieces for Literature and Film Writing classes. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Saving Up to Giddy Up

    By Paulina Crum

    First – you have to know that I’m from Montana. I have been riding horses since I was six, and have desperately wanted a horse of my own, but I have never been able to afford to buy one. Now, it seems like there may be a way to finally purchase the horse I have always wanted. I have been hired for two good paying jobs this summer at a public relations firm and as a receptionist at an equine vet clinic. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: All Work, No Play: Why Everyone Needs to Find A Balance

    By Paola Rodriguez

    All work, no play makes Jack a dull boy. As much as this may seem to be true, working is quite important at the end of the day. It is a means to receiving income in order to live even if it creates a struggle to keep a balance of a social life, good grades, internships and living as comfortably as possible. For many students across the country, this is a reality. Devon Bennett, a junior at the University of Missouri- Columbia, admitted his own struggles as a working student. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How to Afford a Trip to the Movies

    By Abby Monteil

    College is often characterized as a place to gain exposure to new experiences and culture, as well as to meet new people. One reputable way to do this is to catch a new movie with friends. However, a trip to the theater is getting increasingly difficult to afford for college students who are dealing with the costs of attending school. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Money Saving Tips for Your Time Abroad

    By Eli Lederman

    So you’re studying abroad? Awesome. You’ve been accepted into your program. You’ve completed all the painstaking paperwork and endured the process of getting a visa or any other documentation process. You even performed all the financial gymnastics necessary and now, finally, you’ve arrived in Europe or South America or another far away land you’ve chosen to expand your horizons and experience the world. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Earning and Saving Money with Out Leaving Your Dorm Room

    By Meredith Westrich

    Juggling a job while being a full-time student can extremely stressful—there seems to never be enough time or money.  One solution is to make money on your own time schedule, without even ever having to leave your room. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Working full-time and being a student full-time is a challenge

    By Andrea Jennemann

    When the end of my first year of college ended, and everyone was moving out of the dorms and beginning to sign leases for apartments, my father told me I would be solely responsible for my living costs from that point on. Because of a change in roommates, I was late in signing my lease. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Hard financial choices lead to grit and determination in college

    By Crystal Cox

    In my first two years at college, I’ve had to make a decision that my high school self could not have imagined: go to class or be able to afford to eat. This is the reality that I, and many students who come from low-income families, face. Having to work 40 hours a week at an entry-level service job is difficult, but having to do so while being a full-time college student is beyond exhausting. Since being introduced to the economic concept of opportunity cost, I’ve thought a lot about how school and work are opposing variables in my life. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Finding a student job with medical limitations

    By Joseph Bartholomew

    Going into college, I had never had a job. In high school, during the summer going into my sophomore year, I was diagnosed with cancer, at the age of 15. This prevented me from living the normal life of a high schooler as I was pulled from my classes and began treatment. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Are Credit Cards Necessary for Students?

    By Tyler Head

    Will that be cash or credit? These days this question almost seems redundant. Our society is continuously advancing its technology and the thought of paying for things with physical dollar bills feels slightly antiquated to many students. According to a 2016 study done by Sallie Mae, a federally-back lending institution, 56 percent of college students have credit cards. However, the responsibility that comes with having credit cards isn’t for everyone and managing that responsibility raises the question among some of whether they should have credit cards or not. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: What You Should Know Before Signing a Rental Lease

    By Caroline Friedman

    A recent ranking conducted by the financial technology company SmartAsset found that seven of the top ten most transient cities in the country are college towns. In a city like Athens, Georgia, home to the University of Georgia and a transitory student population of nearly 38,000, the options for rental housing are seemingly endless. Although the search process is a relatively easy one for students here, it’s what follows that causes much consternation and difficulty. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Student Saves Money by Renting Textbooks

    By Lauren Diaz

    As a finance student at the University of Georgia, Nathan Moon is required to purchase textbooks that retail upwards of $120. Rather than purchasing them, however, Moon rents them through rental sites that help students save as much as 90 percent of the publisher’s price. “If I were to buy all of my books every semester, it would be close to $500,” Moon said. “If I rent them, I can stay within my budget and don’t have to spend a large portion of my money.” Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Overcoming Unexpected Medical Expenses

    By Mauli Desai

    A visit to the doctor’s office is often met with the question: “On a scale of one to 10 rate your pain.” Rajan Bedi’s response of nine out of 10 on the pain scale was the beginning of a yearlong ordeal. In 2018, while on his way to The Reserve apartment complex to watch the Philadelphia Eagles play the New England Patriots in The Super Bowl, Bedi, was hit on the driver side by a speeder who blew past a yield sign at an intersection on the east side of Athens, Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: What to Expect Financially When Studying Abroad

    By Steve Conyers

    Studying abroad offers a unique experience to students who gain new perspectives by visiting other countries. Broadening one’s world view through hands-on teaching in an unfamiliar culture, gaining valuable networking connections and increasing communication skills in an increasingly demanding global job market are just a few of the advantages students obtain when they study abroad. However, only 10 percent of undergraduate students in the U.S. will study abroad before they graduate, according to the Institute of International Education. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Scholarship Strain

    By Eleanor Cash

    With the end of spring semester approaching, college seniors across the country are looking forward to wearing their caps and gowns and receiving their diplomas.  Soon after flipping their tassels, however, many of these new graduates will be forced to confront a growing national problem: repaying their student loan debt. Student loans place only second to mortgage debt in the consumer debt category. In 2018, 69 percent of students took out loans, and graduated with an average debt of $29,800. To paint a broader picture, Americans owe over $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: College Budgeting: Taking it One Step at a Time

    By Ellie Bramel

    Kelsey Snelgrove was in the sixth grade when the Great Recession happened. The crash hit close to home, and she watched her parents lose the business they had worked to build. “My dad literally came to me one day and was like, okay, so we have a bag of money. It says for groceries. That’s it. We have no other money,” Snelgrove recalled. She said the experience gave her a deeper understanding of money as she learned how to stretch her family’s dollar. Now a junior at the University of Georgia, she uses that understanding to budget her paychecks, account for weekly expenses and adopt long-term savings goals. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Students Turn to Mobile Apps for Financial Tools

    By Jessica Wurst

    Mobile finance applications can offer a simple way for students to track personal finances, but they also can make it too easy to put money into the stock market without proper knowledge. App such as Mint and Acorns aid students with financial management by tracking spending and account balances. Similar apps providedby banks such as SunTrust and Wells Fargo are also attractive to students due to their simplicity and brand recognition. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Is the Master’s Degree the New Bachelor’s?

    By Rebecca Wright

    A bachelor’s degree may soon not be enough to win in a competitive job market. With increasing access to college education, students in the United States are looking for ways to differentiate themselves. Some choose to pursue multiple internships or dual majors, but more often students now are taking the GRE exam with hopes of qualifying for graduate school. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: College Students and Health Insurance

    By Jennifer Williams

    As college students graduate and enter the job market, they face a critical question: How will they pay for health insurance? The Affordable Care Act (ACA) plays a significant role in young adults’ coverage decisions, as it allows them to remain on their parents’ insurance until age 26. This is an advantage for many students who are worried about affording health care on their own as they start their careers and begin paying off student loans. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Worth of an Unpaid Internship

    By Sidhartha Wakade

    Employers today expect job-seekers — including soon-to-be or recent college graduates — to have some level of practical experience in their chosen fields. For many college students, this experience comes from part-time jobs, internships or work-study programs. Not all of these options provide pay, however. For Sarah Lanier, a 20-year-old junior public relations major at the University of Georgia, an unpaid internship has been part of her course of study. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Students and Their Loans

    By Jenny Vo

    When Russell Cochran left Faulkner University in Montgomery, Alabama, he also left behind a football scholarship worth about $22,000 a year. Cochran said he no longer wanted to play football and transferred to the University of Georgia to pursue a degree in Housing Management and Policy. “I was a sports management major there and I decided I wanted to do real estate and they didn’t have it, so I transferred,” he said, noting that it costs more to go to UGA. “But I believe it’s worth it.” Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: A Student’s Guide to Financial Understanding

    By Ashley Scott

    When Luke Morgan came to The University of Georgia to start his freshman year of college, he understood only as much about personal finance as he needed to get by. “It either comes from being raised in a family that teaches you, or doing it and learning, and the latter is probably the more effective way of doing anything,” he said. By learning as he went along, Morgan acquired the skills he needed to be near self-sufficient by his graduation in December 2018. He began with help from his parents, but gradually transitioned into paying for his expenses on his own. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Why Students Should Practice Budgeting While in College

    By Charlotte Norsworthy

    Before Alexis Manson decides to buy a concert ticket or go out to dinner with a friend, she pulls out her laptop to check her digital budget. “It’s like a game, she said. “It’s honestly kind of fun.” Manson is a junior international affairs major at the University of Georgia from Smithfield, Virginia, and while she doesn’t need to be financially independent from her parents, she likes to practice ways to curtail wasteful spending. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Students and Credit Scores

    By Spencer McGuire

    Are credit scores important to college students? Short answer: yes. But that’s not the whole story. Behind every credit score is a more detailed set of three credit reports, according to The University of Georgia’s Mary Carlson, a professor in the Financial Planning Master’s program. TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian are the three companies that pull a person’s financial history, and from that information, create a report about what kind of spender a person is along with a repayment history. If someone pays off the credit card debt consistently, or has a lot of unpaid debt, these companies will know about it. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Federal Work-Study Offers Flexible Job Opportunities for Students

    By Kelly Mayes

    Having a part-time job in college can be a balancing act for many students, but some may find the flexibility they need if they qualify for the Federal Work-Study Program. This program, offered by about 3,400 colleges in the U.S., awards grants for undergraduate and graduate students who qualify to gain valuable work experience pertaining to their career. Peyton Etheridge, a first-year intended public relations student at the University of Georgia, has worked in the front office of the Odum School of Ecology this year. The Federal Work-Study program has been a good option for her. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Car Repair Research Can Help Students Avoid Being Overcharged

    By Savannah Martin

    College is the time when many young adults find themselves facing huge financial responsibilities for the first time. But, sometimes it can be routine things such as car repair that cause the most concern. Emilie Gille, a senior at the University of Georgia, said she has been warned about general sexism toward women when it comes to car repairs and she is concerned about being ripped off. “I’m always very wary,” said Gille. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How Students Can Overcome the Intimidation of Tax Filing

    By Grace Langella

    Taxes can be intimidating, especially for students. Nique Roth, a University of Georgia marketing major, said taxes make her nervous because she knows so little. “If there was an outlet to learn about them, I wouldn’t be scared,” said Roth, “but because it’s kind of a free for all, I’m definitely intimidated by the idea of filing them myself.” According to Lance Palmer, a professor of Family Planning and Consumer Economics, many students have a skewed view of taxes because of the media. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Understanding Student Loan Repayment Options

    By Zach Jones

    Student debt in the United States has reached a staggering $1.5 trillion, but many students know very little about their own loans and how they factor into that giant number. When college students defer to their parents on loan decisions, they typically rely on their parents to do the research and pick the type of loan. This decision will ultimately affect the types of repayment options available once the students graduate. “I was kept in the dark really. My parents took care of picking what type of loan I got, and I was never aware that the type of loan could affect my repayment options,” said Michael Ackerman, a student at The University of North Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Cheap Peace of Mind: College Students and the Need for Renters Insurance

    By Collin Huguley

    College students living away from home for the first time often feel the need for more education on how to protect their living spaces and belongings from potential disaster. For these students, renters insurance is a new concept. “At this point in our lives, we haven’t really experienced much in the realm of home owning,” said 22-year-old University of Georgia student Amanda Gruner. “It’s not like a staple that we’re told about; that we need renters insurance. We’re taught that we need bedding, but not that we need insurance.” Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Navigating Life as a Student Entrepreneur

    By Michael Hebert

    Senior marketing major Kaitlin Lutz always wanted to be an entrepreneur. She started a dog walking business when she was younger, making flyers with her face, a picture of a dog and a little dog bone to promote her service around the neighborhood.“I’ve always had some sort of itch for entrepreneurship as long as I can remember,” Lutz said. As a student at the University of Georgia, Lutz sought out the training offered through the UGA Idea Accelerator, an eight-week program where students are trained in how to develop a business. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Lessons Learned About Life, Finances and Family

    By Noelle Schon

    When it comes to my personal experience with money, I am very lucky to have had parents who opened a college fund for me early on.  My parents are both in the business and finance field. My mother was a regional vice president for Bank of America before taking time off to raise me and my siblings. She is very helpful when it comes to explaining the financial world to me, which really piqued my interest in the field as I grew up. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Unexpected Costs of International Travel

    By Nicole Hernandez

    Peru was the trip of a lifetime. One week, five planes, two trains, six boats, two ATVs, and four zip lines all came together to create one amazing experience. Taking off from LAX in May of 2017 was one of the most exciting days of my life, and landing in Cusco at five in the morning the next day was even better. But getting to the point of stepping into a foreign country for the first time was a long, arduous process that revolved around – you guessed it – finances. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Lessons From My Parents: Spending with a Purpose

    By Andres Guerra Luz

    As my family and I packed up the last of the belongings from my childhood home, a flurry of different feelings rushed over me. For as long as I could remember, home was an old-timey, multi-story building in an idyllic neighborhood in Chicago. But as my family adapted to some bigchanges, the house was becoming too large an expense. A part of me felt sad to leave the house behind, another part of me felt relieved that we were down-sizing to a more affordable place and yet another part of me was excited to live somewhere new. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Blue and Red Fibers of Financial Happiness and Despair

    By Mara Friedman

    Money is a funny thing. It is the only thing (other than your parents) that can be your best friend or a great nightmare. The blue and red fibers woven between its cotton may hold both happiness and despair. My life has been that blue fiber. I have been tangled up inside due to the money-making process. My life made a complete 360-degree turn in my teenage years when I found out that my immediate family was rich. It didn’t turn around the way you may think it would have, however. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Knowledge We Needed

    By Taylor Freds

    When I moved to Arizona for college, I quickly realized that high school had left me completely unprepared for the real world. The school’s need to be the best at standardized tests has left students without the actual knowledge they need when they walk out the door. Taxes, financial aid, savings, budgeting, debt (etc.) are all words that I knew the meaning of but had no real grasp on. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: When It Comes to Finances, Listen to Your Mother

    By Emily M. Dean

    I thought I knew everything when I was 19. That’s cliche, but it’s also true. I remember calling my mom with the master plan for my life. I was to move to Ithaca, New York, and take a job teaching dance. At this point in time my mother’s advice sounded a lot like an outdated and broken record to me. I remember telling her that the apartment I’d found would be $700 a month plus utilities. I remember her asking me if it was a nice apartment. I remember saying yes to spite her. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How I Used Airbnb to Continue My Education

    By Madeline Ackley

    In 2017, I found myself in a precarious financial situation, like so many 20-something college students do. I had left home and was living with two roommates in an apartment in downtown Phoenix so I could be close to campus. One consequence of living in a college town, however, is that things are more expensive. A lot more expensive in some cases. Each month the expenses piled higher and higher and I was barely squeezing by with my minuscule paycheck working part time as a doggy daycare attendant. So, I did what any cash-strapped millennial in 2017 would do: I illegally sublet my room to strangers on Airbnb. Read more…


    University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication students and their advisor at the SABEW fall conference in 2018. Photo ©Skyler Reid/skyreid.com

    Fall 2018

    College Connect Fall 2018: It’s Confusing – the Multicultural Issue of Tipping

    By Yutong Yuan

    Tip, or not tip? As a student from a country where giving a gratuity is not part of the social etiquette, I’m always confused by when, where and how much I should tip. When eating out with friends at a restaurant, I can always ask for advice on how much I should leave as a tip. However, things become trickier when I’m alone, facing an iPad with tipping options ranging from 15% to 25% for a coffee or a lunch buffet. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Why Ditching Your Car is the Right Choice, and Easier than You Think

    By Kristoffer Tigue

    Six years ago, my car got towed for being parked four inches — rather than five — from someone’s driveway. In Minneapolis, where I grew up, that can run you a hefty fine of about $150 for the first day. The problem was that, as an undergrad at the time living in a college town, I didn’t check up on my car for a week. My bill? More than $500, and not to mention another towing charge because the engine wouldn’t start. I told them to keep it. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Understanding the Difference in Student Loans

    By Keegan Pope

    For most kids, when you’re 17 or 18 years old, debt is a concept that doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. If you have a car, it’s likely that your parents own it and are least helping to make payments on it. Even if you don’t live at home, you’re almost certainly paying month-to-month rent somewhere. So when the idea of student loans to pay for college comes up, terms like principal and interest or subsidized and unsubsidized loans might as well be a foreign language you never took in high school. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Music May Seem Free, But It Bites our Budgets

    By Xinyu Wei

    The first day I came to MU, I was overwhelmed by flyers of welcome parties from tons of clubs and organizations. “Free drink. Free pizza. Free music.” I got hooked by the last part. For a long time, I took it for granted that I don’t have to pay for music. I remember all those tapes and CDs in my family home. All I had to do was put them in the players.  hen it’s the time of MP3 and MP4, but they quickly got replaced by phones and personal computers. I still had no concept of paying for music, since the Internet gave me everything without asking for a single dime. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Roomies and Even Dining Can have Financial Pitfalls

    By Sydney Olsen

    College is a fun time in everyone’s life. You have true freedom for the first time in your ever. Don’t want to show up for class? That’s up to you. Want to stay up until 2 a.m. every night? Do it. However, with all of this new-found freedom comes a lot of responsibilities. Responsibilities can be fun too as you start to feel like an adult, but sometimes it is difficult to anticipate everything you need to think about when planning for these. I learned this when deciding who to have as my roommate. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Having a Pet in College: Worth the price?

    By Nikki Ogle

    We have all been there. You bombed an exam and feel like the worst college student in history. You spent your morning in a giant lecture hall full of unfamiliar faces, feeling all alone. You wonder if you are really cut out for this thing called college. Imagine, your whole day changes when you walk in the door of your apartment or duplex. A wagging tail and sloppy kisses or face rubs and the sound of purring can turn it all around. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Stretching Your Dollar in America’s Most Expensive Cities: A Guide to Financing Internships

    By Daniel Noonan

    Old academic halls, crammed libraries on finals week, and Frisbee on the quad are staples of American college life and are often revered as essentials to the college experience. Colleges and universities across America are now adding a fourth aspect to that list that seems to make or break a lot of students overall worthwhile of a traditional four-year degree. That is the undergrad internship. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: My Journey into Finding My First Credit Card

    By Caitlin McCarthy

    Books, late night pizza and beer, spring break, and the list goes on. All of these being college student “necessities” for a studious and fun few years. The one setback of these is how expensive it can all be. The possible answer to being able to afford these? A credit card. Unlike most college students, I have not yet gotten my first credit card. It might be out of fear that I will rack up too may expenditures and not be able to pay it all off. However, it’s a rite of passage into the beginning of being more financially mature and building a credit score, so I can make big purchases once I graduate. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: The Mizzou Rideshare Group

    By Maggie Austin

    When I started my college search during junior year of high school, I wanted to pick a university far from home. It was a classic mistake made by a moody, self-centered teenage girl. I actually thought my parents would drive from Chicago every weekend to come see me, so I looked at Syracuse, the University of Minnesota and, of course, the University of Missouri, which was the closest to my home in Chicago. But it still was a seven-hour drive. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: How to Survive a Summer in NYC on an Intern’s Salary

    By Lexi Churchill

    I have always loved New York from afar. For two years in a row I set my sights on working in the Big Apple, applying to as many journalism internships there as possible. When I finally received a call from the financial news network CNBC, I almost couldn’t believe my goals were coming true. If this sounds familiar at all, you’ve probably been dreaming of the big city without thinking through the big costs. This cost of living calculator from Bankrate estimates the cost of living in NYC compared to my college town, Columbia, Missouri, is about 136% higher overall. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Incremental Costs Eat Away at Your Pocketbooks

    By Noah Higgins-Dunn

    A vivid piece of financial advice from Shark Tank’s Kevin O’Leary slips into my mind every time I’m about to enter Starbucks: “Do I pay $2.50 for a coffee? Never, never, never do I do that,” he said in a CNBC interview. “That is such a waste of money for something that costs 20 cents.” During those late nights at the library, cramming for an exam but struggling to stay awake, I’ll frequently sneak off for a tall Pike’s Place pleasure. I justify the $2.50 expenditure because, in my mind, the small cost is worth the reward. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: The Vaping Habit – Does It Cost More or Less than Cigarettes?

    By Brendan Crowley

    Parents, schools and the federal government have been wringing their hands over the nicotine-delivery sensation that’s sweeping the nation: the JUUL. JUUL puffers may look like they’re sucking on a flash drive, but they’re getting a nicotine hit rivaled only by smoking tobacco. Some turn to the JUUL to help kick their smoking habit. That’s especially common here in Missouri, where tobacco is part of the culture and isn’t subject to the steep taxes found in other states. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Students with Debt Struggle with Transition to Grad School

    By Tucker Pennington

    Imagine driving six hours to class and back each week to save $425 on rent. That is exactly what Jori Moore, a 24-year-old master’s student in school counseling at University of Georgia, does to help make grad school affordable. For the Lilburn, Georgia, student, living at home is one of the many financial decisions she has made in pursuit of her graduate degree, and every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday she drives an hour to reach campus. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Financial Challenge: A Mother Helps her Student with Down Syndrome Succeed

    By Tamara Khader

    Kathryn Junod, a mother of a University of Georgia student with Down syndrome, has financial challenges quite different than most parents who send their child to the state’s flagship university. Her primary challenge is the lack of funding for the few college programs available for students with disabilities. Her 23-year-old son, Jordan Huffman, is enrolled in the Destination Dawgs program at the University of Georgia which provides academic, experiential, social and independent living opportunities for students with intellectual or developmental disabilities (I/DD). Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Pay to Play: A College Athlete without Scholarships

    By Joseph Storelli

    For most students at the University of Georgia the phrase “student-athlete” brings to mind players from high profile sports such as football or basketball. They imagine those on scholarships often described as being on a “full ride.” Rarely, if ever, would someone like Emily Barber come to mind. Barber, a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering, is a goalie on the UGA club ice hockey team. She does not receive the benefits that come with being a scholarship athlete. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Coping with Student Loan Debt as Graduation Approaches

    By Tony Walsh

    Noah Collins almost passed on the opportunity to earn a college degree. Collins said he underperformed in high school because he was not aware of the options to make higher education affordable. “I had this pessimistic view that I wouldn’t be able to afford it anyways,” he said. “I just did the bare minimum.” Collins eventually discovered ways to afford an education through financial aid, including student loans. “I found out there was a way to pay for it,” he said. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: The Art of Balancing School and Entrepreneurship

    By Rachel Grace

    For Yasmin Rahimi, working for someone else has never been an option. Rahimi started her first business at 15-years-old—a nonprofit organization called Couture for Charity—and launched her second one just a few weeks ago. However, Rahimi found that her entrepreneurial spirit often clashes with her responsibilities as a student. “My parents always tell me that school comes first, but sometimes it’s hard to put that into practice,” said Rahimi. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Unpaid Internships Pose Financial Questions for Students

    By Peter Prybylski

    Every year students seek internships, work studies or other professional arrangements with a simple goal: to gain valuable work experience in their fields. However, there is often a bigger question than time, place and duties hanging over the job-seekers’ heads: How much money is in it? As U.S. student debt grows past the $1.6 trillion mark, students who are looking for summer work often grapple with the choice between a standard summer job and unpaid work in their field. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018:  I’ve Got a Business Idea: What Now?

    By Maycee Dukes

    Haart Graham, a sophomore English and Film Studies student at the University of Georgia, said she loved writing, clothes and art, and wanted to turn these hobbies into something bigger. Just like that, HaartLine Fashion was born. “It’s like I have a million ideas and I want to do all of them, but I’m only one person and I only have so many hours in a day,” she said. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Paying to be a Student Fan

    By Mary Ray

    Rhett Parr was a notable exception to the student football ticket chaos this year at the University of Georgia. The fourth -year biology major was granted a full season ticket package to the Bulldogs’ seven home games as well as a ticket to all five away games. Because of the team’s popularity following last season’s near-miss in the national championship game, demand for student tickets was high this season. Many students who had applied for football tickets discovered they had only received half-season packages for home games. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Application Fees – The Underestimated Barrier to Graduate School

    By Madison Gable

    Students applying for doctoral programs will find many that offer full funding, which can include tuition, stipends for living expenses and even healthcare coverage. But first students must get accepted, and for some the cost of application fees can be a real barrier. Allie Ibarra is a senior at the University of Georgia majoring in English, religion and philosophy. She is also a hopeful doctoral student who is expecting to take $2,000 out of her savings to cover the costs of applying to programs in Chicano literature. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: University Student Finds Long-Term Solutions in Part-Time Work

    By Lawson Powers

    It’s common for undergraduate students to find part-time jobs to help support the financial burden of school.  It is far more uncommon, however, for students to find work that also provides professional experience in their field of study. Josh Montag, a computer science undergraduate student at the University of Georgia has found just that through his involvement in the Virtual Experiences Lab (VEL). Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Growing a Photo Business as a Student

    By Keller Austin

    Most students at the University of Georgia have a goal to graduate and get a job. But junior Luke D’Agostino is already working as a photographer. The public relations major takes photos for upcoming graduates and local concerts, and recently was asked to take wedding engagement photos. D’Agostino gets most of his business from graduation photos because of his location in a college town, but said he enjoys the challenge of other types of shoots. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: When Mistakes Happen with Financial Aid

    By Julie Fields

    Sidney Mulkey was preparing to enter her junior year at the University of Georgia when she was informed about a problem with her financial aid. She traced the problem to an error in her Federal Application for Free Student Aid, commonly known as FAFSA, and discovered the problem was likely due to an error on a tax return. She tried to contact the IRS, but soon realized the issue would take time to resolve. Meanwhile, she had to come up with $3,000 a week before school started. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Alumni Network Provides Financial Support for Club Rugby

    By Jed May

    Playing rugby at a university that doesn’t offer it as a varsity sport can be an expensive proposition. Teams organized by a school’s recreation department are often called club sports and their players don’t receive scholarships. Instead, they pay dues to join the team, and are also responsible for paying for everything from hotel stays on road trips to their jerseys and game balls. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: “Moral Hazard” Causes Doctors to Over-Provide Health Care

    By Jeanne Davis

    Emma noticed a swollen lymph node on the left side of her neck in the fall of last year. The public health student at a major southern university knew that a swollen lymph node usually appeared when a person had a sore throat or a cold so she thought that she could wait it out. When it hadn’t gone away by January, she visited a nurse practitioner at her school’s health clinic who referred her to an ear, nose and throat doctor. “They thought that it was mono,” said Emma, whose last name was withheld for privacy reasons. “I did a bunch of tests for mono… but I knew that I didn’t have mono.” Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: The Trouble with Graduating from College

    By Henley Tullos

    Students looking forward to graduation from college often face the uncertainty of taking over responsibility for their expenses and student loan debt from their parents. Chris Pope, senior lecturer in finance at the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia, said students can prepare to take over the expenses that were covered by parents during a student’s undergraduate years. “The best thing to do is make a budget when you first get your job,” Pope said. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018:  Paying the Bills with a “Side Hustle”

    By Caitlyn Richtman

    M Anteau has a passion for making art but doesn’t make enough money for it to be a sustainable income. That’s why artists like Anteau develop a “side hustle.” “The side hustle is what pays the bills,” Anteau said. Anteau is a 21-year-old University of Georgia student from Atlanta majoring in interdisciplinary studies with a focus in sequential art and writing. Anteau (who uses they/their/them pronouns) said they have always been passionate about art, but didn’t pursue an art major until failing chemistry early in college. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Smartphone Apps Encourage College Students to Invest

    By Brittney Butler

    It is rare to find students with enough money saved in the case of an emergency, according to a personal advisor at a large regional bank. “You have a friend who always invites you to go get dinner and then complains that they only have $2 the next day,” said Christopher Ray, a SunTrust Bank personal finance advisor. Ray said most students should aim for having anywhere from three to six months of their monthly income put aside in a savings account in case something happens with their living situation, car or health. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: How Students Can Budget for Travel Experiences

    By Ben Richmond

    Traveling can benefit college students by providing life-enriching experiences. However, as one student discovered this summer, funding and budgeting for such an adventure isn’t easy. “I went into the summer knowing that I was going to be spending a lot of that money, but I didn’t expect to spend all of it,” said Emma Mathews, a 20-year-old junior from Atlanta majoring in accounting and theatre at the University of Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Saving to See the World

    By Annie Campbell

    University of Georgia junior Maggie Wigton said a Maymester in Bali was a trip she couldn’t pass up. Double majoring in anthropology and human geography, Wigton was eager to learn more about an entirely different language, population and culture from her own. However, money was a significant hurdle. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Paying for the Dream

    By Andrew Keith

    Ancel Briley maxed out four credit cards, accumulating $12,000 in credit card debt between his sophomore and junior year of college. He was chasing his dreams. What most people would’ve rationalized as poor fiscal responsibility, Briley saw as an opportunity to chase his passion of being an entrepreneur. “Everyone basically told me no, don’t do it. Don’t start your business using credit cards, but for me it was worth the risk. I had to make minimum payments on the cards for a long time. It took me probably two years to pay them off,” he said. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Education: Getting from Ambition to Accomplishments

    By Amethyst Clifton

    Grace Beasley was preparing for college expenses well before her first semester began. “I am always looking towards the future,” said Beasley, a student at the University of Georgia majoring in biological sciences. Beasley maintained a 4.0 grade point average while completing high school, but she said she worked during the summer to raise money for the extra things she knew she would need in college. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: I Hope You Can Learn from My Story

    By Alexandria Montoya

    I have always wanted to attend the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Arizona State University. When I was as senior in high school and first deciding where to go to college I never thought it would be an option because of the cost of tuition at ASU. I’m from New Mexico and out of state tuition was way too much for my middle-class family to afford. It wasn’t until the day that I got a letter in the mail stating that they were going to give me a $50,000 scholarship that I thought it was a possibility for me. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: I Spent All My Bitcoin On Cookies

    By Yael Grauer

    About three years ago, I caught wind of an unconventional bake sale. The Cybertwee bake sale originated as a Kickstarter campaign. For 24 hours, a site on the dark web (also known as the deep web) allowed users to buy rosewater cardamom cookies using cryptocurrency. The project’s goal was two-fold. First, it would show that something cute and innocent can take place on the deep web, even though it’s notorious for nefarious uses. Second, it would teach people how to use the Tor browser and cryptocurrency. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Building a Sense of Security

    By Tavia Matteson

    Being a college student has presented me with many vigorous challenges. I have had to find a balance between juggling my education and working a part time job. However, the biggest lesson I have had to learn was how to manage my money. During my junior year of college, I made the decision to get my own apartment and this financially was a shock. To go from paying very minimal bills living in my parents’ home to paying over a thousand dollars a month just to live was a huge game changer in my daily life. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Always Keep Money Set Aside for Emergencies

    By Rebecca Spiess

    My very first experiences managing my own money as a teenager were surprisingly successful. I started working at 15, after my parents urged me to start a savings account. The job was in the kitchen of a nursing home where I’d been volunteering for years. I was serving seniors with severe dementia. It was a hard job, I didn’t get paid much and the hours were grueling because we were chronically understaffed. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Money is a Big Factor in Creating Who You Are

    By Mythili Gubbi

    It is said that money doesn’t define who you are, but I believe that it does. I feel that everything I am today is a culmination of my experiences and environment – and a lot of that is based on my family’s financial status. Whether it’s the neighborhood you grew up in, the school you went to, the places you’ve visited, the people you have met or the things you have seen, every aspect of your life has a role to play, and money is a big factor in creating who you are. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: The Value in Budgeting

    By Maddie Johnson

    In my just over two years I have spent to college, I have learned the only surefire way to financially successful is to create a budget. I spent two years with sporadic income from working shifts at my serving jobs, as well receiving monthly “grocery allowance” I receive from my parents.  At this time I thought that I was being good with money by never buying things like clothes, makeup, or other things I didn’t necessarily need to survive. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: My Relationship with Money

    By Lauren Bukoskey

    My relationship with money did not fully take off until my college education did. I always was aware of what money was, but it wasn’t until I lived on my own and now had to really fully budget on my own as well. It was the first time I was financially independent and I had no idea where to start or really what that meant. With everything going on freshman year like new clubs, new friends, new insane text book prices-there are a lot of cost that accumulate quickly. Not to mention student loan debt. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Why College Students Shouldn’t Be Afraid of Credit Cards

    By Bryan Pietsch

    In the age of Venmo and splitting bills down to the penny, why shouldn’t college students be taking advantage of the perks of having a credit card? Students are penny-pinchers – they’ll split a $10 Uber ride between five people and Venmo each other the difference. They’re suckers for deals, sales and free shirts. So why not get free money? Credit cards (and credit card debt) seem like a popular choice in America, but a study found that only 6 percent of total student spending was on their own credit cards. Read more…

    College Connect10n Fall 2018: Saving is Hard

    By Barbara Smith

    One thing I have learned about money is that saving is hard. Extremely hard. Growing up, my parents were AMAZING with money. They both paid off their student debts in their 20’s, they paid off their credit card bills in full each month, and had been saving for my college fund since the day I was born. I watched them closely and figured when it was time to start being serious about money I would be good to go. And that wasn’t the case. At all. Can you believe? Read more…

    College Connect10n Fall 2018: Splitting the Check

    By Amy Xiaoshi DePaola

    After I landed my first job in undergrad, my mom’s spending money stopped, but it was a small price to pay for living at home for free. The only time when I missed the steady flow of cash was when I went out with friends. Like a lot of millennials, we love to eat out. We dedicate hours, and sometimes weeks, to online research, calculating coupons and local deals. Then, a long stretch of carpooling to the destination and taking painstakingly-aesthetic photos before digging in. As much as I love to cook, there’s nothing like sitting down and not having to worry about doing the dishes. However, there is another worry: the bill. Read more…

    College Connect1on Fall 2018: I Thought I Knew How to Handle My Money

    By Adrian Marsh

    When I moved out of the dorms at Arizona State University at the beginning of summer 2018 and into a house with a couple of roommates, I was officially on my own, financially. That was the first time I had been responsible for not only covering housing but now utilities, Internet, grocery among other expenses. My parents have always supported me and will always support me, as long as they are around, but it was time for me to be pushed even further out of the nest. And I wanted to take that next step. Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Wallet-less

    By Abdel Jimenez

    In the summer of 2018, I traveled to Santa Monica with a couple of my friends for our annual vacation trip. We spent the Fourth of July weekend near the beach, tucking our toes in the sand with no worries. The second day in California we planned an all day trip at the beach. I remember leaving rushing out of our Airbnb home trying to pack all my necessities in a fanny pack (yes, they still make those). Read more…

    College Connect Fall 2018: Balancing Your Needs for Student Housing

    By Emma Veidt

    Imagine this scenario: you can live near campus, you can have plenty of living space and you can have cheap rent. Now pick two. As I began hunting for my very first apartment last spring, I had little idea of what was considered expensive or affordable. My parents taught me how to save money because I grew up on a budget, but I was privileged in the sense that they never revealed to me the severity of our struggle. Read more…


    Student at laptop | SABEWSpring 2018

    College Connect: Clashing Cultures When You Go to College

    By Runjie Wang

     “That makes sense to me. That Porsche belongs to a Chinese!” Americans have stereotypes that every Chinese student here is extravagant and squanders away his or her parents’ money. So do many people in China. Even worse, some internet trolls in my country always satirize that we, students studying abroad, are too rich to know where to spend. However, not everyone from China has fancy cars here. Read more…

    College Connect: The Rise of Venmo and Electronic Payment Methods

    By Logan Krenik

    “Hey bro, do you want to go get some ice cream?” “Sorry man — I’m out of cash.” “Dude it’s all good! I’ll cover you and you can just Venmo me later.” “That sounds good! Thanks man!” Not once would anyone a decade ago think that something like this was possible. The concept of paying someone by using a phone app connected to your credit card account would be considered absolutely insane. Read more…


    College Connect: Moving out of the dorms and into an apartment

    By Troy D’Souza

    I personally loved living in the dorms my freshman year of college. I had a good roommate, got along with people on my floor, had a meal plan for the campus dining halls and was only a short walk to most of my classes. But I knew I wanted to move off campus and live in an apartment for the first time. For me one of the most important things was finding good roommates, ones with similar values and personalities. So three guys from my church agreed to live with me and we still do! Read more…

    College Connect: Managing credit for the first time

    By Troy D’Souza

    In high school I was super into business. I took a lot of business classes, was in DECA, a competitive business club and I even almost ended up majoring in business in college. That said, I felt like I always had a pretty good grasp on things. One thing I always wanted was a credit card to start building good credit but my parents were not having it. Finally towards the start of my junior year of college, I finally got a credit card! Read more…

    College Connect: Saving for retirement, starting NOW

    By Molly Stawinoga

    I’m 19 years old, which means I’m about 42.7 years away from retirement (assuming I retire at the U.S. average retirement age of 61.7, according to the United States Office of Personnel Management). Now, in my day-to-day life I cannot even choose what my next-day outfit will be. So why in the world would I start planning for retirement now, when I’m just trying to live a fun college life? Read more…

    College Connect: Treating Yourself on a Bare-Bones College Budget

    By Jonah Emil

    When I came to college, I was so excited to explore everything my campus had to offer. I went downtown to discover the new shops, restaurants, and attractions that added a whole new level of fun to my college experience. However, there is one thing in common with these activities that incoming college kids don’t realize until it’s too late. Money. I was amazed when I glanced at my bank account after first semester. Activities as simple as eating, quickly (and I mean quickly!) diminish your bank account. Read more…

    College Connect: Realizing Your Right to a Raise

    By Adrianna Talavera

    When I was in high school, I worked as a hostess at the same Mexican restaurant for three years. I knew the ins and outs of the restaurant and I could do the job with my eyes closed. With all the experience I acquired there, I was one of few hosts that was capable of keeping the wait short and the hungry customers happy, even during the busiest of Saturday night rushes. However, at the end of my second year, I was still making the same amount of money per hour as the little 16-year-olds who were just starting out: $7.25. Read more…

    College Connect: Finances of a First-Generation College Student

    By Kayley Allen

    Being a first-generation college student is a blessing and a curse. The feeling of being the first person in my family to go to college was, hands down, one of the best accomplishments of my life. Nonetheless, with this feeling of excitement came a dark, looming cloud of uncertainty to what lies ahead. My parents are knowledgeable in many ways, but when it came to questions about college, especially questions about student loans and the FAFSA, they don’t have the answers. Read more…

    College Connect: College and Drinking Your Dollars Away

    By: Kristina Esdale

    When you ask a college student why they are “so poor,” the almost knee-jerk response is to say “food.” But according to Banyan.com, college students spend an average of $900 per year on alcohol; that’s practically double of the average cost of textbooks, around $450. Going away to college comes with a lot of pressures educationally, mentally and especially socially. Drinking is pretty much college culture; you’re always surrounded by people talking about getting drunk, or just drunk people in general. Read more…

    College Connect: First savings account. First laptop. First big money lesson.

    By Alyson Garcia

    Two weeks after I turned 17, I was looking for a job. I realized I was going to need a computer in college and that I only had a year to raise $1,500 which seemed like a lot at the time. All my friends had jobs and paid at least one bill whether it was gas, insurance, or phone. All of them paid something and I paid nothing. After searching for two weeks,I got a call back from Kohl’s department store. Once I started working I wanted to spend my money on everything except bills. Read more…

    College Connect: Budgeting and Spending Money in the Age of Venmo

    By Betsy Smith

    “I forgot my wallet. Can you order my coffee, and I’ll pay you back?” It’s a simple question coming from a trusted friend. You used to say yes and they would pay you back in cash the next time they saw you/had their wallet. Now, everything is different. “Yeah, just venmo me.” Now, they can pull out their phone and pay you the exact amount. I get a notification that says, “Thx for the Dunkin–$2.59.”  Read more…

    College Connect: The importance of emergency savings

    By Marilyn Primovic

    Mice destroyed everything in my storage unit last summer. Instead of moving my belongings to my new apartment, I moved them to a dumpster. I also moved something else: money from my emergency savings account into my checking account to purchase necessary replacements. Ann Woodyard, assistant professor of financial planning at the University of Georgia, encouraged college students to follow my example and build an emergency savings account for scenarios like mine. Read more…

    College Connect: To rent or to buy: that is the millennial question

    By Kristen Rary

    Caroline Wrenn is living her dream. The recent graduate’s husband was drafted by a Major League Baseball team and will finish school in the off season. All of the couple’s plans are falling into place. But they have one big issue: where to live. “My husband is a professional baseball player so we will be moving a lot throughout the year. The players can be traded, promoted, or released, at any time, meaning we could always be moved to another city,” she said. “We didn’t want the financial obligation of a mortgage when we wouldn’t be able to live in the house.” Read more…

    College Connect: New tax laws, but no significant changes for students

    By Maggie Scruggs

    President Donald Trump rolled out a new tax plan early this year making cuts for corporations and some adjustments for individuals. Changes in tax laws can translate into gains or losses due to one’s circumstances, but for students not a lot changed, according to Lance Palmer, professor of financial planning and housing and consumer science at the University of Georgia. When the government has wanted to stimulate the economy historically, individual taxes were cut more than business taxes. Read more…

    College Connect: college students and credit scores

    By Hallie Smith

    Having a good credit score is critical to owning a home, signing a lease and other financial responsibilities of adulthood. However, many college students do not understand how to build credit in a healthy way. Brenda Cude, a professor of financial planning, housing and consumer economics at the University of Georgia, said college students “are way too concerned and too conservative about taking risks.” She said this is especially true when it comes to credit cards. Read more…

    College Connect: Overcoming bad spending habits

    By Henley Tullos

    College is the first time most students have the chance to live away from their parents, which comes with the responsibility of paying bills, buying groceries and budgeting. “I try my best to budget for groceries and utilities.  I don’t make impulsive purchases because my priority is purchasing my needs rather than my wants,” said Abby Feltner, a student at the University of Georgia. Feltner said her parents send a monthly allowance to cover rent, groceries and utilities.  After paying the bills, her budget has little to spare. Read more…

    College Connect: College students and their taxes

    By Catherine Morrow

    A University of Georgia professor said college students can learn important lessons about their financial situation from filing their own taxes. Lance Palmer, a professor in the department of Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics, said learning those skills as students will make it much easier to understand in the future. “I think it’s a great idea for students to file their own taxes as soon as they can because chances are, whatever state or financial affair they are in today, it’s only going to get more complicated,” said Palmer. Read more…

    College Connect: Planning for that future house

    By Rebecca Nauth

    College students are always trying to find ways to save money. If given an option between buying a new $200 textbook or buying that same book used, water-stained, and a little torn for $50 from Amazon, it’s safe to assume that most college students would gravitate towards the second option. But when it comes to looking for a place to live, college students likely have many questions about how much money is appropriate to save and spend. Read more…

    College Connect: The pros and cons of living off campus

    By Charlotte Norsworthy

    Many college students grapple with the decision to live on or off campus. While there are many factors to consider, for most students, the decision boils down to affordability. At the University of Georgia, most students are required to find a spot on campus to live during their first year, which can vary from single-person dorm rooms, six-person dorm rooms and even two-person apartments. Beyond the first year, however, students are free to decide where they want to live. Read more…

    College Connect: Read the fine print: why students should understand their leases

    By Charlotte Norsworthy

    For most students, college is their first attempts at adulthood. Students must learn how to manage personal finance, maintain class-work-life balance and develop the perfect elevator pitch to answer the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Thus, it is easy to see how signing a rental lease, a legally-binding 12-month contract, can add to the stack of intimidating tasks students come in contact with during their time in college. Read more…

    College Connect: Developing a personal budget

    By Michaela Patafio

    Developing a personal budget serves as a useful way to manage money, allowing for more responsible spending and investing strategies while securing financial freedom for the future. A personal budget opens the door for more financial opportunities. It helps consumers prioritize their spending so that they can ensure funding for the things that are most important. Budgeting also provides the opportunity to reach financial goals, reduce or avoid debt, or meet a specific savings plan. Read more…

    College Connect: Long-term goal setting key to student financial success

    By Emma Korstanje

    “I work a part time job, I make $500 a month and I’m having trouble budgeting,” is a string of phrases commonly heard by Matt Goren, who teaches personal finance at the University of Georgia. For many college students, taming their finances in such a situation may seem of utmost importance. However, Goren said focusing on that immediate situation shouldn’t be a student’s biggest concern. Read more…

    College Connect: Students and Financial Stress

    By Alec Larson

    As the end of the Spring semester nears, many graduating college seniors grow increasingly worried about their finances. “I’m stressed because even though I’ve been saving money my entire life, I’ve spent a lot of it while in college just because it’s hard to work a lot,” said Stephanie Motter, who is graduating from the University of Georgia in May. “You can’t have a full time job because you’re taking classes, and doing internships, and extracurricular stuff.” Read more…

    College Connect: Finding Affordable Health Insurance

    By Alex Marchante

    Nearly three in four college students and recent graduates have challenges finding affordable health insurance, according to a poll published by Agile Health Insurance in 2017. Given that student loan debt in the United States has topped $1.4 trillion and average student debt in 2017 passed $37,000, according to debt.org, health insurance may be one of the last things on college students’ minds when it comes to their budgets. Read more…

    College Connect: Credit cards explained from a student’s perspective

    By Danny McArthur

    When University of Georgia student Kalah Mingo applied for her first credit card in 2016, she thought it was a straightforward offer. Mingo, a fourth-year journalism major from LaGrange, Georgia, was enticed by the student offer from Bank of America: zero interest for the first year. “I felt like it was a perfect time to start working on my credit score, so I said ‘yes’ and applied for it, and they approved me for it,” Mingo said. Read more…

    College Connect: Factors to consider when renting

    By Emmy Medders

    Students living in Athens are only here for a short time. As a result, most of them participant in the local real estate market as renters instead of buyers. For the past five years, apartment complexes have popped up throughout the community, especially downtown. With so many options for students, what is the most important element to look for in a home away from home? “That’s easy. Location, location, location,” said Kathryn Kostovetsky, a 21-year-old fourth-year journalism major at the University of Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect: Income Levels Directly Impact the Health of Americans

    By Alyssa Alves

    Americans with higher incomes are healthier because of their ability to afford better health insurance plans, medications and diagnostic tests. “There are a lot of problems in the American healthcare system. Compared to other countries, we are purchasing the same amount and quality of healthcare but paying much more,” said Patryk Babiarz, a professor in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect: Renters insurance may not cover theft

    By Ashlyn Davis

    Hayley Ahuja recently called her insurance company to learn if her renter’s policy would replace stolen property. In recent weeks, Ahuja, a 21-year-old fashion merchandising major at the University of Georgia, noticed some of her items in the common area of her apartment were missing. They turned up again after three or four days, so she feared a roommate was taking these things and worried that something of more value would be taken and not returned. Read more…

    College Connect: Digital waves in personal finance

    By Sam Durham

    Financial apps have begun to cement their place in the modern consumer market. Out of the $80 trillion in the world economy today, only $5 trillion is made of up physical currency, according to Business Insider. As global finances become more ingrained in technology, so do our personal finances. Read more…

    College Connect: College Students and Credit Cards

    By Charlie Ferrelle

    Few college students use credit cards to pay for their expenses, but according to the experts they should. College students in 2015 used debit or check cards for 42 percent of their purchases, cash for 40 percent, and credit cards for only 6 percent, according to Credit.com. These statistics, which were gathered in spring 2015 by Student Monitor Financial Services, have increasingly become the norm, and Brenda Cude, an expert in credit cards, explained a few reasons why. Read more…

    College Connect: Student loans increasing; assistance available

    By Amber Haywood

    The numbers are in. The outstanding student loan debt in the U.S. is $1.4 trillion held by about 44 million individuals, according to Katie Lobosco of CNNMoney. The proportion of people going to college is increasing, but the cost of educating them is increasing at a faster rate than inflation. Read more…

    College Connect: Check Your Balance, Kids

    By MacKinley Lutes-Adlhoch

    “- $347,” read my checking account balance on the screen of my phone, glaring in the Phoenix sun. I stopped in my tracks walking home from work. “What’s wrong?” my friend asked. “I think something is wrong with my bank account. It’s fine, I’ll figure it out,” I said. When I got back to my dorm room, frazzled and in disbelief, I called my bank to see what the mistake could be. I certainly could not have overdrawn my account by that much. Five minutes on the phone answered my questions: It was not a mistake, I had messed up. Read more…

    College Connect: Blackjack Tables Won’t Save Your Wallet, but Proper Planning Might

    By Andrew Wei

    Recently some friends and I turned 21, and we decided a Las Vegas trip was appropriate. Walking into the idea, I had quite a bit of money, but leaving the Las Vegas Strip I had 68 cents and the lesson of the importance of understanding inflated local pricing. Without quite thinking the whole plan through, we all agreed to go, booked the hotel, and within a few hours were in the car well on our way down. I knew Vegas was a little more expensive but nothing would prepare me for what I would find. Read more…

    College Connect: The Moment I Viewed Orange Juice as a Luxurious Item

    By SuElen Rivera

    I managed to remain debt free until my junior year of college and because I chose to be spontaneous and study abroad I am now planning out how I will pay off my student debt after graduation. No longer unsure of how I feel joining all of the other students and parents paying off university tuition, there’s only a couple things I’d redo along my journey. Read more…

    College Connect: A Tale as Old as Time: Where Does Your Paycheck Go?

    By Veronica Graff

    Laundry detergent: $11.93, fabric softener: $9.94, dryer sheets: $8.94, stain remover: $9.99, total: $40.80. Karen from Target looks up—slightly irritated that it’s 11:34 p.m. and she’s still on the clock—and asks if it’ll be credit or debit — can I pay in smiles I think to myself, maybe that will brighten her day. Read more…

    College Connect: Scholarship Searching is Serious Stuff

    By Kimberly Rapanut

    Throughout my entire life, education was always stressed as a priority. When high school graduation came and flew by within the blink of an eye, I didn’t hesitate or second guess my decision to apply to college. Pursuing higher education and a college degree was something I felt my whole life, especially my academic one, had led up to. For me, it was simply just the next step. Read more…

    College Connect: When Finances are the Dinner Conversation

    By Stephanie Morse

    I grew up in a family full of accountants. My parents both majored in accounting in college and most of my grandparents were also accountants. Therefore, money lessons were never in short supply as I was growing up. Words and phrases like “withholding,” “depreciation” and “F.I.C.A limit” often dominated dinner conversation after my sister and I talked about our school day. Read more…

    College Connect: The First Rime I filed My Taxes

    By Abdel Jimenez

    Taxes are a language only a few speak. Like French, some words have one consonant and with others the ending of a word isn’t pronounced. But when it comes together it sounds beautifully.  In the same way learning how to talk taxes can make you astute by conducting a strategic tax plan. Read more…

    College Connect: Practicing Patience

    By Hailey Mensik

    Since the day I turned 16, I’ve had a job. My first job was at a children’s clothing store and followed by many others at different restaurants. It’s been so interesting to me to see these different kinds of retail and restaurant industries through the lens of an employee, and the varying wages and benefits I’ve been offered. Read more…

    College Connect: That Ancient Relic Called Cash and the Power of Budgeting

    By Derek Hall

    Physically handling cash is slowly becoming a thing of the past. Even if you haven’t bought in to the idea of using cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, chances are your money is managed digitally from beginning to end. I opened my personal checking account online. The income my employer pays me is automatically deposited into that checking account. When I want to spend that income, I use a little plastic card that’s far too easy to slip in and out of my pocket. Read more…

    College Connect: College Connect: Being Money Savvy and Balancing Family Demands as a First-Generation Student

    By Bo Tefu

    The expression “money doesn’t grow on trees” is a cliché. However, it is often overlooked by the people who use the expression the most. My family is the perfect example. Growing up I never had the luxury of saving money to buy myself a cute present. Saving money meant I had to make ends meet on my own by finding a way to be self-sufficient. Read more…

    College Connect: On Finding Fulfillment and a Living Wage

    By Arren Kimbel-Sannit

    I come from a family of hardworking people who have done well in professions that don’t typically take home big paychecks. They are English professors, artists, anthropologists and psychologists. My family runs the gambit of liberal art vocations that have so precipitously fallen out of favor as science, technology, engineering and math have become academic defaults — and for good reason, as they provide job security, room for progression and skills applicable to real-world problems. Read more…

    Finesse Your Way through College Finances

    By Sabine Galvis

    My experience with college finances has been a story of stress and worry. I often find myself wondering how I can stretch out each dollar to cover the various costs of attending school while having time to maintain my grades and extracurricular involvement. Unlike many of my peers, I cannot rely on my parents to take care of my expenses. Read more…


    Fall 2017

    Navigating Housing and Renting Issues as a College Student

    By Morgan Brown

    Amari Tillman is a 19-year-old second-year undergraduate at the University of Georgia. Midway through her sophomore year, the safe path she had travelled by living on campus split in front of her. Should she finally leave the campus and dive into apartment life, or should she continue enjoying the benefits of living and studying in the same place? Read more…

    Financial Planning and Millennials

    By Steffenie Burns

    Millennials have been criticized for being egocentric, easily distracted, unmotivated to work and frivolous with their finances. While some in the older generations may still believe such negative stereotypes about millennials, research has indicated otherwise about their financial habits. Read more…

    College Students Should Start Building Credit Sooner Rather than Later

    By Zachary Hansen

    Going off to college creates a lot of new freedoms for the average student. With this increased independence also come extra responsibilities that weren’t present before. Among these, managing debt can be one of the most challenging. While the 2009 CARD Act banned issuing credit cards to anyone under 21, many students still end up with some form of credit card debt before graduation. According to a 2016 Experian study, about 30 percent of grads-to-be had an average balance of $2,573 in credit card debt. Read more…

    Credit Cards: What Students Should Know

    By Becky Burgess

    Credit cards can be intimidating for students, especially since many of us don’t know how to manage and maintain them. For senior Sociology major Noga Baruch at the University of Georgia, a credit card was the first step for establishing credit before graduating college. But she said spending and paying back the money can prove difficult. Read more…

    Student loans: Burden or Investment in the Future?

    By Conner Burks

    Do you, a relative or close friend have student loan debt? Chances are all three hold some outstanding student debt. Student loans are now the second biggest type of debt in America only behind mortgages, but eclipsing credit cards. According to Forbes, more than 44 million people in the U.S. have outstanding student loans totaling $1.3 trillion. The average student in the class of 2016 had $37,172 in student loan debt. Read more…

    Millennials Cash In On Financial Apps, Highest Saving Generation

    By Heather Bryan

    Anything from shampoo to a treadmill can be purchased at the touch of a button on a smartphone. It only makes sense money can be managed the same way through an increasing array of mobile apps. People, particularly millennials, use apps for budgeting, spending, investing and pretty much everything in between. In fact, millennials are coming out ahead of past generations when it comes to saving and investing. Read more…

    Coping with Student Loans

    By Kaleigh Galvin

    When it comes to the infamous juggling act of college life, Andrew Dugan, 21, has been forced to become a master. On top of a full course load, the fourth-year religion student works 25 hours a week on campus to fight the looming reality of student loans, while also maintaining heavy involvement in his local church. “My biggest sacrifice is personal health,” he said. “There have been multiple weeks this semester alone that I have averaged thirty hours of sleep – maximum.” Read more…

    Four Things to Know Before Signing a Lease

    By Savannah McCoy

    Renting an apartment or house is a milestone in a young adult’s life. It’s typically one of the first steps toward independence. No longer dependent on parents and paying for your own housing is a critical step toward adulthood. Before signing that first lease, however, renters understand their rights and responsibilities. Those obligations go beyond the obvious “you pay me, I’ll provide you housing” relationship between renter and landlord. Read more…

    College Students Need More Financial Education

    By Rakel Johnson

    College is a place where students learn all kinds of new skills. In addition to learning academically, they are also learning a plethora of life lessons. However, a lot of college students feel they are collectively lacking in one important area that applies to the real world: financial education. Many students still feel ill-prepared to make their own major financial decisions. Read more…

    Understanding the Tiny House Trend

    By Rachel Hinkle

    Ashley Jonasson, an entertainment and media studies student at the University of Georgia, has been interested in tiny houses since they became popular through television shows on HGTV and other networks. She is considering building her own tiny house one day and had a few questions about the tiny house movement and where it is projected to be in the future. Read more…

    From Piggy Banks to Building Personal Credit

    By Devon Tucker

    An exciting, but uneasy part of moving into adulthood is the need to become financially independent.  No more allowance or piggy banks. The real world requires one to establish credit, but college students are far more likely to carry only a debit card rather than a credit card, explained Brenda Cude, a consumer economics professor at the University of Georgia. Read more…

    Budget Builders: Advice for Those Entering, Existing in or Exiting College

    By Josie Wall

    The average student graduates with over $30,000 of debt as of As of April 2017, according to USA Today. The prospect of such a bill after graduation can deter many from even beginning the process of higher education, but there are ways to plan ahead and stay out of the hole. Read more…

    Emergency Savings: Because It Could Happen to You

    By Kalah Mingo

    Elizabeth Medlock, a third-year linguistics major at the University of Georgia, walked to her car in her parking deck in Downtown Athens, Ga. She had a yoga class to attend, however, something was wrong. Her car was not in her assigned parking spot. She almost started to panic, but remembered she parked in a “future residents” spot closer to her apartment the night before. Unfortunately, she forgot to move it and her car had been towed. It would cost $150 to get it back. Read more…

    Budgeting Tips for New Graduates

    By Kelly Miller

    Life after graduation for college students can mean many things: a change of pace, a chance to explore and a time to discover. However, with that freedom comes great responsibility. College grads are thrown into the “real world,” where training wheels come off, and bills are sent to them instead of their parents. Read more…

    Young People and Overcoming the Fear of Taxes

    By Maureen Sheeran

    Alexa Gilomen, a senior at the University of Georgia said she doesn’t consider her taxes to be “a huge deal” now, but added, “I feel like in the future, it is going to be scary.”  Matt Goren, who teaches personal finance in UGA’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences, said students should overcome any fears about taxes by simply jumping in. “Give it a shot,” he said. “I think people think taxes are really confusing, and they’re really not that bad.” Read more…

    Students and the Search for Housing

    By Angelina Lewis

    Caroline McHam, now a fourth-year consumer economics student, first came to the University of Georgia without knowing anyone, and the quest for housing was a daunting search. A friend of a friend led her to her roommate, Maddie Baker, who has since become a best friend. McHam said Baker had many qualities she looked for in a roommate, and since they were both in the honors program, it seemed to be a perfect match. After their first year living in the Myers honors program dorm on-campus, the two decided to move to an off-campus apartment. Read more…

    Six Steps to Develop Good Money Habits

    By Emily Haney

    When it comes to personal finances, students typically fall in to one of two categories: seasoned or beginner.  J.T. Lynch, a sophomore at the University of Georgia, falls in to the latter category. Lynch said his parents covered only the basics of dealing with money while he was growing up. “It was just pay off your debt and use credit cards for emergencies,” said Lynch. “I really don’t know how to do those things, but I know I should. I don’t know how to save.” Read more…

    Millennials and Urban Living

    By Katherine Sauceda

    Recent studies by the U.S. Census Bureau show more millennials are choosing to live in major cities after graduating college rather than suburban areas. These educated millennials’ population in cities has grown by up to 78 percent within the past few years, according to a Forbes report. Read more…

    The Psychology of Money

    By Kristin M. Bradshaw

    Following the turn of their first tassels, graduated high school seniors enter the collegiate world wide-eyed and inspired by their new-found independence. While some have the soft cushion of their parents’ savings accounts, others with fewer resources find the move stressful. Read more…

    Climb Your Way Out of Credit Card Debt

    By Mary Grace Heath

    Credit cards can be a great tool to have in college. They can help you develop good spending habits, earn rewards and build your own credit history, which will be important if you want to buy a house one day. But credit cards can also become a dangerous burden if they are used incorrectly, leaving students in major debt. Sometimes students don’t recognize the consequences debt can have until they are too far in. Read more…

    College Connect: Earning Money from a Job that Pays Other Dividends

    By Ron Davis

    I’ve put in countless hours at the journalism school over the past few years. I am now in my final semester of college, still putting in those same hours, but now getting paid for it. Following a strong semester, I impressed my professor enough that he offered me a position to be his lone undergraduate teaching assistant. Read more…

    College Connect: Making Sure You Earn Your Own Good Credit

    By Ron Davis

    Before my sophomore year of college, my dad gave a credit card that was to be used strictly for emergencies. The problem was, the card had my name on it, but wasn’t linked to my social security account, but to his, rather. It did nothing for my credit score. Read more…

    College Connect: Treat Your Self!  Retail Therapy to Match a College Kid’s Bank Account

    By Natalia Amandari

    We’ve all had that moment. You see something nice in the store. Or maybe it’s a pricier drink at the coffee shop. You think to yourself:  No, I shouldn’t. I’d be better off saving that money. But then another thought creeps into your head…I just did well on my last exam, so it’s time to…Treat yourself! Read more…

    College Connect: Eating Healthy on a College Student’s Budget

    By Natalia Almandari

    For most college students, living on your own for the first time also means cooking and grocery shopping on your own. Between classes, work and friends, it can be easy to resort to eating out every day or whipping up a quick bowl of ramen noodles. Read more…

    College Connect: Tackle the High Cost of College with Parents as Partners

    By John Messer

    Finances in college have been a rollercoaster so far.  Actually, it’s more like juggling dynamite which may or may not be lit while riding a rollercoaster and Iron Maiden is blasting at top volume.  Between housing, food expenses, tuition, considerations for studying abroad, etc, and etc, the only positive emotion I feel is abject amazement that it’s working out as well as it has been so far. Read more…

    College Connect: Decisions, decisions, decisions: How to pick among multiple job offers

    By Carolyn Heger

    The recruiting season for many majors is in full swing this month, with company recruiters visiting college campuses to encourage seniors to apply for their jobs. There is a significant amount of stress involved in networking with representatives from different firms, submitting job applications and interviewing for various positions. Read more…

    College Connect: Saving for Retirement Early: Why It Matters and How to Do It

    By Carolyn Heger

    When I was in high school, my grandfather frequently stressed to me that I should begin saving for my retirement early. Back then, putting money aside for me to spend when I would be in my 60s and beyond was not at the forefront of my mind. I was focused on applying to colleges at that time, not on whether I would have enough money to live comfortably once I would stop working. Read more…

    Planning and Restraint Help Me Make It On My Own

    By Michael Boyer

    I have been managing my own finances since I was about 15. This was never a huge issue until I came to college. In high school, I could count on one hand the number of times my parents gave me money for something. I didn’t ask, and they didn’t have anything to give me. I knew they had their own money problems. Fortunately, I earned enough from various jobs – from lifeguarding to fixing iPhone screens – to pay my expenses. Read more…

    Saving Even While a Student

    By Veronica Graff

    For most, college is about embracing bankruptcy and finding peace within the fact that you’re simply broke—that was quite the wake-up call. Spending money is like gaining weight, it’s definitely noticeable, and the proof is in your bank account, but for some reason you don’t make the connection that those smoothies or juice cleanses and even those shoes that you had to have, eventually add up to a hefty credit card payment. Read more…

    From Student to Adult (Gulp!)

    By Sydney Maki

    College is hard on your bank account. The fiscal responsibilities you’ll have after graduation hit even harder. This summer was my last as a student, and as financial aid dispersal season loomed close, I wondered what my life could look like in another 12 months. No more would I be able to craft a formula of savings and paychecks minus rent, utilities, textbooks and groceries to calculate how much my student loans needed to be. Read more…

    Savvy Parents Lead by Example

    By Mitchell Atencio

    When I was 10-years-old my family and I moved into a new house. We moved from a medium-sized suburban house in Chandler, Arizona to a custom home in south Gilbert. First off, I recognize the privilege in this, I wouldn’t feel right writing this if I didn’t acknowledge that. But, that’s not the point of this. The point is finances and saving and the lessons learned. Read more…

    New City and New Budget

    By Kara Carlson

    Over the summer I had the opportunity to intern in Seattle, and explore a new city I had no familiarity with. Living in a new, big, and expensive city all summer completely on my own made me really see money and budgeting in a new way. Being in a new city, I naturally wanted to take in as much of the sites, tourist attractions, local food and of course Seattle coffee as possible. The catch of course was how to manage this while balancing most of my costs on an intern’s salary. Read more…

    Early Credit Training Pays Off

    By Joe Gilmore

    I learned at a very young age how important credit is. My parents opened up a bank account for me when I was still in elementary school or junior high. I got my first credit card in high school. Since then, I have been using it to build up my credit score so that when I need to take a loan the interest rate will be acceptable. Read more…

    Tackling Student Loans and Credit

    By Jimmie Jackson

    For a first-time college student, it can be hard to figure everything out financially. You have to fill out the FAFSA in order to be offered scholarship, loan, or grant options. I filled out the FAFSA for my first year of undergrad at the University of Illinois. This was my first time having to know all about interest rates and such. At the time I qualified for subsidized loans that did not collect interest because the government would cover the interest. Read more…

    Bargaining in Thailand

    By Gabriel Sandler

    “Two paintings for 1200 baht.” In a small art booth in Chiang Mai, Thailand, as it rained outside and my friends wandered away down the market street, I decided to stay and haggle. This is how I started. I wanted two paintings: one blue and black, an ethereal river town at night, the other black and orange and yellow, silhouetting a fisherman in a small boat, floating in front of a tree line. It was July 2012, I was 18 on a cultural immersion/community service trip. I wanted souvenirs. Read more…

    Saving in School, Saving on Your Own

    By Ethan Millman

    Over the past few years as a college student, like almost any other student, I’ve had to become more frugal. As a first semester freshman, I didn’t hesitate to go to every dinner, movie or other social event to attempt to solidify the friendships I’d always heard would be the most important of my life. And for the first few months of college, I lived like this with no reservation. But given how unsustainable a lifestyle this was, it’s no shock that changes came relatively quickly. Read more…

    The Little Things Add Up

    By Courtney Beesch

    My first set of consistent paychecks began when I was 15-years-old, working as a hostess for a local food joint. After finishing my school day, I’d wipe down menus, seat families, and make sure there were enough crayons for children accompanying their parents. I didn’t need the extra cash, but I felt a sense of pride in knowing that the money I did spend came from my own pocket. Read more…

    Still a Lot to Learn About Money

    By Arren Kimbel-Sannit

    I thought long about how I could best illustrate the impact of money or finances in my life. I thought I might write about financial hardship, about paychecks getting stuck in the mail, or stipends getting delayed, and having to eat bread and peanut butter for a week. Read more…

    Money’s Pros and Cons

    By Andrew Wei

    This summer I got a speeding ticket. I wasn’t going as fast as they said I was but I guess everyone says that. Without a doubt, it was a new experience. I’ve been pulled over before, but I don’t think anybody gets used to seeing the red and blue lights flicker on behind them. Read more…

    Saving is NOT Over-Rated

    By Andres Guerra Luz

    Some people have to live paycheck-to-paycheck, but for me, I did it because I was dumb. It was my freshman year of college and I was a student worker at Arizona State University, where I study journalism. At my job, pay was good. It came every two weeks, so I had to make sure not to blow my whole paycheck in one week. Read more…

    Starting a Mortgage While in College

    By Erdenetungalag Erdenekhuyag

    I am a student at University of Missouri who already have a mortgage. A home is typically the largest purchase for almost every student. The average home sale price in the U.S. is more than $300,000, according to the recent research conducted by St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank. That’s a lot of money for anyone, but especially for someone who may be paying for college too. Read more…

    How to Avoid From the Exchange Rate Stress

    By Erdenetungalag Erdenekhuyag

    This is my second year at University of Missouri (MU) and I am from Mongolia where one US dollar equals to 2500 tugrug, the Mongolian national currency. Since I came to the US, just in a year, the Mongolian Tugrug depreciated in value by 17 percent relative to the US dollar. This means all my costs here increased while my parent’s income remains unchanged in Mongolian currency. Read more…

    Saving Money On Things of Short-Term Value

    By Abby Ivory-Ganja

    College students buy a lot of stuff – and often they don’t use it very long.   You might need something for the dorm, but different for an apartment. Tastes (and fads) change. We’ve all bought something and then kind of regretted it. Whether it’s a book or piece of clothing, you aren’t getting full value from the item anymore. Read more…

    Students Can Save Money while Eating Out

    By Abby Ivory-Ganja

    As a college student, it’stempting to eat out. In fact, some near-campus restaurants take our student meal charge, so it’s even encouraged. If you aren’t careful, you’ll end up spending more than you realize on food. Lunch can cost $10, and diners about $20. That can really add up. Read more…

    Troubled In Managing Your Financial Accounts? These Mobile Apps May Help.

    By Huiqi Xu

    An international student may have many accounts. I’ve found it difficult to manage my accounts as well as credit cards. Using an app on your smartphone or tablet is one way to put everything in one place. Read more…

    How to Increase Credit Scores as an International student

    By Huiqi Xu

    Most international students have this problem – how to build credit in the United States when they are starting from zero? It was once a problem to me when I first came to the U.S. But luckily, I found an efficient way to increase credit scores within one year. Read more…

    Maintaining a Healthy Credit Score in College

    Learning About the “B” Word – Budgeting!

    By Emma Diltz

    Credit cards are a necessary evil, and it is better to start young to boost credit. It’s difficult to purchase a house or a car without showing fiscal responsibility. But, many young people, and even some matured adults get some level of anxiety when thinking about spending money they might not have. Read more…

    Be Prepared When You Consider Post-College Move to NYC       

    By Kouichi Shirayangi

    Many college students aim to work in New York City after graduation. The searching can be daunting – weighing neighbors, commute time, cost and safety. You may have heard that New York is a very expensive city. That’s because it is. Read more…

    For Many College Students, School Combines with Parenthood

    By Kouichi Shirayangi

    Nothing can be more satisfying (and thrilling!) than introducing a new life into the world. Yet being a first-time parent can be daunting, especially when considering the cost of raising a new infant. Add to that the stress finding out a baby is on the way just after getting handed by Masters in Journalism diploma. Read more…

    College Students and the Equifax Breach

    By Lauren Steffens

    You’re a grad student. You’ve had a credit card for a couple of years, and you’ve been responsible. In fact, thanks to the Credit Card Act of 2009, it;s rare that you could get a credit card under your own name until you were 21 and had an income. That’s because credit card companies were now forbidden to basically hand out credit cards to college freshmen. Read more…

    Applying for Graduate School – A Cost Analysis

    By Lauren Steffens

    I’ve been taking part-time graduate classes, but am seeking to enter a program full-time. I’m also working part-time, so the cost of applications is weighing on me. I am applying to MFA programs – master’s in fine arts. Because there are only a few doctoral programs in art, an MFA is considered a terminal degree. Read more…

    Football May be a College Classic, but it’s Pricey!

    By Alex Schiffer

    For a lot of college students, Saturdays in the fall are the most unproductive day of the week. When college football season is in full swing it’s a tall task trying to get anything done on game day. Read more…

    The High Cost of Turning 21

    By Alex Schiffer

    It’s a situation probably every college student remembers to some degree; the first time they got offered to drink alcohol in college. Sometimes that offer comes at a house party, other times in the dorms and heck, maybe if you have a good fake ID or know the right bouncer, maybe at a bar. Read more…

    College Connect: In Today’s Work Journey – Be Prepared for Detours

    By Philip Joens

    As a student at the University of Missouri I’d often spend nights working at an on-campus dining hall—usually working in the dishroom or cooking cheese burgers on a hot and greasy grill— and say to myself, “There’s got to be something better than this.” Read more…


    Spring 2017

    College Connect: I took Jay Leno’s advice – will you?

    By Philip Joens

    In my last post I talked about my own experiences after graduating from college and how I’ve come to terms with the business side of my life as a reporter. When you’re young and not making much money though, it may be helpful to choose carefully where you’ll live and what you do in your free time. Read more…

    College Connect: Ways College Students Mismanage Their Money

    By Denver Ellison

    It’s a fact that people mismanage their money. However, when college students mismanage their funds, it may be a lifestyle issue rather than a mistake. Read more…

    College Connect: Reasons to Build Your Savings Account Early

    By Denver Ellison

    As college students, we find many ways to blow through our money.  We like to use our funds for new clothes and going out to eat with our friends. However, many finance professionals believe college students should recognize the importance of saving. Read more…

    College Connect: Financial Expert Explains the Basics for College Students

    By Denver Ellison

    Many of us may think we have our personal finances under control. This is especially true if we have been living on our own for some time. However, talking to an expert can help us to better understand the various aspects of personal finance and how money is important in our lives. Read more…

    College Connect: How I Prepared for Off-Campus Living

    By Denver Ellison

    Before making the final decision to move into an off-campus apartment, many of us may wonder what the difference is between living on and off campus. We go back and forth in our heads on if it is worth it to come out of pocket every month only because we want our own place. Read more…

    College Connect: Turning to a Peer for Advice

    By Denver Ellison

    Peer advice can be some of the best advice to rely on when it comes to understanding college experiences. Our peers may have gone through similar situations and can help us learn from the mistakes that they made. Read more…

    College Connect: Paying the Bills, While still Working towards a Career

    By Garrett Michael

    Abbi Camillo, an interior design major at the University of Georgia, has struggled to find a stable college job that will cover rent and other monthly living expenses, while also enhancing her ability to find a career. Read more…

    College Connect: What should I be spending on?

    By Garrett Michael

    Lilley Cushman, a sophomore Biology major at the University of Georgia, said she has trouble deciding what to spend money on, while still growing a healthy savings account. She can cover most of her basic needs, like food, a place to live, and school tuition, but said she struggles to decide what to purchase when it comes to her wants. Read more…

    College Connect: Debit Card Theft: 18 Cents She’ll Never Get Back

    By Kalah Mingo

    Emma Williams, a third year digital marketing major at the University of Georgia, was the victim of debit card theft. Her mother called asking why she had used her card at a gas station in Atlanta when she should’ve been in Athens. Read more…

    College Connect: A Planning Tip When Preparing to Repay Your Student Loans

    By Kalah Mingo

    Alexis Williams, a third-year public relations major, has an unpaid internship, but makes money and saves on dinner as a server at Olive Garden. “I eat salad and breadsticks almost every night for dinner so it has its perks,” said Williams, who attends the University of Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect: A College Students Gets Expert Advice on Her Five Key Questions

    By Rachel Hinkle

    Taylor Liszewski, an advertising major at the University of Georgia, had several questions about personal finance and budgeting as she prepares for life beyond college. College Connect turned to Matt Goren, an assistant professor at UGA who teaches Introduction to Personal Finance, for answers. Read more…

    College Connect: An Expert Answers Five Questions about Planning for the Long-Term

    By Rachel Hinkle

    Taylor Liszewski, an advertising major at the University of Georgia, had more questions for a personal finance expert as she thought about her long goals for owning a home and planning a family. College Connect once again turned to Matt Goren, an assistant professor at UGA who teaches Introduction to Personal Finance, for the answers. Read more…

    College Connect: Students with Questions about His Entrepreneurial Dream Gets Expert Answers

    By Rachel Hinkle

    Victor Edwins, 20, a marketing major at the University of Georgia, has questions about his dream of opening his own restaurant. College Connect found answers to those questions from Bob Pinckney, director the entrepreneurship program at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. Read more…

    College Connect: Students Have Options When Considering Post Graduation Plans

    By Rachel Madray

    As graduation approaches, college students are faced with a tough question. Now what? Perhaps the three most considered options are taking a year off to travel, going to graduate school or getting a job. There are financial pros and cons for each option so careful consideration is important before making a decision. Read more…

    College Connect: What Most College Graduates Don’t Anticipate After Graduation

    By Rachel Madray

    Many college students are not prepared for the financial obligations they will face after graduation. After relying on their parents for the past 20 plus years of their lives, the transition to becoming self-sufficient can be shocking to many, especially if they have not prepared for what to expect. Read more…

    College Connect: Being a Broke College Student

    By Reann Huber

    Having gone through three years of college, I have seen just about every type of student that likes to designate themselves as a “broke” college student. They might not have received as big of a paycheck because they missed a few shifts while preparing for a test, or had to spend a little extra on textbooks for the semester. Read more…

    College Connect: Expert Explains the Reality of Credit Cards

    By Reann Huber

    Diann Moorman is an associate professor at the University of Georgia’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences, and specializes in research on bankruptcy, single parent households, credit card debt and more. I reached out to Moorman to learn more about credit cards and the debt that often comes along with them and how they affect college students. Read more…

    College Connect: Considering Law School? You May Have to Give Up the Part-time Job

    By Reann Huber

    Many students consider the possibility of attending graduate school immediately after finishing their undergraduate degree, but the daunting price tag that comes along with pursuing a higher degree brings financial concerns to students they may not have faced in the past. Read more…

    College Connect: Creating and Actually Sticking to a Budget

    By Reann Huber

    For college students, financial planning and budgeting is easily one of the biggest headaches to deal with when also pursuing a degree. Nonetheless, there are easy ways to make and stick to a budget that any college student can follow. Read more…

    College Connect: The Money Ups and Downs of College Students from a Single-Parent Home

    By Reann Huber

    On the surface, it is not easy to see any differences between a college student who comes from a single-parent household or one from dual-income household. But, research shows these different environments often lead to students approaching their college expenses in completely different ways. Read more…

    College Connect: Tapping into Tuition Assistance Programs

    By Tommy Lehner

    What if there was a legitimate way to get most of your college tuition paid for while you work? Sounds intriguing, right? In the state of Georgia, this is a reality through a Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). Read more…

    College Connect: My first credit card

    By Alexa Nicole D’Angelo

    The first time I really started to think about money was when I got my first credit card. I am a notorious shopaholic with a tendency to shop until I have nothing in my bank account when I am stressed. Read more…

    College Connect: Gambling in Las Vegas

    By Allie Morgan Newman

    Like many people do, I celebrated by 21st birthday in Las Vegas. It is easy to see the opportunity to both spend and make money in a place like Vegas. Read more…

    College Connect: The lessons of money

    By Brianna Stearns

    Although some may warn that money is the root of all evil, my life would be vastly different if I had not had the financial ability to participate in luxuries such as traveling, trying new activities and attending an out-of-state university. Read more…

    College Connect: Line of credit

    By Corinne Roels

    Something that I learned a lot about during while working in retail was how applying for credit cards and acquiring them can affect your credit score.  As an employee of a large-size mall retailer, it was frequently a part of our required performance to “sell” credit cards to customers. Read more…

    College Connect: Keeping a budget

    By Jenna Miller

    Most of my life I haven’t kept a budget. I didn’t see the need to put energy into recording what I make and spend. I never looked at my credit statement or my bills and I thought it worked totally fine. Read more…

    College Connect: Real world budgeting

    By Kara Carlson

    When you’re sixteen years old, getting your license finally means freedom. For me, as student involved in several extracurriculars and two sports it meant that my long days at least began and ended with me behind the wheel. Read more…

    College Connect: Fake discounts

    By Lan Jiang

    Amazon.com, Jet.com, Ebay.com and Taobao.com, these e-commerce websites provide cheaper goods than that in the off-line stores. It is very often that those e-commerce websites providing a discount on some special festivals, such as Best Buy’s time-limited discount on the President Day. Read more…

    College Connect: Investing in the future

    By Madison Alder

    A time I learned something about money was when I discovered my summer internship had automatically set up a 401K for me and I had to transfer the balance. Read more…

    College Connect: Exchange rates

    By Ziluo Qiu

    When thinking about money, the first thing that comes to my mind is the exchange rate. I am an international student. It is necessary for me to understand exchange rate because it affects my life abroad. Read more…

    College Connect: My first paycheck

    By Ross Leviton

    One of my first, and most memorable times with money was after the arrival of my first paycheck. I had volunteered with a company for a few months and they had decided to hire me, which meant I was going to get paid! Read more…

    College Connect: Staying on top of finances

    By Saundra Wilson

    This year I got my first credit card and I had a sentimental moment in my car afterwards. I realized that there was no going back. I had taken a giant leap into the pool of adulthood and was officially submerged. Read more…

    College Connect: Putting time and money in perspective

    By Michelle Maki

    When I first watched “The Avengers,” I leaned over and asked my friends, “How much do you think it would cost to rebuild the whole city after they’re done?” Read more…

    College Connect: Credit scores can be confusing

    By Yu Zhang

    As an international student, I am a newcomer as to the credit scores in the U.S. As soon as I was told that a U.S. credit card will benefit me in terms of flying miles and, I went to Chase to applied for a credit card. However, I was turned down as my credit history was too short. Read more…

    College Connect: Watching the Little Things Can Be Essential to College Student Budgeting

    By Casey Williams

    Managing the often routine expenses can pay off for college students on a budget. Ann Woodyard, an assistant professor of financial planning, housing and consumer economics at the University of Georgia, said simply saving money on gas can make a difference.

    College Connect: College Students Lack Training in Financial Literacy

    By Shannon Duffy

    Nearing graduation, Caskey Dyer feels optimistic about his post-graduation job options. Dyer’s education in international affairs at the University of Georgia has equipped him to intern with Georgia Rep. Park Cannon, work as a teacher’s assistant and publish work on housing inequality.

    College Connect: How to Survive on a Graduate Student Budget

    By Ryan Kor

    As a first-year master’s student freshly off of my parents’ payroll, the only thing tougher than graduate coursework is figuring out how to manage my personal finances. I constantly have to monitor my spending to ensure that I can pay for essential expenses.

    College Connect: Financial Savvy Needed When Entering the Working World

    By Russell Vandiver

    College is a time in life to grow personally and to learn skills that will help establish a career. Although college graduates leave with greater knowledge in their chosen major, they often lack significant training that will prepare them for the financial decisions they will confront.

    College Connect: Student Loan Debt Not Only Factor in Millennials Delaying Homeownership

    By Rakel Johnson

    College comes at a hefty price. It’s no surprise that many students take out thousands in loans to afford their education, and many graduate with a large amount of debt.

    College Connect: Savings Can Make College Less Affordable for Some Families

    By Nathaniel Berg

    For parents of prospective college students, it’s important to plan ahead financially. And while conventional logic would suggest that saving money is the best way to prepare for your child’s higher education, a professor in the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences said that is not always the case.

    College Connect: UGA Finance Students Provide Free Tax Filing Through Community Outreach Program

    By Nathan Hutto

    The University of Georgia gives back to its Athens community in many ways, but one service gains special attention every spring: finance students provide free tax filing and financial advice.

    College Connect: College Students Advised to Start Saving Early

    By Nate Harris

    Though some college student may work part-time jobs during school, for many, their first job outside college is their first steady flow of sizeable income. It’s also when many face a plethora of personal expenses, from rent and utilities to food and gas. Some might also enter the professional world with thousands in student loan debt.

    College Connect: Mortgages and homeownership could benefit some students over apartment rentals in the long-run

    By Lindsey Conway

    For most college students, homeownership is not at the top of the to-do list. But Ashley Panter, who has owned two homes since graduating with her bachelor’s degree in public relations from Augusta University in 2012, said more should consider it.

    College Connect: Financial Planning: Save Now or Pay Later

    By Killian Wyatt

    Never before have people had to make so many financial decisions on their own. Most college students aren’t prepared for these choices, but they can take steps now to secure a solid financial future.

    College Connect: Students Need to Adapt to Budgeting in College

    By John Hammel

    Getting used to harder classes, making new friends and learning to live with a roommate are all reasons why many students find it hard to adapt to their first year of college. Another reason often overlooked is managing money.

    College Connect: Many students have debt; few understand their credit score

    By Harrison Young

    In the age of rising costs of attendance and omnipresent student loan debt, few students graduate from college without developing their credit.

    College Connect: Financial Satisfaction a Result of Strong Financial Behavior

    By Gracie Thompson

    Strong financial behaviors are more important than a base of financial knowledge when it comes to a person’s overall financial satisfaction.

    College Connect: Students should confront their money through budgeting

    By Chelsey Shirley

    For many, college is four years of great adventure, growth and learning. It can also be a time when parents begin to wean their children off of their ‘payroll’ to allow their now young adults the time to practice what is known as ‘adulting.’

    College Connect: Unfamiliar Surroundings Can Make Housing Search Difficult Without Thorough Research

    By Casie Wilson

    Angel Hogg, a 3rd year pre-veterinary student at the University of Georgia, is searching for a home in Athens, Georgia. While juggling the challenges all young adults face when house-hunting for the first time on their own— from managing credit to contacting the right realtors— Hogg also faces a problem familiar to non-Athens natives: the outsider perspective.

    College Connect: Some College Students Can Qualify for Government Support to Meet Basic Needs

    By Brittany Johnson

    The cost of living in college is costly. Students are responsible for tuition, textbooks, rent, and other miscellaneous bills that can make paying for food seem like an option, rather a necessity.

    College Connect: Stress Can Hinder College Students’ Performance

    By Andrew Fisher

    College tends to inflict a great deal of stress onto students, but many people do not understand the extent of it.   High levels of stress hinder learning, memory, immune function and more.  Being able to acknowledge stress can help students get a head start on managing it.

    College Connect: Lack of Affordable Housing Can Negatively Affect College Students

    By Amy Libby

    College students living off campus often grapple with few housing options and poor housing conditions. Students shouldering heavy course loads that don’t allow for full-time employment are limited by scarce affordable housing options within their budget.

    College Connect: Saving Money at the Grocery Store

    By Zack Newman

    I relish food and am constantly enticed by the possibility of a smorgasbord of flavors. While the occasional splurge is ok, constructive habits can lead to long-term savings. This happens a few dollars at a time. I compiled a few of my favorite tricks below to save money at the food store.

    Filing Taxes Cause College Students to Confront their Money Skills

    By Lisa Fu

    College is when many young adults take their first step to financial independence. It may be taking on a part time job or simply remembering to pay the rent on time, but college is when many students often confront their responsibilities with money and find their knowledge is lacking.

    College Loans are Necessary, but Require Planning

    By Azure Aladin

    College is expensive. Tuition, rent, textbooks, groceries and other bills add up, forcing many college students to take out loans to defer the expense of attending a university.

    Yes, You Really Can Afford to Take That Internship

    By Covey Eonyak Son

    Around this time last year, I finally got a call I spent months hoping to get. The voice on the other end offered me an internship at the Minneapolis Star Tribune. It was a happy ending to an annual ritual that thousands of college students take part in each year. We spend hours writing and refining cover letters and résumés with the hope that we’ll be chosen. So naturally, the call left me feeling high with joy.

    Managing Your Money Doesn’t Have to Be So Stressful

    By Covey Eonyak Son

    You probably grew up getting allowances from your parents. Your parents probably got you a piggybank one day, and told you to not to break it open until you’ve saved enough money. And they almost definitely at some point told you to put something back at the store because you don’t really need it.

    In Today’s Electronic Age, Receipts Can Be Your Friend

    By Covey Eonyak Son

    My dad always told me to hold onto my receipts, no matter how minor the purchase. He was obsessed with collecting them. He even had boxes (yes, multiple) of old receipts and invoices in his home office. Just in case.

    College Connect: Effectively budgeting for the holiday season

    By Emma Diltz

    As the holiday season is upon us, students are strapped for money more than usual. Throughout the rest of the year, they’re usually focused on buying groceries, paying rent and with the little money they have left, shopping or attending a variety of events. All too often, December rolls around, the same time every year, and students haven’t even started pricing gifts, let alone purchasing them.

    College Connect: Getting your first credit card and how to manage it

    By Emma Diltz

    Getting a credit card is a big push into adulthood for a lot of people, including students. Going into college, it’s a good idea to start thinking about getting a credit card. Without good credit, it’s hard to buy a house, pay off student loans or buy a car.

    College Connect: Best money-saving apps for students

    By Emma Diltz

    At this age, students struggle with saving money. There’s rent to pay off, groceries to buy and miscellaneous bills to check off. But half of the fun in college is being able to go out with your friends, whether it is dinner, drinks or concerts. The problem with all of these is how much money they cost. I’ve compiled the best apps that students can use to save money for the fun parts of their lives.

    College Connect: As an international student, make sure your bank is actually ‘local’

    By Daniel Levitt

    Telling your bank that you’re going abroad on vacation is often unnecessarily laborious. Try telling them that you’re moving abroad to study until ‘who knows when?’

    College Connect: Grad School Doesn’t Have to Break the Bank

    By Daniel Levitt

    When I first told my friends and family of my plans to study in America, they thought I was barmy. And that was before I told them it was a master’s degree that I wanted to pursue.

    College Connect: A new bicycle isn’t worth it – YES IT IS!

    By Daniel Levitt

    “I’ll buy one at the start of the semester.” “I’ll buy one after my exam.” “No, seriously, I’ll buy one on the weekend.” Sound familiar? There’s only one time to buy that bicycle you need, and that’s now!

    College Connect: Why I have a Safety Net

    By Charlie Clark

    I got my first job at 19 making $8.25 per hour working in a coffee shop. Although I would by no means characterize that as good pay, I was in college on a scholarship, and it was certainly enough income to fill my gas tank and supply my diet of ramen and microwavable mac n’ cheese.

    College Connect: Money Can’t Buy Love

    By Jacob Garcia

    I’m sure you’ve heard of the saying, “Money can’t buy love.” I agree, and I hope my experiential story about money demonstrates that.

    College Connect: Lessons in Money from New York City

    By Kanak Jha

    This past summer I had the opportunity to move to bustling New York City. New York is full of life lessons, especially for a young student working their first full time internship far away from home. Some of the most prominent lessons the city taught me was about money.

    College Connect: The Bank of Mom and Dad

    By Connor Murphy

    After swallowing my pride, I called the bank which every college student dreads, but inevitably uses: the bank of mom and dad.

    College Connect: Why I never buy anything that’s not on sale

    By Kourtney Balsan

    I never buy anything that isn’t on sale. Red stickers and slashed prices is my norm. Why? Well, besides the fact I am a broke college student, I realized that everything will usually go on sale eventually.

    College Connect: Is Money Happiness?

    By Anya Rogers

    Money is a medium of exchange, a unit of accounts and a store of wealth. Money is many things, but it is not happiness, time or love.

    College Connect: Buy Now, Pay Later

    By Sophia Kunthara

    The simplest lesson in personal finance: don’t spend what you don’t have (or won’t have). This is true for borrowing money in the form of loans and for credit card spending. Taking out a loan and using a credit card can have enormous benefits, but can easily be a trap for debt as well.

    College Connect: Magic or Credit?

    By Serena Zhang

    I remember being in awe of credit cards when I was really young. Before I even knew the official name, I use to call them “magic cards” because money was magically stored in them. I was 16 when I got my first magic card.

    College Connect: Can you really live without a TV set?

    By Kouichi Shirayangi

    We all grew up with television as part of the background in our lives. So, when we get to college, a TV comes along with us. I did a research of ads, and most dorm residents get a TV that’s about 32 inches.

    College Connect: 4 Fun Ways to Save Money

    Video by Andrea Stoll

    College Connect: Some simple hacks to help you get your deposit back!

    By Lauren E. Steffens

    I’ve lived in every type of campus and off-campus housing – dorms, sorority house, furnished apartments, unfurnished apartments and houses. Each and every one requires a deposit.

    College Connect: The debate about what it costs to go to college

    By Lauren E. Steffens

    This year’s Democratic primaries talked about the cost of a college education and student debt. Here are some interesting facts I found about the cost of higher education from an annual survey taken by the non-profit, College Board.

    College Connect: The very high cost of college parking

    By Lauren E. Steffens

    Parking is the bane of college students. It’s a scene repeated every day – students are circling the metered parking lot near inner campus, waiting for students to leave so they can claim a coveted spot. After finally grabbing a spot, putting in coins or a pay card, they dash to class.

    College Connect: Coupons for students go high-tech

    By Kouichi Shirayangi

    On a college campus, there are a lot of coupon books with student discounts. Are they good deals? That depends. Is this an item you’d buy anyway? If it isn’t it might make you spend money and not save money.

    College Connect: Tips to save at the grocery store

    By Kouichi Shirayanagi

    A typical college students spends $80 –to $200 on groceries, depending on how much you cook.

    College Connect: Don’t be penny safe and pound foolish when making big decisions

    By Kouichi Shirayanagi

    Perhaps the worst decision I made over the past year with my money was when I did not spend more to save anguish in the future, but I just did not know what the future held for me.

    College Connect: Credit Cards: What To Know and Watch Out For

    By Alex Ring

    With the laundry list of other responsibilities that flood into the life of a college student credit cards can be a double-edged sword that solidifies adulthood and can pave the way for future but it should not be taken lightly.

    College Connect: Starting in college – measured spending and saving

    By Alex Ring

    We learned in Econ 1010, that money is defined as a medium of exchange, a unit of account, and lastly, a store of value. As the school year, approaches I begin to understand that last part — the practical job of money.

    College Connect: Saving money

    By Larissa Garza

    Spending cash is a lot easier when you aren’t looking forward to a paycheck every week. As a server and bartender, most of the time my paychecks are about $20.

    College Connect: Wants versus needs; a lesson learned

    By Lindsey Wisniewski

    For as long as I can remember, my parents warned me about the dangers of money. Before I was of legal age to obtain credit, my mom and dad, who were divorced since I was 12, had a combined four bankruptcies between the two of them. In other words, they didn’t know how to handle money properly.

    College Connect: One financial regret

    By Hilary Davis

    I don’t have many regrets in life. I don’t like to be haunted by “what ifs.” But if I could turn back the clock, I would start saving for retirement from my first paycheck.

    College Connect: Dump the cable bill

    By Krandall Brantley

    Several times throughout my first 3 years of college, my mother kept saying she was planning on getting rid of cable because my parents were paying too much for a bunch of channels they didn’t use.

    College Connect: Change the way you save

    By Judson Tomaiko

    Change has a way of being taken for granted. Not “change” like the concept of something new happening but rather the physical metal coins that people get from a business on the off-chance they didn’t use their debit card.

    College Connect: Credit cards are evil

    By Lauren Potter 

    When I first moved to the U.S. from Australia nine years ago, I was fortunate to land a really great job. For my age, and given that I had no higher education at the time, I was making a lot of money.

    College Connect: Money experience story

    By Anthony Prosceno

    When traveling, it is a good idea to carry a little extra cash because it may turn out that your physical dollars may more value than your credit cards.

    College Connect: My tips for money management

    By Joseph Steen

    Having money is one thing, but being able to handle it wisely is another. I’ve had both good and bad experiences and will try to give you tips on how to handle your money better.

    College Connect: Getting started on budgeting

    By Adam DeRose

    After I landed my first job out of college, finances were tight. The consistent paychecks were great, but I also struggled figuring out how much money I had to spend on non-essential purchases (restaurants, drinks, events, etc.) Read more…

    College Connect: Saving money in college: smart grocery shopping

    By Sabella Scalise

    In college, the first year away from my parents meant freedom, no curfew and no rules. A childhood dream come true. But college is not a dream. It is reality. Read more…

    College Connect: Think small business when you have extra money

    By Jiahui Jia

    If I ever find myself with extra money and there are business opportunities, my experience indicates it is a good time to act. Read more…

    College Connect: A lesson in debt collection

    By Andrea Stoll

    I have worked at a debt collection agency here in Columbia for about a year and a half. While most people start working in the mail department and get drafted into a permanent department, I was immediately called to work in Bookkeeping. Read more…

     

  • SABEW Fall Conference at Reuters, Times Square, Nov. 12

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Sunday August 18, 2019

    SABEWNYC19: Business reporting during an economic downturn

    Is the nation’s 10-year economic expansion running out of steam? Between the trade war and a slowing global economy, some economists think the U.S. might be headed toward recession.

    SABEW’s Fall Conference, scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 12, will give journalists the tools they need to understand and report on an economic downturn.

    Against the backdrop of a possible recession, conference sessions will look at trends in investing, health care, and personal finance. We’ll also look at the growing role that news partnerships play as media organizations cover these big issues. The day will wrap with a chance to network with fellow business journalists over cocktails.

    The conference is hosted by Reuters in Times Square, and in partnership with the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE).

    Register here.

    Check out the evolving program schedule.

    SABEW has secured a special rate at the  Hampton Inn Manhattan/Times Square Central (walking distance to Reuters). The rate is good until Sept. 23  or until the block sells out.

    Make your room reservation.

    SABEWNYC19 Planning Committee

    *Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Reuters

    Matthew Goldberg, consumer banking reporter, Bankrate.com

    Paul Golden, managing director of media and communications, NEFE

    Glenn Hall, global chief, Dow Jones Newswires

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    Scott Wenger, group editorial director, SourceMedia

     

  • 2018 Retail; Medium

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday July 30, 2019

    Winner – Fortune: Michelle Gass is cracking the code at Kohl’s

    • Contributor – Phil Wahba
    • Judges’ Comments – Much has been written about the Amazon effect on brick-and-mortar retailers, but Phil Wahba at Fortune found a fresh angle on the battle for consumers. Kohl’s new CEO Michelle Gass is changing strategies at all levels, such as precise inventory tracking and beefing up beauty sales with pricier Ralph Lauren Polo fragrances. Wahba took us along as Gass did her own consumer research: watching a busy mother return competitor Amazon orders — “brick-and-mortar kryptonite” — at her local Kohl’s store. The rationale is the shopper will linger and spend money at Kohl’s after returning Amazon goods. This story is a fine example of combining a CEO profile with a corporate strategy story to “put a face on” a trend that has shuttered so many retailers.

    Honorable Mention – Chicago Tribune: Sears’ demise

    • Contributor – Lauren Zumbach
    • Judges’ Comments – Lauren Zumbach delivers a smart, in-depth story that did far more than convey the daily news of Sears’ bankruptcy. She followed up with a feature explaining what’s ahead for the legendary Chicago-based retailer.
  • 2018 Investgative; Small

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Monday July 29, 2019

    Winner – A collaboration of The New Republic and Type Investigations: Political corruption and the art of the deal

    • Contributor – Anjali Kamat
    • Judges’ Comments – Anjali Kamat’s fresh and groundbreaking reporting on corrupt practices in Trump Organization real-estate projects in India dove deep into the murky world of Indian politics and business. It emerged with a colorful and compelling tale of a big company tied to Indian politicians and business partners with a long history of lawsuits and investigations that yielded evidence of potential bribery, fraud, intimidation, illegal land acquisition and money laundering — much of which enriched the president of the United States.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Intercept and Type Investigations: FINRA’s black hole

    • Contributor – Susan Antilla
    • Judges’ Comments – Sexual misconduct on Wall Street doesn’t get a fraction of the attention it does in Hollywood, politics and the tech industry, and closed-door arbitration by the financial industry’s own watchdog is one big reason. The Intercept’s detailed investigation of FINRA, which releases almost no information about its arbitrations, revealed that out of 55,000 complaints it decided over the past 30 years, only 97 involved harassment claims by women, who won just 17 of them. It’s a striking picture of the dysfunction that results when a private justice system tries to regulate sexual misconduct in the workplace.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ: Driven into debt

    • Contributors – Melissa Sanchez, Elliott Ramos, David Eads, Sandhya Kambhampati and WBEZ
    • Judges’ Comments – A shocking package with tremendous detail and a great visualization lays out how the city of Chicago raised ticket fees to yield more revenue — but with disastrous effects on the city’s poorer and minority populations. Highlights included compelling personal stories, an interactive graphic based on the city’s entire traffic ticket database and the amazing figure that Chicago residents owe a total of $1.45 billion in ticket debt — many times more than in cities such as New York and Los Angeles, and a burden that often forces people into personal bankruptcy in order to restore their driver licenses.
  • 2018 Innovation; Small

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Sunday July 28, 2019

    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business: Chicago’s opioid crisis series

    • Contributors – Kristen Schorsch, Manuel Martinez, Jason McGregor, Cassie Walker Burke
    • Judges’ Comments – We applaud this series for its use of digital media, photography and graphics to depict the personal and economics impact of the opioid epidemic on Chicago. In “The opioid treatment gap” Crain’s used graphics to help readers navigate the city and in “Gateway to recovery” it used a slideshow to tell the story of one addict in a quick but compelling way. The series was ambitious in its scope and used digital media effectively to tell an important story.
  • 2018 Commentary/Opinion; Small

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Sunday July 28, 2019

    Winner – Fast Company: Rick Wartzman opinion/commentary

    • Contributor – Rick Wartzman
    • Judges’ Comments – Rick Wartzman injects fresh thinking into some of the defining business and political economy topics of our time. His arguments are thought-provoking and bolstered by context and his writing is clear.
      In this category, the judges selected two honorable mentions.

    Honorable Mention – STAT: Adam Feuerstein biotech industry commentary

    • Contributor – Adam Feuerstein
    • Judges’ Comments – This commentary holds a big and important industry and regulators to account, making for essential reading for anyone trying to make sense of an industry that seems to over-promise and (critics would say) over-charge.

    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business: 2018 editorial board

    • Contributor – Ann Dwyer
    • Judges’ Comments – This entry keeps alive the tradition of fact-based civic commentary on local issues. Ann Dwyer’s columns provide a sharp focus on issues that matter with a clear point of view, with writing that’s tight, pacey and engaging.
  • 2018 Banking/Finance; Small

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Sunday July 28, 2019

    Winner – American Banker: Bank CEO’s fire-and-rehire maneuver reaps windfall at taxpayer expense

    • Contributors – Kevin Wack, Alan Kline
    • Judges’ Comments – An ambitious and deeply sourced investigative piece from American Banker’s Kevin Wack. It reveals in stunning detail how Stephen Calk, the head of $265 million-asset Federal Savings Bank, executed an apparently legal but questionable maneuver in which his bank collected $3.6 million in Chicago subsidies after Calk fired employees from a sister firm and then rehired them at the bank. The reporter went beyond the obvious story of the bank’s tangled web with Paul Manafort to deliver a much tougher story to get. Judges appreciated the story’s granular focus and how it exposed both exploitation by individuals and government inaction. A memorable accomplishment — meticulously reported, clearly written and compellingly told.
      In this category, the judges selected two honorable mentions.

    Honorable Mention – Sacramento Business Journal: After a decade, banks returning to Sacramento

    • Contributor – Mark Anderson
    • Judges’ Comments – This story is a strong example of in-depth reporting at the local level. It uses interviews with bank CEOs and graphics to show the increase of outside banks in Sacramento. The story makes the case that the presence of outside banks is a sign of health for the local economy, as the increased competition offers more potential sources of financing.

    Honorable Mention – Financial Planning: Keep quiet

    • Contributors – Ann Marsh, Scott Wenger
    • Judges’ Comments – This is engaging piece about a Wells Fargo whistleblower is beautifully presented and a breeze to read. It’s a good slice of the larger story on widespread consumer finance abuse at Wells Fargo that has now stretched over several years.
  • Past Boards of Governors: 2014-2019

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Wednesday June 26, 2019

    2017-18 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President
    Mark Hamrick
    Senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief
    Bankrate.com

    Vice President
    Bryan Borzykowski
    Freelance business writer

    Secretary/Treasurer
    Kim Quillen
    Business source editor
    Chicago Tribune

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2018
    Suzanne Barlyn
    Correspondent
    Reuters

    Jonathan Blum
    Freelance journalist/author

    Rich Barbieri
    Executive editor
    CNNMoney

    Brad Foss
    Global business editor
    Associated Press

    Andrew Leckey
    President/Business journalism chair
    Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU

    Xana Antunes
    Executive editor
    Quartz

    Term Ending 2019
    Roseanne Gerin
    English news editor
    Radio Free Asia

    Amy Gleason
    Senior director, News
    S&P Global Market Intelligence

    James T. Madore
    Senior business writer/economy
    Newsday

    Patrick Sanders
    Assistant managing editor/investing
    U.S. News & World Report

    Caleb Silver
    Vice president, content
    Investopedia/IAC

    Term Ending 2020
    Robert Barba
    Deputy spot news editor
    The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires

    Shobhana Chandra (deceased)
    Economics reporter
    Bloomberg News

    Marilyn Geewax
    Former senior business editor, NPR
    Cox Institute’s Industry Fellow

    Glenn Hall
    Chief editor
    Dow Jones Newswires

    Dean Murphy
    Associate editor
    The New York Times

    James B. Nelson
    Reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Business journalism instructor, Marquette University

    Ex-Officio
    Cory Schouten
    Senior newsletter editor
    The Wall Street Journal

    Joanna Ossinger
    Editor, cross-asset group
    Bloomberg News

    Marty Wolk
    Freelance

    Marty Steffens
    SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism
    School of Journalism,
    University of Missouri

    2016-17 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President
    Cory Schouten
    Senior editor
    Columbia Journalism Review

    Vice President & Treasurer
    Mark Hamrick
    Senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief
    Bankrate.com

    Secretary
    Xana Antunes
    Executive editor
    Quartz

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2017
    Robert Barba
    Technology editor
    American Banker

    Shobhana Chandra (deceased)
    Economics reporter
    Bloomberg News

    Glenn Hall
    U.S. news editor
    The Wall Street Journal

    Dean Murphy
    Associate editor
    The New York Times

    Mary Jane Pardue
    Professor of journalism
    Missouri State University

    Jim Pensiero
    Consultant
    Gannett Co.

    Allen Wastler
    Head of digital content
    MassMutual Financial Group

    Term Ending 2018
    Suzanne Barlyn
    Correspondent
    Reuters

    Jonathan Blum
    Freelance journalist/author

    Bryan Borzykowski
    Freelance business writer

    Brad Foss
    Deputy business editor
    Associated Press

    Andrew Leckey
    President/Business journalism chair
    Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU

    Kim Quillen
    Business source editor
    Chicago Tribune

    Term Ending 2019
    Roseanne Gerin
    English news editor
    Radio Free Asia

    Amy Gleason
    Senior director, News
    S&P Global Market Intelligence

    James T. Madore
    Senior business writer/economy
    Newsday

    Apna Maheshwari
    Advertising industry reporter
    The New York Times

    Patrick Sanders
    Senior editor for investing
    U.S. News & World Report

    Caleb Silver
    Vice president, content
    Investopedia/IAC

    Ex-Officio
    Joanna Ossinger
    Team leader,
    Global Curation Bloomberg News

    Marty Wolk
    Senior editorial manager
    Amazon

    Kevin G. Hall
    Chief economics correspondent
    McClatchy Newspapers

    Marty Steffens
    SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism
    School of Journalism,
    University of Missouri

    2015-16 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President
    Joanna Ossinger
    Team leader
    First Word Americas FX at Bloomberg News

    Vice President
    Cory Schouten
    Knight-Bagehot fellow
    Columbia University

    Treasurer
    Glenn Hall
    U.S. news editor
    The Wall Street Journal

    Secretary
    Mark Hamrick
    Senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief
    Bankrate.com

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2016
    James T. Madore
    Senior business writer/economy
    Newsday

    Diana Henriques
    Contributing writer
    The New York Times

    Chris Peacock
    Independent journalist

    Gary Silverman
    U.S. deputy managing editor
    Financial Times

    Xana Antunes
    Editor, new initiatives
    Quartz

    Sapna Maheshwari
    Business reporter
    Buzzfeed News

    Term Ending 2017
    Mary Jane Pardue
    Professor of journalism
    Missouri State University

    Robert Barba
    Technology editor
    American Banker

    Jim Pensiero
    Consultant
    Gannett Co.

    Allen Wastler
    Head of digital content
    MassMutual Financial Group

    Shobhana Chandra (deceased)
    Economics reporter
    Bloomberg News

    Dean Murphy
    Business editor
    The New York Times

    Term Ending 2018
    Andrew Leckey
    President/Business journalism chair
    Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU

    Jonathan Blum
    Freelance journalist/author

    Kim Quillen
    Business source editor
    Chicago Tribune

    Brad Foss
    Deputy business editor
    Associated Press

    Bryan Borzykowski
    Freelance Business Writer

    Suzanne Barlyn
    Correspondent
    Reuters

    Ex-Officio
    Marty Wolk
    Freelance writer and editor

    Kevin G. Hall
    Chief economics correspondent
    McClatchy Newspapers

    Jill Jordan Spitz
    Senior editor
    Arizona Daily Star

    Marty Steffens
    SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism
    School of Journalism,
    University of Missouri

    2014-15 Board of Governors

    Executive Officers

    President
    Marty Wolk
    MSN Money

    Vice President
    David Milstead
    Freelance

    Treasurer
    Joanna Ossinger
    Team leader
    First Word Americas FX at Bloomberg News

    Secretary
    Cory Schouten
    Indianapolis Business Journal

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2015
    Andrew Leckey
    President/Business journalism chair
    Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU

    Jonathan Blum
    Freelance journalists/author

    Kim Quillen
    East Valley editor
    Arizona Republic

    Brad Foss
    Deputy business editor
    Associated Press

    Bryan Borzykowski
    Freelance business writer

    Aaron Task
    Yahoo Finance

    Term Ending 2016
    James T. Madore
    Senior business writer/economy
    Newsday

    Diana Henriques
    Contributing writer
    The New York Times

    Chris Peacock
    Independent journalist

    Gary Silverman
    U.S Deputy managing editor
    Financial Times

    Gail MarksJarvis
    Chicago Tribune

    Pamela Yip (deceased)
    Dallas Morning News

    Term Ending 2017
    Mary Jane Pardue
    Professor of journalism
    Missouri State University

    Glenn Hall
    U.S. news editor
    The Wall Street Journal

    Mark Hamrick
    Senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief
    Bankrate.com

    Jim Pensiero
    The Wall Street Journal
    Karey Van Hall
    Reuters

    Allen Wastler
    Head of digital content MassMutual Financial Group

    Ex-Officio
    Kevin G. Hall
    Chief economics correspondent
    McClatchy Newspapers

    Jill Jordan Spitz
    Senior editor
    Arizona Daily Star

    Kevin Noblet
    Managing editor, Wealth Management
    Dow Jones Newswires

    Marty Steffens
    SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism
    School of Journalism,
    University of Missouri

  • Bryan Borzykowski becomes SABEW’s first Canadian president

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Thursday May 23, 2019

    Phoenix – May, 2019

    Bryan Borzykowski, an independent business journalist who has written for CNBC, the New York Times, the Globe and Mail, BBC Capital, Fortune, Inc., and Financial Planning, among other publications, was installed as the new president of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) at its annual conference on May 18, 2019, in Phoenix.

    He succeeds Mark Hamrick, Washington bureau chief and senior economic analyst for Bankrate.com, who served as SABEW’s president for the last two years.

    Borzykowski, who now lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba, after spending more than 15 years in Toronto, is SABEW’s first Canadian president in the organization’s 55-year history. He helped bring SABEW to Canada in 2015 and served as SABEW Canada’s first chair.

    “SABEW has given me so much over the years; it’s an honor to be able to give back in a bigger way and help others get as much out of the organization as I have,” he said. “Creating strong business journalism – and high-quality journalism in general – has never been more important. SABEW has a crucial role to play in helping writers, editors, producers, broadcasters, bloggers, podcasters, and others enhance their training and develop the connections they need to succeed.”

    Over the next 12 months, Borzykowski and SABEW’s 22-member board, plan on creating new training programs for its members, new opportunities to network and new ways to showcase its members’ work. SABEW will also continue to produce its popular monthly virtual training programs and its Best in Business Awards, one of the most highly respected business journalism award programs in the world.

    “We want to do even more for our members and give business journalists everywhere the skills and opportunities they need to tell the stories they need to tell,” said Borzykowski.

    In addition to Borzykowski (@bborzyko), SABEW’s officer ladder is comprised of Kim Quillen (@QuillenKim), SABEW’s vice-president and business source editor of the Chicago Tribune, and Caleb Silver (@calebsilver) SABEW’s secretary/treasurer and Investopedia’s editor-in-chief and SVP content.

    As well, ballots were cast during the SABEW19 conference for six seats on the SABEW Board of Governors, all with a term ending in 2022.

    SABEW members elected three new members to the Board of Governors:

    • Alan Deutschman, professor and Reynolds endowed chair of business journalism University of Nevada, Reno
    • Desiree Hanford, lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University
    • Scott Wenger, group editorial director, SourceMedia

    Three incumbent governors were also re-elected, each serving three-year terms:

    The rest of SABEW’s board includes:

    • Xana Antunes, executive editor, Quartz
    • Cesca Antonelli, editor-in-chief, Bloomberg BNA
    • Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires
    • Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business
    • Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press
    • Pallavi Gogoi, chief business editor, NPR
    • Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires
    • Andrew Leckey, president/business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center, ASU
    • Heather Long, economics correspondent, the Washington Post
    • Dean Murphy, associate masthead editor, the New York Times
    • James B. Nelson, business editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and business journalism instructor Marquette University
    • Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Ex-officio members:

    • Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com
    • Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News
    • Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journa
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair in business and journalism School of Journalism, University of Missouri

    About SABEW
    SABEW, the largest association of business journalists, encourages comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and upgrades the skills and knowledge of business journalists through continuous professional development and educational efforts. For more information, contact Executive Director Kathleen Graham at [email protected] Follow @sabew on twitter.

  • 2019 – 2020 Committees

    Posted By sabew_admin on Thursday May 23, 2019

    (*) indicates Committee Chair
    (**) indicates Vice Chair

    Executive Committee
    Consistent with the requirements of the Society’s constitution and bylaws, the Executive Committee typically meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to discuss business, to make decisions and to lead the organization. These discussions include coordination of plans with the executive director.

    *SABEW President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    **SABEW Vice President, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    SABEW Secretary/Treasurer, Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com (ex-officio member)

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    First Amendment Committee
    The First Amendment Committee is dedicated to helping protect press freedoms. We are vigilant in our role as a watchdog over government agencies, working to ensure that journalists – and all citizens – have access to accurate, relevant government-supported data. The committee regularly issues statements in support of press freedom and for sufficient funding of government-collected and issued information. It engages government officials, private economists, watchdogs, other stakeholders and the public on the importance of robust and transparent economic and financial data as well as on the mission of business and financial journalism more broadly.

    *Henry Dubroff, founder and editor, Pacific Coast Business Times

    **James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Glenn Hall, global chief, Dow Jones Newswires

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    James B. Nelson, reporter, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    First Amendment Legal Counsel: Steven D. Zansberg, partner, Ballard Spahr

    Best in Business Committee

    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Scott Wenger, group editorial director, SourceMedia

    Finance Committee
    The Finance Committee meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to review SABEW’s financial statements and other financial materials presented by SABEW’s executive director, CPA and bookkeeper. The committee also makes a recommendation on the organization’s annual budget to the executive committee and reviews the audit.

    *James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    **James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Matthew Goldberg, consumer banking reporter, Bankrate.com

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    Zoe Sagalow, insurance reporter, CQ Roll Call (FiscalNote)

    Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia and SABEW treasurer (Non-voting member of this committee)

    Investment Sub-Committee
    This group helps monitor and optimize SABEW’s long-term investments, with the goal of balancing return with preservation of funds to help ensure the Society’s long-term financial success. 

    *James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Gail Marks Jarvis, syndicated financial columnist, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    International Committee
    The International Committee seeks to encourage and expand SABEW’s impact and membership within the global business and economic journalism community.  Business journalists worldwide deal with issues of corporate transparency, reliability of government data, trade conflicts and personal financial wellbeing that directly affect readers, viewers and listeners. SABEW’s dedication to improving financial knowledge and accuracy, commending outstanding coverage and upholding the highest ethical standards has relevance in all countries. Seeking new members for SABEW, the International Committee finds opportunities to share information and training while encouraging business journalists at all experience levels regardless of borders.

    *Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Cesca Antonelli, editor-in-chief, Bloomberg BNA

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Andrew Leckey, chair ASU Walter Cronkite School, president Reynolds Center

    Nominations Committee

    * Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com

    Dean Murphy, associate masthead editor, The New York Times

    Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Regional Events Committee
    The regional events committee is responsible for producing local networking and speaker-related events for SABEW members and business journalists to learn and connect.

    *Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press

    Annlynn Kurtz, senior features editor, CNNBusiness

    Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Training Committee
    The Training Committee supports SABEW’s mission by planning and coordinating near-monthly distance training programs, utilizing moderators and presenters who represent a variety of backgrounds and organizations. As many newsroom budgets shrink, SABEW training programs are an important resource, and offer an added value by promoting the professional development of SABEW members.

    *Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Matthew Goldberg, consumer banking reporter, Bankrate.com

    Desiree Hanford, Lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University

    Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Website Committee

    *James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    Renee McGivern, director of conference sponsorship, SABEW

    Past President Committee
    Grateful for their substantial contributions over many years, this committee engages former presidents of the Society by maintaining communication and involvement with current leadership, encouraging meetings and other activities.

    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    SABEWNYC19 Fall Conference Committee

    *Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Matthew Goldberg, consumer banking reporter, Bankrate.com

    Paul Golden, managing director of media and communications, NEFE

    Glenn Hall, global chief, Dow Jones Newswires

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    Scott Wenger, group editorial director, SourceMedia

  • 2019 – 2020 Board of Governors

    Posted By sabew_admin on Thursday May 23, 2019

    Executive Officers

     

    President

    Bryan Borzykowski
    Freelance business writer
    @bborzyko
    Read Bryan’s bio

    Vice President

    Kim Quillen
    Business source editor
    Chicago Tribune
    @QuillenKim
    Read Kim’s bio

    Secretary/Treasurer

    Caleb Silver
    Editor-in-chief & SVP content
    Investopedia
    @calebsilver
    Read Caleb’s bio

    Back to Top

    Board Members

    Term Ending 2020

    Robert Barba
    Spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires
    @Barba_AB
    Read Robert’s bio

    Cesca Antonelli
    Editor-in-chief
    Bloomberg BNA
    @cescaantonelli
    Read Cesca’s bio
    Pallavi Gogoi
    Chief business editor
    NPR
    @pgogoi
    Read Pallavi’s bio
    Glenn Hall
    Chief editor
    Dow Jones Newswires
    @GlennHall
    Read Glenn’s bio


    Dean Murphy
    Associate managing editor of investigations
    The New York Times
    @deanemurphy
    Read Dean’s bio
      James B. Nelson
    Business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University
    @jamesbnelson
    Read Jim’s bio
     

    Term Ending 2021

    Xana Antunes
    Executive editor
    Quartz
    @xantunesx
    Read Xana’s bio

    Rich Barbieri
    Executive editor
    CNN Business
    @richbarbieri
    Read Rich’s bio
    Brad Foss
    Global business editor
    Associated Press
    @bradfoss_
    Read Brad’s bio
    Andrew Leckey
    President/Business journalism chair
    Donald W. Reynolds National Center/ASU
    Read Andrew’s bio
    Heather Long
    Economics Correspondent The Washington Post @byHeatherLong
    Read Heather’s bio

    Cindy Perman
    Partnerships and syndication editor
    CNBC.com
    @CindyPerman
    Read Cindy’s bio

    Term Ending 2022

    Megan Davies
    Editor/reporter at Reuters
    @meganbadavies
    Read Megan’s bio

    Alan Deutschman
    Professor & Reynolds Endowed Chair of Business Journalism
    Univ. of Nevada, Reno
    @alan_deutschman
    Read Alan’s bio
    Desiree Hanford
    Lecturer
    Medill/Northwestern University
    @djh89 
    Read Desiree’s bio

    James T. Madore
    Economics writer
    Newsday
    @JamesTMadore
    Read James’ bio

    Jenny Paurys
    Managing editor
    S&P Global Market Intelligence
    @JennyPaurys
    Read Jenny’s bio
    Scott Wenger
    Group editorial director
    SourceMedia
    @ScottWengerNYC 
    Read Scott’s bio

    Ex-Officio

    Mark Hamrick
    Senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief
    Bankrate.com
    @hamrickisms
    Read Mark’s bio
    Joanna Ossinger
    Editor, cross-asset group
    Bloomberg News
    @ossingerj
    Read Joanna’s bio
    Cory Schouten
    Senior newsletter editor
    The Wall Street Journal
    @CorySchouten
    Read Cory’s bio

    Marty Steffens
    SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism
    School of Journalism,
    University of Missouri

    Back to Top

  • Senior Writer at The Church Pension Group

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday May 22, 2019

    Job Description: The Church Pension Group, a financial services organization that serves the Episcopal Church, is seeking a Senior Writer in Corporate Communications. The successful candidate will be a seasoned writer/journalist who will craft short-form pieces for client newsletters, external CEO communications including the annual report and promotional, direct mail, advertising, and educational materials. • Bachelor’s degree is required. • At least 12 years experience writing in the field of journalism, advertising, marketing, public relations, publishing, philanthropy, or similar area. • At least three years of experience with line editing, copy editing, or proofreading. • Experience in corporate communications. • Experience in financial and/or insurance writing. EOE

    Job Qualifications: To be successful in this role, an individual must have the following professional background and qualities. Reasonable accommodations will be made to enable a person with disabilities to perform these essential functions. Experience with interviewing C-suite-level executives. Demonstrated attention to detail and accuracy. Demonstrated ability to tailor written messages, tones, and materials to differing audiences. In-depth knowledge of English spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Working familiarity with the Associated Press Stylebook and/or The Chicago Manual of Style. Ability to juggle and prioritize projects with competing and often tight deadlines. Well-developed time, resource, and project management skills. Ability to be self-motivated while working as part of a team, with a can-do attitude. Minimum 2016 Microsoft Office skills required.

    How to Apply: Click here to apply.

  • Six elected to the SABEW Board of Governors at SABEW19

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Saturday May 18, 2019

    Ballots were cast during SABEW19, SABEW’s annual conference, in Phoenix for six seats on the SABEW Board of Governors with a term ending in 2022.

    SABEW members elected three new members to the Board of Governors:

    • Alan Deutschman, Professor and Reynolds Endowed Chair of Business Journalism
      University of Nevada, Reno
    • Desiree Hanford, Lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University
    • Scott Wenger, Group Editorial Director, SourceMedia

    “We are very pleased to welcome these three outstanding business journalists to the board. The breadth, depth, and diversity of their experience will strengthen SABEW,” said Executive Director Kathleen Graham. “I look forward to working with the new, re-elected and current members to advance the mission of SABEW.”

    Three incumbent governors were re-elected, each serving three-year terms:

    The new and re-elected governors join these fourteen current members of SABEW’s board:

    • President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer
    • Vice President, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune
    • Secretary/Treasurer, Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia/IAC
    • Xana Antunes, executive editor, Quartz
    • Cesca Antonelli, editor-in-chief, Bloomberg BNA
    • Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires
    • Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business
    • Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press
    • Pallavi Gogoi, chief business editor, NPR
    • Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires
    • Andrew Leckey, president/business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center, ASU
    • Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post
    • Dean Murphy, associate managing editor for investigations, The New York Times
    • James B. Nelson, editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and business journalism instructor, Marquette University
    • Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Ex-officio members:

    • Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com
    • Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair in business and journalism School of Journalism, University of Missouri

    About the Board of Governors and SABEW
    The Board of Governors is the leadership body of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW), a 501(c)(3) organization. Governors are elected by a vote of the membership during the annual spring conference. SABEW’s mission is to encourage comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and to increase members’ skills and knowledge through continuous education. SABEW advocates for full access to financial and economic data, including information collected and distributed by governments.

    For more information, contact [email protected].

    Follow @sabew on twitter.

  • SABEW19 Student Newsroom Staff

    Posted By David Wilhite on Friday May 17, 2019

    Participating Schools and Reporters:

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Madeline Ackley is a junior at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication majoring in digital journalism. She is currently the arts and entertainment editor at the Downtown Devil, an independent digital publication run by Arizona State University students. She covers business, arts and local politics.

    Twitter: @mkayackley

     

    Kara Carlson is a graduate of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. While at the Cronkite School, she focused on digital journalism with an emphasis on business, politics and community reporting. She held multiple internships and was a reporter for ASU’s student-run online publication, the Downtown Devil.

    Twitter: @KaraCarlson2

     

    Derek Hall is an undergraduate student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He has interned for The Seattle Times, The Arizona Republic and the Phoenix Business Journal, and he will be spending his summer at Bloomberg in Chicago. He will graduate in May 2020 with an emphasis in business journalism and a minor in economics.

    Twitter: @dereknhall

     

    Andres Guerra Luz is a recent graduate of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. During his time at ASU, he interned at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and then at Reuters in New York. He graduated from ASU with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and mass communication.

    Twitter: @AndresGLuz

     

    Hailey Mensik is a business journalism student at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and will receive her undergraduate degree in December. Last summer she reported for the Chicago Tribune’s business section and will be with the Los Angeles Times this summer. She enjoys covering retail and labor stories.

    Twitter: @haileymensik1

     

    Deagan Urbatsch is an undergraduate student from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication pursuing a degree in digital reporting with an emphasis on business. Urbatsch has narrowed his focus to data journalism and has written articles based on credit card debt, crime statistics and trends like children spending less time playing outdoors. In his free time, he enjoys reading and exploring nature.

    Twitter: @DeaganUrbatsch

  • SABEW welcomes the release of Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday May 7, 2019

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) welcomes the release of Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo after more than 500 days in jail in Myanmar. As we have been saying for more than a year, they should never have been imprisoned.

    The reporters, who were awarded a Pulitzer Prize for exposing atrocities against Rohingya Muslims, had been sentenced in September 2018 to seven years in prison on charges of illegal possession of official documents. Police in Myanmar detained the two reporters in December 2017 for allegedly “obtaining state secrets” related to a military crackdown on Rohingya Muslims in the country’s Rakhine state.

    SABEW has joined other news organizations, including member Reuters, in calling for their release, most recently in a statement advance of World Press Freedom Day on May 3.

    SABEW is increasingly concerned about the arrests of journalists and attacks on the media by government officials and other authorities in both the United States and abroad. For more information on SABEW’s First Amendment Initiative go to #SABEW1stAmendment. SABEW is the world’s largest organization dedicated to business and financial journalism.

    For more information, contact Kathleen Graham, SABEW executive director, at [email protected].

  • SABEW Board of Governors Elections 2019

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday April 30, 2019

    Ballots will be cast during SABEW19 for six open SABEW Board of Governors seats with three-year terms ending in 2022. If you are interested in running send your statement of intent, bio and photo to Aimee O’Grady at [email protected] by next Tuesday May 7.

    Voting members will receive their ballot information directly from online voting service provider Opavote.org.

    Board Candidates as of 4/30/19 (listed in alphabetical order)

    Megan Davies
    Editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters
    I’d be honored to serve a term as a SABEW board member. I’m passionate about journalism and dedicated to the field of business reporting. I’ve held various leadership roles within Reuters in the United States and Russia and reported on a wide variety of business topics. I’m particularly passionate about enterprise reporting. I’d be keen to be involved in SABEW to further high standards of business journalism and try and encourage the next generation of reporters.

    Alan Deutschman
    Professor and Reynolds Endowed Chair of Business Journalism
    University of Nevada, Reno
    I have enjoyed chairing committees as a judge for the Best in Business Awards, and I would like to get more involved with SABEW by serving on the board. For the past eight years I’ve been a professor of business journalism, and I would like to help expand SABEW’s outreach efforts to students and faculty on college campuses. We’ve seen rising interest in business journalism at universities, and I think that SABEW is the perfect organization for bringing together practitioners and professors. We can do a lot more to attract talented newcomers into our field and to provide valuable training and resources for teachers at j-schools and liberal-arts programs. We can also help to lead the public conversations on campuses about many issues.

    Before joining the faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno, I spent 22 years working as a business journalist in New York and San Francisco. I covered Silicon Valley for Fortune and Fast Company, wrote the “Profit Motive” column for GQ, and contributed to Vanity Fair and New York Magazine. I’m also the author of four books including The Second Coming of Steve Jobs. In my current position as a business journalism professor, I can spend as much as 20% of my time on service to my field. It would be an honor to devote that time and energy to serving on the SABEW board.

    Desiree Hanford
    Lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University
    I would like to be a member of SABEW’s board because I have a great amount of respect for SABEW’s mission and my fellow members, and I would like to collaborate with fellow board members to further the organization’s mission. I think it’s important to cultivate and nurture the next generation of business reporters – those who are in college and just beginning their careers – in addition to supporting veteran business reporters and editors.

    I’ve been involved in SABEW for a few years, helping to run the student newsroom during past spring conferences and judging the Best in Business Awards. I recently joined the Training Committee and look forward to contributing to its work. I can also contribute through member recruitment, conference and workshop planning and more. I am happy to lend a hand wherever it is needed.

    I teach a number of undergraduate and graduate courses at Medill, including business and money reporting, and I was a business reporter at Dow Jones Newswires before joining Medill’s faculty. In addition to Chicago and Evanston, Medill has a presence in Washington, San Francisco and Qatar.

    I’ve been fortunate to bring Medill students to SABEW’s fall and spring conferences, and each time the students have been grateful for the connections they’ve made and inspired by the work of fellow SABEW members. They’ve left the conferences excited about their futures in business reporting, and I’ve left invigorated by their enthusiasm and humbled to spend time with the best in the industry.

    I would be honored to serve as a SABEW board member. Thank you for considering me in the upcoming election.

    James Madore
    Economics writer, Newsday
    I’m seeking re-election to the SABEW Board of Governors to continue my work on the group’s finances and advocacy of the First Amendment.

    I have had the privilege these past three years to chair the Finance Committee and to serve on the Executive Committee.

    The Finance Committee, which includes rank-and-file members and board governors, meets monthly with the executive director and bookkeeper to review income and expense reports. The committee also reviews the proposed budget and audit every year.

    Thanks to the fine work of many, I can report that SABEW’s finances are strong and our reporting is transparent. The Finance Committee provides advice and oversight to the executive director on all financial matters.

    I have found my work as vice chairman of the First Amendment Committee to be very rewarding, particularly SABEW’s support for the independence of federal statistical agencies.

    I hope to continue this important work should I be fortunate enough to win re-election.

    In addition, I hope to work with other governors to increase the involvement of rank-and-file members in SABEW activities. The organization’s greatest strength is its membership, which on a daily basis provides news that’s essential to the financial lives of millions of people in the United States and Canada.

    Thank you for your consideration.

    Jenny Paurys
    Managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    When I became a business journalist in 2005, I discovered a profession that prized curiosity, analytical thinking and explanatory prose. I feel these remain the central attributes of business journalism, but the importance of the craft has grown considerably in the intervening years. Globalization, driven by the information age, is now the shaping force of the world economy; markets, investors and business owners depend more than ever on finding trusted sources of information to help them navigate this increasingly complex ecosystem.

    I still work for the newsroom I joined in 2005, though it has more than quadrupled in size since then. Our news organization is fortunate to be expanding while others are contracting, based in part on our dedicated audience, sector-focused approach to journalism and the longtime practice of integrating data into our reporting. I feel these attributes of our newsroom provide me with a unique perspective that I can bring to my role at SABEW.

    Further, my position as managing editor provides me with the opportunity to travel widely and utilize that travel to help SABEW continue to build its membership, especially outside of the U.S. I would like to use my base in Arlington, Va., to help build participation by D.C.-area journalists. Finally, I would like to support SABEW’s ongoing work to modernize its website and collateral to help attract new business media to our ranks.

    My initial half-year on the SABEW board offered me a set of peers I had not found before: a group of professionals from competing newsrooms who volunteer their time and resources to collaborate for the singular purpose of elevating business journalism. These initial months have so inspired me that I am seeking your support for election to the board, in the hopes that I can work with you to move SABEW forward into its next chapter.

    Scott Wenger
    Group Editorial Director, SourceMedia
    I look forward to helping my fellow business journalists bolster and develop new skills and connections to make the work we do even more relevant and valuable to our readers.

    I am eager to help build on what I see as SABEW’s core competencies: training, networking, inspiring and recruiting. And, most crucially, developing practical ideas to share so we can best engage and grow our readerships. I also look forward to helping SABEW advance its mission of global expansion.

    A core goal of mine will be to strengthen SABEW at a time of revolutionary and exciting changes in our field, which have seen the creation of small organizations that have proved so potent, digital journalism powerhouses and industry-specific content organizations like my own that aspire to deliver savvy analysis, thoughtful enterprise and deeply reported multimedia investigative projects.

    Over the years — from my current role as a group editorial director at SourceMedia, where I manage Financial Planning, Employee Benefit News and four additional brands, to earlier years at The Wall Street Journal, The Hartford Courant, CNBC, CNN, the New York Daily News and as a health care analyst at Alex. Brown & Sons — I’ve seen just how impactful business journalism can be, and needs to be.

     

  • SABEW joins Reuters in calling for imprisoned journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo to be freed

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Monday April 29, 2019

    In advance of World Press Freedom Day on May 3, the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) joins member Reuters in calling for imprisoned Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo to be freed.

    The journalists, who were awarded a Pulitzer Prize for their exposé on atrocities against Rohingya Muslims, were sentenced in September 2018 to seven years in prison on charges of illegal possession of official documents.

    The two journalists also recently received UNESCO’s annual press freedom prize for their reporting on the killings, and they were among a group of journalists recognized as Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” for 2018. World Press Freedom Day is May 3.

    Police in Myanmar detained the two reporters in December 2017 for allegedly “obtaining state secrets” related to a military crackdown on Rohingya Muslims in the country’s Rakhine state. Authorities arrested them just after they had dinner with two police officers who gave them the documents, in what is largely seen as a police setup.

    After a regional high court in January rejected an earlier appeal, attorneys representing the journalists filed an appeal with the country’s highest court the following month.

    But the Myanmar Supreme Court upheld the convictions and jail terms for Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, who already have been incarcerated for more than 16 months.

    In a statement issued Tuesday following the ruling, Reuters chief counsel Gail Gove, said, “Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo did not commit any crime, nor was there any proof that they did. Instead, they were victims of a police setup to silence their truthful reporting. We will continue to do all we can to free them as soon as possible.”

    SABEW is increasingly concerned about the arrests of journalists and attacks on the media by government officials and other authorities in both the United States and abroad.

    The sentencing of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo by Myanmar authorities and the subsequent rejection of their appeal by the country’s Supreme Court for merely doing their jobs — reporting the news — are unacceptable.

    For more information on SABEW’s First Amendment Initiative go to #SABEW1stAmendment.

    SABEW is the world’s largest organization dedicated to business and financial journalism.

    For more information, contact Kathleen Graham, SABEW executive director, at [email protected].

  • Real estate journalist Ilyce Glink to receive SABEW President’s Award – 2015

    Posted By admin on Wednesday April 3, 2019

    Special to SABEW

    glink.jpg.320x320pxCHICAGO – lyce Glink, an award-winning real estate journalist and founder of Think Glink Media, will be recognized by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers with one of its highest honors, the President’s Award.

    Glink will receive the honor Saturday, April 25, at SABEW’s annual conference in Chicago.

    Gibbs, a longtime SABEW member, is being honored for her years of service to the organization, including her key role as chair of the conference, which is expected to attract more than 200 leading business journalists, educators, students and policymakers. Glink is scheduled to receive the award shortly after lunchtime remarks by Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner.

    “Ilyce stepped up to take on the demanding role of conference chair and produced an incredible program that will deliver top-quality training, networking and access to newsmakers,” said Marty Wolk, SABEW president and assigning editor at NerdWallet. “Ilyce has been incredibly generous with her time and resources over the year, and I have relied heavily on her ideas and advice. She is richly deserving of this honor.”

    Glink is the author of over a dozen books, including the best-selling “100 Questions Every First-Time Home Buyer Should Ask” and “Buy, Close, Move In!” Glink has served as an on-air real estate and personal finance expert for “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” and virtually every major national television network, as well many other local stations. Among her many honors, she was named one of the 30 Most Influential Women in Housing 2014 by HopusingWire, and she also won the first Money $mart award from the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

    In addition to Rauner, speakers at SABEWE’s annual conference include Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker and leading financial writers Ron Lieber, Philip Moeller, Diana Henriques, Larry Kotlikoff and Liz Weston.

    The conference kicks off Thursday evening with a panel featuring University of Chicago economists Austan Goolsbee and Randall Kroszner.

    Complete conference details, including ticket information, can be found here.

    About SABEW:
    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers is the nation’s largest organization dedicated to financial journalism with more than 3,500 members. SABEW conducts professional development activities all over the country.

    For more information, contact Kathleen Graham, executive director, at [email protected].

     

  • Complete list of BIB winning entries and newsrooms

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Review the names of the winning contributors.

     

    Audio; All News Organizations

    Winner – Indianapolis Business Journal: The IBJ podcast
    Honorable Mention – The Wall Street Journal: The next battlefield

    Banking/Finance; Large

    Winner – Bloomberg: Sign here to lose everything
    Honorable Mention – Los Angeles Times: The hidden costs of high-interest rate installment lending

    Banking/Finance; Medium

    Winner – The Charlotte Observer: Wells Fargo’s controversies continue

    Banking/Finance; Small

    Winner – American Banker: Bank CEO’s fire-and-rehire maneuver reaps windfall at taxpayer expense
    Honorable Mention – Sacramento Business Journal: After a decade, banks returning to Sacramento
    Honorable Mention – Financial Planning: Keep quiet

    Breaking News; Large

    Winner – Los Angeles Times: Toyota held accountable for a defect in its Prius

    Breaking News; Medium

    Winner – Forbes.com: The inside story of Papa John’s toxic culture
    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg Law: Ben Penn tip sharing rule

    Breaking News; Small

    Winner – American Banker: Comerica scrambles to address fraud in prepaid benefits program
    Honorable Mention – Nashville Business Journal: AllianceBernstein’s move to Nashville

    Commentary/Opinion; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Tech and policies

    Commentary/Opinion; Medium

    Winner – The Detroit News: Daniel Howes opinion/commentary
    Honorable Mention – The Boston Globe: Shirley Leung opinion/commentary

    Commentary/Opinion; Small

    Winner – Fast Company: Rick Wartzman opinion/commentary
    Honorable Mention – STAT: Adam Feuerstein biotech industry commentary
    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business:  2018 editorial board

    Economics; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The trade equation

    Economics; Medium

    Winner – Mother Jones: Frozen assets
    Honorable Mention – Quartz: Remaking economics series

    Economics; Small

    Winner – Indianapolis Business Journal: One city, worlds apart

    Energy/Natural Resources; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock
    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Center for Public Integrity, The Texas Tribune, The Associated Press and Newsy: Blowout

    Energy/Natural Resources; Medium

    Winner – CNN: Dirty energy
    Honorable Mention – The Dallas Morning News: Atmos Energy

    Energy/Natural Resources; Small

    Winner – Providence Business News: Rising waters
    Honorable Mention – Debtwire: Appalachia’s coal comeback collides with grim opioid reality

    Explanatory; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ocean shock
    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: Immigration, Inc.
    Honorable Mention – The New York Times: Pregnancy discrimination

    Explanatory; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: What the hell happened at GE?
    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle: The miracle molecule
    Honorable Mention – Minneapolis Star Tribune: Aging parents, stressed families

    Explanatory; Small

    Winner – InsideClimate News: Harvesting peril
    Winner – Project on Government Oversight: Drilling down series
    Honorable Mention – The Desert Sun: Poisoned cities, deadly border
    Honorable Mention – McClatchy DC Bureau: Ancestry DNA: Privacy for sale

    Feature; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The itsy-bitsy, teenie-weenie, very litigious bikini
    Honorable Mention – Businessweek: Two Towns Forged an Unlikely Bond. Now, ICE Is Severing the Connection.

    Feature; Medium

    Winner – Minneapolis Star Tribune: Legal war engulfs 3M device
    Honorable Mention – Forbes.com: Wilbur Ross series

    Feature; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal: Mapping the new Nashville
    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Kansas is dying
    Honorable Mention – Debtwire Investigations: How Burger King fed storm-ravaged Puerto Rico, and made a killing

    General Excellence; Industry/Topic-Specific Publications

    Winner – American Banker

    General Excellence; Large

    Winner – Financial Times

    General Excellence; Medium

    Winner – The Dallas Morning News
    Honorable Mention – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    General Excellence; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal
    Honorable Mention – Triangle Business Journal

    Government; Large

    Winner – Reuters: Ambushed at home

    Government; Medium

    Winner – Politico: Investigation of Ryan Zinke
    Honorable Mention – The Plain Dealer: Do wage theft laws in Ohio harm or help workers?

    Government; Small

    Winner – InsideClimate News: Dangers without borders
    Honorable MentionCapital & Main: Battery blood: How California health agencies failed Exide workers
    Honorable Mention – New Haven Independent: ‘Scoops & tosses’ $160M in old debt

    Health/Science; Large

    Winner – A collaboration of ICIJ, NBC News Investigative Unit, The Associated Press and partners: The implant files
    Honorable Mention – Financial Times: Opioid crisis and the Sackler family

    Health/Science; Medium

    Winner – ProPublica:  Health Insurance Hustle
    Honorable Mention – ProPublica: Black Patients Miss Out On Promising Cancer Drugs

    Health/Science; Small

    Winner – Kaiser Health News: Drug price shenanigans
    Honorable Mention – InsideClimate News: Surrounded by oil fields, an Alaska village fears for its health

    Innovation; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Visual narratives

    Innovation; Medium

    Winner – GateHouse Media: Failure to deliver

    Innovation; Small

    Honorable Mention – Crain’s Chicago Business: Chicago’s opioid crisis series

    International Reporting; Large

    Winner – The Associated Press: China’s internment camps
    Honorable Mention – Businessweek: Brexit’s big short

    International Reporting; Medium

    Winner – A collaboration of ProPublica and Time Magazine: Unprotected

    International Reporting; Small

    Winner – A collaboration of ICIJ, Norbert Zongo Cell for Investigative Journalism in West Africa (CENOZO) and 11 media partners from West Africa: West Africa Leaks

    Investigative; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: The fall of Steve Wynn
    Honorable Mention – The New York Times and The Guardian/The Observer of London: Facebook, disinformation and privacy

    Investigative; Medium

    Winner – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Bad medicine
    Winner – The Dallas Morning News: Pain & profit
    Honorable Mention – Forbes.com: Wilbur Ross series

    Investigative; Small

    Winner – A collaboration of The New Republic and The Investigative Fund: Political corruption and the art of the deal
    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Intercept and The Investigative Fund: FINRA’s black hole
    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ: Driven into debt

    Markets; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Explaining the financial markets

    Markets; Medium

    Winner – Bloomberg Law: SEC Wall Street cops see staff drop since Trump election

    Markets; Small

    Winner – RTO Insider: The GreenHat Energy story: Doubling down — with other people’s money

    Media/Entertainment; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Moonves and CBS exposed

    Media/Entertainment; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Tronc chairman sexual harassment

    Media/Entertainment; Small

    Winner – The Center for Public Integrity: The NBA and MLB quietly hustle for a cut of the sports betting jackpot

    Newsletter; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Due Diligence

    Newsletter; Medium

    Winner – Barron’s: Review & Preview

    Newsletter; Small

    Winner – Communications Daily on 911

    Personal Finance; Large

    Winner – Financial Times: Click to donate

    Personal Finance; Medium

    Winner – The Chronicle of Higher Education: Drew Cloud is a well-known expert on student loans. One problem: He isn’t real.

    Personal Finance; Small

    Winner – The Marshall Project: Petty charges, princely profit

    Honorable Mention – McClatchy DC Bureau: Non-bank lending targets weakest borrowers

    Real Estate; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: Trump taxes

    Real Estate; Medium

    Winner – The Globe and Mail: Inside the fall of Fortress
    Honorable Mention – Houston Chronicle: Real estate in the aftermath of Harvey

    Real Estate; Small

    Winner – Nashville Business Journal: Project Stella and Why Tony Giarratana gets a Metro park (and you don’t)
    Honorable Mention – Realtor.com: Life in the flood zone

    Retail; Large

    Winner – The New York Times: The human side of the retail shakeout

    Retail; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Michelle Gass is cracking the code at Kohl’s
    Honorable Mention – Chicago Tribune: Sears’ demise

    Retail; Small

    Winner – Capital & Main: The ‘Amazon Tax’ Ruling: Disrupting the Disruptors?
    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Foreign beef can legally be labeled “Product of U.S.A.”

    Small Business/Management/Career; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: Burned out
    Honorable Mention – Bloomberg: In Trump’s America, bosses are accused of weaponizing the ICE crackdown

    Small Business/Management/Career; Medium

    Winner – Fortune: Second to none, but still number two

    Small Business/Management/Career; Small

    Winner – McClatchy DC Bureau: Merchant cash death spiral

    Student Journalism; Projects and Collaborations

    Winner – Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY) and Dollars & Sense of Maine

    Student Journalism; Stories Written for Professional Publications

    Winner – Washington and Lee University published in the Tampa Bay Times: SunPass investigation
    Honorable Mention – UNC Chapel Hill published in the Triangle Business Journal: Where every penny is earned

    Student Journalism; Stories produced for Student News Organizations

    Winner – Cronkite News by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication: Hurricane provides opportunity for Puerto Rico’s battered tourism industry

    Technology; Large

    Winner The Wall Street Journal: Elon Musk

    Technology; Medium

    Winner – Politico: The least connected people in America
    Honorable Mention – Forbes: WhatsApp

    Technology; Small

    Winner – The Weekly Standard: Telemarketers, ahoy
    Honorable Mention – The New Food Economy: Silicon Valley wants to give us eggs without chickens. Do we want that?

    Travel/Transportation; Large

    Winner – The Wall Street Journal: The middle seat

    Travel/Transportation; Medium

    Winner CNN Business: Uber sexual assault investigation
    Honorable Mention – The Seattle Times: Stolen Horizon passenger jet crashes outside Seattle

    Travel/Transportation; Small

    Winner – The Information: The self-driving car industry

    Video; Large

    Winner – Bloomberg: The drone delivery operator in Rwanda
    Honorable Mention – Financial Times: Argentina: A life of boom and bust

    Video; Medium and Small

    Winner – The Story Exchange: A Sandy Hook mom’s nonprofit hopes to stop school shootings

  • Investigative; Small

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Winner – A collaboration of The New Republic and Type Investigations: Political corruption and the art of the deal

    • Contributor – Anjali Kamat
    • Judges’ Comments – Anjali Kamat’s fresh and groundbreaking reporting on corrupt practices in Trump Organization real-estate projects in India dove deep into the murky world of Indian politics and business. It emerged with a colorful and compelling tale of a big company tied to Indian politicians and business partners with a long history of lawsuits and investigations that yielded evidence of potential bribery, fraud, intimidation, illegal land acquisition and money laundering — much of which enriched the president of the United States.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of The Intercept and Type Investigations: FINRA’s black hole

    • Contributor – Susan Antilla
    • Judges’ Comments – Sexual misconduct on Wall Street doesn’t get a fraction of the attention it does in Hollywood, politics and the tech industry, and closed-door arbitration by the financial industry’s own watchdog is one big reason. The Intercept’s detailed investigation of FINRA, which releases almost no information about its arbitrations, revealed that out of 55,000 complaints it decided over the past 30 years, only 97 involved harassment claims by women, who won just 17 of them. It’s a striking picture of the dysfunction that results when a private justice system tries to regulate sexual misconduct in the workplace.

    Honorable Mention – A collaboration of ProPublica Illinois and WBEZ: Driven into debt

    • Contributors – Melissa Sanchez, Elliott Ramos, David Eads, Sandhya Kambhampati and WBEZ
    • Judges’ Comments – A shocking package with tremendous detail and a great visualization lays out how the city of Chicago raised ticket fees to yield more revenue — but with disastrous effects on the city’s poorer and minority populations. Highlights included compelling personal stories, an interactive graphic based on the city’s entire traffic ticket database and the amazing figure that Chicago residents owe a total of $1.45 billion in ticket debt — many times more than in cities such as New York and Los Angeles, and a burden that often forces people into personal bankruptcy in order to restore their driver licenses.
  • Retail; Medium

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    Winner – Fortune: Michelle Gass is cracking the code at Kohl’s

    • Contributor – Phil Wahba
    • Judges’ Comments – Much has been written about the Amazon effect on brick-and-mortar retailers, but Phil Wahba at Fortune found a fresh angle on the battle for consumers. Kohl’s new CEO Michelle Gass is changing strategies at all levels, such as precise inventory tracking and beefing up beauty sales with pricier Ralph Lauren Polo fragrances. Wahba took us along as Gass did her own consumer research: watching a busy mother return competitor Amazon orders — “brick-and-mortar kryptonite” — at her local Kohl’s store. The rationale is the shopper will linger and spend money at Kohl’s after returning Amazon goods. This story is a fine example of combining a CEO profile with a corporate strategy story to “put a face on” a trend that has shuttered so many retailers.

    Honorable Mention – Chicago Tribune: Sears’ demise

    • Contributor – Lauren Zumbach
    • Judges’ Comments – Lauren Zumbach delivers a smart, in-depth story that did far more than convey the daily news of Sears’ bankruptcy. She followed up with a feature explaining what’s ahead for the legendary Chicago-based retailer.
  • 2018 Best in Business Judges

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Monday March 18, 2019

    Jennifer Ablan, Reuters
    Saqib Iqbal Ahmed, Reuters
    Anjuman Ali, The Washington Post
    Bill Alpert, Barron’s
    Susan Antilla, The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute
    Xana Antunes, Quartz and SABEW Board Member
    Doug Banks, Boston Business Global
    Robert Barba, The Wall Street Journal and SABEW Board Member
    Emily Barrett, Bloomberg News
    David Beal, Past SABEW President
    Ben Berkowitz, WNBC
    Rob Blackwell, American Banker
    Jonathan Blum, Blumsday
    Peter Bohan, Retired, formerly Reuters
    Donna Borak, CNN Business
    Bryan Borzykowski, Freelance and SABEW Vice President
    Brandon Brown, Phoenix Business Journal
    Stephanie Brumsey, Reuters
    Jon Buck, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Bob Burdick, Retired, formerly Rocky Mountain News
    Jonathan Burton, MarketWatch
    Adrienne Carter, The New York Times
    Jon Chesto, Boston Globe
    Mary Childs, Financial Times
    Paul Conley, Railway Track & Structures
    Ronnie Crocker, Beaumont Enterprise
    Antony Currie, Reuters BreakingViews
    Megan Davies, Reuters and SABEW Board Member
    Lance Davis, Bankrate.com
    Gail DeGeorge, Global Sisters Report/National Catholic Reporter and Past SABEW President
    Lydia DePillis, CNN Business
    Esme Deprez, Bloomberg
    Alan Deutschman, University of Nevada-Reno
    Jonathan Diamond, Houston Chronicle
    Moira Dickinson, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Allan Dodds Frank, Freelance
    Jack Doran, International Financial Review Refinitiv
    Henry Dubroff, Pacific Cost Business Times and Past SABEW President
    Ed Dufner, Bloomberg News
    Kevin Dugan, The New York Post
    Paul Eckert, Radio Free Asia
    Richard Eisenberg, PBS Nextavenue.org
    Jesse Eisinger, ProPublica
    Clay Eltzroth, Bloomberg
    Rachel Evans, Bloomberg News
    Bay Fang, Radio Free Asia
    Greg Farrell, Bloomberg News
    Brad Foss, Associated Press and SABEW Board Member
    Dennis Fulton, Retired
    Tanya Gazdik, MediaPost
    Melita Garza, Texas Christian University
    Rob Gavin, Houston Chronicle
    Roseanne Gerin, Radio Free Asia and SABEW Board Member
    Pallavi Gogoi, NPR and SABEW Board Member
    Bruce Goldberg, BG Writes
    Howard Goller, Reuters
    Angela Greiling Keane, Politico
    Justine Griffin, Tampa Bay Times
    Rami Grunbaum, Seattle Times
    Dan Haar, Hearst Connecticut Media
    Kevin Hall, McClatchy and Past SABEW President
    Glenn Hall, The Wall Street Journal and SABEW Board Member
    Kristen Hallam, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    David Hamilton, Associated Press
    Mark Hamrick, Bankrate.com and SABEW President
    Desiree Hanford, Medill Northwestern University
    Barry Harrell, Austin American-Statesman
    Craig Harris, Arizona Republic
    Tom Herman, Yale University
    Jeremy Herron, Bloomberg
    Dan Hertzberg, Retired from The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg News
    Maureen Hoch, Harvard Business Review
    Allison Hoffman, CNN Business
    Bill Holland, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Jeff Horwitz, The Wall Street Journal
    Clark Hoyt, Retired, Knight Ridder
    John Hughes, Bloomberg News
    Carol Hymowitz, Stanford’s Center on Longevity
    Andre Jackson, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Peter Jeffrey, Bloomberg
    Brenn Jones, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Dave Kansas, Minnesota Public Radio and Past SABEW President
    Mark Kass, Milwaukee Business Journal
    Janet Kersnar, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Dimitra Kessenides, Bloomberg News
    Aaron Kessler, CNN Business
    Silvia Killingsworth, Bloomberg Businessweek
    Georgia Frances King, Quartz
    Jill Kirschenbaum, Freelance
    Matthew Kish, Portland Business Journal
    Bernie Kohn, Bloomberg BNA and Past SABEW President
    Kathy Kristof, SideHusl.com and Past SABEW President
    Kevin Krolicki, Reuters
    Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press
    Bobby Lamb, The Advocate
    Rachel Layne, Freelance
    Alexis Leondis, Bloomberg News
    Al Lewis, Houston Chronicle
    Madeleine Lim, Bloomberg News
    Teresa Lindeman, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    Heather Long, Washington Post and SABEW Board Member
    Ashley Lutz, Bankrate/The Points Guy
    James Madore, Newsday and SABEW Board Member
    Jonathan Make, Communications Daily
    Kris Mamula, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    Felice Maranz, Bloomberg News
    Lynne Marek, Crain’s Chicago Business
    David Marino-Nachison, Barron’s
    Gary Matsumoto, CGTN America
    Steve Matthews, Bloomberg News
    Scott Mayerowitz, The Points Guy
    Greg McCune, Associated Press and Past SABEW President
    Maura McDermott, Newsday
    Bonnie McGeer, American Banker
    Sarah McGregor, Bloomberg
    Bill McGuire, Bankrate.com
    Flynn McRoberts, Bloomberg News
    Renae Merle, The Washington Post
    Phyllis Messinger, The New York Times
    Nathaniel Meyersohn, CNN Business
    David Milstead, The Globe and Mail
    Fred Monyak, Associated Press
    George Moriarty, Seeking Alpha
    Dan Moss, Bloomberg Opinion
    Dean Murphy, New York Times and SABEW Board Member
    Jeff Muskus, Bloomberg Businessweek
    Jim Nelson, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel and SABEW Board Member
    Rick Newman, Yahoo Finance
    Lananh Nguyen, Bloomberg
    Kevin Noblet, Retired and Past SABEW President
    Paul O’Donnell, Dallas Morning News
    Holly Ojalvo, Quartz
    Susan Orr, Indianapolis Business Journal
    Joanna Ossinger, Bloomberg and Past SABEW President
    Jeremy Owens, MarketWatch
    Mukul Pandya, Wharton School
    Mary Jane Pardue, Missouri State
    Tory Parrish, Newsday
    Jan Paschal, IPOScoop
    Jenny Paurys, S&P Global Market Intelligence and SABEW Board Member
    Jim Pensiero, Retired, The Wall Street Journal
    Cindy Perman, CNBC and SABEW Board Member
    Alanna Petroff, Yahoo Finance
    Mary Ellen Podmolik, Chicago Tribune
    Farran Powell, U.S. News & World Report
    Ken Pringle, Freelance, formerly with Bloomberg and The Wall Street Journal
    Kim Quillen, Chicago Tribune and SABEW Secretary/Treasurer
    Glenn Rabinowitz, Pacific Business Times
    Evan Ramstad, Minneapolis Star-Tribune
    Mike Regan, Bloomberg News
    Gary Regenstreif, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Amy Resnick, Pensions & Investments
    Rob Reuteman, Colorado State University and Past SABEW President
    Stephanie Ritenbaugh, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    Deon Roberts, Charlotte Observer
    Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Globe & Mail
    Peter Robison, Bloomberg
    Ceci Rodgers, Medill Northwestern University
    Mary Romano, Freelance
    John Russell, Indianapolis Business Journal
    Rachel Sams, Albuquerque Business First
    Patrick Sanders, U.S. News & World Report and SABEW Board Member
    Margot Sanger-Katz, The New York Times
    Jane Sasseen, McGraw Center for Business Journalism at the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism
    Ernest Scheyder, Reuters
    John Schoen, CNBC
    Cory Schouten, The Wall Street Journal and Past SABEW President
    Alwyn Scott, Reuters
    Anita Sharpe, Bloomberg News
    Erik Siemers, St. Louis Business Journal
    Caleb Silver, Investopedia/IAC and SABEW Board Member
    Akash Sinha, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Allan Sloan, Washington Post/ProPublica
    Jeanna Smialek, Bloomberg
    Randall Smith, University of Missouri and Past SABEW President
    Katerina Sokou, Kathimerini
    Jill Spitz, Arizona Daily Star and Past SABEW President
    Marty Steffens, University of Missouri and SABEW Chair
    Paul Steiger, ProPublica
    Suzanne Stevens, Portland Business Journal
    Marina Strauss, Globe and Mail
    Alecia Swasy, Washington & Lee University
    Jyoti Thottam, New York Times
    Edward Tobin, Reuters
    Sarah Todd, Quartz
    Fatima Tomas, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Craig Torres, Bloomberg News
    Alex Tribou, Bloomberg News
    Bowdeya Tweh, The Wall Street Journal
    Kathryn Vasel, CNN Business
    David Voreacos, Bloomberg News
    Derek Wallbank, Bloomberg News
    Allen Wastler, Mass Mutual
    Joseph Weber , University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Rob Wells, University of Arkansas
    Mark Wert, Cincinnati Enquirer
    Lindsey White, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    Mark Whitehouse, Bloomberg Opinion
    Danielle Wiener-Bronner, CNN Business
    Dave Wilson, Bloomberg News
    Elijah Wolfson, Quartz
    Marty Wolk, Microsoft and Past SABEW President.
    Kimi Yoshino, Los Angeles Times
    Elana Zak, CNN Business
    Erin Zlomek, Bloomberg

  • College Connect Spring 2019: Lessons From My Parents: Spending with a Purpose

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday February 19, 2019

    By Andres Guerra Luz

    As my family and I packed up the last of the belongings from my childhood home, a flurry of different feelings rushed over me. For as long as I could remember, home was an old-timey, multi-story building in an idyllic neighborhood in Chicago. But as my family adapted to some bigchanges, the house was becoming too large an expense. A part of me felt sad to leave the house behind, another part of me felt relieved that we were down-sizing to a more affordable place and yet another part of me was excited to live somewhere new. But because of my parents and how they managed their money, never once did I feel as if we were financially insecure.

    Caveat: the foreclosure on my family’s home is not indicative of the rest of my childhood. I grew up with two parents who worked steady-paying jobs, I was provided every convenience and did not need to work long hours to help support my family, and by the time I went to college, I had been given every tool and support system I needed to succeed. However, leaving behind a profoundly sentimental possession for my family helped me understand a little better how my parents pulled off raising three kids and giving us the life that they did.

    First, my parents knew the value of saving. Not everyone has the luxury to do so, but wherever it was possible, my parents tried to cut down extraneous costs and keep the money for a rainy day. At the time we were selling the house, my father was moving across the country for work, my brother was finishing up his last years at college and my twin sister and I were preparing to graduate high school. The Chicago home had three bedrooms and two bathrooms nestled in a building with a basement, two stories and an attic. We did not need all that space.

    Second, and most importantly, leaving the house taught me what my parents valued above all else. Every move we made after the foreclosure was to a safe neighborhood where we would have access to good education. The design of the building, the number of rooms and even the state where it was located – all of it didn’t matter to my parents as long as they knew my siblings and I could still flourish there, and we could live there together as a family. My parents set priorities and almost every spending decision they made was informed by those goals. Now, three of those goals are on their way to graduating college and finding their first salary jobs.

    As I approach graduation and seek to build my own life, I have begun reflecting on my parents’ spending decisions and looking for ways to model my own after the principles they instilled in me: save where you can, set priorities for your money and make decisions that will support those goals.

    Andres Guerra Luz is a journalism student at Arizona State University.

  • Fellows selected for 2019 Goldschmidt data immersion workshop

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Monday December 17, 2018

    20 Journalists Selected for 2019 SABEW Goldschmidt Fellowship

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) has selected 20 business journalists for the five-day SABEW Goldschmidt Data Immersion Workshop, which will be Feb. 25 to March 1 in Washington, D.C. Fellows were chosen from a pool of 39 applicants.

    The workshop will focus on understanding how the government creates and uses data, and participants will be able to speak directly with those who compile and manage the statistics. Journalists will talk with experts at the Census Bureau, Bureau of Economic Analysis and Bureau of Labor Statistics and explore the large cache of data each agency produces, as well as learn its importance to communities.

    “Every year, SABEW receives more applications for this fellowship, demonstrating the growing need and popularity of this valuable program. This data-immersion training is a great SABEW member benefit,” said Marty Steffens, SABEW chair and University of Missouri business journalism professor, who will lead the training along with Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent and senior investigative reporter for McClatchy Newspapers in Washington.

    The workshop is made possible thanks to a grant from the Chicago-based Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, a loyal SABEW funding partner since 2010.

    View the workshop schedule.

    2019 SABEW Goldschmidt fellows:

    • Jessica Boehm, city hall reporter, The Arizona Republic
    • Bryan Borzykowski, freelance
    • Kimberly Chin, reporter, The Wall Street Journal
    • Stephen Doig, professor, Arizona State University
    • David Earl, anchor and reporter, KETV Omaha
    • Adrian Garcia, data journalist, Bankrate
    • Alexandra Garfinkle, freelance
    • Coryanne Hicks, investing reporter, U.S. News & World Report
    • Llewellyn Hinkes-Jones, data journalist, Investigative Economics
    • Stephanie Lamm, computational journalist, The Dallas Morning News
    • Katie Lobosco, economic policy writer, CNN
    • Emmanuel Martinez, data reporter, Reveal – The Center for Investigative Reporting
    • Caitlin Ostroff, reporter, Miami Herald and McClatchy DC
    • Alana Pipe, data reporter, Financial Times
    • Patrick Rehkamp, data reporter, Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal
    • Jennifer Schlesinger, producer, CNBC
    • Rachel Stone, financial tech reporter, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    • Jennifer Strong, audio journalist, The Wall Street Journal
    • Aldo Svaldi, reporter, The Denver Post
    • Michael Woodel, reporter, Helena (MT) Independent Record
  • College Connect Fall 2018: Music May Seem Free, But It Bites our Budgets

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday November 13, 2018

    By Xinyu Wei

    The first day I came to MU, I was overwhelmed by flyers of welcome parties from tons of clubs and organizations. “Free drink. Free pizza. Free music.” I got hooked by the last part.

    For a long time, I took it for granted that I don’t have to pay for music. I remember all those tapes and CDs in my family home. All I had to do was put them in the players.

    Then it’s the time of MP3 and MP4, but they quickly got replaced by phones and personal computers. I still had no concept of paying for music, since the Internet gave me everything without asking for a single dime.

    Maybe it sounds unreal,  but in China, you can get a one-year premium subscription to  NetEase Cloud Music – one of the most popular music apps in China – for less than $20. In comparison, the Spotify premium costs $9.99 a month.

    But when you consider what we pay overall to listen to music, those subscriptions okly amount to a fraction.

    Earphones are needed for us to have music anywhere and anytime we want. They are developed to be wireless and easily connected through Bluetooth (which of course are more expensive.)  And I see students all over campus wearing Sennheiser, Bose, Audio-technica, Beats, Sony, Shure, JBL etc. Those earphones often run about $200, sometimes more. Some people value the functions of different earphones, such as whether the earphone is good for noise cancellation or better sound quality. A lot of us do have different preferences of different types of music, which creates different needs of the quality of sound. Just as a bartender mixes drinks to have a specific flavor, a lot of technicians try to design earphones by adjusting the degree of tenor, baritone or bass to achieve a specific “flavor” of sound.

    Speakers are necessary if you want share your music with others. Without them, the “free music” on the flyer can be hard to achieve. And of course, speakers can run from under $50 to thousands of dollars.

    One of the new “luxury” student apartments costs a bit more – and the rental agent will tell you part of those extra fees pay for the Bluetooth speaker in the shower.

    Today our demands for music increase and also diversify.

    To take a step further, quite opposite to our common sense, more traditional ways of listening to music didn’t disappear. I can still hear people talking about buying CDs and even vinyl records. Of course, you’ll need something to play them on – a CD player or turntable.

    I didn’t plan to buy a CD player when I came here for the consideration of all the packing and moving. The local jazz series has a music library with more than 7,000 CDs for renting. With a $25 one-year membership, I went to the series office every week and rent CDs without extra cost.

    We haven’t come to live music or concerts yet.

    My friend, Xiaoyu Wei, once spent her weekend flying to Chicago for the live show of Wanna One. The flight cost $280. The ticket cost $270. The hotel and meals cost around $400. That’s for a three-day trip.

    But if you asked Wei, it was well worth it. The trip allowed her to meet her idols and enjoy live music with a huge crowd. For around three hours, the audience kept jumping, waving their arms, singing, screaming and interacting with people they usually just listened to or watched online. The experience overweighed the price.

    We need a sense of presence when it comes to music.

    Music festivals swept the globe in recent years. For Ultra Music Festival, the three-day ticket is around $400. It’s a little bit expensive, but it’s a price a lot of people could afford. By comparison, the ticket of the concert of Justin Timberlake in December could go up to $900.

    The influence of music implies that we are living in an era that entertainment counts as a large part of our living costs besides food and drinks.

    We pay more than we think for music, but in exchange, music gives us comfort, joy and more importantly, a break from work and study.

    Music is not free, but we are still willing to pay.

    Xinyu Wei is a senior majoring in journalism at the University of Missouri.

     

  • College Connect Fall 2018: The Mizzou Rideshare Group

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday November 13, 2018

    By Maggie Austin

    When I started my college search during junior year of high school, I wanted to pick a university far from home. It was a classic mistake made by a moody, self-centered teenage girl. I actually thought my parents would drive from Chicago every weekend to come see me, so I looked at Syracuse, the University of Minnesota and, of course, the University of Missouri, which was the closest to my home in Chicago. But it still was a seven-hour drive.

    In hindsight, I now realize that I very much wish my parents were closer to me and that seven hours can be quite a long trip — especially on a Greyhound bus.

    I did not have a car freshman or sophomore year of college, but I did have the power of social media to find a way back home. My savior from bus rides back to school came in the form of a FaceBook page called “University of Missouri // Mizzou Rideshare Group!”

    Even though I don’t know many people from Chicago who go to Mizzou, I was able to make a post on the page stating the facts: I need a ride to Chicago for this weekend and I have gas money if someone could drive me. Students with cars and open space can post the sametype of message, and then the parties connect over FaceBook Messenger.

    In my experience, I ended up paying the driver around $30 for gas per trip, but depending on how full the car was, I have paid as low as $20. The monetary cost of a Greyhound ticket back to school is about $40, but the emotional toll is much greater.

    With the rideshare page, I was able to ride back to students who I already had something in common with — we all went to Mizzou. Once when I was a sophomore, I got in the car with two freshman who were also majoring in journalism. We were able to chat about classes and exchange stories and advice.

    The rideshare page functions so efficiently because the group only serves a very specific portion of people, but also because the page benefits from the network effect. The more people who use it, the more effective it will be, and the group currently has over 4,000 members. It’s possible that some of those students have already graduated, but nevertheless, I was able to find a ride every time I needed one.

    Some students used the page as an underground business platform. I got a ride with the same girl, whose name is Marcella, on three separate occasions. If Mizzou was having a school break, she would have a post on the page a week in advance. Every time I rode with her, there were five of us total in the car at $20 a head. Gas back to Chicago varies depending on the car, but for me it has ranged between $50 and $60. Marcella was making $80 on the trip, so the only costs she paid were the mileage on her car and the labor of driving.

    Since a lot of people are from the suburbs of Chicago rather than the city, my dad would drive out to pick me up at the closest point on the ride back to her house. I’m from the far southside of Chicago, so he would trek about 45 minutes west to meet us somewhere off the highway. Although it wasn’t the most convenient, he said he would rather drive 45 minutes to get me than seven hours.

    I have gotten to Mizzou by car, bus and plane over the past four years, but most of rides to and from school came from students I didn’t know with a little extra room in the car.

    Maggie Austin is a senior majoring in journalism at the University of Missouri.

     

     

  • November 19: Behind the lens: How to shoot video for business stories

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Wednesday November 7, 2018

    Listen to the audio.

    View the video.

    Nov. Training Presentation.

    High-quality video can bring business stories to life, and journalists are increasingly being asked to shoot segments on their smartphones. SABEW’s next training session will give you an overview of how best to shoot video and audio, even if your equipment is limited. Mitchell Masilun, an Arkansas-based editorial photographer and multimedia specialist, will lead SABEW members through this one-hour webinar. He’ll cover the basic concepts of what makes a good (and bad) video and offer tips and tricks for shooting the best video with the equipment you have. He’ll also review inexpensive gear that can help improve smartphone video. If time permits, he’ll also provide video editing tips.

    Presenter
    Mitchell Masilun is an Arkansas-based editorial photographer, multimedia specialist and educator. He currently is a photojournalist at The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette in Little Rock.

    Previously, Mitch was a multimedia journalist at the Mansfield News Journal in Mansfield, Ohio. He also worked as a staff photographer at Beijing-based True Run Media, publisher of three lifestyle magazines with a combined circulation of more than 70,000. He taught photography courses at The Hutong and Atelier, two Beijing-based culture and art education centers.

    Before moving to China, Mitch worked as a photojournalist in the Chicagoland and Central Ohio areas, and his images were circulated nationwide through the Associated Press, the Chicago Tribune and The Atlanta-Journal Constitution. Mitch’s stills have been published globally by clients that include Fortune 500 companies, embassies, stock libraries, network news stations and international schools. His images have also been published in four books. Some of his photographs can be seen on his website 1world1eye.com.

  • 2018 – 2019 Committees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday May 1, 2018

    (*) indicates Committee Chair
    (**) indicates Vice Chair

    Executive Committee
    Consistent with the requirements of the Society’s constitution and bylaws, the Executive Committee typically meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to discuss business, to make decisions and to lead the organization. These discussions include coordination of plans with the executive director.

    *SABEW President, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com

    SABEW Vice President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    SABEW Secretary/Treasurer, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal (ex-officio member)

    Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    First Amendment Committee
    The First Amendment Committee is dedicated to helping protect press freedoms. We are vigilant in our role as a watchdog over government agencies, working to ensure that journalists – and all citizens – have access to accurate, relevant government-supported data. The committee regularly issues statements in support of press freedom and for sufficient funding of government-collected and issued information. It engages government officials, private economists, watchdogs, other stakeholders and the public on the importance of robust and transparent economic and financial data as well as on the mission of business and financial journalism more broadly.

    *Henry Dubroff, founder and editor, Pacific Coast Business Times

    **James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Bernie Kohn, editor-at-large, Bloomberg BNA

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report

    First Amendment Legal Counsel: Steven D. Zansberg, partner, Ballard Spahr

    Membership Committee
    The membership committee is focused on ensuring SABEW remain a vibrant professional organization that is useful and relevant to future generations of business journalists. It will seek to fulfill its mission by increasing the number of individuals and institutions affiliated with SABEW, improving diversity, and strengthening the connections between existing SABEW members.

    *Xana Antunes, executive editor, Quartz

    Robert Barba, spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Nominations Committee
    *Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Dean Murphy, managing editor for Investigations, The New York Times

    Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Marty Wolk, freelance

    Finance Committee
    The Finance Committee meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to review SABEW’s financial statements and other statements with SABEW staff. The committee also reviews the organization’s annual budget.

    *James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    **James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    Michael Rapoport, reporter, The Wall Street Journal

    Zoe Sagalow, federal tax and data reporter, Tax Notes Today

    Investment Sub-Committee
    This group helps monitor and optimize SABEW’s long-term investments, with the goal of balancing return with preservation of funds to help ensure the Society’s long-term financial success. 

    *James Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday

    Gail Marks Jarvis, syndicated financial columnist, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    SABEW19 Committee

    *Chair – Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    **Vice Chair Newsmakers and Headliners – Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    ASU Representative – Andrew Leckey, chair ASU Walter Cronkite School, president Reynolds Center

    Robert Barba, spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business

    Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press

    Matthew Goldberg, consumer banking reporter, Bankrate

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Bernie Kohn, editor-at-large, Bloomberg BNA

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Ryan Randazzo, reporter, The Arizona Republic

    Jennifer Strong, radio correspondent, The Wall Street Journal

    Training Committee
    The Training Committee supports SABEW’s mission by planning and coordinating near-monthly distance training programs, utilizing moderators and presenters who represent a variety of backgrounds and organizations. As many newsroom budgets shrink, SABEW training programs are an important resource, and offer an added value by promoting the professional development of SABEW members.

    *Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report

    *Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Marty Steffens, SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism, School of Journalism, University of Missouri

    Best in Business Committee
    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    ** Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    International Committee
    The International Committee seeks to encourage and expand SABEW’s impact and membership within the global business and economic journalism community.  Business journalists worldwide deal with issues of corporate transparency, reliability of government data, trade conflicts and personal financial wellbeing that directly affect readers, viewers and listeners. SABEW’s dedication to improving financial knowledge and accuracy, commending outstanding coverage and upholding the highest ethical standards has relevance in all countries. Seeking new members for SABEW, the International Committee finds opportunities to share information and training while encouraging business journalists at all experience levels regardless of borders.

    *Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    *Andrew Leckey, chair ASU Walter Cronkite School, president Reynolds Center

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Roseanne Gerin, news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Awards System, Membership Database and Website Committee

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    Renee McGivern, Director of Conference Sponsorships

    Past President Committee
    Grateful for their substantial contributions over many years, this committee engages former presidents of the Society by maintaining communication and involvement with current leadership, encouraging meetings and other activities.

    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

  • Seven elected to the SABEW Board of Governors at SABEW18

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday April 30, 2018

    Ballots were cast during SABEW18, SABEW’s annual conference, in Washington, D.C. for seven seats on the SABEW Board of Governors, six with a term ending in 2021 and one ending in 2019.

    SABEW members elected three new members to the Board of Governors:

    • Megan Davies, editor and reporter, Thomson Reuters (term ends in 2019)
    • Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post (term ends in 2021)
    • Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com (term ends in 2021)

    “We are very pleased to welcome these three outstanding business journalists to the board. The breadth, depth, and diversity of their experience will strengthen SABEW,” said Executive Director Kathleen Graham. I look forward to working with the new, re-elected and current members to advance the mission of SABEW.”

    Four incumbent governors were re-elected, each serving three-year terms:

    The new and re-elected governors join these fourteen current members of SABEW’s board:

    • President, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau Chief, Bankrate.com – Hamrick leads SABEW as president for his second term.
    • Vice President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer
    • Secretary/Treasurer, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune
    • Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal
    • Shobhana Chandra, economics reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Marilyn Geewax, former senior business editor, NPR and Cox Institute’s Industry Fellow
    • Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia
    • Amy Gleason, senior director, News, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    • Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires
    • James T. Madore, senior business writer/economy, Newsday
    • Dean Murphy, associate editor, The New York Times
    • James B. Nelson, reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and business journalism instructor, Marquette University
    • Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report
    • Caleb Silver, vice president, content, Investopedia/IAC

    About the Board of Governors and SABEW
    The Board of Governors is the leadership body of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW), a 501(c)(3) organization. Governors are elected by a vote of the membership during the annual spring conference. SABEW’s mission is to encourage comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and to increase members’ skills and knowledge through continuous education. SABEW advocates for full access to financial and economic data, including information collected and distributed by governments.

    For more information, contact [email protected].

    Follow @sabew on twitter.

  • SABEW18-More than just ‘white noise’: Media leaders address solutions to harassment

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Saturday April 28, 2018

    By Danielle Chemtob
    UNC-Chapel Hill

    In the wake of the New York Times Harvey Weinstein investigation and the Me Too movement,  female media leaders tackled the issue of sexual harassment and the systems that enable such behavior at the spring conference for the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing in Washington, D.C., Saturday.

    The conversation largely focused on employees who are particularly vulnerable in newsrooms, especially interns.

    “For all the years that we did dress for success and get your portfolio ready and, ‘do a good job kids,’ we never told them here’s what you do if someone treats you inappropriately, says something wrong,” Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership and Media Integrity at Loyola University Chicago and the institute fellow in women’s leadership at the Newseum.  

    Media leaders discuss sexual harassment in news organizations.

    In the past, Geisler said companies were reluctant to talk about sexual harassment because it would suggest that it was an issue within their workplace culture that they had not yet addressed.

    Geisler heads the Newseum’s Power Shift Project, an initiative promoting workplace integrity on behalf of women in the news industry, and in that role, she led a training session last month titled “Power to the Interns.”

    The federal law that prevents employers from discriminating against employees based on sex, race and other characteristics — Title VII of the Civil Rights Act — does not apply to unpaid interns, according to the Newseum’s website. But the website says universities are supposed to protect students from employers at unpaid internships under Title IX.

    Traci Schweikert, vice president of human resources at POLITICO, said the company is training its interns to be active bystanders, a concept borrowed from college campuses. This means that those who witness harassment should say something about it.

    “The actual person being harassed usually over thinks it — ‘oh, I’m young, I’m new, it’s no big deal,’” Schweikert said.

    Someone who has been told about the harassment or who witnesses it is in a better position to recognize the seriousness of the behavior, she said.

    Karen Testa, East region editor for Associated Press, who was assigned to be the sexual harassment editor after the Me Too movement took hold, focused her team’s coverage on explanatory reporting, exposing the culture and systems that allow for harassment to go unchecked.

    “Otherwise, it just becomes simply like white noise — another guy, another accusation,” she said.

    POLITICO has a succinct unofficial policy to curb harassment before someone even joins the company: “a no-asshole rule,” said Schweikert.

    This is important, Geisler said, because bullying and intimidation are often signals of a potential harasser. Once they are in the company, she said it is difficult to fire them.

    Panelists said that harassment affects a company’s bottom line. In 2015 alone, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recovered $164.5 million for workers alleging harassment.

    Geisler said companies often brush aside claims of harassment because they want to keep their talented employees.

    “It was how we worked around behavior because it was the price we thought we had to pay for that person’s gifts,” Geisler said. “What ultimately has clearly been determined — and it’s why the term ‘power shift’ has come — is that the power does not necessarily reside with a high performing person who abuses others. And it doesn’t necessarily reside in just the law. It resides in what is right, what’s moral.”

  • SABEW18 Student Newsroom Staff

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday April 26, 2018

    Participating Schools and Reporters:

     

     

    Brian Baker is an MSJ Candidate at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. Prior to attending Medill, he worked in equity research at Diamond Hill Capital Management in Columbus, Ohio. He is a CFA Charterholder.

     

     

     

    Danielle Chemtob is a rising senior majoring in journalism and political science at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She has reported for the university’s student newspaper, the Daily Tar Heel, for three years and has had internships at the Triangle Business Journal and the News and Observer, covering everything from startups to state politics. She is interning this summer at the Wall Street Journal in New York, and next fall will take on the responsibility of Enterprise Director at the Daily Tar Heel. Danielle grew up just outside of San Francisco, California. When she’s not writing, she enjoys listening to podcasts, hiking and traveling. She studied abroad in Sydney, Australia, where she spent the semester traversing the country’s natural wonders and working for a small community paper.

     

    Sarah Foster is an MSJ candidate at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, where she specializes in Business, Money and Markets. Foster received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she studied News-Editorial Journalism. Before coming to Medill, she interned at the Chicago Tribune as a copy editor and designer. When she’s not on deadline, she enjoys playing one of her five instruments: piano, flute, guitar, bass or drums.

     

    Ang Gao is an MSJ student and business and tech reporter with Medill News Service at Northwestern University. She has been covering disruptive technologies including blockchain and cryptocurrency and tech event like Apple’s product release in Chicago. She is also interested in the trend of impact investment in the U.S.

     

     

    Xinyi(Ethel) Jiang is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism, specializing in business, money and market. She produced weekly video stories for Medill News Service in Chicago. While in D.C., she reports on technology and international trade for Morning Consult and Medill News Service. She also interned for the Wall Street Journal, Caixin Global and People’s Daily.

     

     

    Jinman Li is a current graduate student at Medill School of Journalism of Northwestern University, specializing in Business, Money and Markets. During her time at Medill, she worked on the beat of finance and investment, and produced multimedia stories on business and economy around Chicago Metropolitan Area. Li graduated from Beijing Foreign Studies University in China, where she majored in International Journalism and Communication and minored in English. Before coming to Medill, Li interned at domestic and international news organizations including CNN Beijing Bureau, Reuters Beijing, CBN Weekly, China Central Television and Xinhua News Agency. She served as a news assistant, intern journalist, director assistant or editorial intern in these media outlets.

     

    Yanchun (Roxanne) Liu is a candidate for the Master of Science in Journalism program at Medill, Northwestern University. Focused on business reporting at the university, Liu has been writing about Illinois-based pharmaceutical companies such as Abbott Laboratories and Baxter International for Medill News Service in Chicago. Liu has been contributing spot news stories and social media content for business-to-business magazine Inside Unmanned Systems. Previously, Liu worked as intern researcher for long-term investigative projects on the political news team of the Wall Street Journal Beijing bureau in summer 2017. She reported on automobile and technology news for the Thomson Reuters Beijing bureau as an intern journalist in summer 2016. Liu is a huge fan of autonomous technology and enjoys Cyberpunk movies and fiction.

     

    Charlotte Norsworthy is a rising senior journalism and political science major at the University of Georgia. During her time at the university, Norsworthy has served as an investigative reporter, city news editor and news editor for The Red & Black newspaper. She has also served as president of the Online News Association and Society of Professional Journalists student chapters. Over the course of her junior year, Norsworthy has conducted research in virtual reality storytelling in journalism, sponsored in part by the National Association of Broadcasters. She successfully completed her undergraduate thesis in December 2017, which she presented at the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities Annual Symposium in April 2018. This summer, Norsworthy will live in Washington D.C. interning for National Public Radio’s business news desk as a UGA Honors D.C. Program Scholar. During her downtime, Norsworthy loves to enjoy the outdoors with her dogs, try new spots to eat in Athens and play card games with her family.

  • SABEW Board of Governors Elections 2018

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday April 5, 2018

    Ballots will be cast during SABEW18 for seven on the SABEW Board of Governors, six with a term ending in 2021 and one ending in 2019. Voting members will receive their ballot information directly from online voting service provider Opavote.org.

    Board Candidates (listed in alphabetical order)

    Xana Antunes
    Executive editor, Quartz
    My two-plus years on the SABEW board have afforded me a close-up appreciation of the vital role the organization plays in the business journalism community. SABEW is an ideal forum to advance excellence in coverage of the global economy, nurture and share best practices, set high ethical standards, and provide networking opportunities for members. Its annual Best in Business awards offer both a measuring stick and a guidepost for our profession as it navigates evolving platforms of choice, quicksilver audiences, and prevailing values and standards that are routinely reapplied and reinterpreted.

    These are all areas in which I can make a real, and I hope, lasting contribution, in the spirit of giving back. I bring deep experience in our profession to the task, having worked in leadership roles across newspapers (NY Post), magazines (Fortune, Fortune.com), and television (CNBC Digital). Today, as Executive Editor at Quartz, I’m able to put that experience at the service of a young and innovative business publication that’s quickly established a reputation for smart, thoughtful coverage.

    And that’s the perspective I bring to the SABEW board. The globalization of business — and the digitization of everything — calls for a professional body that’s especially attuned to the challenges and opportunities before us. As board secretary, a position I served in for a year, and as a member of the team that modernized our BIB Awards, I have shown that I can both help infuse the organization with a deeper digital sensibility, and support members’ efforts to develop the tools and skills they need as they transition to a fully digital future.

    I would be honored to have your support in the upcoming SABEW board election.

    Rich Barbieri
    Executive editor, CNNMoney
    As a longtime business journalist, I have a lot vested in the profession. SABEW holds an important place in as a thought leader in the field. As executive editor of CNNMoney, I spend considerable effort mentoring the next generation of business journalists as well as leading coverage of a major business news outlet. Those two roles make me well suited to serving on the board of SABEW.

    I can contribute to SABEW as judge in contests, recruiting new members, championing the organization within the profession and helping to shape conference content. I’d be honored to serve another term.

    Megan Davies
    Editor and reporter, Thomson Reuters
    I’d be honored to serve a term as a SABEW board member. I’m passionate about journalism and dedicated to the field of business reporting. I’ve held various leadership roles within Reuters in the United States and Russia and reported on a wide variety of business topics. I’m particularly passionate about enterprise reporting. I’d be keen to be involved in SABEW to further high standards of business journalism and try and encourage the next generation of reporters.

    Brad Foss
    Global business editor, Associated Press
    My first full term as a SABEW board member has been rewarding and productive. Being part of the team that revamped the BIB contest to make it more relevant in the digital era was a great way to learn about the organization and the needs and concerns of its members. While SABEW’s challenges are significant, so are its opportunities.

    It would be a privilege to remain part of the leadership team that helps SABEW transform itself further and thrive — although not just by expanding its membership and strengthening its financial foundation. Whether it is developing training programs, running contests or speaking out on ethics, SABEW’s role in setting high standards matters. I want to help steer SABEW toward decisions and actions that will benefit business journalists and their readers, and help sustain the organization for the long run.

    For the past four months, I have been global business editor at The Associated Press, guiding the business news agenda for the world’s largest news organization. AP caters to a general-news audience and the experience I have gained while working there shapes the perspective I bring to SABEW’s diverse and talented board, and to its members.

    I will do my best to marshal any resources and newsroom expertise that will further SABEW’s goals. And I am happy to serve as an ambassador for SABEW in any way needed.

    Thank you for considering me to serve again as a SABEW board member.

    Andrew Leckey
    Chair in Business Journalism, ASU Cronkite School
    President, Reynolds Center 
    As a long-time business journalist and SABEW member, I understood the importance of our professional organization to the momentum and integrity of our field. The honor of serving on its Board of Governors, however, has since given me opportunity to join with outstanding board members in promoting SABEW’s high ideals.

    My primary areas of focus on the board have been promoting international goals, organizing Speed Networking sessions for students at conferences and providing an assist in sponsorship of SABEW events. I’d be honored to serve another term to continue our international expansion building upon the success in Canada, bolstering SABEW finances, attracting young people to our field and seeking new members from a variety of newsrooms.

    I was a syndicated investment columnist for Chicago Tribune for many years, an author and long-time broadcaster whose positions included CNBC anchor and reporter. This led to my  position as Chair in Business Journalism at Arizona State University Cronkite School and President of Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. Receiving Fulbrights in business journalism in China and Uganda reinforced my belief that SABEW can expand its much-needed influence beyond North America.

    Heather Long
    Economics correspondent, The Washington Post
    SABEW is as important as ever for two reasons: Training and networking. I am running for SABEW board member because this organization has been critical for me to strengthen my network and skill set, and I have a lot of ideas on how to enhance that even more for SABEW members in the coming years. I was part of the team that put together SABEW’s Spring 2018 Conference in Washington D.C., helping to secure great speakers including Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. I would also love to see SABEW organize more mini-networking nights and send out a newsletter to members every other week highlighting job openings and sharing the stories of some of SABEW’s members so we can get to know each other better. Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to getting to know more amazing SABEW members at the Spring Conference and finding ways to collaborate.

    Cindy Perman
    Partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com
    I think connecting with each other and sharing ideas is the key for us as individuals and as an industry to grow and thrive – that’s why I want to be a part of SABEW and the board. I think I bring a unique digital background to the table, having been a part of the growth of two major digital operations, as well as CNBC’s integration of its TV and digital operations, and navigating new platforms like Apple News. I’m really creative and am excited about the prospect of helping to craft panels and events that inform and inspire our members. One of my most rewarding career experiences was managing CNBC.com’s intern program. I loved being a part of their development, giving them advice and encouragement – but also hearing their insight. I think we don’t bring young people to the table often enough and say, “Hey, what do you think?” So, one of the things I would like to focus on as a board member is recruiting more young people to the organization, having more events that are geared toward them and really integrating them with more experienced journalists. One thing I think would be cool would be to do some pairings of young journalists with experienced journalists but not in the traditional mentoring way. Set it up in a way where both are asking questions and learning from each other. Let some younger journalists do panels – whether it’s mixed or an all-millennial panel. I’m really inspired by the idea of a two-way flow. I hope to have the opportunity to share these ideas and brainstorm others with the board! I would welcome the opportunity and I think I have a lot to contribute.

  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 23rd Annual Best in Business Competition

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday March 8, 2018

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) announces the results of its 23rd annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding journalism of 2017.

    The 121 winners and honorable mentions come from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. For a complete list of honorees, click here. To read the judges’ comments, click here.

    The Los Angeles Times received 11 honors, while The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal each earned seven. Fortune also earned seven, including one it shared with Quartz. ProPublica won five awards; the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, InsideClimate News and The Center for Public Integrity each got four.

    “This year’s contest was incredibly competitive across all categories,” said Joanna Ossinger, chair of the Best in Business Awards contest and an editor at Bloomberg News. “The strong field shows just how much business journalism is thriving. Congratulations to all the winners, and thank you to the nearly 200 judges who volunteered their time and without whom the contest couldn’t succeed.”

    The winners for General Excellence were The New York Times in the Large category, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel in Medium, health-focused publication STAT in Small, and The Real Deal in industry-specific publications.

    Winners included The New York Times in Investigative for “Culture of Harassment,” ProPublica and NPR in Explanatory for “Sold for Parts,” and The Wall Street Journal in Commentary/ Opinion for the technology columns of Christopher Mims. Honorees in Innovation included the Los Angeles Times for “Disneyland Wait Times” and GateHouse Media for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms.” Organizations as diverse as Crain’s Chicago Business, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Reuters, Portland Business Journal, Bloomberg News and The Motley Fool also garnered prizes.

    In the Student categories, top honors went to Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic; Danielle Chemtob of the University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal; and Shen Lu from Northwestern University’s Medill News Service.

    Contest honorees will be celebrated at a ceremony April 27, 2018, during the 55th annual SABEW conference at the Capital Hilton hotel in Washington, D.C. Honorees are eligible to attend the conference at a discounted rate. This year’s conference will feature notable names from the worlds of politics and business, as well as training sessions and a discussion of journalistic ethics through the lens of the #MeToo movement.

    SABEW is the largest association of business journalists, with more than 3,000 members. The SABEW Canada Best in Business finalists will be announced April 3. For more information, email Crystal Beasley at [email protected].

  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 23rd Annual Best in Business Competition

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday March 8, 2018

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) announces the results of its 23rd annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding journalism of 2017.

    The 121 winners and honorable mentions come from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. For a complete list of honorees, click here. To read the judges’ comments, click here.

    The Los Angeles Times received 11 honors, while The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal each earned seven. Fortune also earned seven, including one it shared with Quartz. ProPublica won five awards; the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, InsideClimate News and The Center for Public Integrity each got four.

    “This year’s contest was incredibly competitive across all categories,” said Joanna Ossinger, chair of the Best in Business Awards contest and an editor at Bloomberg News. “The strong field shows just how much business journalism is thriving. Congratulations to all the winners, and thank you to the nearly 200 judges who volunteered their time and without whom the contest couldn’t succeed.”

    The winners for General Excellence were The New York Times in the Large category, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel in Medium, health-focused publication STAT in Small, and The Real Deal in industry-specific publications.

    Winners included The New York Times in Investigative for “Culture of Harassment,” ProPublica and NPR in Explanatory for “Sold for Parts,” and The Wall Street Journal in Commentary/ Opinion for the technology columns of Christopher Mims. Honorees in Innovation included the Los Angeles Times for “Disneyland Wait Times” and GateHouse Media for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms.” Organizations as diverse as Crain’s Chicago Business, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Reuters, Portland Business Journal, Bloomberg News and The Motley Fool also garnered prizes.

    In the Student categories, top honors went to Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic; Danielle Chemtob of the University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal; and Shen Lu from Northwestern University’s Medill News Service.

    Contest honorees will be celebrated at a ceremony April 27, 2018, during the 55th annual SABEW conference at the Capital Hilton hotel in Washington, D.C. Honorees are eligible to attend the conference at a discounted rate. This year’s conference will feature notable names from the worlds of politics and business, as well as training sessions and a discussion of journalistic ethics through the lens of the #MeToo movement.

    SABEW is the largest association of business journalists, with more than 3,000 members. The SABEW Canada Best in Business finalists will be announced April 3. For more information, email Crystal Beasley at [email protected].

  • 2017 Best in Business Honorees with Judges’ Comments

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday March 7, 2018

    AUDIO – All news organizations

    Winner: Marketplace/The Uncertain Hour, for “How One Sentence Helped Set Off the Opioid Crisis”
    Krissy Clark, Caitlin Esch, Nancy Farghalli, Maria Hollenhorst, Lyra Smith, Sitara Nieves, Deborah Clark, Donna Tam, Tony Wagner, Jake Gorski and Daniel Ramirez
    A fascinating, timely and illuminating look at the origins of one of the nation’s most urgent crises: the opioid epidemic. This series, based on an eight-month investigation, added valuable historical context and background. Clearly focused and impressively produced, this series underscores the importance of taking listeners behind the scenes to follow interactions between a government regulator, the Food and Drug Administration, and a large drug company.

    Honorable mention: KUOW, for “Prime(d)”
    Carol Smith, Joshua McNichols, Carolyn Adolph, Posey Gruener and Brendan Sweeney
    A delightful, deeply thoughtful, fascinating, in-depth and often humorous series focusing on Amazon’s decision to have a national competition among cities over where to build its next headquarters. The authors focused on “what happens when Amazon comes to your town,” how Amazon benefits from inviting cities to compete, Amazon’s impact on Seattle, and other important urban issues. The series flowed naturally and consistently held our attention with fresh and original insights.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Large

    Winner: Financial Times, for articles on non-prime and predatory lending
    Ben McLannahan
    Excellent reporting, writing and editing on this three-part series about the dangers of nonprime lending and predatory auto lending to U.S. consumers and the U.S. economy. The additional special report on “The Whistleblowers” demonstrated an excellent use of interviews with colorful details and statistics to show what bank and Wall Street whistle-blowers endure after reporting wrongdoing. The scope and quality of this series shines a light on a dangerous and important area of the banking world that we may have stopped thinking about in this post-financial crisis era but can’t afford to anymore.

    Honorable mention: Reuters, for “Crypto Casino”
    Steve Stecklow, Alexandra Harney, Anna Irrera and Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi
    This series did an excellent job of both reporting and explaining the risks, realities and mysteries surrounding cryptocurrency. While investors and the general public may have been blinded by the light of the parabolic price movements of tokens like Bitcoin, the lack of regulation and transparency in what is supposed to be an asset class defined by its openness demonstrated how murky the market still is around it and the risks it poses to investors.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with Fortune, for “The Billion-Dollar Loophole”
    Peter Elkind
    This deeply sourced project between ProPublica and Fortune, reveals in stunning detail how some individuals, including President Donald Trump, were able to turn a U.S. tax code provision intended to help preserve the environment — a tax break for agreeing not to develop property, known as a “conservation easement” — into an outsized tax deduction for the rich. Judges appreciated the story’s granular focus, and how it exposed the ability of wealthy individuals to exploit government inaction. A memorable accomplishment on a complicated subject, clearly written and compellingly told by ProPublica’s Peter Elkind.

     

    BANKING/FINANCE – Small

    Winner: TheStreet, for “Big Bank Corporate Governance”
    Brad Keoun
    The judges felt this series offers a thoughtful look at under-reported corporate governance and board issues at banks. By uncovering sweetheart contracts for a Wells Fargo director, a revolving door opening to Citigroup’s board, and secrecy in fixed income reporting at Goldman Sachs, Keoun showed how the largest banks are avoiding transparency.

    Honorable mention: American Banker, for The CFPB leadership battle”
    Kate Berry, Ian McKendry and Rob Blackwell
    This story about a coup at a government agency was a nice scoop for a small publication competing for an inside look against larger entities. It also offered insight about a regulatory body that’s key for many in the business world, particularly in the small-business community.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “CVS-Aetna Deal”
    Dana Mattioli, Sharon Terlep, Anna Wilde Mathews and Laura Stevens
    The package on the CVS-Aetna deal was a true scoop that put the WSJ ahead of the pack on an industry-transforming deal. In addition to the transaction basics, the package included analysis pieces on the industry impact as well as how Amazon’s entry into pharma services helped spur the CVS-Aetna deal. The latter piece, like the main news story, was based on deep inside sources. The Journal’s presentation included graphics illustrating how the new merged company would stack up against competitors.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for Uber coverage
    Mike Isaac and Farhad Manjoo
    An excellent package on an unfolding drama: A main story that delivers the news and its impact, an insider tick-tock of how CEO Kalanick was forced out by investors, and wide-view analysis of how Uber’s issues were symptomatic of wider and more fundamental Silicon Valley problems. The package showed deep reporting and access to inside sources that included former employees and investors.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Medium

    Winner: The Seattle Times, for “Amazon HQ2 announcement”
    Matt Day, Dominic Gates, Mike Rosenberg, Jon Talton, Scott Greenstone, Dan Beekman, Jessica Lee, Joseph O’Sullivan, Mark Nowlin and Kjell Redal
    The coverage of Amazon’s announcement of a second headquarters distinguished itself with a mix of illuminating reporting, insightful analysis and compelling graphics. The package deftly assessed the Amazon stunner from the local perspective of economic development and politics while also conveying the broader implications — beyond Seattle and beyond Amazon. It set the standard for all the HQ2 stories published in its wake.

     

    BREAKING NEWS – Small

    Winner: International Business Times, for “Last-Minute Tax Provisions Could Enrich Top Lawmakers”
    David Sirota, Josh Keefe, Alex Kotch and Jay Cassano
    It is not surprising that Washington politicians slip provisions into bills that benefit themselves or particular industries. But usually such goodies are discovered after a bill has passed. The International Business Times scooped others with its story that Republicans had slipped into the conference report of their tax bill a provision that would benefit real estate moguls such as Donald Trump and Senator Bob Corker and that the provision was more generous than either the House or Senate version. Their story landed in real time before the bill received final approval. Corker professed ignorance in an interview with International Business Times and admitted that he hadn’t read the bill before he changed his vote from no to yes. This is exactly what business journalists should be doing holding politicians accountable.

    Honorable mention: Puget Sound Business Journal, for “Port of Seattle CEO resigned amid probe into $4.7M payout”
    Andrew McIntosh
    The Puget Sound Business Journal provided a public service by exposing the unconstitutional payments to workers approved by the local Port Commission, the largest of which went to the CEO himself. Through dogged reporting and public record requests, Puget Sound Business Journal not only revealed the payments but its reporting led to the money being returned to taxpayers. Puget Sound Business Journal even managed to get a draft of the CEO’s performance appraisal through records requests that documented serious problems. The Puget Sound Business Journal resisted the urge to couch its series of breaking stories as gotcha journalism and was careful to present the improvements that the CEO had made.

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business, for “Amazon HQ2 bid revealed: tax breaks, $120 million talent program, transit vision”
    Chad Livengood and Kirk Pinho
    When Amazon announced it intended to build a second headquarters, cities all over the country salivated at the prospect for a boost in employment and infrastructure improvements. But the secrecy surrounding Amazon’s selection process combined with the reluctance of urban centers to disclose their negotiations made it impossible to determine what city Amazon would choose or how cities were wooing the e-commerce giant. Partly through the FOIA, Crain’s Detroit Business got hold of Quicken Loans’ founder Dan Gilbert’s proposal to Amazon to locate in Detroit, which included a massive amount of goodies including tax breaks and a $120 million talent program. The story was picked up throughout the US and Canada, crediting Crain’s with the scoop.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for Keywords Technology Column
    Christopher Mims
    These columns provide a micro and macro take on the tech industry. One column looked at the positive impact of diversity on business and process outcomes. The “worm” has been turning recently about the (mostly) unintended impacts of technology, including the male-dominated culture in tech. This column broadened the argument in many ways, including impacts on shareholders. Although it falls outside the usual commentary realm, we liked the visual aspects included along with the good writing. A new thread on the downside of Facebook was interesting, using an extension of the old TV news maxim, “if it bleeds, it leads” pertaining to social.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Equifax Hack”
    Ron Lieber
    An excellent work in reporting the implications of the Equifax hack, with commentary and consumer insights on what can be done to mitigate damage. It also includes what should be done in the future to make companies like Equifax more responsive to consumers.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Lee Schafer’s columns
    The columnist blends smart business insight and an enjoyable writing style into incisive commentary on some of the nation’s most important companies that call Minneapolis their home — or in Wells Fargo’s case, second home. His piece “Wells Fargo CEO didn’t take ‘run it like you own it’ mantra to heart” gets to the core of the beleaguered bank’s cultural problems that allowed employees to open more than 3 million fake accounts to help hit sales targets. In “Deciding what to do with Yoplait,” he outlines why General Mills should sell its souring yogurt business. And his article “CVS-Aetna deal is about catching up to UnitedHealth” he makes a compelling case for why one of 2017’s biggest announced mergers is no threat to the locally based giant.

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “A Boom with a View”
    Erin Griffith
    An excellently crafted piece commenting on the rise in scandals hitting startups from Theranos to Hampton Creek.

    Honorable mention: The Dallas Morning News, for “Texas business repels a bathroom bill”
    Mitchell Schnurman
    The columnist deserves praise for his series of articles putting forth the case for why business leaders ought to speak up against a state bill that would restrict bathroom use by transgender people. After corporate executives started arguing against it, the bill failed.

     

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Small

    Winner: Albany Business Review, for Mike Hendricks’ columns
    Hendricks’ elegantly written columns demonstrate a deep knowledge of local business and a strong desire to serve his community. He focuses on issues of interest to his readership that are unlikely to be covered elsewhere, and he offers solutions. That said, he doesn’t shy away from broader topics, and uses personal experience to great effect in his piece on health care.

    Honorable mention: The Nation, for Helaine Olen’s columns
    Olen’s strongly opinionated columns demonstrate an excellent grasp of complex topics. She marshals ample evidence, connecting disparate and fast-moving events into a coherent picture, which her engaging prose makes accessible to a broad readership.

     

    ECONOMICS – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh
    The judges unanimously selected this story on immigrant farm labor in a category with significant competition. The LA Times narrative stood out because the reporters were truly in the field for this piece, sharing details of the immigrant experience, from wages to housing. It was thoughtful and extraordinarily descriptive in reporting on a topic widely talked about, but perhaps less understood. We all felt this piece was a good read that made us smarter. Beyond the immigrants at the center of the piece, it captured the broader context of the communities where they work, and the labor market dynamics that supply their jobs.

     

    ECONOMICS – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Trump’s Trade Pullout Roils Rural America”
    Adam Behsudi
    POLITICO’s standout piece relied on vivid writing, exhaustive reporting and cogent analysis to show readers how the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership amounts to a hit on American farmers. The article analyzed trade negotiations between the remaining TPP nations, finding that the United States’ rivals are furiously negotiating with each other to lower tariffs and undercut American farmers. But it went far beyond policy analysis, delving deeply into the lives of people in Eagle Grove, Iowa. The owner of one pork and poultry business making a vast investment there said he is “scared to death,” and others fear the economic ripple effects. The piece laid out clearly and persuasively why rural communities have good cause for concern.

     

    ECONOMICS – Small

    Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Sarasota Drift”
    Barbara Peters-Smith
    A wonderful job of weaving together demographic and income data to tell the story of a widening divide between have and have-nots in a community often associated with retirement. It used data effectively to argue its point, and spotlighted creative approaches to address the problem.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut “
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh
    California utility customers likely had no idea what hit them until the LA Times invested the resources to examine the perverse incentives offered by state regulators. If companies get paid to build power plants, whether needed or not, they’ll build them and send the bills to ratepayers. Deep reporting and excellent writing made this package extremely accessible given the jargon-heavy topic. Charts and interactive graphics spelled it out even more simply. The reporting has actually had an impact, given that authorities are reacting.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Medium

    Winner: The Atlantic, for “The Problem with Rolling Back Regulations”
    Alana Semuels
    This impeccably researched and well-written story uses North Carolina’s rollback of environmental regulations to show what could happen if national and global policies move toward less regulation. Framing such moves as “business-friendly” can stymie debate, but it ultimately hurts homeowners and residents. It makes a compelling case that citizens should be worried about changing climate policies in the Trump administration.

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan
    While much has been written about the Dakota Access Pipeline, another and potentially bigger risk to the environment threatens the drinking water of 40 million people. A growing stream of oil is pumping through aging pipes along and under the Great Lakes. The pipeline company, Enbridge Inc., is seeking to expand through eminent domain. Through clear and sophisticated writing, reporter Egan helps readers understand the possible consequences of allowing Enbridge to move forward.

     

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Small

    Winner: Debtwire, for American Idle: An Offshore Drilling Crisis “
    Alex Plough
    Debtwire drilled in on a topic few people think about — who is on the hook for cleaning up abandoned offshore oil platforms — and managed to hook readers with colorful description while making the case for how and why the issue is a considerable environmental and economic problem. By collaborating with a university research tank to sort through available data, the reporter was able to provide specific examples that spelled out risks to companies and taxpayers. The story provides history and context. It supplements text with excellent graphics to help readers grasp the significance of a previously obscure topic. In short, the combination of clear writing, lavish details and demonstrable impact made this story stand out.

     

    EXPLANATORY – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “Shock Tactics”
    Jason Szep, Peter Eisler, Tim Reid, Lisa Girion, Grant Smith, Linda So, M.B. Pell and Charles Levinson
    Reuters’ comprehensive, multi-part investigation of Taser raised real concerns about the company’s devices. In addition to routinely injuring and even killing people, Reuters showed through document reviews, interviews and number- and data-crunching the cost to police departments and city governments of using the electroshock devices.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Anaheim’s Subsidy Kingdom “
    Daniel Miller, Priya Krishnakumar and Ben Poston
    This rigorously-reported LA Times series shows how Disney spent millions contributing to the PACs behind pro-Disney city council candidates in Anaheim and received $1 billion of incentives in turn. The series uses interviews, data, and an interactive graphic to expose Disney’s complex system of donations, revealing the company’s political influence in Anaheim.

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Education Disrupted”
    Natasha Singer
    This three-part series revealed provocative ways tech companies and executives are gaining influence in America’s public schools, creating potential conflicts of interest but not necessarily better results for children or teachers. The package’s strong reporting about the enticing lures to teachers and administrators in cash-strapped school systems raises serious questions about who’s really running the nation’s classrooms.

     

    EXPLANATORY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with NPR, for “Sold for Parts”
    Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes
    As the nation debates White House efforts to overhaul immigration, ProPublica’s Michael Grabell gave his readers an up-close look at horrific working conditions in Ohio, Florida and South Carolina. Companies that have a history of failing to comply with federal workplace safety standards are hiring immigrants to work long hours in the most dangerous jobs; when workers fight for better pay and working conditions, the companies repeatedly use their immigration status against them to quash dissent and avoid paying medical bills. This is an outstanding grouping of stories that are deeply reported and well-written stories.

    Honorable mention: Miami Herald, for “Hotel housekeepers commute”
    Chabeli Herrera and Carl Juste
    This is textbook explanatory reporting. Chabeli Herrera explores income inequality and sky-high housing costs through the commute of a Fontainebleau housekeeper. The smooth, graceful writing benefits from its relative brevity. Graphics and a compelling video enhance the story.

    Honorable mention: Detroit Free Press, “The Fault in No Fault”
    JC Reindl
    A deeply researched series explaining how various bad actors exploited Michigan’s no-fault insurance statute in a way that enriches them but results in sky-high rates for Detroit drivers. Metro reporting at its best.

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan
    Egan is known for his authoritative reporting on the Great Lakes. Here he gives his readers another excellent series, documenting how the nation’s most important source of fresh water could be jeopardized by an aging underground pipeline and a backroom legislative deal. Egan’s work is deeply reported and masterfully presented.

     

    EXPLANTORY – Small

    Winner: McClatchy’s Washington Bureau, “Trump’s footprint across ex-Soviet world”
    David Goldstein, Ben Wieder, Kevin G. Hall, Gabriellle Paluch and Peter Stone
    On one of the most-swarmed stories in years, the McClatchy team unearthed evidence of Trump’s Russia ties that no one else did — including a birthday phone call to an ex-Soviet official that was pried from a sealed British lawsuit. Given the often-bewildering maze of business relationships and foreign associates, it’s amazing that these stories were very readable narratives. An example of painstaking reporting, careful writing and patient editing.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for A Century of Domination: As America’s Carbon Wars Rage, Oil and Gas Industry Influence Grows”
    Jie Jenny Zou, Michael J. Mishak, Jamie Smith Hopkins, Kristen Lombardi, Jim Morris, Chris Young, Sasha Khokha and Tom Dart
    This entry offers an impressive historical sweep as it examines fresh evidence of the pervasive influence of the fossil-fuel industry. One story exposes the industry’s practice of leading free seminars for state and federal judges. The seminars, hosted by an industry-backed risk analyst, are an obvious effort to make courts more skeptical of the scientific evidence underpinning regulations.

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy”
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle, Robert McClure and Brad Wieners
    Authoritative reporting and clear writing bring fresh insights to the well-worn topic of how vigorously the fossil fuel industry fights environmentalists. One story broke news on how the scientists whose study was used by George W. Bush’s EPA to excuse the fracking industry from clean-water standards now disavow those conclusions.

     

    FEATURE – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh
    Through data analysis and extensive on-the-ground reporting, this series illuminates one of the most timely and controversial issues of the day (and rebuts the poorly-informed positions of many of our national leaders). An important story told with exceptionally compelling writing.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Pink Boxes”
    David Pierson
    The best doughnuts are airy but packed with flavor. They can really make your day a little better. The same things could be said about the best feature stories. This history of the ubiquitous pink doughnut box is the epitome of the business feature. While explaining one of the curiosities of everyday life, it delights us with insights into entrepreneurship, economics, immigrant culture, and consumer psychology.

     

    FEATURE – Medium

    Winner: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “The Land Alcoa Dammed”
    Rich Lord, Len Boselovic, Stephanie Strasburg, Zack Tanner, James Hilston and Ed Yozwick
    The judges were impressed with this multimedia package that explored a giant conglomerate’s impact on a small South American nation. The reporters went to great lengths to explore every angle, from Alcoa’s hometown in Pennsylvania to the deals that were made and the ones that are in still in the works in Suriname as Alcoa withdraws its once-formidable presence. The question of what happens to a company town when the company leaves is an important one; this story explores the aftermath from when an entire country is overly dependent on one business. The story was accompanied by beautiful photographs, and a well-presented online package.

    Honorable mention: Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, for Trapped by Heroin”
    Penelope Overton, Dieter Bradbury, Gregory Rec and Brian Robitaille
    For this ambitious project, the reporter entered the closed realm of Maine lobstermen and persuaded these insular workers to open up about a scourge claiming the lives of friends and family members. The lobster industry, it turns out, is particularly susceptible to opioid addiction. The reporter explained the reasons why, interspersing memorable vignettes about down-on-their-luck survivors as well as the unfortunate ones who didn’t make it.

    Honorable mention: The Weather Channel Digital, for “United States of Climate Change”
    Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans, Kevin Hayes and Geoff Hansen
    This series represents strong coverage of a business, political and cultural topic of great interest to all of us. With solid interviews, excellent pictures and clear prose, the series showed great range. While focusing on issues that are particular to each state, such as energy advocates in Vermont or riverfront casinos in Missouri, the series informs its audience of climate change’s high economic stakes.

     

    FEATURE – Small

    Winner: The Real Deal, for “Real Estate’s Diversity Problem”
    Kathryn Brenzel, Rich Bockmann, Elizabeth Kim, Jill Noonan, Damian Ghigliotty and Yoryi De La Rosa
    The Real Deal’s reporting on the lack of diversity in New York City’s commercial real-estate industry was a comprehensive and compelling narrative. Combining statistics from multiple credible sources with dozens of interviews, the reporting demonstrated with clarity how “entrenched discriminatory practices surrounding access to credit, commission-based pay and a clubby, male-dominated culture have raised the barrier to entry.” The article provided data, testimonies and anecdotes necessary for readers to fully comprehend, as one of its experts noted, that “the people involved in building NYC’s skyline bear little resemblance to its 8.5 million inhabitants.”

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Chicago Business, for Can jobs stop Chicago violence?”
    Lisa Bertagnoli and Ann Dwyer
    The story on jobs vs. bullets impressed the judges with its compelling interviews, deep reporting and excellent graphics. Judges praised the authors’ strong use of anecdotes from key interviewees, which drove home the impact and importance of the topic. The interactive map and charts stood out as unique elements to tell the story.

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for “Meet the Woman Who Broke Silicon Valley’s Gender Barrier and Built a $1.5 Billion Tech Company “
    Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks
    This profile of Blackline founder Theresa Tucker is a sparkling read from the moment the reader meets her in an elevator, where her black hoodie practically guarantees the investment bankers will totally ignore her. This story is an unvarnished look at an effective, no-B.S. technologist who built and took public what is now a $1.5 billion company. Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks cracked the code for writing about women executives in an era of #MeToo. The story strikes the right chord between recognizing a true pioneer in bringing gender equality to the Silicon Valley and providing a balanced picture of a 56-year-old technology company CEO who has succeeded against long odds.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Industry/topic-specific publications

    Winner: The Real Deal
    The Real Deal was full of news and we really liked some of the how-things-really-work type reporting. It set a high standard for what is expected.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times
    This entry included five major reports, all of which illuminated, and some of which triggered, major business or economic developments of 2017. Jodi Kantor and Meghan Twohey exposed sexual harassment across three decades by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein aimed at women over whom he could wield serious career power. Weinstein apologized (while denying some allegations), promised to do better, but was soon ousted from the company bearing his name. Emily Steel and Michael S. Schmidt revealed settlements totaling $13 million with women who accused Bill O’Reilly of Fox News of sexual harassment or abusive behavior. O’Reilly denied wrongdoing but departed Fox News within weeks after the story appeared. These stories played a leading role in spurring a wave of coverage of misbehavior by prominent men in multiple industries and significantly transformed the power dynamic in the executive suite. The other stories in this entry: exposure of ride-sharing giant Uber’s use of “Greyballing” and other technological tools to frustrate efforts by government investigators to check up on whether some of its competitive behaviors complied with the law; insight into how the collapse of much of the Wisconsin paper industry helped swing formerly Democratic voters and ultimately the state to Donald Trump; and graphical portrayal of the massive Republican tax cut’s benefits and pain. For its breadth, depth, and impact, the Times’ work was extraordinary.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    An outstanding range of work across news, investigations and explanatory journalism. This was a unanimous winner from a deep field with many competitive candidates. All of the pieces in the entry were strong, and presentation took advantage of smart multimedia as well as print. The investigation about rapes in Mexico was particularly compelling. The coverage served Milwaukee’s audience well with national-level reporting on pertinent local issues, such as the risks of oil transport both through aging pipelines and potential new ones.

    Honorable mention: Houston Chronicle
    Impressive work under highly competitive conditions on the flood stories, including an insightful and original piece about floating-roof oil tanks. The entry also showed breadth outside of that major story, with excellent examples of explanatory journalism as well as high-quality visuals and graphics.

     

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Small

    Winner: STAT: Reporting from the frontiers of health and medicine
    STAT impressed us with the breadth and quality of coverage, a powerful marriage of deep reporting with lively, engaging writing. In a skeptical look at IBM’s claims that its Watson supercomputer would revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, along with a well-timed piece documenting years of sexual harassment at a powerful biotech hedge fund, STAT displayed strong investigative chops and skilled narrative storytelling. Its breaking news entry, written after another in a long line of highly-anticipated Alzheimers drugs came up short in late-stage testing, went well beyond the basics, succinctly putting the development into the wider context so valuable to readers.

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business
    In a category filled with city business publications, Crain’s Detroit stood out with the strength and depth of reporting on a range of issues affecting the region. It revealed in rich detail the big push made by city officials and a local billionaire to lure Amazon to Detroit for the online retailer’s second headquarters, and also the surprising ways in which factories end up contributing to their own workers’ opioid abuse. A piece probing why Michigan has the highest auto-insurance rates in the country tackled a pressing local problem, while another, looking at the economic roots behind the decline of a once prosperous African-American neighborhood, connected readers to their city’s history in a fresh and interesting way.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “One Nation, Divisible”
    Michael M. Phillips, Betsy McKay, Paul Overberg and Sarah Nassauer
    An absolutely fabulous series of strong, powerful storytelling. The series used great reporting through data analysis and exact sourcing to give voice to an economy that is often invisible and thereby neglected by the country and the media. The writing was outstanding and delivered a compelling narrative that was hard to stop reading.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Burned”
    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett and John Diedrich
    This is genuine investigative journalism at its best. Next time someone tells you we don’t need local reporters, point to this series. It exposed the public hazard of barrel refurbishment plans and made a difference.

    Honorable mention: Kansas City Star, for “Business and politics collide in Missouri”
    Lindsay Wise and Steve Vockrodt
    This is quite good — exposing the hypocrisy of a popular politician with a national profile.

     

    GOVERNMENT – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Industry Lawsuits Try to Paint Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket”
    Nicholas Kusnetz
    The compelling narrative, starting with questionable characters arriving unannounced in a person’s driveway for reasons unknown, distinguished this entry from the pack. The story neatly wove a novel legal strategy in with the larger fight being waged against climate groups in a way that set the table for the wars to come in this arena.

    Honorable mention: Financial Planning, for “Wells Fargo whistleblowers”
    Ann Marsh, Marc Hochstein and Scott Wenger
    Judges were impressed by the depth of reporting, including the use of documents, and an on-record interview with a former OSHA employee alleging multiple violations that deprived whistleblowers of a chance at justice.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “The Body Trade”
    Brian Grow, John Shiffman, Blake Morrison, Elizabeth Culliford, Reade Levinson, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Zach Goelman
    The Reuters entry shook us on a primitive level as readers. As judges, we found the meticulousness and depth of reporting, the detail in the anecdotes and the sheer number of documents involved impressive. A seamless presentation through words, graphics and images gripped each of us to make this stunning series the clear winner.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Wasted Medicine”
    Marshall Allen
    An expert examination of an outrageous failure of the health care system, in three powerfully interlocking deep dives that looked at waste built into the industry.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity and Reveal, for “The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools”
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Chris Zubak-Skees, Eric Sagara, Fernanda Camarena, Amy Walters and Ike Sriskandarajah
    Before school shootings came back to haunt the news in February, this dogged piece of enterprise, studded with disturbing historic and sociological context and powerful graphics, laid bare a shocking dereliction of duty to our kids — an insidious problem that harms many more children than even these grotesque massacres. Now we have two huge problems to solve.

     

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy “
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle and Brad Wieners
    This team reports how the U.S. government whittled away protections for average Americans to interests of large fossil-fuel corporations. It includes reporting on how a scientific report was tweaked to justify a provision of the Energy Policy Act that bars the Environmental Protection Agency from safeguarding drinking water that may be contaminated by fracking, and how coal mining depleted aquifers. It also reports on how people responsible for the climate misinformation machine now have a seat at the table of President Donald Trump.

    Honorable mention: Kaiser Health News, for Treating Cancer: Hope Vs. Hype”
    Liz Szabo and John Hillkirk
    These eye-opening stories show how some cancer patients, even those with good insurance, are stalling the start of medication because of high co-pays. Those in financial distress die at higher rates. Doctors are not communicating with patients about how long they have to live, causing some to choose aggressive therapy that can cause pointless suffering. The stories are compelling and well-sourced and -written.

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Nuclear Negligence “
    Patrick Malone, Peter Cary, R. Jeffrey Smith and Chris Zubak-Skees
    This report illuminates rarely-reported safety weaknesses at corporate contractor run U.S. nuclear weapons sites. The reporting is diligent and employs all tools, including FOIAs, to show that the Los Alamos contractor’s inattention to safety crimped critical aspects of nuclear weapons-related work. Penalties imposed by the government were small compared to the vast amounts they get in contracts.

     

    INNOVATION – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Disneyland Wait Times”
    Hugo Martin, Joe Fox, Priya Krishnakumar, John Schleuss and Ben Poston
    “Disneyland Wait Times” did an excellent job matching data analysis and innovative interactivity with a very practical audience need — giving us the secrets to not standing in lines at the Magic Kingdom. It is a sleek integration of reporting, data and reader tips, which both helps the audience and encourages them to use the interactive tools. We loved the animated gif too!

     

    INNOVATION – Medium

    Winner: GateHouse Media, for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms”
    Emily Le Coz, Lucille Sherman, Mara Corbett and Tyson Bird
    This strong piece of investigative journalism told the story visually and audibly – letting readers see the impact of wind farms and listen to what it may sound like to be near one. This was a new experience for all of us. It was also easy to interpret the data in the story and consume it.

     

    INNOVATION – Small

    Winner: Crain’s Chicago Business, for “The Rebuilders of Chicago’s Southland”
    Jason McGregor, Thomas J. Linder and Ann Dwyer
    We applaud this piece for its use of digital design, aerial video and historical research to depict positive economic change in what for decades was one of the city’s most economically stagnant and negatively portrayed neighborhoods. Maps show the entrance of new businesses, with interspersed text narrative and before/after photos, along with a video portion. The series covers a lot of ground in explaining this rehabilitative metamorphosis to a business readership that no doubt had long written off the area.

     

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Large

    Winner: Associated Press, for “North Korea”
    Eric Talmadge, Tim Sullivan, Hyung-jin Kim and Martha Mendoza
    Timely stories that elegantly contrast the competing ambitions of a country that seeks to sequester its citizens even as it opens limited access to the internet and encourages more consumerism. These pieces go beyond investigative business journalism, offering readers absorbing insights into North Korea’s social structure.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Mexico’s Housing Crisis
    Richard Marosi
    An ambitious 360-degree view of the widespread failure of Mexico’s plan to provide housing for 20 million people. The reporter found original voices to tell the story of Mexico’s housing economy, government corruption and corporate greed. His illustrations of the personal cost to aggrieved homebuyers can’t help but shake the reader.

     

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Welcome to Tomorrow Land”
    Vivienne Walt
    This story was full of surprises. We loved the contrasts between showing how far Estonia has come from Soviet-era backwater with magnificent medieval architecture to rocketing straight into the future with specific, solid examples. Well-written with every sentence used economically to tell us relevant and interesting information. We loved the “startups on the rise” box, with just a sampling of what’s going on. There are some gems: The PM filing his taxes on his iPad from an airport. Genius! We also liked the pullout with SHORT examples of the Estonian government being ahead of the curve. It then throws the story right into the future — it’s not just about what the country has done, it’s about where it’s going.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Culture of Harassment “
    Emily Steel, Michael S. Schmidt, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey, Susan Chira and Catrin Einhorn
    This collection of New York Times’ articles about sexual harassment, including the October story on Harvey Weinstein, helped to spur a national reckoning on the issue and upended the notion that if you’re powerful, you will not be held to account. All three stories submitted involved rigorous reporting and uncovered incidents and settlements that were previously undisclosed. Although many victims were unwilling, the newspaper managed to get a number of women to tell their stories.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut”
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh
    This story asked why electric rates were 50 percent higher in California than the national average and why regulators continued to approve new plants. The answer, naturally, is complex, but the LA Times did a masterful job of explaining the reasons and what could or should be done about them. The writing, data, photos and engaging graphics worked together to create an easy-to-follow package relevant to consumers, government and corporations. In a field of outstanding entries, this was a smart piece that did an exceptional job of telling a multilayered story while keeping it interesting.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Too Broke for Bankruptcy”
    Paul Kiel and Hannah Fresques
    Beautiful combination of strong shoe-leather and data reporting on a fresh and important topic – why some poor people don’t file for bankruptcy protection because they can’t afford a lawyer. Excellent analysis, clearly presented.

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for “Quantity of Care”
    Mike Baker and Justin Mayo
    Compelling, deeply researched and beautifully written and illustrated stories about the dire consequences of emphasizing money over once-selfless medical practices. The project got immediate results, including investigations by the state Department of Health and U.S. Department of Justice, and the resignation of the hospital’s CEO and top neurosurgeon.

    Honorable mention: The Boston Globe, for “FAA”
    Jaimi Dowdell, Kelly Carr, Jenn Abelson, Todd Wallack, Jonathan Saltzman and Scott Allen
    Amazing and frightening story on lax oversight on plane registration at the Federal Aviation Administration that has received little, if any, media attention. A very strong entry.

    Honorable mention: The Des Moines Register, for “TPI Investigation”
    Kevin Hardy and Grant Rodgers
    The Des Moines Register revealed how wind-blade maker TPI failed to protect its workers from toxic chemicals that damaged their skin. Some workers were fired when they reported skin damage and were denied workers compensation benefits by the company. Excellent use of Iowa OSHA documents, unemployment appeals hearing testimony, photos and on-the-record and anonymous interviews with former workers.

     

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Small

    Winner: Boston Business Journal, for “Promises, promises: Massachusetts companies are missing hiring goals even with hefty tax breaks”
    Greg Ryan
    The investigation reveals Massachusetts has awarded over $25 million in job-creation tax credits to businesses that have since fallen short of their hiring promises — more than one third of the companies were granted the tax credits. The story is well-researched and presented fairly.

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces”
    Sabrina Shankman
    InsideClimate News examined the long history of regulatory violations by an energy company planning a major drilling program in the Arctic.

    Honorable mention: Orlando Business Journal, for “The Amazon Effect”
    Sarah Aslam, Veronica Brezina, Matthew Richardson and Craig Douglas
    A fresh look at the impact of huge web-based Amazon using a mix of commercial real estate transaction information, national data from partner business publications and local title and tax records.

     

    MARKETS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Market-Moving Leaks”
    Mike Bird
    Within three months of the Journal’s initial story about potential abuse of the prerelease of UK government economic data, the practice was halted. The newspaper wasn’t the first to notice suspicious trading – there were rumors as early as 2009 – but it highlighted the issue with a statistical analysis and a clear explanation of risks posed by leaked data. Interactive charts clearly showed how widespread advance notice of economic data allowed those in the know to trade on the information.

     

    MARKETS – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Whatever It Takes to Win”
    Jen Wieczner
    A polished, extensively reported story on a subject of significant interest to investors and company executives, as well as a broader readership: activist hedge funds, in this instance Elliott Management. The reporter’s persistence and in-depth reporting forced the reluctant subjects into lifting the curtain on the inner workings of one of Wall Street’s most aggressive operators. The story had all the right elements and was accompanied by interesting graphics. A very enjoyable read.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Ratner-Simmons Sex Allegations “
    Daniel Miller, Amy Kaufman and Victoria Kim
    An unflinching account of sexual misconduct allegations that spanned decades and are now part of a broader cultural reckoning over society’s treatment of women. The reporters skillfully walk the tightrope of ‘he said-she said,’ forcing readers to confront the inherent power imbalance between the abusers and their victims. In the Ratner stories, the reporters dispassionately lay out the accusations juxtaposed with the director’s repeated denials. Patterns begin to emerge: Ratner, through his lawyer, claiming not to recall an incident; Ratner switching seats on an airplane to sit next to a strange woman and then showing nude photos of his girlfriend. The final piece exposes the hypocrisy of Simmons’ lifestyle brand alongside decades of alleged abuse. The reporting is methodical and the writing compelling. The anger and frustration of the many direct, named sources is palpable. In most cases, the reporters verified accounts with multiple sources. The series does not shy away from the uncomfortable reality that in many cases, the victims maintained their relationships with Ratner and Simmons and in some cases sought professional gain from them.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Medium

    Winner: CNNMoney, for Five women accuse journalist and ‘Game Change’ co-author Mark Halperin of sexual harassment “
    Oliver Darcy
    CNNMoney broke news of Halperin’s alleged sexual misconduct while at ABC and followed the news as its impact grew and Halperin responded. Darcy’s stories were clear, well-written and exceptionally well-reported, giving them credibility and impact.

     

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Small

    Winner: Portland Business Journal, for “Portland’s media mania”
    Erik Siemers
    The three stories in this entry brought together detail, character and perspective to capture the subject matter from all angles. Each report delivered not only key facts and figures, but also compelling anecdotes of the people affected by them. A report on the comic-book industry was a highlight because of its creative presentation, worthy of the topic.

    Honorable mention: Investor’s Business Daily, forCan E-sports’ Armchair Gladiators Vanquish Hulking NFL Players?”
    Patrick Seitz
    A comprehensive account of an industry that’s developed enough to merit in-depth reporting, but fresh enough to be news to most readers. There’s plenty of well-organized detail about the players — in other words, the companies — in the world of E-sports.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Student Debt”
    Stacy Cowley, Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Natalie Kitroeff
    The reporting on this important topic was thorough, the writing powerful and the personal stories were compelling. The series put a spotlight on the predatory practices of companies holding student debt, and the fact that the investor in one of those firms actually condemned his own company’s procedures was a testament to the rock-solid reporting.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: The Chronicle of Higher Education, forWelcome Students! Need a Checking Account?”
    Dan Bauman
    A well-reported story that exposes the millions that banks are paying U.S. colleges to market checking accounts and other banking services to students. The piece stands out for its excellent use of data and public records, and for personal stories that bring to life the financial concerns of students, parents and consumer advocates.

     

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Small

    Winner: The Motley Fool, for Matthew Frankel’s columns
    Frankel wins for his in-depth columns looking at the impact of the 2017 federal tax overhaul on average Americans and for his analysis of the implications of the Fed’s swing to raising interest rates for Americans. His prompt take on these shifting policies, and his smart and readable approaches, helps readers make sense of immensely complex topics so they can protect their pocketbooks.

    Honorable mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Money Help for Aging Parents”
    Sandra Block, Mark Solheim and Eileen Ambrose
    Many seniors are unaware of their gradually declining capacity for managing their financial affairs. This piece was packed with solid tips on ways adult children can move into sensitive caregiving modes by advising aging parents on topics ranging from keeping up with the bills and estate planning to constantly being on alert for fraudulent schemes. This package of articles offered good suggestions about where families can turn for reliable advice in such situations.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg News, for “Cashing In on Calamity”
    Prashant Gopal
    The scope of the concept was high; global warming is causing more catastrophes, causing more reconstruction, and here’s what that looks like on the ground. The judges were impressed that it was one reporter doing all the work. Prashant Gopal wove together detailed and compelling individual stories to construct a big and important story, one that will continue into the future.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Puerto Rico seeks aid for tens of thousands of squatters”
    Lorraine Woellert and M. Scott Mahaskey
    A beautifully written and deeply reported story on how Hurricane Maria exposed the open secret of tens of thousands of squatters living illegally in Puerto Rico. Woellert writes persuasively about how the island’s political structure has compounded the problem for many years, and why its leaders now must decide what to do. The terrific photographs bring the story to life.

    Honorable mention: The Arizona Republic, for HOA foreclosures”
    Jessica Boehm and Catherine Reagor
    This solidly reported, multimedia package alerted Arizona homeowners to the risks they face from their homeowners associations. As this extensively researched and well-written project explained, these largely unregulated bodies have broad powers that include the right to seize homes in foreclosure for as little as $1,200 in unpaid dues. A series of engaging videos that included first-person accounts helped to unravel the causes and impact of the most recent wave of foreclosures spurred in part by the recovery in home prices.

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for Amazon coverage
    Mike Rosenberg, Ángel González, Bettina Hansen, Mark Nowlin, Judy Averill, Kjell Redal, Thomas Wilburn and Alan Berner
    As Amazon turns Seattle into a true company town, The Seattle Times documented that transformation with sharp data analysis and graphics, crisp writing and a novel approach to storytelling. The numbers alone are striking – from rising rents to sheer volume of office space – but we found the story that followed one home through the selling process particularly effective in illustrating the speed and craziness of the Seattle housing market.

     

    REAL ESTATE – Small

    Winner: Puget Sound Business Journal, for Marc Stiles package of stories
    Marc Stiles
    A great package with three very different topics – a shady real-estate developer, a neighborhood in turmoil over gentrification, and a profile of the man in charge of building Amazon’s second headquarters. For each, Stiles consistently brought excellent reporting and writing to bear, resulting in stories that were in-depth, nuanced and compulsively readable. His work stood out in a competitive environment for real-estate submissions.

    Honorable mention: The News Tribune (Tacoma), for Fight for your country, lose the bidding war for a house”
    Kate Martin
    Martin highlighted an underreported problem in the real estate market—former soldiers who were unable to successfully use loans from the Department of Veterans Affairs to purchase a home. Martin did a terrific job of detailing the scope of the issue, talking to affected veterans, real estate brokers and lenders about what was going on and why. Martin did this well before more national media became interested in similar cases later in 2017.

     

    RETAIL – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Retail in Crisis”
    Suzanne Kapner, Valerie Bauerlein, Esther Fung and Yaryna Serkez
    The Wall Street Journal staff explores the retail industry’s transformation in vivid detail, first taking readers to a retail-dependent city where store closings are causing waves of economic woes and then exploring the pressures on an old-school retailer struggling to compete in a rapidly-changing world. This entry is topped off with an innovative interactive tracing the slow death of an American mall by tracking tenant life cycles dating to 1995. Excellent work all around in this category’s deepest and most complete entry.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Counterfeit Shoes”
    David Pierson
    Readers got enlightening glimpse into a $460 billion industry: counterfeit goods. Using rapper Kanye West’s luxury sneakers as his hook, Pierson’s deep reporting is complemented by rich storytelling to produce a piece that’s compelling on many levels, from the technology used to produce replicas of these high-priced kicks to the mind-set of buyers who rationalize their decisions to purchase fake goods.

     

    RETAIL – Medium

    Winner: Report on Business Magazine, for Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”
    Marina Strauss
    An in-depth look at the transformation of Tim Hortons after the iconic Canadian brand was acquired by private equity firm 3G Capital. Strong details and storytelling transformed a local story into a bigger business saga. Disgruntled franchisees formed an association and used details from the article in their complaint to the company.

    Honorable mention: BusinessInsider.com, forDefining the Retail Apocalypse”
    Hayley Peterson
    Smart reporting and bright writing differentiated this series from other submissions on the demise of the retail industry. The package provided three angles to the crisis: including engaging pieces on retail job loss, the decline of Sears and the impact of store closings on bond holders.

     

    RETAIL – Small

    Winner: Racked, for “eBay is Playing Catch-Up “
    Chavie Lieber, Christie Hemm Klok and Laura Bullard
    A smart story, written with authority, that tackles an interesting area of the online marketplace and focuses on eBay, a company that the judges hadn’t really thought about for a long time. Lieber provides insight into the strategic decisions the company has made as it struggles to fend off competitors including mighty Amazon.

    Honorable mention: Capital & Main, for a package of retail features
    Jessica Goodheart
    In A Dream and a Microwave: Everytable Serves Healthy Meals to Hungry ‘Hoods, Goodheart writes deftly on a compelling and socially important topic: how to make healthy eating affordable for everyone. Her reporting about a fledgling restaurant chain with a unique business model is comprehensive and rich with voices.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Contracted”
    Lauren Weber
    The package of stories was well-researched and well-done as it toggled between data and real-world examples filled with people and companies. It was written and edited at a high level, making it an enjoyable read on a fairly wonky subject. We also liked the kicker at the end of the main story about bots. The sidebar on the video-game industry was particularly engaging, and a smart story to do to draw in a younger demographic of readers. Altogether, the trio of stories gave a good 360-degree view of an issue certain to become more pressing in the economy.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for Can AT&T Retrain 100,000 People? “
    Aaron Pressman
    This story struck a great balance. It took us inside a single, massive company to examine an interesting change and grappled with an existential crisis many businesses are facing: skills mismatch in an era of technological progress. The outcome is a story that is well-developed and resonant.

    Honorable mention: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Cost of affair, family rift measured in millions”
    Jeffrey Meitrodt
    A deeply reported story that chronicled executive negligence at a prominent Minnesota firm owned by the Barry family, and the turmoil that followed.

     

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Small

    Winner: LinkedIn, for “Managing Business “
    Chip Cutter
    Impressive reporting effort to show a U.S. labor market in the grip of rapid change. One notable conclusion: The changes aren’t all in the same direction. Readers get to watch up close as truckers exploit a driver shortage and employers despair over the opioid crisis. A scoop about a Walmart floor scrubber shows how automation is creeping into American workplaces. The stories make abstract issues concrete, bolstering the musing of experts with compelling, real-world examples.

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for Main Street”
    Leigh Buchanan
    Bright writing and detailed reporting is employed to tell enlightening stories about small business. We especially liked a piece that profiled a family of immigrant hotel entrepreneurs, telling the story of how they grew a small business into a much bigger one and the creative and thoughtful ways they reacted to the devastation of Hurricane Harvey. Her two other articles described a unique solution to the problem of the fading family farm and the surprising source of all those cardboard eclipse glasses last year.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Projects and collaborations

    Winner: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic, for “Arizona owners can lose homes over $50 in back taxes”
    Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark
    This story packs a powerful punch, showing the devastating impact of tax liens on some Arizona homeowners, particularly minorities and the poor. It recounts the experience of one family and then uses data analysis to illustrate the magnitude of the problem. Bravo on the map. The complex process of tax liens and foreclosure is laid out in an understandable fashion that makes readers want to stay with the story until the end. Many sources are featured, including individuals who are going through the worst time of their lives and are therefore reluctant to speak publicly. This is an example of strong community reporting that can lead to change.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for professional publications

    Winner: University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal, for Losing the Fight to Debt”
    Danielle Chemtob
    Excellent journalism and a unique story angle for a topic that’s been covered exhaustively — student debt. Reporter Danielle Chemtob took an in-depth look at the high amount of debt taken on by students at historic black colleges and universities. Though the story included a lot of hard data on rising tuition costs and flat wages, she kept it interesting and personal by speaking to students and school leaders.

    Honorable mention: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Profits of Policing”
    Agnel Philip and Emily Mahoney
    Profits of Policing sheds light on a largely hidden area, exposing shortcoming in the accounting and reporting of seized personal property. Reporters Emily Mahoney and Agnel Philip did an incredible amount of digging for this report. An added bonus: The video of the 76-year-old man, who could lose everything as a result of this personal property seizure program, provided a very personal element to this in-depth investigation.

     

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for student publications

    Winner: Medill News Service, for “Opportunities open up for women truckers, but their numbers remain small”
    Shen Lu
    Touching on two issues of national importance — gender equity in the workplace as well as a trucker shortage — the article told the story of two women struggling to make it in a male-dominated workplace, while putting their experiences into a broader context. The engaging article smartly wove in graphics and photos and mixed the macro and micro for a fascinating business story.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Inside Uber”
    Mike Isaac
    An insightful profile of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick that examined how his personality evolved from his high school years, how his penchant for risk-taking shaped Uber and led to the company’s managerial crisis. This series contained remarkable reporting about Kalanick’s showdown with Apple CEO Tim Cook and use of a technique called “Greyballing” aimed at deceiving local governments about Uber’s activities. In-depth reporting, quality writing and compelling multimedia made this series the clear winner.

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Snap IPO”
    David Pierson, James Rufus Koren, Paresh Dave, Joe Fox and Ben Muessig
    The judges were impressed by the breadth and quality of writing on the initial public offering of Snap Inc., particularly the remarkable profile of Snap CEO Evan Spiegel. This series included a clearly written article on shareholder governance and Snap’s attempt to retain control of the company after the IPO. The judges also commend a clever interactive graphic that describes the volatility and price declines of much-publicized tech stock offerings.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Automating Hate”
    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner, Ariana Tobin, Madeleine Varner, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Rob Weychert, Noam Scheiber, Hannes Grassegger and Stefanie Dodt
    A clear winner — well-written, newsworthy, and one that made an impact. This trio of stories takes an inventive, investigative look at the underside of social-media giant Facebook and its not-so-politically correct ways, highlighting how hard it is to make it accountable. The in-depth and original reporting shows how the company’s guidelines for censoring hate speech let controversial posts slip through the cracks while unfairly shutting down more reasonable ones, and it exposes how easy it is for employers to use Facebook’s technology to exclude older workers from job ads. While these stories were written last year, the subject they tackled remains critical in today’s charged political environment.

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “Blockchain Mania!”
    Robert Hackett and Jeff John Roberts
    This piece tackles a complicated and technically challenging subject with aplomb and creates a great explainer that’s also an engaging read.

     

    TECHNOLOGY – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Saving face: Facebook wants access without rules”
    Jared Bennett and Allan Holmes
    A deep, broad look at a project that an increasingly dominant company has worked hard to avoid scrutiny. The topic has huge potential implications for privacy, technology and the consolidation of power. The story draws its force from crisp writing, good graphics and, above all, impressively thorough reporting.

    Honorable mention: Triangle Business Journal, “How an $850 million deal died for a Durham company”
    Lauren Ohnesorge
    This story goes deep inside a collapsed investment by a German giant in a North Carolina tech company to show how international trade policy hits home in American cities. It was well-written, clearly organized and comprehensively reported, with informative graphics.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, forSelf-Driving Cars”
    Tim Higgins, Jack Nicas, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Mike Spector
    The WSJ stories were our top pick for the deeply reported insight into perhaps the biggest issue facing the transportation industry: self-driving cars. The submitted pieces covered three of the most important players — Tesla, Google and Uber — and raised important concerns about safety, tensions with Detroit and theft of intellectual property. The stories showed impressive sourcing and research and used storytelling elements to bring the stories to life.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “The Last Railroad Tycoon”
    Shawn Tully
    Well-written, engaging and insightful — the story took readers inside the CEO’s attempt to remake a fourth railroad after three previous successes. Hunter Harrison’s gambit lives on after his death and is the biggest story in U.S. railroading in a decade.

    Honorable mention: Quartz, for Uber’s New York subprime leasing program and the drivers it hurt”
    Alison Griswold
    Uber’s turnabout showed the impact of the story. Quartz was effective in highlighting the human element of drivers caught in the rent-to-own trap, helping readers make a more-personal connection. The follow-up with drivers afterward also was a nice touch.

     

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Small

    Winner: The Information, forUber’s Hell”
    Amir Efrati
    The year 2017 became a reckoning for Uber in so many ways, from how it attempted to skirt, or even potentially break, the law in thwarting competitors and regulators to its disgraceful treatment of women in its workplace. The company’s hard-charging CEO thought he could rule Uber as his personal kingdom but discovered otherwise, with his downfall resulting in major drama. The stories broke new ground in nearly every area of controversy at the company – delivering investigative scoops that punched well above its weight. From exposing secret programs to spy on its competitor Lyft to documenting sexual misconduct instances pervasive at the company, The Information’s work was an amazing example of hard-hitting business reporting that never let up and never backed down.

    Honorable mention: Jacksonville Business Journal Reporter, for “Employed & Homeless: As CSX changes plans, dispatchers left in limbo during holidays”
    William Robinson
    This story showed just how vulnerable employees are to the whims of shifting winds at a corporation like CSX. They uprooted their lives and started moving based on the company’s direction that their jobs were being relocated, only to suddenly have the company change its mind. Good solid story and notable that the company kept trying to deny what was happening, requiring the reporter to prove it through dogged reporting involving documents and persuading the employees to go on record.

     

    VIDEO – Large

    Winner: CNBC, forBroken Bonds”
    Leslie Picker, Scott Zamost, Dawn Giel, Chris Mulligan, Jackie Dessel, Alex Herrera, Leroy Jackson and Scott Matthews
    CNBC’s powerful entry gave viewers strong investigative material gleaned from a wide variety of sources. This CNBC piece apparently wasn’t the first reporting on this long running issue, but it detailed the issue with sweep, depth and clarity, tackling an important subject and serious questions about UBS’s actions as crucial concerns grew about the product it was marketing. The look of the video itself was clean and straight forward, but it clearly took deep reporting, meaningful resources and time to craft it.

     

    VIDEO – Small and Medium

    Winner: Quartz in collaboration with Retro Report, for “What Happens Next”
    This series was thorough and polished, plus it was on-topic. The aerial footage! Looks like they used drones to good effect. Impressive production quality and it conveys relevant info. The well-produced videos took us to new and different places, telling us something we didn’t know and relating it to the world we live in. Excellent work.

  • 2017 Best in Business Honorees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Wednesday March 7, 2018

    AUDIO – All news organizations

    Winner: Marketplace/The Uncertain Hour, for “How One Sentence Helped Set Off the Opioid Crisis”
    Krissy Clark, Caitlin Esch, Nancy Farghalli, Maria Hollenhorst, Lyra Smith, Sitara Nieves, Deborah Clark, Donna Tam, Tony Wagner, Jake Gorski and Daniel Ramirez

    Honorable mention: KUOW, for “Prime(d)”
    Carol Smith, Joshua McNichols, Carolyn Adolph, Posey Gruener and Brendan Sweeney

    BANKING/FINANCE – Large

    Winner: Financial Times, for articles on non-prime and predatory lending
    Ben McLannahan

    Honorable mention: Reuters, for “Crypto Casino”
    Steve Stecklow, Alexandra Harney, Anna Irrera and Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi

    BANKING/FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with Fortune, for “The Billion-Dollar Loophole”
    Peter Elkind

    BANKING/FINANCE – Small

    Winner: TheStreet, for “Big Bank Corporate Governance”
    Brad Keoun

    Honorable mention: American Banker, for The CFPB leadership battle”
    Kate Berry, Ian McKendry and Rob Blackwell

    BREAKING NEWS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “CVS-Aetna Deal”
    Dana Mattioli, Sharon Terlep, Anna Wilde Mathews and Laura Stevens

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for Uber coverage
    Mike Isaac and Farhad Manjoo

    BREAKING NEWS – Medium

    Winner: The Seattle Times, for “Amazon HQ2 announcement”
    Matt Day, Dominic Gates, Mike Rosenberg, Jon Talton, Scott Greenstone, Dan Beekman, Jessica Lee, Joseph O’Sullivan, Mark Nowlin and Kjell Redal

    BREAKING NEWS – Small

    Winner: International Business Times, for “Last-Minute Tax Provisions Could Enrich Top Lawmakers”
    David Sirota, Josh Keefe, Alex Kotch and Jay Cassano

    Honorable mention: Puget Sound Business Journal, for “Port of Seattle CEO resigned amid probe into $4.7M payout”
    Andrew McIntosh

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business, for “Amazon HQ2 bid revealed: tax breaks, $120 million talent program, transit vision”
    Chad Livengood and Kirk Pinho

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for Keywords Technology Column
    Christopher Mims

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Equifax Hack”
    Ron Lieber

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Medium

    Winner: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Lee Schafer’s columns

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “A Boom with a View”
    Erin Griffith

    Honorable mention: The Dallas Morning News, for “Texas business repels a bathroom bill”
    Mitchell Schnurman

    COMMENTARY/OPINION – Small

    Winner: Albany Business Review, for Mike Hendricks’ columns

    Honorable mention: The Nation, for Helaine Olen’s columns

    ECONOMICS – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh

    ECONOMICS – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Trump’s Trade Pullout Roils Rural America”
    Adam Behsudi

    ECONOMICS – Small

    Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for “Sarasota Drift”
    Barbara Peters-Smith

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut “
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Medium

    Winner: The Atlantic, for “The Problem with Rolling Back Regulations”
    Alana Semuels

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan

    ENERGY/NATURAL RESOURCES – Small

    Winner: Debtwire, for American Idle: An Offshore Drilling Crisis “
    Alex Plough

    EXPLANATORY – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “Shock Tactics”
    Jason Szep, Peter Eisler, Tim Reid, Lisa Girion, Grant Smith, Linda So, M.B. Pell and Charles Levinson

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Anaheim’s Subsidy Kingdom “
    Daniel Miller, Priya Krishnakumar and Ben Poston

    Honorable mention: The New York Times, for “Education Disrupted”
    Natasha Singer

    EXPLANATORY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, co-published with NPR, for “Sold for Parts”
    Michael Grabell and Howard Berkes

    Honorable mention: Miami Herald, for “Hotel housekeepers commute”
    Chabeli Herrera and Carl Juste

    Honorable mention: Detroit Free Press, “The Fault in No Fault”
    JC Reindl

    Honorable mention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Oil and Water”
    Dan Egan

    EXPLANATORY – Small

    Winner: McClatchy’s Washington Bureau, “Trump’s footprint across ex-Soviet world”
    David Goldstein, Ben Wieder, Kevin G. Hall, Gabriellle Paluch and Peter Stone

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for A Century of Domination: As America’s Carbon Wars Rage, Oil and Gas Industry Influence Grows”
    Jie Jenny Zou, Michael J. Mishak, Jamie Smith Hopkins, Kristen Lombardi, Jim Morris, Chris Young, Sasha Khokha and Tom Dart

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy”
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle, Robert McClure and Brad Wieners

    FEATURE – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Immigrant Farm Labor”
    Geoffrey Mohan, Natalie Kitroeff and Ben Welsh

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “Pink Boxes”
    David Pierson

    FEATURE – Medium

    Winner: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, for “The Land Alcoa Dammed”
    Rich Lord, Len Boselovic, Stephanie Strasburg, Zack Tanner, James Hilston and Ed Yozwick

    Honorable mention: Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, for Trapped by Heroin”
    Penelope Overton, Dieter Bradbury, Gregory Rec and Brian Robitaille

    Honorable mention: The Weather Channel Digital, for “United States of Climate Change”
    Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans, Kevin Hayes and Geoff Hansen

    FEATURE – Small

    Winner: The Real Deal, for “Real Estate’s Diversity Problem”
    Kathryn Brenzel, Rich Bockmann, Elizabeth Kim, Jill Noonan, Damian Ghigliotty and Yoryi De La Rosa

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Chicago Business, for Can jobs stop Chicago violence?”
    Lisa Bertagnoli and Ann Dwyer

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for “Meet the Woman Who Broke Silicon Valley’s Gender Barrier and Built a $1.5 Billion Tech Company “
    Maria Aspan and Danielle Sacks

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Industry/topic-specific publications

    Winner: The Real Deal

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Honorable mention: Houston Chronicle

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE – Small

    Winner: STAT: Reporting from the frontiers of health and medicine

    Honorable mention: Crain’s Detroit Business

    GOVERNMENT – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “One Nation, Divisible”
    Michael M. Phillips, Betsy McKay, Paul Overberg and Sarah Nassauer

    GOVERNMENT – Medium

    Winner: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for “Burned”
    Raquel Rutledge, Rick Barrett and John Diedrich

    Honorable mention: Kansas City Star, for “Business and politics collide in Missouri”
    Lindsay Wise and Steve Vockrodt

    GOVERNMENT – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Industry Lawsuits Try to Paint Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket”
    Nicholas Kusnetz

    Honorable mention: Financial Planning, for “Wells Fargo whistleblowers”
    Ann Marsh, Marc Hochstein and Scott Wenger

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Large

    Winner: Reuters, for “The Body Trade”
    Brian Grow, John Shiffman, Blake Morrison, Elizabeth Culliford, Reade Levinson, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Zach Goelman

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Wasted Medicine”
    Marshall Allen

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity and Reveal, for “The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools”
    Jamie Smith Hopkins, Chris Zubak-Skees, Eric Sagara, Fernanda Camarena, Amy Walters and Ike Sriskandarajah

    HEALTH/SCIENCE – Small

    Winner: InsideClimate News, for “Choke Hold: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Fight Against Climate Policy, Science and Clean Energy “
    Neela Banerjee, Robert McClure, Clark Hoyt, David Hasemyer, Marianne Lavelle and Brad Wieners

    Honorable mention: Kaiser Health News, for Treating Cancer: Hope Vs. Hype”
    Liz Szabo and John Hillkirk

    Honorable mention: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Nuclear Negligence “
    Patrick Malone, Peter Cary, R. Jeffrey Smith and Chris Zubak-Skees

    INNOVATION – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Disneyland Wait Times”
    Hugo Martin, Joe Fox, Priya Krishnakumar, John Schleuss and Ben Poston

    INNOVATION – Medium

    Winner: GateHouse Media, for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms”
    Emily Le Coz, Lucille Sherman, Mara Corbett and Tyson Bird

    INNOVATION – Small

    Winner: Crain’s Chicago Business, for “The Rebuilders of Chicago’s Southland”
    Jason McGregor, Thomas J. Linder and Ann Dwyer

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Large

    Winner: Associated Press, for “North Korea”
    Eric Talmadge, Tim Sullivan, Hyung-jin Kim and Martha Mendoza

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Mexico’s Housing Crisis
    Richard Marosi

    INTERNATIONAL REPORTING – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Welcome to Tomorrow Land”
    Vivienne Walt

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Culture of Harassment “
    Emily Steel, Michael S. Schmidt, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey, Susan Chira and Catrin Einhorn

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for “California’s Power Glut”
    Ivan Penn, Ryan Menezes and Ben Welsh

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Too Broke for Bankruptcy”
    Paul Kiel and Hannah Fresques

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for “Quantity of Care”
    Mike Baker and Justin Mayo

    Honorable mention: The Boston Globe, for “FAA”
    Jaimi Dowdell, Kelly Carr, Jenn Abelson, Todd Wallack, Jonathan Saltzman and Scott Allen

    Honorable mention: The Des Moines Register, for “TPI Investigation”
    Kevin Hardy and Grant Rodgers

    INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING – Small

    Winner: Boston Business Journal, for “Promises, promises: Massachusetts companies are missing hiring goals even with hefty tax breaks”
    Greg Ryan

    Honorable mention: InsideClimate News, for “As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces”
    Sabrina Shankman

    Honorable mention: Orlando Business Journal, for “The Amazon Effect”
    Sarah Aslam, Veronica Brezina, Matthew Richardson and Craig Douglas

    MARKETS – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Market-Moving Leaks”
    Mike Bird

     MARKETS – Small and Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “Whatever It Takes to Win”
    Jen Wieczner

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Large

    Winner: Los Angeles Times, for “Ratner-Simmons Sex Allegations “
    Daniel Miller, Amy Kaufman and Victoria Kim

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Medium

    Winner: CNNMoney, for Five women accuse journalist and ‘Game Change’ co-author Mark Halperin of sexual harassment “
    Oliver Darcy

    MEDIA/ENTERAINMENT – Small

    Winner: Portland Business Journal, for “Portland’s media mania”
    Erik Siemers

    Honorable mention: Investor’s Business Daily, forCan E-sports’ Armchair Gladiators Vanquish Hulking NFL Players?”
    Patrick Seitz

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Student Debt”
    Stacy Cowley, Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Natalie Kitroeff

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Medium

    Winner: The Chronicle of Higher Education, forWelcome Students! Need a Checking Account?”
    Dan Bauman

    PERSONAL FINANCE – Small

    Winner: The Motley Fool, for Matthew Frankel’s columns

    Honorable mention: Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, for “Money Help for Aging Parents”
    Sandra Block, Mark Solheim and Eileen Ambrose

    REAL ESTATE – Large

    Winner: Bloomberg News, for “Cashing In on Calamity”
    Prashant Gopal

    REAL ESTATE – Medium

    Winner: POLITICO, for “Puerto Rico seeks aid for tens of thousands of squatters”
    Lorraine Woellert and M. Scott Mahaskey

    Honorable mention: The Arizona Republic, for HOA foreclosures”
    Jessica Boehm and Catherine Reagor

    Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, for Amazon coverage
    Mike Rosenberg, Ángel González, Bettina Hansen, Mark Nowlin, Judy Averill, Kjell Redal, Thomas Wilburn and Alan Berner

    REAL ESTATE – Small

    Winner: Puget Sound Business Journal, for Marc Stiles package of stories
    Marc Stiles

    Honorable mention: The News Tribune (Tacoma), for Fight for your country, lose the bidding war for a house”
    Kate Martin

    RETAIL – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Retail in Crisis”
    Suzanne Kapner, Valerie Bauerlein, Esther Fung and Yaryna Serkez

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Counterfeit Shoes”
    David Pierson

    RETAIL – Medium

    Winner: Report on Business Magazine, for Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”
    Marina Strauss

    Honorable mention: BusinessInsider.com, forDefining the Retail Apocalypse”
    Hayley Peterson

    RETAIL – Small

    Winner: Racked, for “eBay is Playing Catch-Up “
    Chavie Lieber, Christie Hemm Klok and Laura Bullard

    Honorable mention: Capital & Main, for a package of retail features
    Jessica Goodheart

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, for “Contracted”
    Lauren Weber

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for Can AT&T Retrain 100,000 People? “
    Aaron Pressman

    Honorable mention: Minneapolis Star Tribune, for Cost of affair, family rift measured in millions”
    Jeffrey Meitrodt

    SMALL BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/CAREER – Small

    Winner: LinkedIn, for “Managing Business “
    Chip Cutter

    Honorable mention: Inc. Magazine, for Main Street”
    Leigh Buchanan

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Projects and collaborations

    Winner: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic, for “Arizona owners can lose homes over $50 in back taxes”
    Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for professional publications

    Winner: University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal, for Losing the Fight to Debt”
    Danielle Chemtob

    Honorable mention: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, for “Profits of Policing”
    Agnel Philip and Emily Mahoney

    STUDENT JOURNALISM – Stories written for student publications

    Winner: Medill News Service, for “Opportunities open up for women truckers, but their numbers remain small”
    Shen Lu

    TECHNOLOGY – Large

    Winner: The New York Times, for “Inside Uber”
    Mike Isaac

    Honorable mention: Los Angeles Times, for Snap IPO”
    David Pierson, James Rufus Koren, Paresh Dave, Joe Fox and Ben Muessig

    TECHNOLOGY – Medium

    Winner: ProPublica, for “Automating Hate”
    Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner, Ariana Tobin, Madeleine Varner, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Rob Weychert, Noam Scheiber, Hannes Grassegger and Stefanie Dodt

    Honorable mention: Fortune, for “Blockchain Mania!”
    Robert Hackett and Jeff John Roberts

    TECHNOLOGY – Small

    Winner: The Center for Public Integrity, for “Saving face: Facebook wants access without rules”
    Jared Bennett and Allan Holmes

    Honorable mention: Triangle Business Journal, “How an $850 million deal died for a Durham company”
    Lauren Ohnesorge

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Large

    Winner: The Wall Street Journal, forSelf-Driving Cars”
    Tim Higgins, Jack Nicas, Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Mike Spector

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Medium

    Winner: Fortune, for “The Last Railroad Tycoon”
    Shawn Tully

    Honorable mention: Quartz, for Uber’s New York subprime leasing program and the drivers it hurt”
    Alison Griswold

    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION – Small

    Winner: The Information, forUber’s Hell”
    Amir Efrati

    Honorable mention: Jacksonville Business Journal Reporter, for “Employed & Homeless: As CSX changes plans, dispatchers left in limbo during holidays”
    William Robinson

    VIDEO – Large

    Winner: CNBC, forBroken Bonds”
    Leslie Picker, Scott Zamost, Dawn Giel, Chris Mulligan, Jackie Dessel, Alex Herrera, Leroy Jackson and Scott Matthews

    VIDEO – Small and Medium

    Winner: Quartz in collaboration with Retro Report, for “What Happens Next”

  • SABEW Announces New Executive Leadership Ladder

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday January 22, 2018

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW), the largest association of business journalists, has elected new executive officers effective immediately. The terms of service are through spring 2019 at the annual SABEW conference. The executive ladder changes were approved unanimously by the SABEW Board of Governors.

    Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief of Bankrate.com, will lead SABEW as president for a second term.

    An award-winning journalist, Hamrick joined personal-finance site Bankrate.com in January 2013 after leading business news for the Associated Press’ radio and television/online video operation in Washington, D.C., for more than 18 years.

    Along with his work analyzing economic developments, financial markets, politics and business for Bankrate.com, Hamrick provides commentary or content hundreds of times a year for radio, television, print and online news organizations. Before joining the SABEW board in 2014, he served as president of the National Press Club.

    Xana Antunes, executive editor at Quartz, will resign as SABEW vice president effective immediately due to personal time demands inhibiting her ability to serve as an officer. Antunes will remain engaged and supportive of SABEW’s mission through her service as a board member.

    Bryan Borzykowski, a freelance business writer, will take over as vice president through spring 2019, when he will become SABEW’s first Canadian president. Borzykowski is a Toronto-based business writer, editor and author. He has written for a number of publications in Canada and the U.S., including The Globe and Mail, Canadian Business, The New York Times, CNBC, BBC Capital and CNNMoney.

    Kim Quillen, an editor on the Chicago Tribune business desk, will be secretary/treasurer. Quillen joined the Tribune staff in 2016 from The Arizona Republic. She also has been business editor at The Times-Picayune, where she was involved in the New Orleans newspaper’s award-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina and the 2010 BP oil spill.

    “The SABEW executive ladder is in excellent hands with Mark Hamrick, Bryan Borzykowski and Kim Quillen. Mark has raised SABEW’s profile on First Amendment issues; Bryan has expanded our international efforts; and Kim has produced incredible virtual training for members,” said SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham. “I’m thankful to have Mark’s steady leadership for another term, and I’d also like to thank Xana Antunes for her work on the Best in Business Awards and ongoing contributions to SABEW as a board member.”

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers was formed in 1964 to promote superior coverage of business and financial news and issues. The non-profit organization promotes excellence through training opportunities, including conferences, workshops, fellowships and online programs.

    For more information, contact [email protected] or follow us on Twitter @SABEW.

  • Behind the lens: How to snap photos and videos that make business stories shine

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday January 9, 2018

    High-quality photos and video can make stories sing online and in print, but in business journalism, coming up with great art can be a challenge. SABEW’s next training session will give you ideas about how to break beyond the standard ‘CEO at a desk’ shots and bring new life to business photography. Mitchell Masilun, an Arkansas-based editorial photographer and multimedia specialist, will lead SABEW members through this one-hour webinar. He’ll talk about things to do before, during and after the shoot and review easy techniques for creating better images. Mitchell will also share tips for shooting and editing video on an iPhone.

    View the webinar.

    Download the webinar slide presentation.

    Recommended links:
    Using your iPhone slider.
    Using lights. This can be applied to any camera or smartphone, for stills and video.
    Buying guide for lights for all budgets.

    Presenter

    Mitchell Masilun is an Arkansas-based editorial photographer, multimedia specialist, and educator. He currently is a photojournalist at The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette in Little Rock. Previously, Mitch was a multimedia journalist at the Mansfield News Journal in Mansfield, Ohio. He also worked as a staff photographer at Beijing-based True Run Media, publisher of three lifestyle magazines with a combined circulation of more than 70,000. He taught photography courses at The Hutong and Atelier, two Beijing-based culture and art education centers.

    Before moving to China, Mitch worked as a photojournalist in the Chicagoland and Central Ohio areas, and his images were circulated nationwide through the Associated Press, the Chicago Tribune, and The Atlanta-Journal Constitution. Mitch’s stills have been published globally by clients that include Fortune 500 companies, embassies, stock libraries, network news stations and international schools. His images have also been published in four books. Some of his photographs can be seen on his website 1world1eye.com.

  • Fellows selected for 2018 SABEW Goldschmidt Data Immersion Workshop

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday December 11, 2017

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) has selected 22 business journalists for the five-day SABEW Goldschmidt Data Immersion Workshop, which will be Jan. 8-12, 2018, in Washington, D.C. Fellows were chosen from a pool of 37 applicants.

    Click here for the agenda.

    The workshop will focus on understanding how the government uses data, and participants will be able to speak directly with those who compile and manage the statistics. Journalists will talk with experts at the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics and explore the large cache of data each agency produces, as well as learn its importance to readers.

    “Every year, SABEW receives more applications for this fellowship, demonstrating the growing need and popularity of this valuable program. This data-immersion training is a great SABEW member benefit,” said Marty Steffens, SABEW chair and University of Missouri business journalism professor, who will lead the training, along with Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent and senior investigative reporter for McClatchy Newspapers.

    The workshop is made possible thanks to a grant from the Chicago-based Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, a loyal SABEW funding partner since 2010.

    The 2018 SABEW Goldschmidt fellows:

    • Ivan Angelovski, reporter, Balkan News Service
    • Brian Cheung, reporter, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    • Maria Chutchian, associate courts editor, Debtwire
    • Katherine Doyle, associate editor, Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
    • Mark Fahey, CAR producer, Scripps Howard D.C. Bureau
    • Theo Francis, special writer, The Wall Street Journal
    • Craig Harris, investigative reporter, The Arizona Republic
    • Dan Kopf, economics reporter, Quartz
    • Jon Lansner, reporter and columnist, The Orange County Register
    • Matt Lundy, interactive editor, The Globe and Mail
    • Alessandra Malito, personal finance and retirement reporter, MarketWatch
    • Peter McGuire, staff writer, Portland Press Herald
    • Kim Moore, research director, Oregon Business
    • Lananh Nguyen, reporter, Bloomberg News
    • Meagan Nichols, lead reporter, Memphis Business Journal
    • Lauren Ohnesorge, senior reporter, Triangle Business Journal
    • Gabrielle Paluch, freelance, contributing reporter McClatchy
    • Ely Portillo, business reporter, The Charlotte Observer
    • Arlene Satchell, freelance business reporter
    • John W. Schoen, economics reporter, CNBC.com
    • Andrew Welsch, senior editor, Financial Planning and On Wall Street
    • Erin Zlomek, senior editor and digital projects manager, Bloomberg News
  • June 26 at 2:00 p.m. EDT: Covering all the bases – Reporting on Sports Business

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday June 15, 2017

    Reporting on Sports Business Slides

    Writing about the business of sports has become more than just game coverage in recent years. In fact, sports business has been elevated to a significant stand-alone beat at many news outlets. The beat offers fertile ground for compelling enterprise and investigative stories on collective bargaining agreements, marketing and management initiatives, intellectual property issues, team financial operations, and stadium and arena deals.

    SABEW’s June training session will feature a panel of experts who will discuss how reporters can come up with story ideas by delving into the financial operations of professional teams, universities, and other organizations that run athletic events. They will discuss how to use public records to dig up information on owners of professional sports franchises as well as college teams, and talk about major stories they have uncovered on the sports business beat.

    Monday, June 26
    2-3 p.m. ET

    Listen to the recording.

    Instructions: On the day of the call, dial (512) 879-2134. When prompted enter access code 846394#.

    Moderator

    Kristi Dosh is a professional writer, speaker, sports business analyst, attorney and author who runs Guide My Brand, a boutique publicity firm representing entrepreneurs and authors. As a sports business reporter/analyst, she has reported on everything from collective bargaining to endorsements to the finances of pro and intercollegiate athletics for outlets such as ESPN, Forbes, Golf Digest, SportsBusiness Journal, Campus Insiders, Bleacher Report, SB Nation, The Motley Fool, and Comcast Sports Southeast. She is the author of Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges.

    Panelists

    Geoff Baker is a Montreal-born sports enterprise and investigative reporter for The Seattle Times, who writes the weekly “Inside Sports Business” column and produces the paper’s “Hard Count with Geoff Baker” podcast. He has gained critical acclaim for covering Seattle’s years-long pursuit of a new major sports arena and NBA and NHL teams. Geoff is a two-time Associated Press Sports Editors award winner and nine-time finalist. He also has won three National Newspaper Awards in Canada with the Toronto Star and Montreal Gazette.

     

     

    Mark Conrad directs the sports business concentration and is an associate professor of law and ethics at Fordham University’s Gabelli School of Business, where he teaches sports law and the business and ethics of sports. The third edition of his book The Business of Sports: Off the Field, In the Office, On the News was published in March.

     

     

     

    Danny Ecker covers the local sports business scene for Crain’s Chicago Business, focusing on the marketing, media, products and personalities tied to the city’s professional and college teams. He is a frequent panelist on CSN Chicago’s daily “Sports Talk Live” show and WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight.” Prior to joining Crain’s in January 2010, Danny worked as a producer for college sports and news website UWire.com. He is a 2008 graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and a native of Columbus, Ohio.

     

     

    Alex Reimer is a seasoned sports writer and host on the “Kirk & Callahan Show” at WEEI Sports Radio Network in the Greater Boston area. He is a contributor to Boston Magazine, Forbes and the sports news website SB Nation.

  • SABEW - Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication,
    Arizona State University

    555 North Central Ave, Suite 406 E, Phoenix, AZ 85004-1248

    E-mail: [email protected]

    ©2001 - 2019 Society of American Business Editors and Writers, Inc.

    SABEW Home