Nominees Announced: SABEW Canada’s 3rd Annual Best in Business Awards

Posted By David Wilhite

TORONTO, March 31, 2017 /CNW/ – The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Canada is excited to announce the list of nominees for the 3rd Annual Best In Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published or broadcast in 2016.

This year, SABEW Canada received a record number of submissions from journalists across the country. The nominees represent some of Canada’s most venerable publications, including the Financial Post, Canadian Business, Bloomberg Canada, The Globe and Mail, the Wall Street Journal and more.

Their stories shone a spotlight in 2016 on some of the most important issues in the Canadian business landscape  — from runaway house-flipping in Vancouver, Bombardier’s attempts to suppress information, and the failure of retail giant Target’s expansion into Canada.

“Despite a difficult year in the media industry, we received a record number of submissions this year,” said SABEW Canada’s chairperson, Dawn Calleja. “Selecting finalists was an especially challenging task for our 27 judges, highlighting not only the depth and quality of business journalism in Canada, but also the valuable role it plays. ”

There are a total of 27 finalists in nine categories this year, selected from well over 100 applicants. Categories include investigative, commentary, investing and personal finance, features, multimedia, beat reporting, package and profile.

SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges, chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

The winners will be announced at the Best In Business Awards reception on April 19 at Baro in Toronto. Business journalists interested in attending can register at sabew.org/canada. The cost is $25 for SABEW members and $40 for non-members. Tickets include hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

Nominees for SABEW Canada’s 3rd Annual Best in Business Awards (in no particular order):

Beat Reporting

Bloomberg News – Toronto Bureau
Gerrit De Vynck
Technology

Financial Post
Claudia Cattaneo
Energy

Globe and Mail
Jacqueline Nelson
Insurance

Commentary

Report on Business Magazine
Eric Reguly
International Business

Report on Business Magazine
Ian McGugan
Investing

Canadian Business
Deborah Aarts
The Realist Column

Feature (Long-form)

Canadian Business
Joe Castaldo
The Last Days of Target

Report on Business Magazine
Bruce Livesey
Company Province, Provincial Company

Globe and Mail
Sean Silcoff
Vision Critical

Feature (Short-form)

Bloomberg News – Toronto Bureau
Gerrit De Vynck
Bunz

Financial Post
Claire Brownell
The End of Meat

Bloomberg News – Vancouver Bureau
Natalie Obiko Pearson
Trump Brothel

Investigative

Globe and Mail
Kathy Tomlinson
B.C Housing Investigation

Ottawa Citizen
James Bagnall
Built To Fail

Financial Post
Kristine Owram
How Bombardier Suppresses Information

Multimedia

MoneySense
Romana King, Mark Brown and Prajakta Dhopade
City or Suburbs: Where can you afford to live?

Financial Post
Peter Kuitenbrouwer and Peter J. Thompson
The Sault Ste. Marie Locks

Globe and Mail
Chris Manza, Jeremy Agius, Michael Pereira, Andrew Saikali, Tamsin McMahon, Brent Jang, D’Arcy McGovern, Duncan Hood, Matt Lundy and Rob Carrick
Real Estate Data

Package or Ongoing Series

Bloomberg News – Vancouver Bureau
Natalie Obiko Pearson, Katia Dmitrieva and Gerrit de Vynck
Real Estate

CPA Magazine – CPA Canada
Susan Smith, Manon Chevalier, Rosalind Stefanac and Peter Carter
The Immigration Issue

Globe and Mail
Rob Carrick, Roma Luciw, Jacqueline Nelson, Brent Jang, David Parkinson, Chris Manza and Matt Lundy
House Poor

Personal Finance/Investing

Globe and Mail
David Milstead
Valeant Investing

Money Sense
Bryan Borzykowski
Shocking Tax Tips You’re Missing Out On

MoneySense
Julie Cazzin, Mark Brown, Dan Bortolotti, Bryan Borzykowski, David Fielding and David Thomas
Personal Finance Package

Profile

Globe and Mail
James Bradshaw and Christine Dobby
Blais

BCBusiness Magazine
Frances Bula
Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Report on Business Magazine
Max Fawcett
The Artist of the Deal

About SABEW

The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is a 50-year-old organization with more than 3,000 members across the globe. Journalists from The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, CNN and other organizations, big and small, are involved in the organization.

About SABEW Canada

A group of Canadian journalists launched SABEW Canada, SABEW’s first international chapter, last year. We now have more than 200 members, among them reporters and editors from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, MoneySense, Bloomberg, Canadian Press, the Wall Street Journal and more.

SABEW Canada’s mission statement is simple: We want to define and inspire excellence in business journalism. We do that by hosting educational events with company chief executives, leading business journalists and well-known politicians, among others. We also offer teletraining to members to help improve their skills, and hold networking events where business journalists can make new connections, as well as catch up with colleagues and friends.

For further information: Dawn Calleja at dawncalleja@gmail.com or 416-554-6450

 

 

Enter SABEW’s Best in Business Awards Competition by Jan. 31

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Awards

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Distinguished Achievement Award
Established in 1993, this award singles out individuals who have made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who have served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession.

President’s Award
President’s awards are given by the then current SABEW president at their discretion.

Larry Birger Young Business Journalist of the Year Award
The Larry Birger Young Business Journalist Award is made possible by a gift from rbb Public Relations of Miami, Fla., the award commemorates Birger, the former Miami Herald business editor who led SABEW as president in 1977. Birger was later a principal in rbb until his death in 1998.

SABEW Best in Business
SABEW celebrates the Best in Business journalism. This contest is open to regular members of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers in good standing as of the date of entry.

David J. Morrow Scholarship for Business Journalism
The Morrow scholarship is a partnership between the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of South Carolina and SABEW. The scholarship is for students aspiring to become business journalists. The funds are designated for college tuition and expenses associated with attending a SABEW conference.

Cox-SABEW Fellowship
The Cox-SABEW Fellowship recognizes student commitment to learning and engaging in business journalism. Sponsored and funded by the University of Georgia’s Cox Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership, the fellowship recognizes students who have embraced business journalism and qualified for the recognition through professional internships.

Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 21st Annual Best in Business Awards

Posted By Crystal Beasley

PHOENIX — The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) today announces winners and finalists in its 21st annual Best in Business (BIB) Awards competition, which recognizes outstanding business journalism that was published or aired in 2015.

Adding up winners and finalists, Bloomberg led with seven honors, while The New York Times earned six honors — all winners. A diverse group of news outlets earned four honors apiece: ProPublica, Quartz, Reuters, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Minneapolis StarTribune, The Center for Public Integrity, and International Business Times. News outlets with three honors included The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press, CNBC, Portland Business Journal, Fortune, and Institutional Investor.

The 116 honored works represent all corners of the financial news industry. To read the complete list of winners and finalists and the judges’ comments, click here. For a complete list of winners only, click here.

“The quality of this year’s honorees is really excellent, and it’s great to see so many different organizations having an impact with their business reporting,” said SABEW President Joanna Ossinger, team leader at First Word Americas FX at Bloomberg News. “We at SABEW are proud to honor such good work.”

SABEW will honor the winners and finalists at a ceremony on Saturday, May 21, during the 53rd annual spring conference in the Washington, D.C., area. The conference and ceremony will be held at the DoubleTree by Hilton hotel in Crystal City, Va. Conference speakers include Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson, and Washington Post executive editor Martin Baron. There will also be panel discussions covering the marijuana business, the rise of e-newsletters, how reporters can better delve into wage issues, and much more.

Click here for conference details and registration information.

“I am delighted to announce a special discounted conference rate of $250 for BIB honorees,” said SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham. “We plan to showcase the work of honorees throughout the conference to encourage, inspire, and teach fellow journalists.”

More than 190 working journalists and academics served as contest judges, sifting through 880 entries representing 175 news outlets across 71 categories. Here is a sampling of the winners honored by SABEW judges:

– The Associated Press investigated the Thai seafood industry’s use of slaves to catch and package seafood sold in the U.S., a series that led to the release of some 2,000 people.

– ProPublica explained in words and interactive graphics how debt collectors are more likely to sue black people.

– Quartz produced a thought-provoking and visually arresting feature about the Internet’s underground economy.

– International Business Times examined how private prisons exploit inmates’ use of telecommunications by levying huge fees.

– The Wall Street Journal cinematically chronicled the desperation of a young banker who admitted his role in an interest-rate rigging scandal.

– Milwaukee Journal Sentinel exposed in a series of stories the health threats faced by workers in the coffee-roasting industry.

– Bloomberg Businessweek revealed that a CEO who cast himself as a hero for cutting his salary later earned hefty amounts from speaking fees and a book deal.

– The New York Times showed how billions of dollars tainted by corruption and tax avoidance flow unchecked into New York’s real-estate market.

– Portland Business Journal exposed why Oregon has emerged as a haven for the registration of shell companies that often hide dubious activities.

– Student journalists from Baruch College/CUNYproduced a series of multimedia stories on entrepreneurs in the emerging Cuba economy.

– Fortune employed shoe-leather reporting and narrative skill to illuminate how lax computer security at Sony enabled hackers to leak company emails.

– CNBC demonstrated great skill in using social media to deliver news in all formats and to engage with its audience.

– Reuters produced a series of balanced and sharply written commentaries on the interplay between Wall Street and the gun industry.

– Minneapolis StarTribune published a series of insightful columns on the beleaguered retailer Target, a major local employer.

– The Seattle Times, The Center for Public Integrity, and BuzzFeed News jointly exposed the high fees and interest rates of a mobile-home business owned by Warren Buffett.

SABEW, the world’s largest and oldest organization of business and financial journalists, began the Best in Business competition in 1995 to set standards and recognize excellence in the industry.

For more information on the contest, contact Crystal Beasley at cbeasley@sabew.org or 602-496-7862.

One-day ASBPE conference and awards ceremony in NYC, Friday, July 24

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Special to SABEW
The American Society of Business Publication Editors (ASBPE) is holding their 2015 National Conference and Azbee Awards Banquet, Friday, July 24The conference will be held at New York University Kimmel Center for University Life.
 
The conference offers expert advice and training for all business-to-business editors, writers and freelancers. 
 
Check out the 2015 Azbee Award finalists here.
 
As a courtesy, ASBPE is offering a discounted rate for SABEW members. Full registration $399 and $165 for the awards reception and banquet. Please register as an ASBPE member.
 
For additional information on speakers, sessions and registration, visit the 2015 ASBPE National Conference event page

More than 100 honored in 20th SABEW Best in Business awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Monday, March 2, 2015

PHOENIX- The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) today announces finalists in its prestigious 20th annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding business stories published or aired in 2014.

The 119 honored works represent all corners of financial news, from Institutional Investor to Fortune Magazine and National Public Radio, and from Crain’s Chicago Business to The Seattle Times and The Columbus Dispatch.

View the full list here.

Bloomberg News, Bloomberg Businessweek and The Wall Street Journal are finalist in seven categories. CNBC and  The New York Times are all finalists in six categories, and the Financial Times in five.

“The works honored in this list truly represent the finest of our profession,” said Marty Wolk, SABEW president and assigning editor for NerdWallet, the personal finance website. “In its 20th year, SABEW’s Best in Business contest is more competitive and more prestigious than ever.”

This year, SABEW decided to announce only finalists in all categories, with the announcement of the winner reserved for the reception and Best in Business Awards ceremony on Saturday, April 25, during the SABEW’s 52nd annual conference in Chicago. The number of awards is based on the number and quality of entries in each category, as determined by judges.

The April 25 ceremonies will be at the Hyatt Chicago Magnificent Mile, the closing event of the April 23-25 conference. Keynoting the event will be Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Morningstar CEO Joe Mansueto. SABEW has announced a special discounted conference rate of $225 to honor BIB honorees.

Conference details and registration. 

Some 214 working journalists and academics served as judges, sifting through 1,020 entries from 178 news outlets across 73 categories. “This year’s honored works represent an inspiring variety of stories tackled by news organizations of all sizes, but what they have in common is ambition and excellence. We extend a hearty thanks to our fantastic judges, and can’t wait to congratulate these talented journalists in person in Chicago,” said Cory Schouten, managing editor of Indianapolis Business Journal, who served as contest co-chair. Joanna Ossinger of Bloomberg News was contest co-chair and judging coordinator.

The honored work reflected challenges that continue to dog the American economy like long-term unemployment and the mounting problems of debt. A sampling of finalists includes The Center for Investigative Reporting’s investigation into environmental cleanup efforts that result in more pollution being created at waste dump sites, and Bloomberg News’ searing report on the fatal results of sleep-deprived truck drivers.

Several publications earned recognition for revealing the “story behind the story.” The Financial Times used government calculations combined with independent research to slap a $1 trillion price tag on U.S. involvement in the 13-year war in Afghanistan, noting that much of it was spent during the Obama presidency. That piece was honored in the Government category, one of three new categories that also included Energy and Healthcare.  In the latter category, some 54 entries competed for honors. Judges singled out Bloomberg’s reporting on “anonymous” health information that could be matched to patients, as well as The Columbus Dispatch’s examination of home health care abuses and the New England Center for Investigative Reporting’s investigation into the faulty reliability of medical screening tests. The Detroit News was honored for continuing examination of the Motor City’s rise from bankruptcy.

Innovation in business journalism was honored, such as the Des Moines Register’s “Harvest of Change” interactive series with 360-degree videos. Crain’s New York was honored for its ambitious “The 200 Most-Connected New Yorkers” feature that ranks the city’s power brokers.

Corporate coverage continued to explain why things happen. The McClatchy Washington Bureau team looked at Motorola’s lock on the emergency communications market. The New York Times was honored for its breaking news coverage of the Alibaba’s initial stock offering, as was The Wall Street Journal for its story behind the Comcast-Time Warner deal.

In a category for student journalists, Brittany Elena Morris of Arizona State University won for a story on southern Mexico farmers being let down by NAFTA, published by the Arizona Daily Star. Daniel Bauman, of Webster University in St. Louis, won for his examination of the costs of college chess teams, a project that included open records requests.

(For more information, contact SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham at kgraham@sabew.org or call 1-602-496-7862.)

 

 

Canadian SABEW member wins first prize in the PMAC Awards for Excellence in Investment Journalism

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Bryan BorzykowskiSpecial to SABEW

The Portfolio Management Association of Canada (PMAC) announced the winners of its third annual PMAC Awards for Excellence in Investment Journalism (the PMAC Awards) today.

First prize went to SABEW member Bryan Borzykowski for the Canadian Business Investor’s Guide 2014, an investment resource for all levels of investors.

Winners were selected from 31 French and English entries from 13 unique publications. Judges represented a variety of professionals from within the field of journalism and investment/financial services.

The prizes, including the $5,000 first prize, will be presented at an investment industry event in Toronto on June 16, 2014.

Read the full story here.

SABEW Honors the Best in Business Journalism, Handing Out 150 Awards for Stories Written in 2013

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

BIB_logo_copyPHOENIX— The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) has announced honorees in its 19th Best in Business competition, which honors excellence in business journalism across all news platforms.

The 150 honored works represent all corners of financial news, from the Albany (NY) Business Review to Fortune magazine and National Public Radio, from CNBC to the Atlanta Journal Constitution and The Wall Street Journal.

View the full list here.

Bloomberg News and its related media outlets, including Bloomberg Markets, Bloomberg BusinessWeek and Bloomberg TV, led with 13 honors; The New York Times had nine, Reuters had seven, American Banker had six, and the Los Angeles Times and ProPublica had five each.

“We congratulate the winners, and more broadly, contest entrants, for submissions that really highlighted the strength of American business reporting. With so many strong entries, picking a winner was a tough proposition for many judges,” said Kevin G. Hall, SABEW president and chief economics correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers.

For the first time, the contest singled out a winner in each category. “Based on feedback from members, we altered the contest this year to reduce the number of finalists in favor of a single winner in most categories,” Hall said. “This represents a big change for the organization, and we intend to engage the membership to determine whether we should continue down this road or modify the contest further.” The judges also chose to name one or two finalists in many categories, as warranted by the quality of entries.

Awards will be presented during ceremonies Saturday, March 29, at the Sheraton Phoenix Hotel, the closing event of SABEW’s 51th annual conference. The conference will be March 27-29 at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University in downtown Phoenix, and features headliners author Michael Lewis, Quartz editor-in-chief Kevin Delaney, and GoDaddy founder Bob Parsons.

More than 200 working journalists and academics served as judges, sifting through a record 1,123 entries from 181 news outlets across 72 categories. “I’d like to extend a special thank-you to all our volunteer judges, who gave hundreds of hours of their time to make this the best and highest-quality contest it could be,” said Joanna Ossinger of Bloomberg News, who served as judging coordinator. “We couldn’t have done it without them.”

The honored work reflected the challenges as well as the progress in the world economy in 2013.  A sampling of winners included ProPublica’s investigation into continued problems in the payday lending industry, and GlobalPost’s series on the emergence of the newly democratic Myanmar, where child labor remains a critical issue. Several publications earned recognition for “why it happened reporting,” from the Detroit Free Press series on why Detroit went broke to the Globe and Mail’s examination of corporate and government oversight failures that led to the derailment of an oil train and resulting fire that killed 47 in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec.

Judges were delighted by the innovation in some entries, such as NPR’s video from its Planet Money program on how the world produces T-shirts. Paul Edward Parker of the Providence Journal penned a winning piece on how technology has changed all our lives, and The New York Times graphics staff earned high praise for its complex and informative graphics collection. And CNBC made judges smile with its series, “Death: It’s a Living,” which featured stories on a raffle for a free cremation at a senior event, and a woman demanding no obstructions in the view from her final resting place.

A dominant theme for honorees was health care.  The Orange County Register and Money magazine explained how the Affordable Care Act will change the lives of Americans, while the Charlotte Observer looked at the ACA’s impact on small business, and National Public Radio won for its ongoing coverage of the flawed healthcare.gov website. Publications also shone a light on the healthcare industry itself, with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel winning for a series on delays in processing screening tests for newborns, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review into high pay for executives in organ procurement industry, and USA TODAY for bogus pills in the nutritional supplement industry.

The school shooting tragedy in Newtown, Conn., continued to rattle the business world, from the Albany’s Business Review profile of nervous workers at Remington in Ilion, N.Y., where the AR-15 military assault rifle used in the shooting was manufactured. New York has passed tough gun-control laws in the wake of Newtown. The Hartford Courant also chronicled the rise of the AR-15. Rob Cox of Reuters BreakingViews and Paul Barrett of Bloomberg BusinessWeek earned honors for their commentary on the issue.

Corporate coverage continued to explain why things happen. The Globe and Mail explored BlackBerry’s fall from its once must-have status, and Fortune magazine peered inside Amazon’s hard-nosed tactics to avoid having its customers pay state taxes.

A new category for 2013, Social Media, saluted the efforts of The New York Times and Bankrate to communicate across Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social sites.

In a category for student journalists, Caitlin McCabe of the University of North Carolina won for a story on backlogged unemployment benefits during her internship at the Charlotte Observer.  Chad Garland and Andrew Knochel of Arizona State University won for an examination of how con men prey on military veterans that was part of a larger News21 project.

SABEW has announced a limited scholarship program for BIB winners and other parties interested in attending the March 27-29 conference.  Details are available at www.sabew.org.

(For more information on the contest and scholarships, contact SABEW Executive Director Warren Watson at watson@sabew.org or call 1-602-496-7862.)

 

Reynolds Center awards fellowship to two journalists to attend SABEW Conference

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Special to SABEW

Phoeniz logoPHOENIX- The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism has awarded fellowships to two journalists to attend the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) spring conference in Phoenix from March 27-29.

The fellowships were awarded to Jason Frazer of WFSB-TV in Hartford, Conn. and Sam Murillo of La Voz, Ariz. Both fellows will participate in the Reynolds Center training and SABEW events. Read the full story…

Winners of the Barlett and Steele awards include the Tampa Bay Times, NY Times and The Wall Street Journal

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

BarlettSteeleAward_2Special to SABEW

PHOENIX–The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism announced today the winners of the prestigious Barlett and Steele awards.

The gold prize went to  a Tampa Bay Times/Center for Investigative Reporting collaboration on “America’s Worst Charities,” a project by Kris Hundley and Kendall Taggart that identified charities that steered as much as 95 percent of donations to boiler-room operations and direct-mail companies.

The silver award went to “The United States of Subsidies,” by Louise Story of The New York Time. The project tabulated the $80 billion that local governments dole out to corporations each year in tax breaks and other business incentives – expenditures to recruit and keep businesses that may or may not produce results.

The bronze went to Susan Pulliam, Rob Barry, Michael Siconolfi and Jean Eaglesham of The Wall Street Journal for their work on “Inside Game: How Corporate Insiders Profit Ahead of the Public,” an  examination of how more than 20,000 corporate executives traded their own companies’ stock over the course of eight years.

Read the full story here.

The awards are named for the renowned investigative team of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, whose numerous awards include two Pulitzer Prizes, these annual awards, funded by the Reynolds Center, celebrate the best in investigative business journalism.

The judges for this year’s awards were Amanda Bennett, editor-at-large for Bloomberg News; Paul Steiger, ProPublica’s founding editor-in-chief and current executive chairman; and Rob Reuteman, freelance writer, professor at Colorado State University and former president of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

The awards will be conferred Nov. 18 at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University in Phoenix.

Call for entries in the Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

reynolds centerSpecial to SABEW

PHOENIX, July 9,2013- The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism celebrates the best in print and online investigative business journalism each year with the Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism.

Named for two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists Don Barlett and Jim Steele, the awards were first given in 2007 and have featured a gold award of $5,000 and a silver prize of $2,000. Due to the growing number of exceptional submissions each year, a bronze award of $1,000 was added in 2011.

Entries for the 2013 award must have appeared in the year ending June 30, 2013. Each media outlet may submit no more than two entries.

HOW TO APPLY BY AUG. 1, 2013

Applications will be accepted only online and from editors or the contest coordinator designated by your news organization. Applicants will need to provide the following on the Barlett & Steele Contest Entry Form.

  • Contact information for the editor submitting the entry.
  • An editor’s letter outlining any (a) obstacles in reporting, (b) reforms or impact after publication and (c) corrections or challenges to accuracy. It can be submitted as a Word document (.doc) or an Adobe Acrobat PDF (.pdf) file.
  • Up to four articles, submitted as either an active URL or as a Word document (.doc) or Adobe Acrobat PDF (.pdf). A sidebar counts as an article.

Applicants do not have to file all elements in one sitting, but all elements must be uploaded before the application is submitted for consideration.

The deadline for submission is 11:59 p.m. PT on Aug. 1, 2013.

Questions? Email Andrew Leckey, Reynolds Center president, or call 602-496-9186.

 

 

Scripps Howard Awards offers categories for business journalists

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

PHOENIX–The Scripps Howard Awards honors excellence in journalism with prizes totaling $175,000 in 18 categories.

Of special interest to SABEW members is the Styles Award for business and economics reporting, which is open to staff and freelance journalists from newspapers, TV and radio stations, cable networks, online news sites, news magazines, syndication and wire services.

It costs $50 to enter and the deadline is Jan. 31. Entry forms and more information are available at www.shawards.org.

Loeb Awards deadline approaching

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

PHOENIX–UCLA Anderson School of Management and the Loeb Foundation invite business, financial and economic journalists from print, online and broadcast media to submit entries for the 2013 Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism in 14 competition categories.

The Loeb Awards began in 1957 with the mission to recognizing writers, editors and producers who make significant contributions to the understanding of business, finance and the economy for both the private investor and the general public.

Submissions will be accepted online only at http://www.loeb.anderson.ucla.edu until Friday, Feb. 1, 2013.

New York Times, USA Today and two N.C. Newspapers Win 2012 Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Special to SABEW

PHOENIX — The New York Times, USA Today and a joint project by The Charlotte Observer and The (Raleigh) News & Observer won gold, silver and bronze awards respectively in the sixth annual Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism, the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism announced today.

Named for the renowned investigative team of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, whose numerous awards include two Pulitzer Prizes, these annual awards funded by the Reynolds Center celebrate the best in investigative business journalism.

  • “Vast Mexico Bribery Case Hushed Up by Wal-Mart after Top-Level Struggle,” by David Barstow of The New York Times, received the top gold award of $5,000. Barstow obtained hundreds of confidential documents and interviewed important players in the company’s internal inquiry. He discovered Wal-Mart had received powerful evidence that its Mexican executives used systematic bribery payments totaling more than $24 million to obtain zoning rulings and construction permits.

“Yet Wal-Mart never notified law-enforcement officials in the U.S. or Mexico about the bribes,” the judges said, noting their “astonishment” that the firm’s headquarters would cover up violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

  • “Ghost Factories,” by lead reporters Alison Young and Peter Eisler of USA Today, received the silver award of $2,000. The series involved a 14-month investigation that revealed locations of more than 230 long-forgotten smelters and the poisonous lead they left behind.  Reporters used handheld X-ray devices to collect and test 1,000 soil samples to prove there was a serious threat to children living in dozens of neighborhoods.

“As a result of their efforts, government officials in 14 states have reopened flawed investigations, tested soil or taken other action to clean up contaminated property,” said the judges.

  • “Prognosis: Profits,” by Ames Alexander, Karen Garloch, Joseph Neff and David Raynor, received the $1,000 bronze award for a joint project of The Charlotte Observer and The (Raleigh) News & Observer. Reporters dissected finances of large institutions through documents and sources to paint a compelling picture of nonprofit hospitals that function as for-profit institutions—often to the detriment of their care and charity missions. Discovered were inflated prices on drugs and procedures, lawsuits against thousands of needy patients and minimal charity care to poor and uninsured patients.

“All of that is in contrast to their large profit margins, billions of dollars in reserves and top executives being paid millions,” noted the judges.

Honorable mentions in this year’s awards are, in alphabetical order:

 

 

 

  • Reuters, “Chesapeake Energy,” by Brian Grow, Anna Driver, Joshua Schneyer, Jeanine Prezioso, David Sheppard, John Shiffman and Janet Roberts.

 

“Cutting-edge, in-depth reporting on global ethics, environmental concerns and health-care finances led the way in this year’s competition,” said Andrew Leckey, president of the Reynolds Center. “The wide range of news organizations and the diverse issues they probed underscored the fact that investigative business journalism is operating at a high level.”

The judges for this year’s awards were Amanda Bennett, executive editor/projects and investigations at Bloomberg News; Steve Koepp, editorial director of Time Home Entertainment Inc.; and Paul Steiger, ProPublica’s founding editor-in-chief, president and CEO.

The awards will be conferred Jan. 3, 2013, during Reynolds Business Journalism Week at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Phoenix.

Contact: President Andrew Leckey, Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, 602-496-9186, or andrew.leckey@businessjournalism.org.

ABOUT THE REYNOLDS CENTER

Since 2003, more than 15,000 journalists have benefited from the Reynolds Center’s free training. Its mission is to help journalists cover business better through in-person and online training and its website, BusinessJournalism.org. It is part of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication on Arizona State University’s downtown Phoenix campus.

The center is funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed over $115 million nationwide through its Journalism Program.

SOURCE: Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism

Related link: http://www.BusinessJournalism.org

The 2012 Barlett and Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism are now open for entries

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

By SABEW Staff

The 2012 Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism are now open for entries.

Named for two-time Pulitzer Prize winners Don Barlett and Jim Steele, the sixth annual awards celebrate the best in print and online investigative business journalism. “Don and I have an informal motto: ‘Tell the reader something they don’t know,’” said Steele. “It sounds simple. Yet a lot of journalism is a rehash of what people already know.”

This year $8,000 will be awarded in prizes. Entries must have appeared in print or online in the year ended June 30, 2012. Deadline for applications is Aug. 1, 2012

For more information, visit the details page on BusinessJournalism.org, or email Reynolds Center President Andrew Leckey at Andrew.Leckey@businessjournalism.org or call him at 602-496-9186.

 

Newspapers sweep Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

By MARK J. SCARP, SABEW Staff

PHOENIX — Newspapers made a clean sweep of the 2011 Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism, as The Arizona Republic, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and The Seattle Times captured the Gold, Silver and Bronze awards, respectively. Journalists from the three papers were honored with the awards at luncheon ceremonies Jan. 3.

The Republic‘s Craig Harris won the Gold Award for his series, “Public Pensions: A Soaring Burden,” which reported on “questionable public-pension practices and their cost to taxpayers,” according to the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, the awards’ presenter. More on the awards and their recipients here.

From left, Craig Harris of The Arizona Republic, Michael Berens of The Seattle Times, award namesake Jim Steele and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's Raquel Rutledge and Rick Barrett appeared at a Jan. 3 ceremony in Phoenix where they received 2011 Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism. Photo by Warren Watson

Harris’ project was based on 67 public-records requests, and found retired elected officials earning more in pensions than they did during their working years.

In one case, Harris told the gathering at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Commu-nication, a convict serving three years in prison was still receiving his monthly pension check.

The Silver Award-winning  Journal Sentinel‘s series,”A Case of Shattered Trust,” dealt with “how a firm with a decade of serious regulatory violations of sanity conditions was allowed to operate while the Food and Drug Administration did nothing,” according to the luncheon program written by the Reynolds Center, which is based at ASU’s Cronkite School. SABEW’s headquarters is also at the Cronkite School.

The stories by the Journal Sentinel‘s Raquel Rutledge and Rick Barrett resulted in the FDA’s announcing the name of the bacterium that it discovered in the manufacturer’s alcohol wipes. A federal injunction was levied against the firm, which today no longer manufactures the product.

A Bronze Award was introduced in the 2011 awards, going to Michael J. Berens of The Seattle Timesfor his series that probed the expanding phenomenon of “adult family homes” for seniors. Berens discovered more than 230 deaths had occurred “that indicated neglect or abuse in these homes but were not reported to the state,” according to the Reynolds Center.

In a video explaining the awards to the audience, all four honorees paid tribute to the awards’ namesakes, Pulitzer-Prize- and National-Magazine-Award-winning investigative journalists Donald Barlett and James Steele.

Rutledge called the two “the best investigative journalists on the planet. It’s truly humbling.”

Commonwealth Fund awards SABEW $15,000 grant for business of health care training

Posted By Perri Collins

PHOENIX — The Commonwealth Fund has awarded a new $15,000 grant to the Society of American Business Editors and Writers to conduct education and training programs focusing on the nation’s new health-care law.

The programs will be conducted onsite and online, said Warren Watson, executive director of SABEW, the world’s largest and oldest organization of business and financial journalists.

It is the fourth such grant the Commonwealth Fund has awarded to SABEW, which has conducted 11 workshops on the business of health care under the Commonwealth Fund’s sponsorship since 2007.

In all, SABEW will conduct four training events under the new grant. The first was held at SABEW’s annual fall conference Oct. 14 in New York City. A panel discussion explored the new healthcare exchanges under the recent reform act.

SABEW will also conduct a webinar and two workshops at its 2012 national conferences under the grant.

The next on-site workshop will be on the “Business of Aging” and will be held at SABEW’s annual spring conference, to be held at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis March 15-17.

After a midyear webinar on a topic to be developed, SABEW will conduct its final education event in fall 2012 at its fall conference at City University of New York. That conference will be held Sept. 27-28.

“Dozens and dozens of journalists have benefitted from our programs made possible by the Commonwealth Fund’s support,” says Watson. “There will be more to come. We’re grateful for the help.”

With offices in New York City and Washington, D.C., The Commonwealth Fund is a private foundation that aims to promote a high-performing health care system that achieves better access, improved quality, and greater efficiency, particularly for society’s most vulnerable, including low-income people, the uninsured, minority Americans, young children, and elderly adults.

The Commonwealth Fund carries out this mandate by supporting independent research on health care issues and making grants to improve health care practice and policy. An international program in health policy is designed to stimulate innovative policies and practices in the United States and other industrialized countries.

For more information, contact SABEW executive director Warren Watson at watson@sabew.org or call 1-602-496-5186

Phoenix, Milwaukee, Seattle newspapers win ’12 Barlett & Steele Awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Submitted by REYNOLDS CENTER Staff

PHOENIX, Oct. 4, 2011 — The Arizona Republic, Milwaukee Journal  Sentinel and The Seattle Times won gold, silver and bronze awards respectively in the fifth annual Barlett & Steele Awards in Investigative Business Journalism, the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism announced today.

Named for the renowned investigative team of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, whose numerous awards include two Pulitzer Prizes, these annual awards funded by the Reynolds Center celebrate the best in investigative business journalism.

“Public Pensions, A Soaring Burden” by Craig Harris of The Arizona Republic received the top gold award of $5,000. The series focused on questionable public-pension practices and their cost to taxpayers. A project that included 67 public-records requests uncovered elected officials making more in retirement than when they were employed and pensions paid to convicted felons removed from office for official wrongdoing.

“This is an important subject that many had taken shots at before, but what’s new is the clarity with which it addressed the issue and its rigor in expressing a complicated analytical story,” the judges said of the series that led to sweeping statewide pension reform. “It was fair and comprehensive in reaching out to those on all sides, dug deeply into public records and told us something we didn’t know.”

(Harris presented an overview of his series at a special reporting institute presented by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers in June in Phoenix sponsored by the McCormick Foundation.)

“A Case of Shattered Trust” by Raquel Rutledge and Rick Barrett of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel received the silver award of $2,000. The series revealed how a firm with a decade of serious regulatory violations of sanitary conditions was allowed to operate while the Food and Drug Administration did nothing. As a result of the stories, the FDA revealed the name of the bacterium that it found in the manufacturer’s contaminated alcohol wipes. Following a permanent federal injunction against the firm, the product is no longer manufactured.

“This brilliantly written series was prompted by the death of a two-year-old boy in Houston and led to the exposing of a serious problem in a plant located in its own region,” said the judges. “It is a systematic examination of the manufacture of a commonplace item and the sluggishness of regulation designed to protect consumers by investigating and correcting fatal flaws.”

“Seniors for Sale” by Michael J. Berens of The Seattle Times received the bronze award of $1,000. The series investigated the growing trend toward seniors being moved from nursing homes into less expensive “adult family homes.” The investigation uncovered more than 230 deaths that indicated neglect or abuse in these homes but were not reported to the state.

“This is groundbreaking, exhaustive reporting of a little-known abuse of elderly patients in which they are sometimes treated as commodities rather than patients,” the judges said of the series, which prompted significant reform at the state and county levels. “At a time when the aging population offers business opportunities, there are also opportunities for tragic abuses.”

Honorable mentions in this year’s awards are, in alphabetical order:

“In a volatile year for business and the economy, this year’s top entries struck blows against stunning abuses in the public and private sectors and got results,” said Andrew Leckey, president of the Reynolds Center. “In all our entries, newsrooms of a variety of sizes reaffirmed their dedication to intelligent and robust investigative business journalism.”

The judges for this year’s awards were Amanda Bennett, executive editor/projects and investigations at Bloomberg News; Myron Kandel, the founding financial editor of CNN; and Steve Koepp, editorial director of Time Home Entertainment Inc.

Awards will be conferred Jan. 3, 2012, during Reynolds Business Journalism Week at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Phoenix.

Scripps Howard Foundation journalism awards now accepting entries

Posted By Spring Eselgroth


PHOENIX, Sept. 20, 2011 — Rules and entry forms will be available starting Nov. 1 for the Scripps Howard Foundation’s National Journalism Awards in 18 categories, as foundation officials invited SABEW members to enter the category for Business/Economics reporting.

The cash prize for the winner of that category is $10,000, one of several prizes of $10,000 and $15,000 to be offered in each of the other categories totaling $185,000, said Sue Porter, vice president/programs of the Scripps Howard Foundation.

Foundation officials would like to see more business journalists enter this year. Last year 73 entries in the business/economics category were received, Porter said.

The rules and entry forms will be available Nov. 1 at http://scripps.com/foundation/, where today a description of the awards can be found in that website’s “Programs and Projects” area. For more information, contact Porter at porter@scripps.com.

Apply by Aug. 1 for 2011 Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

New $1K Bronze award joins $5K Gold, $2K Silver

From the Reynolds Center staff

PHOENIX —The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is accepting applications for the 2011 Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism at BusinessJournalism.org.

Named for two-time Pulitzer Prize winners Don Barlett and Jim Steele, the fifth annual awards celebrate the best in print and online investigative business journalism. This year, a bronze award of $1,000 has been added, joining the gold award of $5,000 and the silver award of $2,000.

“Don and I have an informal motto: ‘Tell the reader something they don’t know,'” said Steele. “It sounds simple. Yet a lot of journalism is a rehash of what people already know.”

Judges will be looking for investigative enterprise, strong business theme, elegant writing style, clarity and impact.

Entries must have appeared in print or online in the year that ended June 30, 2011. Deadline to apply online is Aug. 1.

For more information, visit BusinessJournalism.org, or email or call center President Andrew Leckey at 602-496-9186.

SABEW member papers win SDX awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

SABEW Staff Report

PHOENIX, May 11, 2011 — The Society of Professional Journalists has honored SABEW member publication The Pacific Coast Business Times with a 2010 Sigma Delta Chi award for its coverage of the $500 million rescue of the largest bank in the region the paper covers.

Also, Paige St. John, a reporter for another SABEW member publication, the Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune, won a 2010 Sigma Delta Chi award for investigative reporting on troubles in the Florida property-insurance industry.

In announcing results May 10 of its annual Sigma Delta Chi awards competition, SPJ honored The Business Times, staffers Marlize van Romburgh and Stephen Nellis, former executive editor Tony Biasotti and Times founder and editor Henry Dubroff with the deadline reporting award in the non-daily publication category.

Henry Dubroff, Pacific Business Times

Dubroff is a past president of SABEW, having served in 1997 while at the Denver Business Journal.

The paper and staffers received the award for a compilation of stories, graphics and a column published May 7, 2010,  on the recapitalization of Pacific Capital Bancorp.

The Society of Professional Journalists said its judges chose the winners from more than 1,400 entries in categories covering print, radio, television and online. An awards banquet will be held Sept. 24 in New Orleans.

“The SPJ award is a tribute to our team approach to news coverage,” Dubroff said in a May 10 statement on The Business Times’ website. “Winning in a general news category is an awesome breakthrough for our newspaper.”

Paige St. John, Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune (Herald-Tribune photo by Dan Wagner)

SPJ honored St. John with a Sigma Delta Chi award for investigative reporting among newspapers of 50,001 to 100,000 circulation for “Florida’s Insurance Nightmare,” which also won a 2010 Pulitzer Prize and a 2010 SABEW Best in Business award.

• To read the Business Times and Herald-Tribune stories and all other Sigma Delta Chi award winners, click here.

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Frequently Asked Questions about the 2010 Best in Business Awards Competition

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Introduction

A task force of members of the SABEW Board of Governors and other industry representatives has updated and revised the Best in Business contest divisions, categories and criteria for 2011 (contest year 2010). The result accomplished both objectives of the task force:

• Maintain what is important from contests past.

• Honor and reward the industry of the present and future.

Here, with answers, are FAQs  about the changes we’ve made to Best in Business:

__________


Q: Tell me again why SABEW needs to change up its very successful contest.

A. Because the contest we’ve run in years past doesn’t fit the way the industry is structured any longer. Our divisions and categories were out of date, failing to recognize the evolution of news online, among other things. We needed more clarity on what each division entails and what each category is supposed to reward.

Q: Where did the enterprise and project categories go?

A. Enterprise, we’ve learned, means different things to different people. As a result, no one ever really knew what SABEW was looking for. This year, we’ve replaced the mystery categories with more specific places for you, our entrants, to submit your work. We’ve added Investigative and Explanatory categories, and we’ve specifically stated that the Breaking News can include reactive or proactive coverage.

Q. What does that mean, reactive or proactive breaking news?

A. We know that, traditionally, breaking news has been defined as reactive coverage of an unplanned event. The times, they are a-changin’. We believe it’s important to reward those enterprising reporters who endeavor to dig up and break news that gets widespread attention as well as those who are able to react to stuff that happens on their watch. And we think that digging up and breaking news that people need to know should carry more weight in the judges’ decisions.

Q: “Creative use across multiple platforms” vs. digital entries. What’s the difference?

A. One of the biggest issues of our times (well, besides all of those OTHER issues) is how to define and reward a truly digital enterprise without creating a void where some really enterprising digital work is happening. We think we’ve taken a big step forward, by adding a category in the Print division called “Creative use across multiple platforms.” This allows us to differentiate between the work of digital-only entrants — which often have smaller staffs and fewer resources — and the digital entities that are related to — and often draw on the resources of — a print or other news organization whose primary business is in a medium other than digital.

Adding “Creative use across multiple platforms” to every division except Digital allows these hybrid organizations (for example, yourdailynewspaper.com or cnbc.com) to enter digital work that is complemented by work in print and/or in another medium.

Keeping the totally digital news organizations separate from their hybrid counterparts seems more apples to apples when it comes to judging and rewarding good work.

Q. So, can the dot-com associated with a daily newspaper enter the digital categories?

A. Generally, no. For instance, because charlotteobserver.com is largely powered by content from The Charlotte Observer and its staff, digital entries from charlotteobserver.com must be entered in the Print Division category “Creative use across multiple platforms,” EVEN IF THEY ONLY RAN ONLINE.

The Digital division is reserved for online-only enterprises that are powered by their own staff and content.

Q. How come there are blog categories in divisions other than digital?

A. Because we know that many business news organizations whose primary business is in a medium other than digital have outstanding blogs and bloggers associated with them. There isn’t much opportunity for a blogger’s work to appear in a different medium (say, in a newspaper or on TV), so the only way we can honor the work of these folks is to give them a special category in every division.

Q: Why are there more shapes and sizes of divisions and categories this year?

A. This is how the industry looks these days. We need to be sure we’re pitting the right folks against each other in terms of resources and heft. And we need to be more specific in what the judges should be looking for in each category. Adding size divisions and more categories helps us do that.

Q: It’s cool that you’ve added an International division this year. How come it’s platform-agnostic and doesn’t divide entrants into size categories?

A. Because we’re dipping our toe into this water, hoping to build some critical mass in this vibrant and growing part of our industry. We’re hoping there is such an overwhelming response from the international business press that we’ll simply have to divide it up going forward.

Q: What are the open categories (Personal Finance and Real Estate) all about?

A. We’re trying something new this year. Typically the work of personal finance and real estate beat reporters and/or columnists ends up on the cutting room floor when it comes to contests, because it doesn’t fit snugly into the categories we honor.

We’ve asked them to enter five examples of their best work, regardless of the format, to be judged against the work of folks who do what they do.

We think this will help us widen our tent in terms of industry honors, and give much-deserved credit where it is due.

Q. Can freelancers enter the Best in Business contest?

A. Yes. It’s a little more complicated, so contact the staff in Phoenix (sabew@sabew.org or 602-496-7862) and we’ll walk you through it.

Rules for the 2010 Best in Business Awards Competition

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Introduction

What follows are the official rules for filing entries from calendar year 2010 for the 2010 Best in Business Awards Competition, sponsored by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. This year there are eight divisions: Digital, International Categories, News Agencies, Print (subdivided into Newspapers, Magazines and Business Weeklies/Biweeklies), Radio/TV, Personal Finance, Real Estate and Student. Within each division are various categories. Please select the category you wish to make entries into carefully.

I. Division: Digital

Eligible entrants: Primary business activity is disseminating news and information through a digital platform (online, mobile, etc.)

Digital news organization groupings

Group Digital 1: Fewer than 500,000 unique users per month

Group Digital 2: 500,001 to 2.5 million unique users per month

Group Digital 3: 2,500,001 and more unique users per month

Digital categories

1. General Excellence

An entry will consist of a digital new organization’s URL, which judges will use to view the site and all of its components at their discretion. In addition, entrants may send five screen shots and/or permalink URLs of work from 2010 that illustrates a digital new organization’s quality, strength and consistency over time.

Eligible entrants: Primary business activity is disseminating news and information through a digital platform (online, mobile, etc.)

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please attach it to your entry as a pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-genex-coverletter.pdf)

2. Breaking News

Defined as coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Can be reactive reporting of news that breaks or proactive news broken by a reporter or news organization’s reporting staff. Judges will be asked to give greater weight to the latter.

Can be a single story or a package of stories produced on the same day. Must be submitted as permalink URLs. All facets of single-day coverage should be included in entry.

Ongoing coverage of an event that continues after the initial reporting period does not meet SABEW’s definition of “Breaking News” and should be entered in “Investigative,” “Explanatory” or “Feature” category, whichever is appropriate.

Judges will be asked to pay particular attention to the creative opportunities that digital media provide to breaking news reporting and presentation of breaking news reports.

3. Investigative

Defined as in-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership/viewership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted as permalink URLs. All facets of investigative story and/or package should be included in entry.

Judges will be asked to pay particular attention to the creative opportunities that digital media provide to investigative reporting and presentation of investigative reports.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please attach it to your entry as a pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

4. Explanatory

Defined as in-depth reporting that presents, defines, unpacks, and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows the reader/listener/viewer to understand it more clearly.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted as permalink URLs. All facets of explanatory story and/or package should be included in entry.

Judges will be asked to pay particular attention to the creative opportunities that digital media provide to explanatory journalism and presentation of explanatory news reports.

5. Feature

Defined as a single story that covers a selected topic in-depth but does not: a) require a time element to be relevant; b) confine itself to a news style of writing and/or presentation; and/or c) shy away from reflecting a point of view.

Entry must be a single story and should include all relevant infographics, interactive components, photos and/or sidebars. Must be submitted as permalink URLs.

Judges will be asked to pay particular attention to the creative opportunities that digital media provide to feature storytelling.

6. Opinion/Column

Defined as reported coverage that, as a matter of course, reflects the point of view of a writer, writers and/or news organization. Category includes unsigned editorials and individual commentary.

Five examples constitute one entry. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Two will be chosen by submitter. Entries must be submitted as permalink URLs. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the NEXT issue published that fits the category.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For signed commentary, names of all writers must be included. For unsigned editorials, list of editorial board members must be included.

7. Blog

For this category, blog is defined as a web site or a clearly labeled part of a web site that is maintained by an individual or group of individuals, and contains regularly added entries that may be news-based or otherwise factual; opinion or commentary; descriptions of events; and/or other material such as graphics or video.

An entry will consist of complete blog activity from five dates. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. If there is no activity on a date chosen by SABEW, entrant should choose the next date where there is activity, noting the change on the entry form.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For blogs maintained by a group of individuals, names of all writers must be included.

8. Creative use across multiple platforms

An entry can be any story or package of stories, including those entered in other digital division categories, where use of more than one platform is employed as part of the same coverage. For example, an entry may include a story written for print, its accompanying online coverage and a video and/or audio component.

Judges will be asked to interpret eligibility for this category broadly and creatively. They will be asked to consider the heft and significance of the content, certainly, but to place greater emphasis on the creativity of presentation and interactivity across several platforms.

Entry should include all facets of story and/or package, including all pdfs and permalink URLs.

II. Division: International

Defined as work written or produced by a non-U.S.-based correspondent (including those who work for U.S. news organizations).

This division is platform agnostic. Entries from print, radio/TV, news agency and digital sources will be judged against each other in the Breaking News, Investigative, Explanatory, Feature and Opinion/Column categories.

Judges will be asked to weigh the heft and significance of the content more than the method of delivery.

International categories

1. Breaking News

Defined as coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Can be reactive reporting of news that breaks or proactive news broken by a reporter or news organization’s reporting staff. Judges will be asked to give greater weight to the latter.

Can be a single story or a package of stories produced on the same day. Print entries must be submitted as pdfs. Radio/TV and digital entries must be submitted as permalink URLs. News agency entries may be submitted in whichever format is most appropriate. All facets of single-day coverage should be included in entry.

Ongoing coverage of an event that continues after the initial reporting period does not meet SABEW’s definition of “Breaking News” and should be entered in “Investigative,” “Explanatory” or “Feature” category, whichever is appropriate.

2. Investigative

Defined as in-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership/listenership/viewership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Can be a single story or a package of stories produced on the same day. Print entries must be submitted as pdfs. Radio/TV and digital entries must be submitted as permalink URLs. News agency entries may be submitted in whichever format is most appropriate. All facets of investigative coverage should be included in entry.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please attach it to your entry as a pdf. ((To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

3. Explanatory

Defined as in-depth reporting that presents, defines, unpacks, and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows the reader/listener/viewer to understand it more clearly.

Can be a single story or a package of stories produced on the same day. Print entries must be submitted as pdfs. Radio/TV and digital entries must be submitted as permalink URLs. News agency entries may be submitted in whichever format is most appropriate. All facets of explanatory coverage should be included in entry.

4. Feature

Defined as a single story that covers a selected topic in-depth but does not: a) require a time element to be relevant; b) confine itself to a news style of writing and/or presentation; and/or c) shy away from reflecting a point of view.

Entry must be a single story and should include all relevant infographics, interactive components, photos and/or sidebars. Print entries must be submitted as pdfs. Radio/TV and digital entries must be submitted as permalink URLs. All facets of feature story should be included in entry.

5. Opinion/Column

Defined as reported coverage that, as a matter of course, reflects the point of view of a writer, writers and/or news organization. Category includes unsigned editorials and individual commentary.

Five examples constitute one entry. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Two will be chosen by submitter. Entries must be submitted as permalink URLs. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the NEXT issue published that fits the category.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For signed commentary, names of all writers must be included. For unsigned editorials, list of editorial board members must be included.

6. Creative use across multiple platforms

An entry can be any story or package of stories, including those entered in other international division categories, where use of more than one platform is employed as part of the same coverage. For example, an entry may include a story written for print, its accompanying online coverage and a video and/or audio component.

Judges will be asked to interpret eligibility for this category broadly and creatively. They will be asked to consider the heft and significance of the content, certainly, but to place greater emphasis on the creativity of presentation and interactivity across several platforms.

Entry should include all facets of story and/or package, including all pdfs and permalink URLs.

7. Blog

For this category, blog is as a clearly labeled part of a web site that is maintained by an individual or group of individuals, and contains regularly added entries that may be news-based or otherwise factual; opinion or commentary; descriptions of events; and/or other material such as graphics or video.

An entry will consist of complete blog activity from five dates. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. If there is no activity on a date chosen by SABEW, entrant should choose the next date where there is activity, noting the change on the entry form.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For blogs maintained by a group of individuals, names of all writers must be included.

III. Division: News agencies

Eligible entrants: Primary business activity is distributing news to news organizations and other business entities.

News agencies categories

1. General Excellence

An entry will consist of five pieces of work that exemplify a news agency’s quality, strength and consistency over time. Three will be from a date and time chosen by SABEW. Two will be chosen by the submitter.

Mandatory dates/dayparts for 2010-11 contest::

Feb. 21, between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

May 26, between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Sept. 27, between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Entries must be uploaded and submitted as five permalink URLs.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please attach it to your entry as a pdf. ((To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-genex-coverletter.pdf)

2. Breaking News

Defined as coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Can be reactive reporting of news that breaks or proactive news broken by a reporter or an agency’s reporting staff. Judges will be asked to give greater weight to the latter.

Can be a single story or a package of stories produced on the same day. Must be submitted as permalink URLs. All facets of single-day coverage should be included in entry.

Ongoing coverage of an event that continues after the initial reporting period does not meet SABEW’s definition of “Breaking News” and should be entered in “Investigative,” “Explanatory” or “Feature” category, whichever is appropriate.

3. Investigative

Defined as in-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted as permalink URLs. All facets of investigative story and/or package should be included in entry.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please attach it to your entry as a pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

4. Explanatory

Defined as in-depth reporting that presents, defines, unpacks, and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows the reader/listener/viewer to understand it more clearly.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted as permalink URLs. All facets of explanatory story and/or package should be included in entry.

5. Feature

Defined as a single story that covers a selected topic in-depth but does not: a) require a time element to be relevant; b) confine itself to a news style of writing and/or presentation; and/or c) shy away from reflecting a point of view.

Entry must be a single story and should include all relevant infographics, interactive components, photos and/or sidebars. Must be submitted as permalink URLs.

6. Opinion/Column

Defined as reported coverage that, as a matter of course, reflects the point of view of a writer, writers and/or news organization. Category includes unsigned editorials and individual commentary.

Five examples constitute one entry. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Two will be chosen by submitter. Entries must be submitted as permalink URLs. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the NEXT issue published that fits the category.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For signed commentary, names of all writers must be included. For unsigned editorials, list of editorial board members must be included.

7. Creative use across multiple platforms

An entry can be any story or package of stories, including those entered in other news agencies division categories, where use of more than one platform is employed as part of the same coverage. For example, an entry may include a story written for print, its accompanying online coverage and a video and/or audio component.

Judges will be asked to interpret eligibility for this category broadly and creatively. They will be asked to consider the heft and significance of the content, certainly, but to place greater emphasis on the creativity of presentation and interactivity across several platforms.

Entry should include all facets of story and/or package, including all pdfs and permalink URLs.

8. Blog

For this category, blog is as a clearly labeled part of a web site that is maintained by an individual or group of individuals, and contains regularly added entries that may be news-based or otherwise factual; opinion or commentary; descriptions of events; and/or other material such as graphics or video.

An entry will consist of complete blog activity from five dates. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. If there is no activity on a date chosen by SABEW, entrant should choose the next date where there is activity, noting the change on the entry form.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For blogs maintained by a group of individuals, names of all writers must be included.

IV. Division: Print

Eligible entrants: Primary business activity is publication in print

IV.(a) Print — Daily newspapers

Size groupings

Using most recent ABC audit figures for Sunday circulation

Group Dailies 1: Daily newspapers with circulation up to 25,000

Group Dailies 2: Daily newspapers with circulation 25,001 to 100,000

Group Dailies 3: Daily newspapers with circulation 100,001 to 200,000

Group Dailies 4: Daily newspapers with circulation 200,001 to 500,000

Group Dailies 5: Daily newspapers with circulation 500,001 and above

1(a). General Excellence – Daily Newspapers (divided by five size groupings)

Entry will consist of five business sections (may include any other business-related coverage from that date) that exemplify a news organization’s quality, strength and consistency over time. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

Entry must be submitted as five pdfs – one for each issue date. PDF file names should be styled with the paper name (can use acronym or nickname, if it’s intuitive) and the issue date. For example, a General Excellence pdf from the Dallas Morning News of Aug. 12, 2010, should be named:

dallasmorningnews02-21-2010.pdf

OR

dmn02-21-2010.pdf

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please include it as the first page of the first pdf.

2.(a) Breaking News

Defined as coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Can be reactive reporting of news that breaks or proactive news broken by a reporter or publication’s reporting staff. Judges will be asked to give greater weight to the latter.

Can be a single story or a package of stories that run on the same day. Must be submitted in pdf format. All printed facets of single-day coverage should be included in pdf entry.

Ongoing coverage of an event that continues after the initial reporting period does not meet SABEW’s definition of “Breaking News” and should be entered in “Investigative,” “Explanatory” or “Feature” category, whichever is appropriate.

3.(a) Investigative

Defined as in-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted in pdf format. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

All printed facets of investigative story and/or package should be included in pdf.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please include it as the first page of the pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

4.(a) Explanatory

Defined as in-depth reporting that presents, defines, unpacks, and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows the reader to understand it more clearly.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted in pdf format.

Entry should include pdf of all printed facets of explanatory story and/or package.

5.(a) Feature

Defined as a single story that covers a selected topic in-depth but does not: a) require a time element to be relevant; b) confine itself to a news style of writing and/or presentation; and/or c) shy away from reflecting a point of view.

Entry must be a single story and should include all relevant infographics, photos and/or sidebars. Must be submitted in pdf format.

6.(a) Opinion/Column

Defined as reported coverage that, as a matter of course, reflects the point of view of a writer, writers and/or printed publication. Category includes unsigned editorials and individual commentary.

Five examples constitute one entry. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Two will be chosen by submitter. Entries must be submitted in pdf format. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the next issue published that fits the category.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For signed commentary, names of all writers must be included. For unsigned editorials, list of editorial board members must be included.

7.(a) Creative use across multiple platforms

An entry can be any story or package of stories, including those entered in other print categories, where use of more than one platform is employed as part of the same coverage. For example, an entry may include a print package, its accompanying online coverage and a video component. Or, an entry may include an online package, bolstered by examples of ongoing coverage in the printed publication.

Judges will be asked to interpret eligibility for this category broadly and creatively. They will be asked to consider the heft and significance of the content, certainly, but to place greater emphasis on the creativity of presentation and interactivity across several platforms.

Entry should include all facets of story and/or package, including all pdfs and permalink URLs.

8(a). Blog

For this category, blog is as a clearly labeled part of a web site that is maintained by an individual or group of individuals, and contains regularly added entries that may be news-based or otherwise factual; opinion or commentary; descriptions of events; and/or other material such as graphics or video.

An entry will consist of complete blog activity from five dates. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. If there is no activity on a date chosen by SABEW, entrant should choose the next date where there is activity, noting the change on the entry form.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For blogs maintained by a group of individuals, names of all writers must be included.

IV.(b) Print — Magazines

Size groupings

Using most recent ABC audit figures for monthly circulation

Group Magazines 1: Magazines with circulation up to 75,000

Group Magazines 2: Magazines with circulation 75,001 to 500,000

Group Magazines 3: Magazines with circulation 500,001 and above

1(b). General Excellence – Magazines (divided by three size groupings)

Entry will consist of three issues. Two dates/months will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose one. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the next issue published that fits the category.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

May 26 (May issue for monthlies)

September 27 (September issue for monthlies)

Entry must be submitted as three pdfs – one for each issue date. PDF file names should be styled with the magazine name and the issue date. For example, a General Excellence pdf from Money Magazine of August 2010, should be named:

moneymagazine05-2010.pdf

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please include it as the first page of the first pdf.

2.(b) Breaking News

Defined as coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Can be reactive reporting of news that breaks or proactive news broken by a reporter or publication’s reporting staff. Judges will be asked to give greater weight to the latter.

Can be a single story or a package of stories that run on the same day. Must be submitted in pdf format. All printed facets of single-day coverage should be included in pdf entry.

Ongoing coverage of an event that continues after the initial reporting period does not meet SABEW’s definition of “Breaking News” and should be entered in “Investigative,” “Explanatory” or “Feature” category, whichever is appropriate.

3.(b) Investigative

Defined as in-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted in pdf format. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

All printed facets of investigative story and/or package should be included in pdf.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please include it as the first page of the pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

4.(b) Explanatory

Defined as in-depth reporting that presents, defines, unpacks, and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows the reader to understand it more clearly.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted in pdf format.

Entry should include pdf of all printed facets of explanatory story and/or package.

5.(b) Feature

Defined as a single story that covers a selected topic in-depth but does not: a) require a time element to be relevant; b) confine itself to a news style of writing and/or presentation; and/or c) shy away from reflecting a point of view.

Entry must be a single story and should include all relevant infographics, photos and/or sidebars. Must be submitted in pdf format.

6.(b) Opinion/Column

Defined as reported coverage that, as a matter of course, reflects the point of view of a writer, writers and/or printed publication. Category includes unsigned editorials and individual commentary.

Three examples constitute one entry. Two dates will be chosen by SABEW. One will be chosen by submitter. Entries must be submitted in pdf format. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the NEXT issue published that fits the category.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

May 26 (May issue for monthlies)

September 27 (September issue for monthlies)

For signed commentary, names of all writers must be included. For unsigned editorials, list of editorial board members must be included.

7.(b) Creative use across multiple platforms

An entry can be any story or package of stories, including those entered in other print categories, where use of more than one platform is employed as part of the same coverage. For example, an entry may include a print package, its accompanying online coverage and a video component. Or, an entry may include an online package, bolstered by examples of ongoing coverage in the printed publication.

Judges will be asked to interpret eligibility for this category broadly and creatively. They will be asked to consider the heft and significance of the content, certainly, but to place greater emphasis on the creativity of presentation and interactivity across several platforms.

Entry should include all facets of story and/or package, including all pdfs and permalink URLs.

8.(b). Blog

For this category, blog is as a clearly labeled part of a web site that is maintained by an individual or group of individuals, and contains regularly added entries that may be news-based or otherwise factual; opinion or commentary; descriptions of events; and/or other material such as graphics or video.

An entry will consist of complete blog activity from five dates. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. If there is no activity on a date chosen by SABEW, entrant should choose the next date where there is activity, noting the change on the entry form.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For blogs maintained by a group of individuals, names of all writers must be included.

IV.(c) Business weeklies/biweeklies

Weekly category includes all business weeklies and biweeklies. If demand warrants, weekly and biweekly categories will be separated.

1(c). General Excellence – Business weeklies/biweeklies

Entry will consist of five issues. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the NEXT issue published that fits the category.

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

Entry must be submitted as five pdfs – one for each issue date. PDF file names should be styled with the publication name (can use acronym or nickname, if it’s intuitive) and the issue date. For example, a General Excellence pdf from the Puget Sound Business Journal of Aug. 12, 2010, should be named:

pugetsoundbusinessjournal02-21-2010.pdf

OR

pugetsoundbizjournal02-21-2010.pdf

OR

psbj02-21-2010.pdf

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please include it as the first page of the first pdf.

2.(c) Breaking News

Defined as coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Can be reactive reporting of news that breaks or proactive news broken by a reporter or publication’s reporting staff. Judges will be asked to give greater weight to the latter.

Can be a single story or a package of stories that run on the same day. Must be submitted in pdf format. All printed facets of single-day coverage should be included in pdf entry.

Ongoing coverage of an event that continues after the initial reporting period does not meet SABEW’s definition of “Breaking News” and should be entered in “Investigative,” “Explanatory” or “Feature” category, whichever is appropriate.

3.(c) Investigative

Defined as in-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted in pdf format. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

All printed facets of investigative story and/or package should be included in pdf.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please include it as the first page of the pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

4.(c) Explanatory

Defined as in-depth reporting that presents, defines, unpacks, and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows the reader to understand it more clearly.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Must be submitted in pdf format.

Entry should include pdf of all printed facets of explanatory story and/or package.

5.(c) Feature

Defined as a single story that covers a selected topic in-depth but does not: a) require a time element to be relevant; b) confine itself to a news style of writing and/or presentation; and/or c) shy away from reflecting a point of view.

Entry must be a single story and should include all relevant infographics, photos and/or sidebars. Must be submitted in pdf format.

6.(c) Opinion/Column

Defined as reported coverage that, as a matter of course, reflects the point of view of a writer, writers and/or printed publication. Category includes unsigned editorials and individual commentary.

Five examples constitute one entry. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Two will be chosen by submitter. Entries must be submitted in pdf format. In the event that the entrant did not publish on a SABEW date, he or she should enter the NEXT issue published that fits the category.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For signed commentary, names of all writers must be included. For unsigned editorials, list of editorial board members must be included.

7.(c) Creative use across multiple platforms

An entry can be any story or package of stories, including those entered in other print categories, where use of more than one platform is employed as part of the same coverage. For example, an entry may include a print package, its accompanying online coverage and a video component.

Judges will be asked to interpret eligibility for this category broadly and creatively. They will be asked to consider the heft and significance of the content, certainly, but to place greater emphasis on the creativity of presentation and interactivity across several platforms.

Entry should include all facets of story and/or package, including all pdfs and permalink URLs.

8.(c). Blog

For this category, blog is as a clearly labeled part of a web site that is maintained by an individual or group of individuals, and contains regularly added entries that may be news-based or otherwise factual; opinion or commentary; descriptions of events; and/or other material such as graphics or video.

An entry will consist of complete blog activity from five dates. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. If there is no activity on a date chosen by SABEW, entrant should choose the next date where there is activity, noting the change on the entry form.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For blogs maintained by a group of individuals, names of all writers must be included.

V. Division: Radio/TV

Eligible entrants: Primary business activity is distributing news by broadcast, cable and radio

Radio/TV categories

1. General Excellence

An entry will consist of five pieces of work that exemplify a news organization’s quality, strength and consistency over time. Three will be from a date and daypart chosen by SABEW. Two will be chosen by the submitter.

Mandatory dates/dayparts:

Feb. 21, between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

May 26, between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Sept. 27, between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Entries must be uploaded and submitted as five permalink URLs.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please attach it to your entry as a pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-genex-coverletter.pdf)

2. Breaking News

Defined as coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Can be reactive reporting of news that breaks or proactive news broken by a reporter or news outlet’s reporting staff. Judges will be asked to give greater weight to the latter.

Can be a single story or a package of stories that run or are aired on the same day. Must be uploaded and submitted as permalink URLs.

Ongoing coverage of an event that continues after the initial reporting period does not meet SABEW’s definition of “Breaking News” and should be entered in “Investigative,” “Explanatory” or “Feature” category, whichever is appropriate.

3. Investigative

Defined as in-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general viewership/listenership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Entry should include all facets of investigative story and/or package. Must be uploaded and submitted as permalink URLs.

A one-page cover letter (double-spaced) may be submitted with this entry. Please attach it to your entry as a pdf. (To help the judges keep track of things, please style the pdf title like this: yournewsorgname-investigative-coverletter.pdf)

4. Explanatory

Defined as in-depth reporting that presents, defines, unpacks, and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows the listener or viewer to understand it more clearly.

Can be a single story or a series of stories. Entry should include all facets of explanatory story and/or package. Must be uploaded and submitted as a permalink URL.

5. Feature

Defined as a single story that covers a selected topic in-depth but does not: a) require a time element to be relevant; b) confine itself to a news style of writing and/or presentation; and/or c) shy away from reflecting a point of view.

Entry must be a single story. Must be uploaded and submitted as a permalink URL.

6. Creative use across multiple platforms

An entry can be any story or package of stories, including those entered in other radio/TV categories, where use of more than one platform is employed as part of the same coverage. For example, an entry may include an audio and/or video package, it’s accompanying online coverage and a print package.

Judges will be asked to interpret eligibility for this category broadly and creatively. They will be asked to consider the heft and significance of the content, certainly, but to place greater emphasis on the creativity of presentation and interactivity across several platforms.

Entry should include all facets of story and/or package, including all pdfs and permalinks.

7. Blog

For this category, blog is as a clearly labeled part of a web site that is maintained by an individual or group of individuals, and contains regularly added entries that may be news-based or otherwise factual; opinion or commentary; descriptions of events; and/or other material such as graphics or video.

An entry will consist of complete blog activity from five dates. Three dates will be chosen by SABEW. Submitter will choose two. If there is no activity on a date chosen by SABEW, entrant should choose the next date where there is activity, noting the change on the entry form.

Mandatory dates for 2010-11 contest:

Feb. 21

May 26

Sept. 27

For blogs maintained by a group of individuals, names of all writers must be included.

VI. Division: Personal Finance

This open category will honor the best work of personal finance reporters and columnists from across the country.

This division is format- and platform agnostic. Any personal finance reporting and/or commentary from any source may be entered.

All entries will be judged against each other.

Judges will be asked to weigh the heft and significance of the content over the method of delivery.

An entry will consist of five pieces of work chosen by entrant. All five bylines must match.

VII. Division: Real Estate

This open category will honor the best work of commercial and residential real estate reporters and columnists from across the country.

This division is format- and platform agnostic. Any commercial and residential real estate reporting and/or commentary from any source may be entered. All entries will be judged against each other.

Judges will be asked to weigh the heft and significance of the content over the method of delivery.

An entry will consist of five pieces of work chosen by entrant. All five bylines must match.

VIII. Division: Student

This open category will honor the best work of student business journalists.

An entry will consist of any story or package of stories written or produced by a college or university student who also is a member of SABEW. Work done for school news organizations will be judged separately from work done for professional news organizations.

Best of the Best

Best of the Best rewards the very best work entered in SABEW’s Best in Business contest. After BIB judging is completed, two über-judging panels (one for General Excellence, one for all other categories) will receive all of the winning entries. The Best of the Best judges, made up of top business journalists, SABEW past presidents and Distinguished Service Award winners, will single out only those entries that rise far above the competition.

Scripps Howard announces National Journalism Awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

SABEW Staff Report

SABEW members are invited to submit their best journalistic work in 2010 for consideration for the National Journalism Awards, presented since 1953 by the Scripps Howard Foundation.

Winners in 18 categories will be honored with cash awards totaling $185,000. The amounts range from $10,000 to the $15,000 Ursula and Gilbert Farfel investigative reporting prize.

The 2010 competition is open to media outlets, their staff members and freelance contributors and provide opportunities to enter across the multiple platforms of print, broadcast and online media. Several are open to news magazines. For more on the competition, click here.

FOR INFORMATION about the competition, contact Sue Porter, vice president/programs, Scripps Howard Foundation, 800-888-3000 ext. 3030, or send e-mail to sue.porter@scripps.com .

Reuters, Milwaukee J-S win ’10 Barlett & Steele Awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

By the REYNOLDS CENTER STAFF, businessjournalism.com

PHOENIX, Oct. 4, 2010 — Reuters received the gold award and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel the silver award in the fourth annual Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism, the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism announced.

GOLD AWARD: “Diagnosed with Breast Cancer, Dropped by Insurer” by Murray Waas of Reuters received the top gold award of $5,000. A four-month investigation revealed that a giant health insurer had targeted policyholders recently diagnosed with breast cancer for aggressive investigations with the intent to cancel their policies. An exhaustive study of records, hearings and federal data, as well as dozens of interviews with experts, officials and patients led to the story.

“Reuters contrasted the upfront public stance of a health care company and its CEO to the reality behind the scenes, revealing the insidiousness of gate keeping by software,” said the judges.  “This investigation led to government pressure and an industry-wide change in the practice of dropping health care coverage for patients after they became sick.”

Reuters’ investigation led to government pressure and industry-wide changes in health-care practices.

SILVER AWARD: “Side Effects: Money, Medicine and Patients” by John Fauber of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel received the silver award of $2,000.

The stories uncovered conflicts of interest that can compromise a doctor’s judgment. An example was a surgeon receiving millions of dollars in royalties annually from a medical device company while serving as editor of a medical journal that published favorable research on the company’s projects.

Here are links to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel stories:

  • UW tied to male hormone marketing
  • Journal editor gets royalties as articles favor devices
  • As universities tighten ethics policies, drug firms turn to private physicians to promote products
  • Doctors’ role in drug studies criticized

“The Journal Sentinel by revealing interwoven ties between doctors and the pharmaceutical industry prompted an inquiry by a U.S. Senate committee and led to sweeping changes at a major university school of medicine,” said the judges, noting that the reporter poured over thousands of pages of medical literature, coursework and documents obtained through open records laws.

HONORABLE MENTIONS
Honorable mentions in this year’s awards are, in alphabetical order:

McClatchy Newspapers
“Goldman Sachs and the Housing Crash” by Greg Gordon, Kevin Hall and Chris Adams

Minneapolis Star Tribune
“Hounded: Debtors and the New Breed of Collectors” by Chris Serres and Glenn Howatt

Philadelphia Inquirer
“Inside the Health-Care Crucible: Reports from a Hospital in a Time of Upheaval” by Michael Vitez

USA Today
“The Credit Trap” by Kathy Chu

“This was the strongest group of award entries the judges have encountered and clear indication that investigative business journalism is alive and well,” said Andrew Leckey, president of the Reynolds Center, which funds the awards. “Even though health care has been the subject of prolonged national debate, our award winners were able to tell us something we didn’t know.”

ABOUT THE JUDGES
Barlett & Steele Awards distinguished panel of judges:
Myron Kandel was the founding financial editor of CNN.
Steve Koepp is the former executive editor of Fortune magazine.
Laurie Hays is the executive editor for company news at Bloomberg News.

ABOUT THE BARLETT & STEELE AWARDS
Named for the two-time Pulitzer Prize winning investigative business journalist team of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, these awards, funded by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, celebrate the best in print and online investigative business journalism. The annual awards were first given out in fall 2007, and feature a Gold award of $5,000 and a Silver prize of $2,000.

NYT, CNBC, Vanity Fair top winners in Loeb awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Television, newspapers and magazines were represented among the top winners in the Gerald Loeb Awards, announced June 29 in New York City.

The New York Times, CSNBC and Vanity Fair each won two awards in the competition that recognizes excellence in business journalism.

McClatchy Newspapers, the Los Angeles Times, and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch were also among the newspaper winners.

Kevin Hall, a member of the Board of Governors of SABEW, was honored in the News Services category  for “Goldman, Moody’s and the Collapse of the American Economy.”  Greg Gordon and Chris Adams also were honored.

Summary of winners

The Times’ “Food Safety” investigation, by Michael Moss and Andrew Martin, told the story of 22-year-old Stephanie Smith, who was paralyzed by a contaminated hamburger. That story also won the 2010 Pulitzer for Explanatory Reporting. David Pogue, the Times’ technology blogger, won for Online Commentary & Blogging for his “Pogue’s Posts.”

Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger of the Los Angeles Times won the Beat Writing award for “The Toyota Recall.”

The Detroit News’ Christine Tierney, David Shepardson and Gordon Trowbridge won the Breaking News category for “GM, Chrysler Nudged Toward Bankruptcy.”

Among Medium and Small Newspapers, The Miami Herald took home a Loeb for “Keys to the Kingdom,” by Michael Sallah, Rob Barry and Lucy Komisar, focusing on how the state’s lax regulation aided Ponzi schemer Allen Stanford.

In the Personal Finance category, the St. Louis Post Dispatch’s Matthew Hathaway, Elizabethe Holland and Jim Gallagher won for “From Prison to the Pinnacle,” which chronicled the rise of auto service-contract marketer US Fidelis and its co-founder, Darain Atkinson.

Wall Street Journal Deputy Managing Editor Alix Freedman was the recipient of the Lawrence Minard Editor Award, which recognizes an editor who does not get a byline. It is named in memory of Laury Minard, founding editor of Forbes Global.

The other winners:

  • Feature Writing: “Wall Street on the Tundra,” by Michael Lewis, Vanity Fair, on the financial meltdown in Iceland
  • Television Enterprise: “House of Cards,” by D. Faber, M. Weitzner, J. Jacoby, J. Landes, P. Ahearn, J. Segelstein and L. Orlando, CNBC, on the global economic collapse
  • Honorable Mention in Television Enterprise: “Black Money,” by Marlena Telvick, Lowell Bergman, Oriana Zill de Granados and Daniel Hirst, PBS Frontline, on international bribery
  • Commentary: “Capitalist Fools” and “Wall Street’s Toxic Message,” by Joseph E. Stiglitz, Vanity Fair, about the mistakes behind the economic collapse and its possible impact on nations’ future choice of economic systems
  • Magazines: “How Bernie Did It,” by James Bandler, Nicholas Varchaver and Doris Burke, Fortune, about the Madoff scandal
  • Television Breaking News: “The Madoff Scandal,” by Scott Cohn, Mary Thompson, Courtney Ford, Wally Griffith and Molly Mazilu, CNBC
  • Business Book: “Too Big to Fail,” by Andrew Ross Sorkin

In addition, Walt Bogdanich, assistant investigative editor of The New York Times, won a Lifetime Achievement Award in the annual competition administered by the UCLA Anderson School of Management.

The awards were established in 1957 by the late Gerald Loeb, founding partner of the brokerage firm E.F. Hutton, to honor journalists who contribute to the understanding of business, finance and the economy.

This year’s competition drew a record 513 entries.

(Information from Editor and Publisher and www.businessjournalism.org was used in this report.)

Deadline Aug. 2 for Barlett and Steele awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Named for the two-time Pulitzer Prize winning investigative business journalist team of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, these awards, funded by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, celebrate the best in print and online investigative business journalism.

The annual awards were first given out in fall 2007, and feature a Gold award of $5,000 and a Silver prize of $2,000.

For the 2010 awards, entries must have appeared between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010. Each media outlet may submit no more than two entries. The submission deadline is Aug. 2, 2010.

Barlett and Steele, who won two Pulitzers with The Philadelphia Inquirer and two National Magazine Awards at Time, have worked together for more than three decades. They are contributing editors to Vanity Fair.

Applications will be accepted only online and from editors or the contest coordinator designated by your news organization. Applicants will need to provide the following at Barlett & Steele Contest Entry: BusinessJournalism.org:

  • Contact information for the editor submitting the entry.
  • An editor’s letter outlining any (a) obstacles in reporting, (b) reforms or impact after publication and (c) corrections or challenges to accuracy. It can be submitted as a Word document (.doc) or an Adobe Acrobat PDF file.
  • Up to four articles, submitted as either an active URL or as a Word document or Adobe Acrobat PDF. A sidebar counts as an article.

Applicants do not have to file all elements in one sitting, but all elements must be uploaded before the application is submitted for consideration. The deadline for submission is 11:59 p.m. PDT on Aug. 2, 2010.

Questions? E-mail Andrew Leckey, Reynolds Center president, or call 602-496-9186.

Scripps awards longtime SABEW leader, blogger Roush; ASU j-dean Callahan

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

By MARK J. SCARP, SABEW Staff

PHOENIX, March 12, 2010 – Arizona State University’s journalism school’s founding dean and a University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, professor who is a former SABEW board member were respectively honored today as 2009’s journalism administrator and teacher of the year by the Scripps Howard Foundation.

callahan and roush

Chris Callahan, left, dean of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Chris Roush, a longtime SABEW leader, were given the 2010 Charles E. Scripps Award for Journalism Administration.

SABEW moved its headquarters to the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where Christopher Callahan is dean, in August. Roush, the Walter E. Hussman Sr. Distinguished Scholar in Business Journalism at North Carolina, is the author of the popular “Talking Biz News” blog presented daily on this Web site.

Both awards were bestowed in cooperation with the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Callahan, who was named founding dean of the Cronkite School in 2005, is the recipient of the Charles E. Scripps Award for Journalism Administration. The award includes the payment of $10,000.

Roush, who teaches courses he organized on business and economics reporting and the business of media at the UNC-Chapel Hill campus, is the recipient of the Charles E. Scripps Award for Journalism Education. The award also includes the payment of $10,000.

A former director of the Cronkite School – who was the school’s leader for 12 years – told Arizona State University’s ASU News Web site that when it comes to running a j-school, Callahan is in a class by himself.

“No journalism-mass communication dean at a university in the United States can match – or come close to – Chris’s accomplishments at ASU during the past five years,” Doug Anderson, dean of Pennsylvania State University’s College of Communications, told ASU News. “The strides that the school has made under his high-voltage leadership are nothing short of astonishing.”

According to the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication Web site, Roush’s economics reporting class has students tracking actual stock portfolios. In his business reporting class, students join in mock news conferences portraying both reporters and corporate CEOs.

“Chris is the kind of faculty member every dean would like to clone,” the site quoted Jean Folkerts, UNC’s journalism dean, as saying in a letter nominating Roush. “He gets excellent student evaluations. His students get real jobs.”

Roush is the author of several books on business journalism.

The honors are part of the Scripps Howard Foundation’s annual National Journalism Awards, which pay tribute to the communication industry’s and journalism education’s finest work each year.

First given in 1953, the awards are open to all U.S. news organizations and college journalism and mass communications educators and administrators. Cash awards totaling $175,000 will be presented in the competition’s 17 categories at an awards dinner April 23 during a dinner at the Tampa, Fla., Grand Hyatt hotel. The dinner will be hosted by the foundation and its corporate founder, the E.W. Scripps Co.

Nieman Foundation Journalism Awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

  • The Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism. The Nieman Foundation will present the 2009 Bingham Prize on March 4, 2010. The award honors exceptional investigative reporting of a story of national significance in which the public interest is being ill-served. The cash award for the winner is $20,000 and the deadline for applications is January 8, 2010. For more information visit: www.nieman.harvard.edu/worth-bingham-prize/. New this year: Stories published exclusively online may now be submitted for consideration for the Worth Bingham Prize if produced by a U.S. newspaper or magazine or a Web-based news organization that follows a strict code of journalistic ethics and publishes original reporting on a regular basis.
  • The Taylor Family Award for Fairness in Newspapers encourages fairness in news coverage by daily newspapers in the United States. The application deadline is February 5, 2010. The cash prize is $10,000 for the winner and $1,000 for each of the top two finalists. Full details can be found at www.nieman.harvard.edu/taylor-family-award/

Nieman Fellowships

Nieman Fellowships are awarded to working journalists of accomplishment and promise who come to Harvard University for a paid year of study, seminars and special events. New this year: The Donald W. Reynolds Nieman Fellowship in Business Journalism. The application deadline for U.S. journalists for the 2010-2011 academic year is January 31, 2009.

More information about the Nieman Fellowship program is available online at www.nieman.harvard.edu/nieman-fellowships/

The Miami Herald and Bloomberg Markets receive 2009 Barlett & Steele Awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

PHOENIX-The Miami Herald received the gold award and Bloomberg Markets magazine the silver award in the third annual Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism, the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism announced today.

“Borrowers Betrayed” by Jack Dolan, Matthew Haggman and Rob Barry of The Miami Herald received the top gold award of $5,000.

A nine-month investigation and resulting series uncovered poor oversight by Florida mortgage regulators that permitted thousands of individuals with criminal records to conduct business in the state’s home loan industry. Starting with the tragic case of a single mother who lost her home because of a crooked broker, the Herald expanded its probe to ultimately topple one of Florida’s most powerful commissioners.

“The Herald really nailed this investigation, uncovering a unique angle on the theme of the year,” the judges said in their assessment of the work. “It found a staggering degree of nonfeasance on the part of the state, bringing perpetrators to life and showing the human impact of misdeeds.”

“AARP’s Stealth Fees” by Gary Cohn and Darrel Preston of Bloomberg Markets received the silver award of $2,000.

Through public documents and scores of interviews, reporters found that the world’s largest organization for seniors collects hundreds of millions of dollars annually from insurers who pay for AARP’s endorsement of their policies. The insurance companies build this cost into premiums they charge AARP members. AARP sometimes also holds client insurance premiums as long as a month and invests the money, the reporters found.

“Beginning with a complaint by an individual AARP member, Bloomberg Markets goes on to surprise the reader with a number of revelations about an organization whose conduct and organizational lifestyle had previously been taken for granted,” the judges said.

Honorable mentions in this year’s awards are, in alphabetical order:

  • ABA Journal for “The Curious Case of Alex Latifi” by Linda Edwards;
  • The Seattle Times for “Culture of Resistance” by Michael Berens and Ken Armstrong;
  • The Wall Street Journal for “USA Inc.” by Dan Fitzpatrick, Susanne Craig, Deborah Solomon, Kate Kelly, Jon Hilsenrath, Susan Pulliam and Tom McGinty.

To view this year’s winning stories and more coverage on the Barlett & Steele Awards, visit businessjournalism.org.

“In a difficult year for the media, we were delighted to receive hard-hitting stories with surprising revelations about business in its many forms,” said Andrew Leckey, president of the Reynolds Center, which funds the awards. “The heart of the investigative journalist beats loudly in these well-researched, forcefully presented stories, and we commend both the publications and the journalists.”

The Barlett & Steele Awards, named for the famed investigative team of Donald Barlett and James Steele, were first conferred in the fall of 2007 to celebrate the best in print and online investigative business journalism. They are conducted by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, which is located at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. The Center is funded by the nonprofit Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, one of the nation’s largest philanthropic organizations, which is based in Las Vegas.

Awards will be conferred at a ceremony to be held Jan. 6, 2010, during “Reynolds Business Journalism Week” at the Cronkite School.

For further information, contact: Andrew Leckey, president, Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, 602-496-9186 or andrew.leckey@businessjournalism.org

SABEW Announces Winners of First Best of the Best Awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Nine news organizations won the first-ever Best of the Best awards from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

Two prestigious judging panels considered all winning entries in SABEW’s Best in Business contest and singled out one daily newspaper, one weekly business journal, one magazine and one website along with one enterprise story, three projects and two online entries.

Here are the winners and the judges’ comments:

Fast Company magazine for “China Storms Africa” (enterprise story)

This groundbreaking package on China’s push into Africa is an original and frankly, scary six-part story about what China is really doing, and why we in the U.S. have cause to fear the possibility of Chinese hegemony. As author Richard Behar writes, “The region is now the scene of one of the most sweeping, bare-knuckled, and ingenious resource grabs the world has ever seen.” One former U.S. assistant secretary of state describes the Chinese assault as a “tsunami.” Must reading.

The Seattle Times for “Culture of Resistance” (project)

An extremely well-done package that showed the local implications of a national problem — supergerms — that very few people realize we have. By the third day of the series, the state of Washington announced that it would require all hospitals — for the first time — to report all patient cases linked to MRSA (or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). The online presentation included a searchable database that allowed readers, researchers and others to look up individual hospitals and see how many patients each facility had treated for MRSA, year by year.

The Charlotte Observer for “The Cruelest Cuts” (project)

An example of our highest calling: comforting the afflicted while afflicting the comfortable. The investigation illustrated problems rampant in the multi-billion-dollar poultry industry, showing how one company blocked injured workers from seeing doctors, and hauled others with broken bones or severed fingers back to work hours after surgery. The stories also demonstrated how federal oversight has deteriorated. Comprehensive and well written, it should make any of us think twice before eating chicken.

Philadelphia Business Journal, “The Price of Crime” (project)

This package examining the impact of crime on the city economy covered was an extraordinary commitment for a business journal. It involved 21 pages, 22 stories, 24 photos and five graphics. The package applied business-news metrics to material that’s usually treated as just a social problem. The result put a business spotlight (and a price tag) on a major societal problem affecting all Philadelphians.

St. Petersburg Times, “Testing Grounds: Shipping Drug Trials Overseas” (online project)

Our medicine at what costs? This online series concerning the shipping of drug trials overseas is an example of the downside of globalization, in human rather than financial terms. What’s especially impressive is that it was done by a regional paper that was following up what started as a local story. It is an impressive example of investigative reporting on the web, with powerful and illuminating graphics.

The New York Times for “The Debt Trap” video (video)

Before the market crash in fall 2008, the Times used the web to bring a serious and complex story to life: that the economy was resting on a mountain of consumer debt. By telling the story through the words and images of Diane McLeod (a perfect microcosm) in simple, personal human terms, we see how the advent of widely available easy credit can destroy a perfectly fine, hardworking person who isn’t financially sophisticated.

New York Times (general excellence)

The scope and depth of the business coverage in The New York Times make it a model. Its coverage of the Sept. 13-14, 2008 weekend of financial tumult was outstanding. Few publications can devote the resources to business journalism that The Times does, but its reporters and editors made the very most of those resources in 2008.

Indianapolis Business Journal (general excellence)

This weekly newspaper offers an appealing layout and an excellent mix of coverage. A special report on a questionable residential developer was a hard-hitting investigative effort that many larger newspapers would have been proud to publish. Clear, well-written stories range beyond the business world to cover politics, sports, and the arts.

Bloomberg Markets (general excellence)

Solid reporting and analysis can be found throughout the feature well in this magazine from the Small/Regional Category. The coverage has a global perspective, but gave readers probing stories on Lehman and Washington Mutual as the financial crisis closed in on those two U.S.-based institutions. The layout is low-key, but engaging, and lets the clear prose speak for itself.

www.businessweek.com (general excellence)

Navigation on this site is made exceedingly easy. The site stood out for the judges with its fast, smooth access to its video offerings. The “What’s Your Story Idea?” and “Debate Room” features astutely tap the reader interactivity potential of the Web. The “Lifestyle” section of the site provides an inviting counterpoint to the basic business and finance coverage.

The awards were handed out Monday at the conclusion of SABEW’s Best in Business awards ceremony in Denver. To see all the Best in Business entries, visit the SABEW site at http://www.sabew.com/contest/2008/winners/winners.php

SABEW is an independent, not-for-profit organization whose mission is to encourage comprehensive reporting of economic and financial events and to upgrade the craft’s skills and knowledge through educational efforts.

SABEW is headquartered in Columbia, Mo., at the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri.

Judges comments for SABEW Best in Business Awards

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

The Society of American Business Editors and Writers has named the winners in its 12th annual Best in Business contest, which recognizes the best sections or publications, as well as the best breaking news, enterprise and projects reporting in business journalism during 2006.

The judges comments for each category are available below:

Student Contest
Student Competition Winners

Reuters
“Iraq, Afghanistan lure poor Latin American Guards” by Isabel Ordonez, University of Missouri
This was a story that judges agreed they just hadn’t read anywhere else. U.S. companies with operations in these countries are cutting costs by hiring Latin Americans with military know-how. In two months, one man said, he earned as much money guarding the U.S. Embassy in Kabul as he would earn in two years in Peru. The piece was insightful and complete. It was written during her internship for Reuters in Lima, Peru. She is a student at the Missouri School of Journalism.

Bloomberg
“Smith & Wesson, `Dirty Harry”™ Gun Maker, Targets Army” by Amy Thomson, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
This offered a well-balanced report of one company’s efforts to expand its business. The company’s strategy is to sell more .45-caliber pistols over the next 10 years. The business story was solid, packed with details and written straight-down-the-middle. We have no idea how the reporter views handguns – as it should be. The piece was written during her summer internship at Bloomberg. She’s a student at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

News Contest
Breaking News Winners

Giant Newspaper Category

The Boston Globe
“Boston Scientific’s acquisition of Guidant” by Stephen Heuser, Robert Gavin, Steven Syre, Jeffrey Krasner, Erica Noonan, Emily Shartin and Bennie DiNardo
The BSX/GDT merger was a long, drawn-out affair, yet when it closed, the hometown paper put together an exceptional package. It touched on what it meant to the industry, to the region and had a bonus for readers: a profile of the CEO, ready to go on Day 1. A sound lead brought the story home to Boston readers; so did sidebars that paid attention to details, such as what this deal means to suburban Boston, how Boston Scientific is viewed by its neighbors and even what the deal might mean to charity in the region.

The New York Times
“Google’s YouTube Deal” by Andrew Ross Sorkin, Matt Richtel, Miguel Helft and John Markoff
Great storytelling on a breaking-news piece put this story a cut above. It combined insider detail, depth and remarkable context, especially given the deadline pressures faced by staff writers. The Times saw this thoroughly modern deal for its cutting-edge significance, even if it wasn’t that big a deal in 2006 terms and if it had huge question marks over it. By paying attention to the details of language, the coverage captures the unique place Google and YouTube hold in today’s business news.

Chicago Tribune
“Board of Trade-Mercantile Exchange Merger” by Greg Burns, David Greising, Susan Chandler, Susan Diesenhouse and Julie Johnsson
The Tribune made this an international and local story, and kept the arcane world of futures accessible. This was breaking news two decades in the making – a veteran staff building institutional knowledge and unleashing it when the big news broke. Readers were the winners, enjoying a comprehensive package of stories that started online and carried into a print presentation that went from the obvious (how the deal was done) to the minute (how “regular” Chicagoans will feel the ripple effects). A succinct analysis of what it means to Chicago’s place in the trading world was a nice bow to the package.

Large Newspaper Category

San Jose Mercury News
“Inside the HP Privacy Drama” by Therese Poletti, Sarah Jane Tribble, Howard Mintz, Scott Duke Harris, Mike Langberg, Michelle Quinn, Donna Alvarado, Michele Chandler, Maria Shao and Kevin Wendt
Very strong coverage of a complicated story. Package detailed not only the events – with director profiles and a chronology to help the reader – but also explored the issue of pretexting, foreshadowing later news on the subject.

The Denver Post
“Raids at Swift Plants” by Bruce Finley, Tom McGhee, Christine Tatum, Kieran Nicholson, Greg Griffin, Kristi Arellano, David Migoya and Christopher Osher
This coverage successfully tackled two important issues – immigration and identity theft – simultaneously. An excellent example of a national story made local, with personal stories and business effects explored.

Detroit Free Press
“GM Alliance: Power Play Shakes Motor City” by Mike Ellis, John Gallagher, Ron Dzwonkowski, Jennifer Dixon, Susan Tompor and Margarita Bauza
Strong coverage from all angles, with great presentation. This is a visually impressive package: big layouts, outstanding graphics, nice photos, tons of stores.

Medium Newspaper Category

The Charlotte Observer
“Creditors, feds key to air takeover bid”Â by Steve Harrison, Rick Rothacker, Andrew Shain, Mike Drummond, Ames Alexander, Stella M. Hopkins, Christopher Kirkpatrick and Tony Mecia
This package was very strong, especially for taking a national story and saying what it means for people in Charlotte, without losing the sophistication of the national point of view. The quotes were strong, the impact was clear and the historical points of view were well done. The examples of past instances of this sort of change were well presented. The sidebars filled in with things such as the Mr. Watchdog column that answered some of the specific questions that come up for the community.

Detroit News
“Blue Friday” by Bill Vlasic, Daniel Howes, Bryce G. Hoffman, Christine Tierney, Sharon Terlep and Louis Aguilar 
The trend for the year seemed to be the shrinking center of U.S. manufacturing. This package matched the gravity and history-making nature of the event. You could not ask for a more complete coverage. You can feel the shoe leather in these stories, with reporters getting deep into the community to feel what changes in one company will do for the people, economy and city of Detroit. The writing avoids the cliché and moves easily between the global implications and the family stresses.

Detroit News
“New Ford CEO” by Bill Vlasic, Daniel Howes, Bryce G. Hoffman, Christine Tierney, Josee Valcourt and Sharon Terlep 
This package showed off the paper’s deep sources and brought the reader into the board room. It did this without assuming any knowledge or going over the heads of more readers. The writing was strong and clear and told the story quickly and easily. The surprising nature of this move means the team had to hustle, and they did. The sidebars elaborated on points such as the differences between the auto industry and Boeing and the dangers of bringing an outsider into a club like the auto makers.

Small Newspaper Category

The Morning Call (Allentown, Pa.) 
“Agere Bought Out” by Kurt Blumenau and Sam Kennedy
Kurt Blumenau’s main story was comprehensive and authoritative, demonstrating knowledge about the chip industry, individual companies involved and the local economic implications of the deal. Blumenau questioned whether the merger would have the results espoused by the two companies and was rightly skeptical about whether this truly represented a “merger” vs. a takeover. Despite including commentary about Agere’s “brief, disappointing life”, the writer included views from all of the major constituents – Agere and LSI officials, Agere employees and Wall Streets sell – and buy sides – which were presented in a balanced fashion. Sam Kennedy’s sidebar “Similarities between Agere, LSI only go so far” backed up Blumenau’s questioning of the companies”™ proposed $125 million cost-saving figure target and provided good historical information about both firms. The accompanying frontpage graphics “Comparing the Companies” and Agere “Through the Years” provided quick and handy reference for readers with less familiarity with the companies and Agere’s history.

The Wichita Eagle
“Beechcraft is Back” by Jerry Siebenmark
Judges were impressed by the depth of research and reporting that went into such a quick turnaround for the story of Beechcraft’s private equity deal. The overall package was impressive with just about every conceivable angle covered. The writing in the main piece was creative and clear and the accompanying graphics and pictures added to the comprehensive feel of the coverage. The Wichita Eagle’s coverage was particularly impressive given the regular beat reporter was on vacation when the story broke. The quality of the coverage in such a “scramble situation” is a testament to the professionalism and talent of all involved in putting together the package.

Press-Register (Mobile, Ala.) 
“Prichard Wins” by Kathy Jumper, Andy Netzel and Mark Inabinett
Kathy Jumper’s main story Pritchard, Ala. being declared the site of a new motor sports complex was crisply written and, along with the accompanying graphic, provided the reader with all the relevant information in any easily digestible form. Jumper’s “just the facts ma”™am” reporting was only enhanced by a strong sidebar by Andy Netzel. While also adhering to a straightforward style, Netzel’s story provided the “human angle” of the story, but did so in an evenhanded way. Rather than pandering to the potential “victims” of the race track, the story contained comments from several local constituencies – critics and supporters alike – while addressing the broader economic impact of the news. Mark Inabinett’s sports-section cover story took yet another angle to the story: the impact the planned new complex would have on existing area raceways. The surprising slant of the story was many of the “mom and pop” race track operators were upbeat about the news of a potential “big league” competitor.

Business Weekly Category

Advertising Age
“Unruly Julie and the Scandal that Rocked the Ad World” by Matthew Creamer
This was such an engaging subject. And the thing you took away from this package was that this was much deeper than the news event – it was about a clash of cultures and Wal-Mart wanting to break out of itself and not being able to. The writing was not only flashy, it was authoritative. The sidebars were well-conceived and comprehensive. And how do you miss with booze, bribery and sex?

Dallas Business Journal
“HUD Secretary’s Blunt Warning” by Christine Perez
It was gutsy that the Dallas Business Journal went with the story, and then it broke nationally. This has become part of a national conversation about cronyism in the Bush Administration. So we gave them credit for showing up and for seeing the outrageousness of what he was saying. And the story had good balance and was fairly written.

Real-Time Category

Bloomberg News
“Bill Ford Makes Way for Mulally” by Bill Koenig, Rachel Layne, John Lippert, James Gunsalus, Peter Robison and Gillian Wee
Our criteria for this category included whether an entry had strong detail and analytical prescience. This entry had both. There wasn’t much redundancy throughout the package, and the Herb Kelleher interview was a score. Most of all, the package offered a peak behind the curtain. Ford is a behemoth that guards itself pretty carefully. To have a look at its power struggle within was interesting.

News Contest
Enterprise Winners

Giant Newspaper Category

New York Times
“Very Rich Are Leaving the Merely Rich Behind” by Louis Uchitelle
Kudos to the New York Times and Louis Uchitelle for giving us an insightful and realistic look into what makes a growing number of professionals decide to leave their chosen professions for much more lucrative ones. Whether you agree or disagree with the reasoning, the author writes it in a way that stimulates further discussion. Mr. Uchitelle has a tremendous capacity to weave a story and get people to speak openly and frankly about such a delicate subject like personal financial compensation.

The Philadelphia Inquirer
“Philadelphia Baggage Story” by Tom Belden and Craig R. McCoy
Tom Belden and Craig R. McCoy give you an excellent description of what happens to luggage going from Philadelphia’s airport. Added to that you have excellent photos and graphics that depict the customer frustrations as well as a timeline of how US Airways was doing in relationship with their airline counterparts. It also explains how an airline going through bad financial times can have a massive trickle down effect to its customers. It makes a reader want to inquire further to see if conditions have changed in a year’s time.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“Insurance Injustice – When Credit Matters” by Carrie Teegardin and Ann Hardie
This entry not only told a story but should make every business editor in this country take notice and say – “Is this happening in my town?” These two reporters questioned something we take for granted and probably never question in life. It is modern day red lining at its best. This is truly a buyer beware story with excellent historical documentation and statistical material to back up their story. I would have liked to see more anecdotes. And being able to see the photos would have been a plus.

Large Newspaper Category

The Oregonian (Portland, Ore.) 
“Millions for rural health miss mark” by Joe Rojas-Burke
This is terrific enterprise work. The Oregonian’s well-told tale shows how affluent doctors are getting millions in state funds that were meant to help small-town doctors pay their malpractice premiums. To make this tale even richer, the reporter’s search of real estate records showed how one plastic surgeon receiving the state subsidy lives in an 11,000-square-foot, 11-bedroom house.

The Denver Post
“The Gospel of Prosperity” by Eric Gorksi
This takes readers inside the empire of Heritage Christian Center, a church where welcoming sinners has created a lavish lifestyle for Bishop Dennis Leonard. The reporting is exhaustive, revealing conflicts such as sweetheart deals that diverted funds from low-income housing projects to the Bishop’s family. It’s a fascinating portrait of how mega-churches work as mega-businesses. And it’s written without hype, allowing the readers to draw their own conclusions.

Medium Newspaper Category

The Charlotte Observer
“Suspicious Timing” by Binyamin Appelbaum
Figuring out whether any local companies backdated stock options is a daunting task, requiring exhaustive research through hundreds of documents. The Observer was up to the challenge, and actually identified a company that was soon forced to admit it had a problem. It was enterprise work at its finest.

Austin American-Statesman
“Pension fund scheme” by Robert Elder
Tax schemes aren’t just for Wall Street high rollers. Sometimes a local pension plan gets into the act. Austin wasn’t afraid to wrestle with a complex topic and demonstrate that a local firefighter’s pension was ensnared in shady doings.

The Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Va.) 
“Life after Ford” by Jeremiah McWilliams 
Hazelwood, Missouri learned a few years ago that its Ford assembly plant would be shut down, and Norfolk got the same message in early 2006. So The Virginian-Pilot’s Jeremiah McWilliams went to Hazelwood to see how its experiences could instruct Norfolk. In a deeply-reported story, he laid out the anguish that comes with a closing. But he also found workers who had used the shutdown to favorably remake their lives.

Small Newspaper Category

The Gazette
“Money Enthusiast Group Has Troubles With – Money” by Debbie Kelley 
Kelley’s story had irresistible irony: The American Numismatic Association, the main American coin-collecting body, was excelling at losing money. Kelley delved into turmoil at the ANA, one of only two federally chartered nonprofits in the U.S. She dug up tax documents and talked with former employees to tell a story of mismanagement, including the executive director’s campaign to secure loyalty oaths from employees, at the 115-year old group. Her piece was a colorful and enjoyable read.

Arizona Daily Star
“Squeezing Border Business” by Brady McCombs 
The first in a sweeping series, McComb’s story dove into the searing national debate over illegal immigration. The story lucidly explained that the costs of attempting to seal the border would be vast, including billions for extra fencing, surveillance equipment and extra border guards. It explored cost overruns of past, more modest efforts. And the piece examined how vulnerable American businesses could be if the border were sealed. The story took on a difficult and emotional subject and brought it into the realm of dollars, cents, and sense.

Lexington Herald-Leader
“Inklings of Change” by Scott Sloan

As the newspaper industry faces declining readership, falling advertising and shareholder revolts, many local newspapers are in for hard times. Sloan’s story made sense of the larger trends and brought them home to local readers of his newspaper, the Lexington-Herald Leader, a jewel in the crown of the then-independent Knight-Ridder. The effects of years of pressure? The paper was smaller. It could no longer staff some bureaus. The travel budget had been tightened. Sloan’s piece boldly scrutinized a subject most newspapers avoid: Themselves.

Business Weekly Category

Indianapolis Business Journal
“The Ties that Blind?” by Matthew Kish
This was a fine piece of investigative financial journalism about how a local company called Marsh Supermarkets was running into difficulty because of conflicts of interests on the board level. While problems were being blamed on the great boogey man, Wal-Mart, in this case it just wasn’t so.

Crain’s Chicago Business
“Long hours at the nuke plants” by Steve Daniels
Crain’s senior reporter Steve Daniels dug deeply into the causes of a string of accidents at Illinois nuclear plants and came up with the behind the scenes story. One of the reasons for the mishaps: the operator had been cutting costs, including those for maintenance. Solid work for a worthy cause.

Financial Week
“Inside Google” by Matthew Quinn
We probably thought we had heard it all about the overly-successful Internet search engine. But this story sheds new light on the complications that financial success can bring. And while Google can probably handle the threat of being declared a mutual fund because of its $10 billiion in case this tale is still well worth telling.

Real-Time Category

Bloomberg News
“MBIA Debt Backed by Crack Houses Perpetuates Blight” by Christine Richard
This story got results. When the city of Pittsburgh found out through Christine Richard’s article that MBIA, the nation’s largest bond insurer, held tax liens on thousands of abandoned properties it moved to correct the problem.

Dow Jones News Service
“IN THE MONEY: Wrigley Bulks Up Takeover Defenses” by Steven D. Jones
This piece explained the complicated story of special shares and special interests. The writer, Steven D. Jones, handled the in and outs of Wrigley’s special stock arrangements with ease.

Bankrate, Inc.
“Suspicious Activity Reports” by Laura Bruce
Journalists love catching the government being overly aggressive in monitoring its citizens. And that’s what Bankrate reporter Laura Bruce discovered in this piece about post-Sept. 11 activities.

News Contest
Project Winners

Giant Newspaper Category

Wall Street Journal
“Perfect Payday” by Charles Forelle, James Bandler, Mark Maremont, and Steve Stecklow

First-class watchdog journalism. This work shows why it takes more than a few bloggers to police the corporate world. In this case, reporters employed highly refined investigative skills to unravel a complex story, one that is important to anyone who owns a share of stock.

New York Times
“Leaky Oil Royalties” by Edmund L. Andrews
Kudos for taking a big story of the day and slicing off a piece others didn’t think to explore. In the end, readers were able to learn in very clear fashion that mismanagement of oil and gas royalty programs has been costing their government millions. It doesn’t get much better than that.

Chicago Tribune
“Throwaway Workers” by Stephen Franklin and Darnell Little
You have to love how this story is told so directly and firmly. It clearly hammers home a story about illegal immigrant workers that people need to read. Many newspapers have written about these workers, but few have told the story of how they are often used up and thrown away, with none of the protections U.S. workers normally receive.

Large Newspaper Category

The Denver Post
“Foreclosing on the American Dream” by David Olinger, Greg Griffin, Aldo Svaldi and Jeffrey Roberts
The Denver Post, for its prescient and well-written series describing the disruptive rise of mortgage failures in Colorado, compromising the dream of home ownership.

The Sacramento Bee
“The Price of Access” by Sam Stanton and Marjie Lundstrom
The Sacramento Bee, for its careful and disturbing look at a small number of lawyers in California who specialize in bringing questionable or completely meritless lawsuits under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The Kansas City Star
“It’s hot fuel for you, cold cash for big oil” by Steve Everly
The Kansas City Star, for a surprising expose on how the oil industry has reaped many millions in undeserved profits while shortchanging American motorists at the gas pump with the widespread use of “hot gas.”

Medium Newspaper Category

Tampa Tribune
“A Rapid Rise” by Shannon Behnken
This series was an original, well-researched take on the housing boom, about a great central character who was just too good at selling houses for very high prices. It captured the broader impact that this agent’s sales – in particular, the high market values – had on the neighborhoods where they occurred. It also brought to light some of the problems investors could have in trying to cash in on Florida’s hot housing market. The topic prompted reaction and action, with agency investigations and suspicious property sales being discovered across the state of Florida.

The Seattle Times
“China: Customer and Competitor” by Kristi Heim and Alwyn Scott
This project offered a beautifully written, compelling look at this complex country halfway around the world. The cataloguing of rampant piracy – its drawbacks, benefits and universal, intractable presence – was presented in a way that illustrated the complexity of the issues. And the portrait of Susie Cheng’s life was an excellent humanization of the booming Chinese economy. Traveling to her rural village and explaining how she worked her way up to her managerial position showed readers what life is like in red-hot China.

The Charlotte Observer
“Hiding in Plain Sight” by Stella M. Hopkins, Mitch Weiss, Binyamin Appelbaum, Rick Rothacker, Franco Ordonez, Liz Chandler, Tim Funk and Peter St. Onge
This project offered fresh angles on a story that has gotten a large amount of publicity in the past year. The reporters came up with stories of real relevance, such as payment of illegal immigrants using tax dollars and eligibility for workers-compensation, and paid tribute to the national scope of the issue. In particular, the article about the Washington farmer and the Oaxaca immigrant who used his Social Security number humanized the issue of how to absorb immigrants into U.S. society.

Small Newspaper Category

Sun Journal
“Seeing Green” by Carol Ann Coultas
Ambitious, relevant and tough assessment of the critical local paper industry, relating how South America stole the competitive momentum, and what Maine has to do to recover – if it’s not too late. Demonstrated a major investment in resources and staff time, ingenuity in securing a grant to help with financing, substantial research and dedication, spiced by lively personal impressions of the journalists”™ trip to South America. A lot of bigs: idea, research, effort and service to the community.

The Herald
“Our Fading Fleet” by Michael J. Benbow
Effectively, at times emotionally, weaves historical vignettes describing how an industry built a community and helped, as the writers put it, “feed the world with the bounty of the Puget Sound.” Very difficult to put down the dramatic stories of the fishermen, their families and their hard lives – and deaths – at sea. Where a day’s catch once paid for a house, today’s sad reality is exemplified by five fishermen splitting a “bounty” of only $79 for a long day of backbreaking work. Facts, perspective, people, clearly presented through well-chosen words, old photos and fresh graphics.

The Herald
“Worldwide Assembly Line” by Bryan Corliss
Globalization is dramatically presented through the cockpit of a major new Boeing aircraft. What at first looks like a triumph for U.S. industry really isn’t totally so, which the writers prove by stripping back the skin of this new plane; rather, it is a hybrid triumph, with a number of nations getting some of the economic action. Very good detail, in words and graphics, on an economic shift of critical importance to the U.S. economy – and the economy of the paper’s area. Penetrates well beneath the issue’s veneer.

Business Weekly Category

Puget Sound Business Journal
“Bold Flight: Creating the Boeing 787″ by Steve Wilhem
Superior storytelling enabled by excellent sourcing. Wilhelm has obviously built trust with multiple sources inside the company. The result is one delicious anecdote after another, telling details that put readers in the room as decisions are being made and a narrative that keeps moving. This is a story you can’t put down until the very end. Should be required reading for anyone who covers a company.

Crain’s Chicago Business
“Doing Business in China: Enter the Dragon” by Thomas Mucha, Mark Scheffler, Erik Unger and Melissa Phee
Compelling. Well-written. Witty. This package from Crain’s had it all. This was a substantial commitment by a weekly and it paid off for readers. The team brought skepticism to its reporting; explored the relationship between U.S. business and the Chinese government and offered anecdotes that brought the business dealings to life (now we know why Hyatt is branded Yue). Stunning visuals.

The South Florida Biz Journal
“Water Woes” by Susan Stabley
The implications of South Florida’s water problems are huge and this entry does a superb job of: explaining how things got this way, what it will take to make things better and the price that the area will pay if it doesn’t get fixed. The writing is on target, mixing data, history and anecdote to good effect. The ledes in particular are smart and compelling. Good use of documentation – as in finding the SEC filing that showed a developer’s financial incentive to get a buffer zone modified to allow a project to go forward.

Real-Time Media Category

Bloomberg News
“Slaves in Amazon Forced to Make Materials Used in GM, Toyota Cars” by Michael Smith and David Voreacos
This entry is in a class by itself. The reporters combined extensive reporting and documentation to show how the products of slave labor in South America are bought and turned into cars, appliances and windows in the U.S. The story telling is as exquisite as the scenes are atrocious. If anyone says business journalism is boring, show them these stories. If anyone says journalism can’t make a difference, show these stories.

Bloomberg News
“Duping Main Street” by Martin Z. Braun, David Dietz, William Selway, Christine Richard and Darrell Preston

These reporters uncover a national scandal that is as local as it gets – the municipal bond. These stories build on Bloomberg’s earlier work on how banks profit through municipal bond deals. The reporting is thorough, the territory covered wide. These are business stories that any taxpayer will find compelling.

Dow Jones News Service
Mortgage Finance” by Lingling Wei
Most papers are writing this story now. Dow Jones got ahead of it. This is an important story that papers will follow for years to come. The reporter’s knowledge of the industry shines through while her writing makes the report accessible to all. She simply and succinctly explains the subprime meltdown, and then goes beyond the officials and consumer advocates to find the people hurt by the numbers game being played by the subprime industry. Multiple angles are explored that take this entry beyond explanatory journalism.

News Contest
Column Winners

Giant Newspaper Category

The Boston Globe
Steve Bailey
Possessing the brain of a business columnist and the heart of a metro columnist, Steve Bailey is a double threat. He cares for his town and can write about outsized characters and perform columnist theater with the best. But he also gets the numbers, which often reveal truths beyond the ken of metro scribes. Bailey shamed Gov. Mitt Romney’s passiveness on job growth by traveling to Fairhaven, Mass., where the governor had ignored 185 at-risk AT&T jobs. Great piece on concessionaire Aramark’s decision to start fingerprinting its low-paid, overworked Fenway workers. And he surprised the Middlesex Retirement System fat cats by showing up at their own Florida junket, scaring them into paying their own way.

The New York Times
Gretchen Morgenson
Morgenson writes with confidence, wit and indignation, a combination that is particularly potent when she backs up her allegations with the solid facts. She manages to present a numbers-driven analysis in a thoughtful and readable way. Nowhere is that more evident than when she takes on the issue of corporate pay. In one column, she detailed the myriad of ways that United Airlines executives were lining their pockets as they emerged from bankruptcy. In another, she took the Business Roundtable to task for a glowing report portraying executive pay as reasonable while ignoring add-ons such as dividends paid on restricted stock.

Wall Street Journal
Alan Murray
Alan Murray can make national news with his chronicles of intrigue in the Hewlett-Packard boardroom, or softly engage with his analysis of how two CEOs are “the Cain and Able of the corporate world.” You can’t beat a combination of hard-news impact and style.

Large Newspaper Category

The Denver Post
Al Lewis
These were compelling columns, well-written and conceived. Each provided either an unusual take on an on-going news story (his “tour” of Kozlowski’s billionaire log cabin) or truly compelling news break of his own making (Qwest employees”™ decision to end their lives ahead of the expiration of their retiree life insurance). By the end, I was eagerly anticipating the next column to see what else awaited me.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Mitchell Schnurman

These are exceptionally well-reported columns, rich with sources, detail and analysis. They”™re also well-written, relevant and significant.

Plain Dealer
Sheryl Harris
These columns stood out as being particularly original and useful, from her Hispanics issues column to her shocking take on telephone bad debt abusers. These columns took some well-plowed ground and seeded it effectively and, at times, dramatically.

Medium Newspaper Category

The Seattle Times
Brier Dudley
In technology savvy Seattle, tech columnist Brier Dudley likely could find an audience merely by pitching his copy at the geek-erati. Instead, his pieces hit home with the average reader, but without condescending, i.e. likening what the internet could do to the newspaper business to “watching the Incas greet the Spanish conquistadors in 1528.” Solid work.

Des Moines Register
David Elbert
It’s hard to find a buried lede or a hedged opinion in an Elbert column. Last rites for Iowa’s quixotic rain forest project were said and done by Elbert’s second line, and you were delighted to read on to get details. His contrarian piece on the failure of big state incentives to save jobs at a Maytag plant began this way: “Government can’t do everything, and there are times when it should do nothing. This week we saw a bad example of government trying to do too much. Fortunately, it failed.” Elbert’s columns are also well reported, as demonstrated by his Kafkaesque tale of Pella flack who lost her job when a lying co-worker told stories to superiors.

San Antonio Express-News
David Hendricks
One true measure of a columnist is picking topics keen to one’s local economy. Hendrick’s was driven and focused on that benchmark in San Antonio. His columns tuned into such issues as corporate reticence over the immigration hot-button and the troubled North American Development Bank in San Antonio. He was particularly aggressive urging federal help for the development bank, delineating border projects that could be lost if the bank was forced to close. In a third column, Hendricks weighed in on the Shakespearean-like Enron debacle with some harsh criticism of an unrepentant Ken lay who died in Aspen’s “playground of the rich, as a ruined, bitter and disillusioned man.”

Small Newspaper Category

Tacoma News Tribune
Dan Voelpel
A unique and original perspective on companies and issues that are important to his local community. These are quite unique stores, each told in a compelling fashion and attention to detail and color, but each with an important business point as well.

The Patriot Ledger
Jon Chesto
Interesting takes on important local issues. From cell service the Big Dig to the revival of HoJos (originally a Quincy invention), to a successor to Tower Records, he has chosen quirky issues that have an interesting perspective.

Ledger-Enquirer
Susan Miller
These quirkily, personal columns each tell small businesses (and executives of larger companies as well) some interesting lessons about how to succeed at all levels.

Business Weekly Category

Crain’s New York Business
Alair Townsend
Alair Townsend skewers the excesses of state and city government, and drills into complex subjects like city budgeting and mandatory health insurance. As a publisher and former city official, she also brings a rare perspective. She criticized a Hewlett-Packard director for “dribbling out his gripes to the press. All the furor that followed was because of this fact. It was the original sin.” Agree or disagree, her crisp, tart tone reminds us of the late Molly Ivins – if Ivins were reborn as a conservative, pro-business New Yorker.

Indianapolis Business Journal
“There Ought to Be a Law” by Ron Gifford
Ron Gifford isn’t a journalist, and he doesn’t pretend to be one. “My name is Ron G.,” he wrote in the Indianapolis Business Journal. “And I”™m a registered lobbyist.” With insight and flair, Gifford used his column to bring readers inside Indiana politics, from jury selection to the class-action business. Most trenchantly, he warned readers to take concerns about electronic voting seriously. What’s the acronym for the new Help America Vote Act? “HAVA – as in “˜HAVA lot of fun trying to figure out how to spend billions of dollars on voting machines that don’t work and raise suspicions about stolen elections.”

Real-Time Media Category

Bloomberg News
“What the Money Culture Breeds” by Michael Lewis
Michael Lewis”™ work makes you laugh out loud, and it makes you think. In one column, he took readers inside the financial markets and inside one of the biggest stories of the early 21st century: the enormous fortunes being made by people who were already doing very well. “One of the miracles of Wall Street,” he wrote, “is its ability to create a class system without class resentment.” At Barnes & Noble these days, Lewis may pass for an extremely successful sportswriter, but his column betrays his roots, and business readers are thankful for it.

Dow Jones Newswires
“In the Money” by Michael Rapoport
Michael Rapoport has a rare talent for finding the financial details that make a big difference. With Blockbusters and Netflix, it was the separate ways they accounted for DVDs. With Google, it was the tax bite that was less taxing than advertised. In the Alcatel-Lucent merger, he showed how Alcatel was worth twice as much. One fact that elevated Michael’s work in the eyes of the judges: They covered some of the same stories themselves, and they still learned a lot from him.

MarketWatch
David Callaway
David Callaway brings an urgency to real-time column-writing that sets his work apart. Hours after Ken Lay’s unexpected death, he wrote about the scorned businessman with insight, perspective and compassion. David’s ambition alone vaults him to the top of the class. He also gets bonus points for sticking to the right length for a column. And when he defended the leakers in the Hewlett-Packard spy scandal, his passion was contagious. “I could work for this guy,” said one judge.

Overall Excellence
Section Contest Winners

Giant Newspaper Category

The New York Times 
For an exceptionally well reported and smartly written section with an unparalleled variety of stories, analysis, and commentary on finance, economics, and business. The Times effectively uses its vast resources to give readers in-depth coverage of Wall Street and corporate deal making as well as a true global perspective on business.

The Star-Ledger (Newark, N.J.) 
For a sharply written and edited section with a highly appealing balance of local and national news and personal finance information. A potential business-school case study on what one can do with limited resources, this section consistently produced top-rate enterprise reporting, reader service and infographics.

USA Today 
For a consistently interesting and informative business section that used straight-forward no-nonsense writing, innovative graphics and a smart-looking presentation to provide a quality experience for the reader.

Certificates of Merit

Houston Chronicle
For blanket spot, sidebar and column coverage of the trials of Enron executives Ken Lay and Jeff Skilling, a hometale tale that was also one of the country’s most important business stories in 2006.

The Arizona Republic
For consistently strong coverage of local business and the local economy.

Large Newspaper Category

Fort Worth Star-Telegram
For its excellent enterprise reporting, as shown by the paper’s investigation into Radio Shack’s CEO and a series of stories about a complicated regulatory issue, the Wright Amendment. These are just two examples of the paper’s smart, explanatory news coverage as well as engaging, narrative storytelling. This is a business section that understands how to make local company stories come alive for average readers, and distill complex issues down to news consumers can use. These sections also make clear that the paper’s reporters reflexively ask hard questions of the companies they cover (e.g. the Alcon story) and that they have a deep reserve of inside sources/contacts.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
For its ability to tell compelling, local business stories that have broader, national implications (wine and spirits coverage) as well as its general coverage that hits on all levels of the business community. A profile of Tower Automotive does a nice job of mirroring larger factory layoff trends, while the Superior refinery piece paints a vivid picture of the tough tradeoffs businesses face today. The Black Gold feature is a powerful example of how a regional paper can find, and skillfully tell, a local story as it relates to a much bigger international theme. Well-researched art and story summaries further elevate the section.

San Jose Mercury News
For outstanding business coverage that looks both ahead and back (Apple), giving readers deep insights into the tech-heavy market in which they live. Sophisticated writing, graphics and packages make the paper sing verbally and visually. The coverage, notably, is far from limited in its tone. The paper proves how cultural trends, consumer behavior – as well as changing job markets and human folly (HP leaks) – are all topics that can shine brilliantly through a business prism. The number of entries with starts on A1 is impressive, and demonstrates all of the above.

Medium Newspaper Category

Des Moines Register
We chose this paper because of its clear dedication to serving its audience: Farm Belt readers, with most stories targeted to such topics as agriculture, crop prices and energy. The writing was solid, the layout generally clean, and the reporting focused and highly localized. Such columns as the “Washington Farm Report” showed that this business section knows its audience and its needs. The business staff also regularly produced solid A-1 offerings, including an attention-grabbing A-1 feature on a “virtual businessman,” operating from Iowa.

Detroit News
This paper had a great deal of breaking news and analysis on last year’s developments in the auto industry, which led to very strong local section fronts and A-1 packages, both on mandatory dates as well as those their editors selected. While the paper had a built-in advantage because of auto industry turmoil, they made very good use of the opportunity with smart reporting, photography and graphics. The writing had an authoritative voice on developments, and they went beyond these to offer useful Personal Finance advice for those considering whether to take buyout packages, for instance, and on the overall economic effects that the auto industry changes would likely produce. The business fronts also used headlines boldly and weren’t afraid to “grade” the importance of news for readers.

Hartford Courant
We chose this paper in part because of their smart, comprehensive coverage of the insurance, aerospace and defense industries in their region, both in the Business section and on A-1. The paper “owned” the Allstate story, a story breaking in their backyard. The Business section layouts were clean, graphics often compelling, solid writing and we saw good evidence of project reporting. And the section kept a business-trained eye on the statehouse and Congress, as evidenced by a smart Business front story written just after the November election by the paper’s Washington bureau chief on the interesting role Connecticut’s Chris Dodd will play as chairman of the Senate Banking Committee as he tries to still win backing from the state’s insurance and banking interests as he considers a run for the White House. 

The Seattle Times
This paper did it all: Covered the region’s technology, aerospace and other industries comprehensively and with creativity in the Business section and on A-1, made good use of graphics, photo and layout, provided useful Personal Finance and Personal Technology coverage and had some A-1 enterprise work as well. The layouts were clean and crisp and the writing was clear and decisive. The Business staff also did a good job of covering the potential implications of geopolitical and global economic events – particularly in China and the Far East – on Seattle’s businesses and economy. One judge put it well: “The paper used graphics to augment its reporting, lift-out quotes and other devices that really gave the readers a lot of information in a way that wasn’t overwhelming.”

South Florida SunSentinel
This paper impressed the judges by its coverage of two national issues in a highly localized way that brought home the importance of the story to readers. The first issue was the housing bust. Through stories on the section front, the paper’s Monday business section and on A-1, the paper covered the effects of the slump through real stories and by the numbers, but also were ahead of the curve on discussing the potential implications for the overall economy. The second national story the paper effectively localized was white-collar crime, which it covered from a consumer perspective in its Monday section, and then through a twice-monthly column on the subject. The paper’s section fronts were generally attractively designed, made good use of photos and graphics, and were highly local.

Certificates of Merit

Salt Lake Tribune
For its Feb. 16 A-1 story on Questar subpoenas going out to customers and shareholders who criticized the company over high heating bills. The lede said it all: “If you”™re a concerned Questar Gas customer or shareholder, don’t be surprised if late one night a sheriff shows up on your porch, hammering on the door with one fist and gripping a subpoena from the company in the other.”

St. Paul Pioneer Press
For its April 14 revealing and forward-thinking centerpiece story (and continuing coverage of) of what will likely happen to 1,900 workers and the local economy when the Ford assembly plant in St. Paul closes in two years.

The Tennessean
For its comprehensive and spirited coverage (taking up the top half of A-1 and four pages inside) on July 25 of HCA going private. The paper looked at the key players, including the family of then Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist; the effects on shareholders, workers and patients, and the larger implications for the industry and the local economy.
Small Newspaper Category

Florida Today (Melbourne, Fla.) 
The depth and breadth of business coverage published throughout the newspaper demonstrated a clear commitment to financial journalism that exceeded all other entries. The story selection showed a clear understanding of their audience and an effort to tailor the news to their readership. The public service quality of many reports stood out, in particular the report on 9-11 loans that ended up going to many companies with no clear impact from the terrorist attacks and the series on hurricane insurance costs. The diverse and abundant coverage was enhanced with presentation that was newsy yet appealing. The design of pages and story packages offered a good balance of graphics and photos that helped create a lively and inviting reader experience. From comprehensive analysis pieces to daily fare on the housing market, development and consumer issues, the Florida Today team somehow managed to deliver more local news than you”™d expect from a paper their size.

Roanoke Times (Roanoke, Va.) 
The reporters and editors of the Roanoke Times take an ambitious approach to reporting and writing that goes well beyond the press releases and takes a deeper look at the issues and news from their business community. Writing is clearly their strength. The compelling details stood out in their coverage of the use of restraints in nursing homes and the storytelling in the Burned Alive package captured the suffering behind a work-related accident without sensationalizing the case. The Roanoke Times business team clearly makes a consistent effort to humanize business news and make it relevant to everyday readers.

The Press Democrat (Santa Rosa, Calif.) 
This business section delivers an intelligent mix of national and local stories, so that readers don’t need to go anywhere else to know what’s happening in the business world. Yet they are clearly in tune with the interests of their local readership. Their section covers and overall design complement their solid news judgment by offering a clean and attractive presentation. The details and supporting information is readily available and accessible and the packages have an appropriate balance of images and stories. And they demonstrated an instinct for originality that gives readers a reason to turn to their pages for national news – such as the archive photo presentation of Bill Gates to remind readers of the “kid” behind the empire.

Certificate of Merit

Post and Courier (Charleston, S.C.) 
The Post and Courier team delivered two standout entries that deserve recognition. Their coverage of the expansion of the Panama Canal did an outstanding job of explaining the local relevance of an international issue. And the storytelling that went into the train tragedy transition piece delivers a powerful narrative that is on par with some of the best writers in the country.

Business Weekly Category

Advertising Age
This splashy weekly is fun to read, full of color, graphics and crisp writing. Advertising age offers an entertaining blend of must-read insider stories with topical industry news about advertising winners and losers and what it will cost to advertise on NBC during the 2008 Summer Olympics. “Unruly Julie and the scandal that rocked the ad world” dissected in detail the rise and fall of Julie Roehm, Wal-Mart’s unlikely marketing chief whose firing was first disclosed in Ad Age.

Baltimore Business Journal
This journal appealed not only to CEOs but also to average Joes. Its series, “Higher wages, higher risks,” astutely looked at the risks and rewards that illegal immigrants face as they work in manual labor jobs in the United States at an increasing rate. Another piece, “Riding the rails,” wove together personal stories of commuters who have eschewed cars for public transportation. The journal has a bright and breezy page 2 (Girl Scout cookie sales down; video rentals up with the onset of winter) and useful standing features. Crisp headlines and a clean design make it visually appealing, too.

Crain’s Chicago Business
This journal was very polished and readable. It had a solid grasp on key industries and companies in Chicago and paid particular attention to those in flux, like United Airlines and Tribune Co. Particularly noteworthy was its focus on corporate giving, “Too many mouths to feed?” which looked at recent drops in charitable giving in Illinois. Other good work included its in-depth examination of doing business in China, a piece about Target’s expansion in Chicago, and a story on the battle between Crate & Barrel and a company created by the son of its founder. Its design was clever with strong graphics and good headlines.

Louisville Business First
It’s tough to keep a business weekly in a small market fresh and interesting, but Louisville Business First rises to the challenge. Its ambitious, three-part series on the inner workings of UPS, Louisville’s largest employer, is one example of enterprising, well-written and edited stories that consistently appear in Business First. The journal’s design is clean, centerpieces are strong, and inside features, such as “What’s in Store” and “BizTrends” are entertaining and colorful. A story on minority entrepreneurs and a special section on business women in Louisville show a commitment to reporting on diversity in the local business community.

Certificates of Merit

Boston Business Journal
This weekly offers a good mix of news and features highlighting the key economic drivers of Boston: higher education, health care, high-tech and real estate. The writing is a cut above many other business journals, but what distinguishes the Boston Business Journal most is an intentional focus on women, minority and young businesspeople. One front page featured two stories about women – one an up-and-coming Hispanic banker, the other a failed dot.com CEO.

Puget Sound Business Journal
This weekly consistently published enterprising stories. Its “Bold Flight” series took a thoughtful look at the creation of Boeing’s 787 jetliner. Its technology startups special section used clever “Light bulb moments” to spotlight interesting innovations in easy-to-read nuggets. The journal also did a good job covering real estate and the University of Washington as a business.

Street and Smith’s Sports Business Journal
This journal dissects the sports business, examining the far-flung and competing commitments of NASCAR drivers and whether NFL games could resuscitate NBC’s ratings. This glitzy publication has an elegant cover with an appealing index, but it was sometimes a little busy inside. And it had a good plan for reader interaction, even devoting an issue to reader favorites (game analyst, sport-themed movie) and least favorites (Tampa Bay Devil Rays uniforms, for example). It was perhaps more fun than insightful, but it let the readers know they mattered.

2005 News: Gerald Loeb Awards Winners Announced by UCLA Anderson School of Management

Posted By Spring Eselgroth

Byron E. “Barney” Calame of The New York Times Receives Lifetime Achievement Award and Lawrence Minard Editor Award goes to Timothy K. Smith of Fortune

NEW YORK, June 27, 2005 “” Journalists from across the nation gathered tonight at New York City’s Cipriani 42nd Street for the 2005 Gerald Loeb Awards Banquet, celebrating the best of business, financial and economic journalism. The Loeb Awards, considered the most prestigious honor in business journalism, recognize those journalists whose contributions to the industry illuminate the world of business and finance for readers and viewers around the world.

Bruce Willison, dean of UCLA Anderson School of Management and chairman of the G. and R. Loeb Foundation, welcomed Loeb Awards honorees and their guests. Lou Dobbs, anchor and managing editor of CNN’s “Lou Dobbs Tonight” and a Loeb Awards final judge, served as the master of ceremonies.

The Loeb Awards gives two special awards for career contributions, the Lifetime Achievement Award, which was given to Byron E. “Barney” Calame, public editor, The New York Times, and the Lawrence Minard Editor Award, which went to Timothy K. Smith, assistant managing editor, Fortune. In addition, there are 9 competition categories in which the winners were named at the banquet. Following is the list of 2005 Loeb Awards recipients, along with brief synopses of their award-winning work.

Large Newspaper Winner

Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times for “Death on the Tracks”
Bogdanich tackles a little recognized problem of clear malfeasance on the part of railroads, using creative in-depth analysis of database records, combined with compelling human stories and court records from around the country, to demonstrate the huge failure of government to regulate a key industry.

Medium Newspaper Winner

Bill Vlasic and Jeff Plungis of The Detroit News for “Danger Overhead: Crushed Roofs”
This three-part series examines a little-known auto safety hazard – roofs that fail in rollover accidents, documenting the human cost and making a compelling case that four-decade-old safety standards are inadequate and that automakers are fighting the development of tougher rules.

Small Newspaper Winner

Craig Troianello of Yakima (WA) Herald-Republic for “The China Challenge”
Two smaller newspapers came together to tell four stories of great economic import for their communities, presenting a balanced view of the benefits and pitfalls of global trade on a key industry for Western Washington.

Magazines Winner
There are two winners in the magazine category.

Charles Fishman of Fast Company for “The Toll of a New Machine”
Highly original, the story explains that there is a new wave of automation and machinery that’s changing how business gets done. It stresses the counterintuitive fact that the machines are not eliminating jobs.

Clifton Leaf of Fortune for “Why We’re Losing the War on Cancer (and How to Win It)”
The piece shed new light on the reasons why cancer research has not made more progress toward finding a cure, demonstrating that the focus is on the easiest improvement areas and that arguably the most important aspect of the disease, metastasis, is the least researched.

Commentary Winner

Peter Eavis of TheStreet.com for “Cracks in Fannie Mae’s Foundation”
Eavis spelled out the accounting troubles at Fannie Mae long before any findings of wrongdoing were raised and dug into Fannie’s financial statements finding numerous areas of concern, even going so far as to tell federal regulators where to look.

Deadline Writing Winner

Andrew Ross Sorkin, Steve Lohr, David Barboza, Gary Rivlin and John Markoff of The New York Times for “End of an Era”
The coverage of the IBM-Lenovo deal begins with a major news scoop, that IBM had decided to sell its PC business, and unfolds with insightful analysis that succinctly covers all of the bases and describes the rise of China as the world’s new economic super power.

Beat Writing Winner

Ellen E. Schultz and Theo Francis of The Wall Street Journal for “The Short Life of ‘Lifetime’ Health-Care Benefits”
The reporters use their deep knowledge of the insurance and benefits industry to catch corporate America in a big lie – that rising health care costs are forcing them to cancel retiree health benefits to remain competitive – and find that there’s an incentive in accounting rules for companies to terminate plans even when/if costs are flat or declining.

News Services or Online Content Winners

Carol S. Remond of Dow Jones Newswires for “Exposing Small-Cap Fraud”
Remond’s analysis of the small-cap world exposed the shenanigans of three small companies that used unscrupulous means to pump up their stocks. The work led to the opening of SEC investigations and provided a clear warning for investors.

Television Deadline Winner

Chris Cuomo, Shelley Ross, Bob Lange, Thomas Berman and Jack Pyle of ABC News: Primetime for “Money for Nothing?”
The piece examined one California family’s experience with health care bills that went unpaid, and a small family business that found the health insurance plan they purchased from an out-of-state company reneged on paying actual medical bills. The story used this experience to detail an issue that has state-wide ramifications for California.

The table sponsors of the 2005 Loeb Awards are as follows:

Golden Circle Patrons
BusinessWeek
Dobbs Group
Forbes
Fortune 
Smith Barney
USA Today
The Wall Street Journal
UCLA Anderson School of Management

Silver Sponsors
Bloomberg News
Dow Jones Newswires
NBC
The New York Times

Loeb Associates Sponsors
The Associated Press
CNBC
CNN
Financial Times
TheStreet.com
The Washington Post

A gift bag was given to all attendees at the Loeb Awards banquet with contributions from the following sponsors:

Business Wire
HarperCollins Publishers
The New York Times
Princeton University Press
Time Warner Books
UCLA Anderson School of Management

The Loeb Awards included a career development seminar exclusively for the 2005 Loeb Awards finalists. The event was held on Sunday, June 26, 2005, and was hosted by CNBC. Featured presentation included: “The Ethics of Business Journalism” by Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Byron E. “Barney” Calame, public editor of The New York Times; “Managing Your Editor” by Minard Editor Award recipient Timothy K. Smith, assistant managing editor of Fortune and “The Strange World of Television Economics” by Steve Liesman, senior economics reporter for CNBC.

About the Loeb Awards
Established in 1957 by Gerald Loeb, a founding partner of E.F. Hutton, the Loeb Awards recognize journalists who have made significant contributions to the public’s understanding of business, finance and the economy. The judges select winners based on quality of reporting and writing, news and analytical value, originality and exclusivity, and in the broadcast categories only, production value and visual impact. UCLA Anderson School of Management has presented the awards since 1973.

For more information about the Loeb Awards, please visit the Loeb Awards Web site at http://loeb.anderson.ucla.edu or call the Loeb Awards office at (310) 206-1877. 

 

 

SABEW Announces New Executive Leadership Ladder

Posted By Crystal Beasley

The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW), the largest association of business journalists, has elected new executive officers effective immediately. The terms of service are through spring 2019 at the annual SABEW conference. The executive ladder changes were approved unanimously by the SABEW Board of Governors.

Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief of Bankrate.com, will lead SABEW as president for a second term.

An award-winning journalist, Hamrick joined personal-finance site Bankrate.com in January 2013 after leading business news for the Associated Press’ radio and television/online video operation in Washington, D.C., for more than 18 years.

Along with his work analyzing economic developments, financial markets, politics and business for Bankrate.com, Hamrick provides commentary or content hundreds of times a year for radio, television, print and online news organizations. Before joining the SABEW board in 2014, he served as president of the National Press Club.

Xana Antunes, executive editor at Quartz, will resign as SABEW vice president effective immediately due to personal time demands inhibiting her ability to serve as an officer. Antunes will remain engaged and supportive of SABEW’s mission through her service as a board member.

Bryan Borzykowski, a freelance business writer, will take over as vice president through spring 2019, when he will become SABEW’s first Canadian president. Borzykowski is a Toronto-based business writer, editor and author. He has written for a number of publications in Canada and the U.S., including The Globe and Mail, Canadian Business, The New York Times, CNBC, BBC Capital and CNNMoney.

Kim Quillen, an editor on the Chicago Tribune business desk, will be secretary/treasurer. Quillen joined the Tribune staff in 2016 from The Arizona Republic. She also has been business editor at The Times-Picayune, where she was involved in the New Orleans newspaper’s award-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina and the 2010 BP oil spill.

“The SABEW executive ladder is in excellent hands with Mark Hamrick, Bryan Borzykowski and Kim Quillen. Mark has raised SABEW’s profile on First Amendment issues; Bryan has expanded our international efforts; and Kim has produced incredible virtual training for members,” said SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham. “I’m thankful to have Mark’s steady leadership for another term, and I’d also like to thank Xana Antunes for her work on the Best in Business Awards and ongoing contributions to SABEW as a board member.”

The Society of American Business Editors and Writers was formed in 1964 to promote superior coverage of business and financial news and issues. The non-profit organization promotes excellence through training opportunities, including conferences, workshops, fellowships and online programs.

For more information, contact sabew@sabew.org or follow us on Twitter @SABEW.

SABEW January Spotlight

Posted By David Wilhite

SABEW Best in Business

  • The BIB awards are the only comprehensive set of awards honoring excellence in business journalism. The contest covers work published, broadcast and posted in the 2017 calendar year.
  • Click here to submit your entry. Deadline is midnight EST on Jan. 29, 2018.

SABEW Goldschmidt Data Immersion Workshop

The 2018 SABEW Goldschmidt Data Immersion Workshop in Washington, D.C., has concluded. Twenty-two business journalists learned how the government uses data. They received a special briefing from the Council of Economic Advisers at the White House and spoke with experts at the Investment Company Institute, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The week concluded with Janet Yellen addressing the fellows in the board room at the Federal Reserve. View the agenda. The training is thanks to a grant from the Chicago-based Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation.

SABEW18 – Spring conference

  • The 2018 SABEW Spring Conference in Washington, D.C., is April 26-28 at the Capital Hilton. The program is shaping up to be awesome! SABEW will host a conversation with David Rubenstein, co-founder of the Carlyle Group. David Fahrenthold of The Washington Post will break down how he pursued his 2017 Pulitzer-winning investigation into Donald Trump’s misuse of charities, in a discussion with Keith Alexander, part of The Post’s 2016 Pulitzer-winning team that quantified police shootings across the U.S. for the first time. Conference participants can learn how to tell their stories effectively (and without fear) on radio and television. Make sure to bring your laptops to the hands-on training session “Visualizing the State and Local Economy” with Jeannine Aversa, chief of public affairs and outreach at Bureau of Economic Analysis, and Rob Wells, professor of journalism at University of Arkansas.
  • View the program to date.
  • Click here to register prior to March 31 to receive the early-bird discount. Reserve your hotel room at the special discounted SABEW rate online before March 31.

Training

  • High-quality photos and video can make stories sing online and in print, but in business journalism, coming up with great art can be a challenge. SABEW’s next training session, “Behind the lens: How to snap photos and videos that make business stories shine,” will give you ideas about how to break beyond the standard “CEO at a desk” shots and bring new life to business photography. This webinar is Jan. 22 at 2 p.m. EST. Click here for more information.
  • Develop your understanding of health-care economics and get an update on the Affordable Care Act at the sixth annual Business of Health Care Summit. Selected journalists will receive a stipend to offset travel-related expenses through a grant from The Commonwealth Fund. Fellowship application information will be released soon.
  • In the December training, a panel of experts discussed the impact of President Donald Trump’s withholding of subsidies and other actions the year’s sign up with the exchanges. How are states coping? What is the impact on premiums and enrollment? Panelists were Sara Collins, vice president of health care coverage and access at The Commonwealth Fund; Kevin Lucia, senior research fellow and project director at the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute; Rodney Whitlock, vice president of health policy at ML Strategies; with Tami Luhby, senior writer at CNNMoney. Listen now.
  • Miss a previous teletraining? Go to our free archive.

First Amendment Initiative
SABEW welcomes the decision by publisher Henry Holt to move up the release of “Fire and Fury” by Michael Wolff. However, we strongly oppose the White House’s effort to prevent the book’s release. This is the latest example of President Donald Trump’s unprecedented and unwarranted attack on press freedom enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. SABEW urges the president and his administration to respect the First Amendment as our Founding Fathers did.

College Connect
College Connect gives students a chance to speak from their own experiences handling and managing money and credit. Read about financial planning and Millennials from Steffenie Burns, a student at Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Georgia. This project is funded by the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE).

Member news

  • Brad Foss, a SABEW board member, has been named global business editor at The Associated Press. Congratulations, Brad!
  • Condolences to the family and friends of Getahn Ward, business reporter at The Tennessean. Ward died Dec. 16 after a brief illness. He was 45.
  • Congratulations to Ely Portillo, business reporter at The Charlotte Observer and his wife, Caroline McMillian, on the announcement that they are expecting their first child.
  • It’s a new year! Time to update your member profile. Once you log in, click on Member Profile in the left menu bar.
  • Send SABEW your career updates. We would love to hear from you!

Follow us on Twitter to stay up to date on all SABEW news.

2017 Best in Business

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Welcome to the 23rd annual Best in Business awards competition, sponsored by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

 

This contest covers work published, broadcast and posted in the calendar year 2017.

Click here for categories and guidelines.
Click here for FAQs.
Click here to start the entry process.
Click here for step by step, BIB entry form instructions.

Deadlines

Entry deadline has been extended to 11:59 p.m. EST on Friday, Feb. 2.

Fees

Regular entry fees are:
$70 for Story Type and Story Topic categories
$135 for General Excellence categories
$25 for Student categories

Freelancer entry fees are:
$55 for regular entry period (Jan. 1 – 29, 2018)

Please use the promo code Freelancer on the payment page. If you have any questions, please email bib@sabew.org.

Students:
$25 for Student categories

Staff Hours

SABEW staff will be available by email (bib@sabew.org) or phone (602-496-7862) to help with BIB questions and entries, Mon. – Fri. from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST.

2017 Best in Business FAQ

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Here are some basic questions and answers regarding the BIB.

Q: Do I have to be a SABEW member to enter?
A: Yes. At the time of submission, entrants must be either an individual member of SABEW or a journalist listed on a current institutional membership. If you are unsure if you’re a part of an institutional membership, please contact your organization’s SABEW representative or SABEW staff at sabew@sabew.org.

Q: What is a “publication,” “category” and “size group” as defined by the contest?
A: “Publication” doesn’t only mean something that appears in print. “Publication” refers to any media outlet where your work might appear, in print, broadcast or online. “Category” refers to the size of the news organization’s editorial staff. “Size group” refers to circulation size of the publication. “Size group” is not being used for this contest.

If you have a question or concern about your assigned publication, category or size group, please contact BIB@sabew.org.

Q: The rules state that I am limited to three elements per entry. What if I am submitting work from a series?
A: We recommend selecting the three best examples from the series.

Q: Can I “park” an entry in mid-submission and go back to it later?
A: Absolutely. Entries are stored in “My Contest Entries” if you need to take a break, gather more information, etc. You may resume the entry process at your convenience.

Q: Can I pay for multiple entries all at once? 
A: Yes. Your entries are stored under “My Contest Entries” until you’re ready to submit. Upon completion of all entries, you can pay for all entries at one time.

Q: Are non-U.S. media eligible for other categories beyond the international division?
A: Yes. They may compete in the same categories as their U.S. counterparts.

Q: Can freelancers enter the Best in Business contest?
A: Yes. Freelancers who enter must be SABEW members.

Q: When will I find out if I won?
A: Winners and honorable mentions will be notified during the month of March. They will be honored at the BIB Awards Ceremony on April 27, 2018 at our annual conference in Washington, D.C.

Still can’t find the answer?  SABEW can help. Contact us at BIB@sabew.org or 602-496-7862.

2017 Best in Business Categories and Guidelines

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Eligibility: The Best in Business contest is open to regular members of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers in good standing as of the date of entry.

Regular membership is defined by SABEW’s constitution and bylaws, particularly Article III, https://sabew.org/about/constitution-and-bylaws.

Good standing means SABEW received your membership dues and your membership is current as of the date you submit your entries. Check your membership status on your member profiles, https://membership.sabew.org/membership/profile.

For entries with more than one byline, one person must be a SABEW member in good standing.

Please direct your membership questions to sabew@sabew.org.

Payment: Unless prior arrangements are made with SABEW, payment must be made by VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express through the secure BIB contest system. Payment must be received for an entry to be judged. Please note: When submitting multiple entries, the contest system does allow you to leave payment until all entries have been submitted.

Judging: Each category will be judged by a panel of business journalists who will award one winner and up to two honorable mentions. No honorable mentions will be named in categories with fewer than 10 entries. Up to one honorable mention will be named in categories with 10 to 20 entries. Up to two honorable mentions will be named in categories with more than 20 entries. Judges and the conference committee reserve the right to move an entry into a different category if they deem it mis-categorized. (In order for a category to be judged, there must be at least four total entries submitted from three different news organizations.)

Notification and recognition of winners: Winners and Honorable Mentions will be notified in March 2018. Winners will be recognized during the SABEW spring conference in Washington, D.C. on April 27, 2018.

 

CATEGORY DESCRIPTIONS

There are 27 contest categories in 2017, including the General Excellence and Student Journalism awards.

News organizations will be judged against similarly-sized organizations, regardless of format, unless otherwise noted. (Freelancers will be grouped based on size of the outlet that published their work.)

Categories are broken out by size, determined by the news organization’s total editorial staff.

Small: Fewer than 50 editorial staff

Medium: 51-300 editorial staff

Large: 301+ editorial staff.

Industry Publications: There will be an additional General Excellence category for industry- or topic-specific publications. Otherwise, these publications will compete against other similarly-sized news organizations.

 

GENERAL EXCELLENCE AWARD

Entries should showcase the depth and breadth of quality in your news organization.

Only one entry allowed per news organization or publication

A cover letter of up to 250 words may be submitted as a PDF attachment with entries. (Style the PDF title like this: yourpublicationcoverletter.pdf)

Entrants will demonstrate general excellence by submitting at least one element from three of the five following areas of coverage (as PDFs or permalink URLs). You may submit up to five elements.

1. Breaking news, scoop: A news story exclusive to your organization.

2. Breaking news, event: One story from your organization’s coverage of an unexpected breaking news event.

     Entrants may include a 100-word description of the full day’s coverage plan to give a broader context.

3. Explanatory/Feature: One enterprise story of the agency’s choosing.

4. Investigative/Project: The main story of a large-scale project or investigative piece. Entrants may include a 100-word description of the overall package.

5. Visual Storytelling: A stand-alone visual story — could be a video, a series of related photographs or an interactive data visualization.

 

STORY TYPE AWARDS

There is no limit on the number of entries per news organization; however, any individual story may only be entered into one story type. (For example, same story or package of stories cannot be entered into investigative and explanatory categories.)

News organizations compete against other similarly-sized organizations, regardless of format, unless otherwise noted. (Freelancers will be grouped based on size of the outlet that published their work.)

An entry shall consist of no more than three elements. Elements should all contain the same theme, though they don’t need to be directly related to each other. An element can be a text, audio or video story, or an interactive. Accompanying photos and static graphics will not be counted as elements.

A cover letter of up to 250 words may be submitted as a PDF attachment with entries. (Style the PDF title like this: yournamecoverletter.pdf)

Breaking News: Coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Proactive news broken by a reporter or news organization’s reporting staff, or quality reactive reporting.

Investigative: In-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership/viewership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; and b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

Explanatory: In-depth reporting that presents, analyzes and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows audiences to understand it more clearly.

Feature: Enterprise storytelling that may be presented as a trend story, a profile, or a narrative, that draws on in-depth reporting to offer fresh discovery or insight in a memorable way.

Commentary/Opinion: Reported coverage that reflects the point of view of the journalist or news organization. Category includes unsigned editorials, individual columns, and blogs.

Video: Coverage that is visually compelling and deeply engaging, demonstrating excellence in visual storytelling.

Audio: Coverage that demonstrates excellence in audio storytelling. (News organizations of all sizes will compete against each other in this category.)

Innovation: Entries should demonstrate a creative way to report, tell and/or distribute stories.

 

STORY TOPIC AWARDS

There is no limit on number of entries per news organization; however, any individual story may only be entered into one story topic. (For example, same story or package of stories about automated driving cannot be entered into autos/transportation and technology categories.)

News organizations compete against other similarly-sized organizations, not by format, unless otherwise noted. (Freelancers grouped based on size of outlet that published their work.)

An entry shall consist of no more than three elements. Elements should all contain the same theme, though they don’t need to be directly related to each other. An element can be a text, audio or video story, or an interactive. Accompanying photos and static graphics will not be counted as elements.

Submit entries as PDFs or permalink URLs.

A cover letter of up to 250 words may be submitted as a PDF with entries. Not required. (Style the PDF title like this: yournamecoverletter.pdf)

Energy/natural resources

Travel/Transportation

Health/science

Technology

Media/entertainment

Economics

Government

International reporting

Retail

Markets

Banking/Finance

Personal Finance

Small Business/Management/Career

Real Estate

 

STUDENT JOURNALISM

An entry shall consist of no more than three elements. Elements should represent the best work of the contributor(s) over the contest year. An element can be a text, audio or video story, or an interactive. Accompanying photos and static graphics will not be counted as elements.

Submit entries as PDFs or permalink URLs.

A cover letter of up to 250 words should be submitted as a PDF with entries indicating the year of graduation (or expected graduation for each contributor). Please also indicate if the student is an undergraduate or graduate student. The cover letter is required. (Style the PDF title like this: yournamecoverletter.pdf)

Stories Written for Professional Publications
Entries should feature one student. The elements submitted can include other bylines, contributors and producers, but all should primarily be the work of the entered student. The cover letter should address what contributions were made to the stories by others.

Stories Written for Student Publications
Entries should feature one student. The elements submitted can include other bylines, contributors and producers, but all should primarily be the work of the entered student. The cover letter should address what contributions were made to the stories by others.

Student Projects and Collaborations
Work done in the contest year by more than one student, with minimal contributions from non-students. Entries should all fall under one theme.

Student Public Service
Outstanding effort by a single student, not under a byline, in the service of business journalism in the contest year. This can be through editing, a project, work on behalf of a free press or other achievement that advances the cause of business journalism.

 

Note: Judges and the conference committee reserve the right to move an entry into a different category if they deem it miscategorized.

 

Click here for a PDF version of the 2017 Best in Business Contest Guidelines.

Associate Director at Reynolds Center

Posted By David Wilhite

Job Description: The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University seeks an Associate Director for the Donald W. Reynolds Center for Business Journalism, which provides training and support to business journalists around the world. The associate director plans, organizes and directs day-to-day operations of the center, reporting to the Senior Associate Dean of the Cronkite School.

Essential Duties:

  • Supervises a full-time staff member who manages the center’s website and social media channels
  • Hires, supervises and edits contract writers who report on business, finance and the economy for the center’s website and social media channels.
  • Plans and manages signature events that include the annual Barlett & Steele Awards for investigative business journalism and Strictly Financials workshops for business journalists at locations around the country
  • Oversees the Cronkite School’s Masters in Business Journalism, an online graduate degree program
  • Supervises graduate students who contribute content for the Reynolds website, businessjournalism.org.
  • Oversees strategy and execution of marketing materials for the center
  • Oversees and participates in planning, developing and administering the center’s budget
  • Prepares financial and administrative reports, analyzes and interprets statistics, financial data, and management planning data for predicting resource needs and developing long-range plans.
  • Represents the center and the Cronkite School to external constituents and liaisons with national business organizations and leading business journalists
  • Works with other departments across the university to develop interdisciplinary efforts
  • Performs other duties as assigned

Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in a field appropriate to the area of assignment AND seven (7) years of related administrative experience, which includes four (4) years of supervisory experience; OR, Eleven (11) years of related administrative experience, which includes four (4) years of supervisory experience; OR, Any equivalent combination of education and/or experience from which comparable knowledge, skills and abilities have been achieved.

Desired Qualifications: The ideal candidate is a dynamic individual who can develop and execute new initiatives while managing and delivering the center’s core programs at a high level.  The ideal candidate will demonstrate:

  • Knowledge and experience editing and preparing copy for distribution
  • Knowledge and experience in business journalism
  • Skill in effectively managing, supervising and evaluating assigned staff
  • Knowledge and experience managing a website and social media distribution of content
  • Knowledge and experience developing and executing content marketing strategies
  • Knowledge and experience planning and executing events
  • Knowledge and experience managing a budget

How to Apply: Click here to apply. Application deadline is 3:00PM Arizona time on Dec. 13, 2017. Please include all employment information in month/year format (e.g., 6/88 to 8/94), job title, job duties and name of employer for each position. Resume should clearly illustrate how prior knowledge and experience meets the Minimum and Desired qualifications of this position. As part of your application, please also submit a cover letter describing how your experiences will benefit the Cronkite School. ASU does not pay for travel expenses associated with interviews, unless otherwise indicated. Only electronic applications are accepted for this position.

The importance of a free press and quality business journalism

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Dear Friends and Supporters of SABEW:

We share a passion for something fundamental to democracy: business journalism. Its themes are key to understanding the common financial interests and conflicts among government, enterprises and individuals. Now is the moment for our profession and our nation to demand engagement and response.

At SABEW, the leading organization for business journalists, we advocate for our members and our profession, exemplifying the highest standards. We do that through our annual conferences, workshops and seminars; virtual training; Best in Business awards competition; reporting fellowships; and board and committee work. Underpinning these activities is the promotion of financial literacy and personal financial goals.

Journalism has always been a target of the powerful who find facts to be a threat. While that has often been the case abroad, domestic news organizations — including many of our members — have come under increasing attack. President Donald Trump continuously attempts to undermine the credibility of our profession through his “fake news” tweets. The Trump administration also has made government data difficult for journalists to find and access. Abroad and even closer to home, there have been recent cases of verbal and physical harassment and assault against journalists.

SABEW formed a First Amendment Committee as part of its response to these attacks. The goal of the committee is to offer training and programming related to press freedom, transparency and access to data; to advocate for SABEW members and the profession in a climate of unprecedented risks and threats; and to release public statements in support of individual journalists and the industry as a whole. These First Amendment issues, vital to a healthy democracy, will be a focus of our spring conference in April in Washington, D.C.

We are asking for your financial support of quality business journalism through a year-end donation. Your gift will fund training, fellowships and award competitions that help journalists develop, ensuring the future of trustworthy, ethical reporting that empowers citizens.

Donate today to qualify for a 2017 charitable income tax deduction. You can do so online through Razoo’s secure site or by mailing a check to: SABEW, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, ASU, 555 N. Central Ave., Suite 302, Phoenix, AZ 85004-1248.

Thank you for supporting SABEW. We wish you a safe and happy holiday season!

Sincerely,

Mark Hamrick                                                            Kathleen Graham
SABEW president                                                     SABEW executive director

Young Journalists, Big Impact

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Monday, October 30
2 p.m. EDT

There’s a lot to be learned from today’s young financial journalists through their strong beat reporting.

Take Jillian Berman, 28, of MarketWatch, for example. Her work covering the student-debt crisis earned her this year’s Larry Birger Young Journalist Award, which honors journalists under the age of 30. The judges of the contest noted that on this extensively covered topic, Berman repeatedly found new story angles. She dug through mounds of data, distilled complex information and told compelling stories of those affected by this crisis.

On SABEW’s next teletraining session, hear from Berman, as well as our Birger award finalists Sarah Freir of Bloomberg and Jen Wieczner of Fortune, as they discuss how they work sources, develop their beats and uncover unique ways to tell important stories.

Listen to the recording.

Moderator

Jon Chesto, a business reporter for the Boston Globe, served as Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize judging team chair. Jon covers the leaders who shape Boston’s business community. He has been reporting on business and politics in New England for the past two decades. Before joining the Globe, he was managing editor at the Boston Business Journal. Prior to that role, he was the business editor at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy. His weekly Ledger column, “Mass. Market,” won several national awards with SABEW. A graduate of Wesleyan University and Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism, he has also worked as a business reporter at the Boston Herald and as a political reporter with Ottaway Newspapers.

Panelists

Jillian Berman, a New York-based reporter for MarketWatch, is the 2017 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists younger than 30. Berman focuses on student debt. Previously, she worked as a business reporter for HuffPost, covering retail and food companies as well as gender politics at work. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Bloomberg.

Sarah Frier is a technology reporter at Bloomberg News, where she is focused on breaking news and writing features about social media companies including Facebook and Snap. Her work appears on Bloomberg.com, in Bloomberg Businessweek and on Bloomberg Television. In her more than six years at Bloomberg, she has received several awards from SABEW. Frier is a 2011 graduate of the University of North Carolina, where she majored in journalism and was editor-in-chief of the Daily Tar Heel.

Jen Wieczner is a senior writer at Fortune covering Wall Street, finance and cryptocurrency. She has profiled business leaders including two-time Fortune 500 CEO Meg Whitman; controversial Mylan CEO Heather Bresch; and hedge fund billionaire Steve Cohen, featuring his first interview since his involvement in a record-breaking insider trading case. Recently, she launched The Ledger, a publication within Fortune dedicated to covering the intersection of money and technology. Previously, Jen covered health care for MarketWatch and The Wall Street Journal. Her work has also appeared in SmartMoney, The Atlantic, Fast Company, New York, Edible Manhattan, Boston, Glamour and Marie Claire. In 2017, she received the American Society of Magazine Editors “Next” Award honoring journalists under 30. Originally from Boston, Jen graduated from Northwestern University with a B.S. in journalism.

International Trade in the Era of Trump

Posted By Crystal Beasley

President Donald Trump has talked tough on trade ever since he first hit the campaign trail. He criticized China for a massive U.S. trade deficit. He also said the North American Free Trade Agreement was bad for the United States. Once in office, he fulfilled a campaign promise of pulling the United States out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a 12-nation deal negotiated under former President Barack Obama, which Congress had not yet approved. Since that time, international trade issues have continued to be at the forefront of President Trump’s agenda.

For SABEW’s September training session, we’ll dive into the difficult task of covering international trade in the era of President Trump. A panel of experts and experienced journalists will discuss the latest developments in international trade discussions, offer historical perspectives on the topic and provide thoughts on what journalists may be overlooking in their coverage. 

Listen to the training.

Moderator

Rich Barbieri is the executive editor of CNNMoney, overseeing digital coverage and newsgathering for CNN’s worldwide coverage of brands, media, markets, economics, technology, and personal finance.Prior to joining CNN, Barbieri worked for 15 years at American Lawyer Media as a reporter and editor covering law, business and government in New York, Washington and San Francisco. He has also worked as New York news editor at the Associated Press and as managing editor of Crain’s New York Business. He won an AP reporting award in 1992 for coverage of California’s first execution in decades, and his newsrooms have won more than 100 editorial and design awards from local and national journalism organizations.

Panelists

Gary Hufbauer is a senior fellow at the Petersen Institute for International Economics in Washington, who has written extensively on international trade, NAFTA, investment, and tax issues. His previous positions include the Maurice Greenberg Chair and Director of Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, the Marcus Wallenberg Professor of International Finance Diplomacy at Georgetown University, and deputy director of the International Law Institute at Georgetown University. Gary also served in the U.S. Treasury Department as deputy assistant secretary, where he was responsible for trade and investment policy during the Tokyo Round of multilateral trade negotiations, and as director of the international tax staff. The most recent books he has coauthored include Bridging the Pacific: Toward Free Trade and Investment between China and the United States and Economic Normalization with Cuba: A Roadmap for US Policymakers.

Joshua Teitelbaum is counsel in the public law and policy practice and advises clients across a diverse array of industries on issues related to trade and health policy, among others at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP. Prior to his current role, Teitelbaum served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Textiles, Consumer Goods and Materials with the International Trade Administration in the U.S. Department of Commerce. While serving in this role, he was a policy-maker for, and public advocate of, the Obama administration’s highest international trade priorities. His work included substantial contributions to the development of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement, the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the DOC’s implementation of the conflict minerals provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, among other multilateral, regional and bilateral trade initiatives. His work spanned a broad cross section of U.S. industries, including textiles, apparel, home furnishings, processed foods, distilled spirits, recreational transportation, cosmetics, chemicals, and building materials. He also served as the chairman of the Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements, which supervises the negotiation and implementation of textile and apparel agreements.

Prior to his role at the DOC, Teitelbaum served as staff director for the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Subcommittee on Children & Families; as legislative assistant to Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC); and as legislative counsel to Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY), where he advised on a wide range of issues, including health care, international trade, education and financial services. His experience in the Senate included advising Senator Hagan on international trade policy during Senate floor consideration of three U.S. free trade agreements as well as the negotiation of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Doug Palmer is senior trade reporter at Politico and one of the most experienced trade reporters in Washington after nearly 15 years on the beat. He was on the scene when efforts to launch world trade talks failed in Seattle in 1999 to the delight of thousands of protesters who clashed with police throughout the week. Since then, Palmer has covered trade negotiations with more than a dozen countries as well as the long-running Doha round of world trade negotiations, which was launched in 2001 and still has not successfully concluded. Palmer’s job currently includes keeping tabs on trade frictions with China and negotiations on two huge regional free regional trade agreements, the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.

Kristi Ellis is a retail editor for S&P Global Market Intelligence and former Washington bureau chief for Women’s Wear Daily. Prior to joining S&P, she was a trade reporter in Washington for 16 years. She covered negotiations on several trade deals and developed a deep understanding of Washington trade policy, spanning three administrations. Ellis was on hand for the World Trade Organization’s Doha ministerial round in Cancun, Mexico in 2003 and filed a series of stories on the intensifying disputes that ultimately led to the collapse of those talks. She has covered several national political conventions, including the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia where anti-TPP tensions were running high and trade was a key campaign issue. Her current job as a retail editor involves training and guiding a team of reporters, including a policy reporter covering the Trump administration’s trade agenda.

Aug. 21 at 3 p.m. ET – 10 Great Digital Tools for Business Journalists

Posted By Crystal Beasley

For SABEW’s August training session, we’ve teamed up with the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism to present a webinar via the Adobe Connect video-conference platform. The session will introduce business reporters and editors to new web tools and apps that are mostly free, easy to learn, and fun to use. The digital tools will simplify many of the tasks that business journalists must perform, including social media posting, recording and transcribing interviews, and scanning documents.

Listen to the training.

Presenters:

Eric Newton is a professor of practice at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and innovation chief of Cronkite News, the news division of Arizona PBS, staffed by students and faculty from the Cronkite School. He previously was senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation where he expanded the organization’s journalism and media innovation program. Eric was also the founding managing editor of the Newseum, the first major museum of news, and a managing editor of the Oakland Tribune, where he helped guide the paper to numerous awards, including a Pulitzer Prize.

 

Sally Kilbridge is associate director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism where she spearheads the center’s digital marketing efforts and contributes to web marketing at the Cronkite School. Previously, she was vice president of content at the national content marketing agency McMurry/TMG. Sally spent more than 25 years in editorial positions at Condé Nast, and has written for a variety of consumer publications and websites.

10 Great Digital Tools for Business Journalists

Posted By Crystal Beasley

For SABEW’s August training session, we’ve teamed up with the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism to present a webinar via the Adobe Connect video-conference platform. The session will introduce business reporters and editors to new web tools and apps that are mostly free, easy to learn, and fun to use. The digital tools will simplify many of the tasks that business journalists must perform, including social media posting, recording and transcribing interviews, and scanning documents.

Listen to the training.

Eric Newton is a professor of practice at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and innovation chief of Cronkite News, the news division of Arizona PBS, staffed by students and faculty from the Cronkite School. He previously was senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation where he expanded the organization’s journalism and media innovation program. Eric was also the founding managing editor of the Newseum, the first major museum of news, and a managing editor of the Oakland Tribune, where he helped guide the paper to numerous awards, including a Pulitzer Prize.

 

Sally Kilbridge is associate director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism where she spearheads the center’s digital marketing efforts and contributes to web marketing at the Cronkite School. Previously, she was vice president of content at the national content marketing agency McMurry/TMG. Sally spent more than 25 years in editorial positions at Condé Nast, and has written for a variety of consumer publications and websites.

Membership

Posted By Natalie Savarino

JOIN SABEW!

For more than 50 years the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW), has been promoting ethics and excellence in business journalism. Joining this viable organization will put you among the largest organization of business news people in the world, with members ranging from the United States to Canada.

SABEW offers an updated and constantly growing spectrum of member services, including:

Awards and Competitions

  • The Best in Business Contest that highlights overall excellence in newspaper business sections and pages, weekly business journals and wire services.  The news contest rewards superior coverage of breaking news and enterprise stories.

Education and Training

  • An annual national conference that includes specialized workshops and panel discussions geared to expose SABEW members to new ideas in business and economic journalism. The annual event features speeches by important figures in the news and a provocative ethics discussion.
  • Annual fall conference in New York City covering hot topics in business and economics.
  • Scholarships presented to students and professionals.
  • Specialized onsite and online programming, call-ins and webinars.
  • Specialized programs covering vital topics facing business journalists.

SABEW Endowed Chair in Business and Financial Journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia.  Martha “Marty” Steffens occupies the chair.  The SABEW chair develops business journalist curricula for undergraduate, graduate and mid-career professionals.

Networking Opportunities

  • A member directory accessible only by members consisting of hundreds of business journalists in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.
  • Active social networking sites (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter) with all the latest news and SABEW information.

Those eligible for membership are persons for whom a significant part of their occupation involves writing, reporting, editing or overseeing business, financial or economic news for newspapers, magazines, newsletters, journals, books, press or syndicated services, radio or television, online publications, or other media approved by the SABEW Board of Governors and to teachers and students of business journalism or business media subjects at recognized colleges or universities or other organizations approved by the Society’s board.

Questions about new memberships or renewals may be directed to Crystal Beasley, special projects manager, at 602-496-5188, or cbeasley@sabew.org.

 

To join, click here

To renew, click here

Rate Card

Posted By David Wilhite

Establish relationships. Generate coverage. Distribute content.

SABEW’s 3,400 members include North America’s best and brightest business and finance editors, reporters and writers. They work for companies such as Bloomberg, Reuters, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, CNBC, Quartz, Investopedia and many other respected print and digital information sources in the U.S. and Canada.

For more information about tapping into the power of SABEW to meet your media relations needs and sales goals, contact director of sponsorships Renee McGivern or call 651-210-0911.

Upcoming Conferences


SABEW18 in Washington, D.C.

Sponsorships

All Platinum and Gold sponsors will receive:

  • Verbal onsite recognition of your organization’s role in the success of the conference
  • Sponsorship recognition in the program and on SABEW’s website.
  • Prominent placement of your organization’s logo on signage.
  • Welcome and reception recognition.
  • Targeted benefits include . . .

PLATINUM $20,000-$30,000

  • Four conference registrations
  • 1/2 to full-page ad in conference brochure
  • Best in Business Awards sponsorship, if available
  • Exhibit table or Ted-style talk (limited availability)

GOLD $10,000

  • Three conference registrations
  • 1/2 to full-page ad in conference program
  • Can be designated to meals or Best in Business reception
  • Exhibit table or Ted-style talk (limited availability)

SILVER $5,000

  • Two conference registrations
  • Can be designated to receptions or meals

BRONZE $3,000

  • One conference registration
  • Logo on conference website, signage
  • Can be designated to morning coffee breaks, if available

BASIC – $1,000

  • Logo on conference website, signage

Download sponsor/exhibitor information sheet.

Pay for your sponsorship online.

Need a SABEW W-9 form to request funds? Here you go!

Exhibit Tables

$2,750 thru Dec. 31 and $3,250 after Dec. 31, 2017.

Tables include two registrations, chairs, participation in event receptions and meals, and recognition on the conference website and on signage. Sponsored content and advertising.

Download exhibitor form.

Register as an exhibitor and pay online.

Sponsored content and advertising


– Sponsored content e-blast: (reaches 3,400 members) $500

– SABEW Spotlight member e-newsletter ad: (reaches 3,400 members) $500

– Home page carousel slide: (30 days, average 3,500 visitors per month) $500

– Conference bag inserts: $250

Custom content and advertising options are available. Please contact director of sponsorships Renee McGivern or call 651-210-0911.

June 26 at 2:00 p.m. EDT: Covering all the bases – Reporting on Sports Business

Posted By Crystal Beasley

Reporting on Sports Business Slides

Writing about the business of sports has become more than just game coverage in recent years. In fact, sports business has been elevated to a significant stand-alone beat at many news outlets. The beat offers fertile ground for compelling enterprise and investigative stories on collective bargaining agreements, marketing and management initiatives, intellectual property issues, team financial operations, and stadium and arena deals.

SABEW’s June training session will feature a panel of experts who will discuss how reporters can come up with story ideas by delving into the financial operations of professional teams, universities, and other organizations that run athletic events. They will discuss how to use public records to dig up information on owners of professional sports franchises as well as college teams, and talk about major stories they have uncovered on the sports business beat.

Monday, June 26
2-3 p.m. ET

Listen to the recording.

Instructions: On the day of the call, dial (512) 879-2134. When prompted enter access code 846394#.

Moderator

Kristi Dosh is a professional writer, speaker, sports business analyst, attorney and author who runs Guide My Brand, a boutique publicity firm representing entrepreneurs and authors. As a sports business reporter/analyst, she has reported on everything from collective bargaining to endorsements to the finances of pro and intercollegiate athletics for outlets such as ESPN, Forbes, Golf Digest, SportsBusiness Journal, Campus Insiders, Bleacher Report, SB Nation, The Motley Fool, and Comcast Sports Southeast. She is the author of Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges.

Panelists

Geoff Baker is a Montreal-born sports enterprise and investigative reporter for The Seattle Times, who writes the weekly “Inside Sports Business” column and produces the paper’s “Hard Count with Geoff Baker” podcast. He has gained critical acclaim for covering Seattle’s years-long pursuit of a new major sports arena and NBA and NHL teams. Geoff is a two-time Associated Press Sports Editors award winner and nine-time finalist. He also has won three National Newspaper Awards in Canada with the Toronto Star and Montreal Gazette.

 

 

Mark Conrad directs the sports business concentration and is an associate professor of law and ethics at Fordham University’s Gabelli School of Business, where he teaches sports law and the business and ethics of sports. The third edition of his book The Business of Sports: Off the Field, In the Office, On the News was published in March.

 

 

 

Danny Ecker covers the local sports business scene for Crain’s Chicago Business, focusing on the marketing, media, products and personalities tied to the city’s professional and college teams. He is a frequent panelist on CSN Chicago’s daily “Sports Talk Live” show and WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight.” Prior to joining Crain’s in January 2010, Danny worked as a producer for college sports and news website UWire.com. He is a 2008 graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and a native of Columbus, Ohio.

 

 

Alex Reimer is a seasoned sports writer and host on the “Kirk & Callahan Show” at WEEI Sports Radio Network in the Greater Boston area. He is a contributor to Boston Magazine, Forbes and the sports news website SB Nation.

Training – Covering all the Bases: Reporting on Sports Business

Posted By David Wilhite

Click the link below to download the slides for this training session:

Reporting on Sports Business Slides

Writing about the business of sports has become more than just game coverage in recent years. In fact, sports business has been elevated to a significant stand-alone beat at many news outlets. The beat offers fertile ground for compelling enterprise and investigative stories on collective bargaining agreements, marketing and management initiatives, intellectual property issues, team financial operations, and stadium and arena deals.

SABEW’s June training session will feature a panel of experts who will discuss how reporters can come up with story ideas by delving into the financial operations of professional teams, universities, and other organizations that run athletic events. They will discuss how to use public records to dig up information on owners of professional sports franchises as well as college teams, and talk about major stories they have uncovered on the sports business beat.

Monday, June 26
2-3 p.m. ET

Listen to the recording.

Moderator

Kristi Dosh is a professional writer, speaker, sports business analyst, attorney and author who runs Guide My Brand, a boutique publicity firm representing entrepreneurs and authors. As a sports business reporter/analyst, she has reported on everything from collective bargaining to endorsements to the finances of pro and intercollegiate athletics for outlets such as ESPN, Forbes, Golf Digest, SportsBusiness Journal, Campus Insiders, Bleacher Report, SB Nation, The Motley Fool, and Comcast Sports Southeast. She is the author of Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges.

Panelists

Geoff Baker is a Montreal-born sports enterprise and investigative reporter for The Seattle Times, who writes the weekly “Inside Sports Business” column and produces the paper’s “Hard Count with Geoff Baker” podcast. He has gained critical acclaim for covering Seattle’s years-long pursuit of a new major sports arena and NBA and NHL teams. Geoff is a two-time Associated Press Sports Editors award winner and nine-time finalist. He also has won three National Newspaper Awards in Canada with the Toronto Star and Montreal Gazette.

 

 

Mark Conrad directs the sports business concentration and is an associate professor of law and ethics at Fordham University’s Gabelli School of Business, where he teaches sports law and the business and ethics of sports. The third edition of his book The Business of Sports: Off the Field, In the Office, On the News was published in March.

 

 

 

Danny Ecker covers the local sports business scene for Crain’s Chicago Business, focusing on the marketing, media, products and personalities tied to the city’s professional and college teams. He is a frequent panelist on CSN Chicago’s daily “Sports Talk Live” show and WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight.” Prior to joining Crain’s in January 2010, Danny worked as a producer for college sports and news website UWire.com. He is a 2008 graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and a native of Columbus, Ohio.

 

 

Alex Reimer is a seasoned sports writer and host on the “Kirk & Callahan Show” at WEEI Sports Radio Network in the Greater Boston area. He is a contributor to Boston Magazine, Forbes and the sports news website SB Nation.

 

 

 

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Reporter for Minneapolis Star Tribune

Posted By David Wilhite

Description: The Minneapolis Star Tribune is looking for a reporter to cover big-picture economic trends, with an emphasis on the job market and the financial circumstances of Minnesotans.

This is an opportunity to take a prominent role on a team of nearly two dozen writers and editors who are aiming to produce the best business report in the Midwest.

Minnesota is home to 17 Fortune 500 companies, including Cargill, General Mills, UnitedHealth Group, 3M and Target. The economics reporter’s mission will be to identify trends across the state’s diverse economy and to connect them with the lives of our readers. We’re looking for a sophisticated reporter with a drive to write stories that attract a large digital audience and that routinely land on the front page in print.

This reporter will be able to put major news developments in a broader economic context, develop quick-turn enterprise on a regular basis and also pursue more ambitious work. They should be able to use economic data as a starting point for stories that explain the economy in human terms.

The Star Tribune has won general excellence from SABEW four times in the past six years, as well as three Loeb awards in that period. We’re looking for someone who can help us build on this track record of success.

If you have questions about the position, email assistant managing editor Thom Kupper at thom.kupper@startribune.com.

How to Apply: To apply, go to Startribunecompany.com/jobs

A message from new SABEW President Mark Hamrick: On press freedom and the year ahead

Posted By David Wilhite

Hello SABEW members:

This is the first of what I hope will be regular updates.

First, I’m excited to be your president for the year ahead! I’ve had the good fortune of meeting or knowing you in-person. For others, I look forward to being introduced. Also, please check out our terrific new board and officers.

We’re just coming off our exciting Seattle spring conference. Thanks to all who attended and who helped to make it a success. We’re already looking ahead to our fall gathering in New York and the 2018 spring conference, which is returning to the Washington, DC area. (Exact dates and location to be announced).

There’s an important, new effort at SABEW, already up-and-running. Under our new First Amendment Committee, we’re looking to accomplish several things:

  • To advocate for SABEW members and for journalism more broadly as the press (broadly defined) experiences unprecedented risks and threats, both externally and from within the industry. The threats include verbal attacks and reduced access from government, violence abroad and continued disruption of news media business models.
  • To explore training and programming opportunities related to press freedom, transparency and access to data.
  • To release public statements when appropriate. (We did so on World Press Freedom Day in early May).

As if to serve a reminder of the risks our colleagues are facing, this past week a reporter, whom I’ve known for years and respected, was confronted during his work covering the FCC. His treatment was unacceptable, particularly in Washington and in America. An apology followed, but what’s really needed is a thorough understanding on the part of the Trump administration about the vital role press access plays in a free, civil and robust democracy.

Despite the challenges, there’s tremendous opportunity for journalists as demonstrated by new and innovative enterprises as well as remarkable reporting we see every day. As a judge in SABEW’s Best in Business awards, I was reminded of the great work being done around the world by our colleagues in business and financial journalism. We see it every day.

We’ll need your help! Please use social media using the @SABEW handle (or other outreach) to raise issues to our attention.

I’m grateful immediate past SABEW president Cory Shouten, board member Marilyn Geewax and past president Kevin Hall of McClatchy, a recent Pulitzer Prize winner, are all working on our new First Amendment Committee.

Please make plans to attend one of our upcoming conferences, where networking and skills training opportunities abound.

Mark Hamrick
SABEW president
Senior economic analyst, Washington bureau chief
Bankrate.com
@Hamrickisms

SABEW - Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication,
Arizona State University

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Phone: (602)-496-7862

E-mail: sabew@sabew.org

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