SABEW Canada Announces the Finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards

Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday April 2, 2019

TORONTO, April 2, 2019 – The Canadian chapter of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) is excited to announce the list of finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published in 2018. For this year’s contest, we expanded the number of categories to 15 (including beat reporting, investigative, commentary, trade article, editorial newsletter and scoop), and the finalists represent the most diverse array of Canadian publications we’ve seen yet, including names both old and new. Their stories shone a spotlight on a wide range of stories, including the legalization of recreational cannabis, real estate fraud, trade wars, mental illness, and even murder.

SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges (listed below), chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

The winners were announced at the Best in Business Awards reception on April 17 at Baro in Toronto.

The finalists for SABEW Canada’s 5th Annual Best in Business are:

Audio or visual storytelling

Beat reporting

Breaking news

Commentary

Editorial newsletter

Feature (long-form)

Feature (short-form)

Investigative

Package

­­

Personal finance and investing

Profile

Scoop

Trade article

Our first-ever award for Best Young Journalist goes to Zane Schwartz of The Logic. In the four years since he graduated from the University of Toronto, Zane has gathered an impressive body of work. As the 2017 Michelle Lang Fellow in journalism at the National Post and Calgary Herald, he ​created the first searchable database of more than five million political donations in every province and territory—a project that won him a Data Journalism Award from the Global Editors Network in 2018. He helped modernize Maclean’s 25-year-old university rankings system, a project that saw him hire and manage 23 freelancers to work on a 400,000-point database. He has been with The Logic since Day 1, where he has had a hand in everything from design to hiring new staff to editing investigations on Canada’s innovation economy. As a reporter, he has consistently broken national news, including Amazon lobbying governments across Canada for billions in contracts after shortlisting Toronto for its HQ2 to revealing the government’s private assessment that there’s no downside to letting an American telecom come north.

Our inaugural Outstanding Achievement Award goes to the Financial Post’s Claudia Cattaneo, who retired in May 2018. As FP editor Nicole MacAdam put it in her nomination letter: “Claudia has been one of the most influential voices in Western Canada for nearly three decades, through bust, boom and bust. She is one of those rare journalists who earned the respect of both her peers and the energy industry due to her thorough, balanced reporting and deep understanding of the issues that matter to Albertans. But it wasn’t just her ability to break news that made her a must-read; it was her ability to bring context and analysis to these stories. Her columns suffered no fools and offered a clear-eyed view that often punctured the Ottawa bubble. At the same time, she was quick to criticize the oil patch for its high-profile problems, such as corporate governance and handling of the environment file. Bureau reporters who work from home can often be isolated, but Claudia was the ultimate colleague, taking junior reporters under her wing, meeting her Calgary colleagues weekly to discuss story ideas, participating in weekly features pitch meetings by phone, generously giving of her time to all who asked. Claudia was an editor’s dream right till the day she retired in May, 2018: Deeply experienced but with the keenness of a rookie ready for the day—pitching something nearly every day; unflinching reporting, but with a delightful turn of phrase; blunt in her critique but with an acute sense of fairness.”

Thank you to our judges, without whom we could not do this: Gavin Adamson, Vikram Barhat, Laura Bobak, Greg Bonnell, Bryan Borzykowski, Mark Brown, Dawn Calleja Henry Dubroff, Tim Falconer, Max Fawcett, David Friend, Howard Green, Megan Griffith-Greene, Kevin Hall, Brian Hutchinson, Jason Kirby, Peter Kuitenbrouwer, Steve Ladurantaye, Andree Lau, Katie Lobosco, Nicole MacAdam, James Madore, Garry Marr, Susan Nerberg, Mira Oberman, Matt O’Grady, Joanna Ossinger, Rachel Pulfer, David Scanlan, Anna Sharratt, David Topping, Andrew Wahl, Tom Watson, Jennifer Wells and Renée Williams.

If you have anything questions about the contents of this press release, please contact SABEW Canada chair Dawn Calleja at [email protected].

  • Best in Business Awards

    Posted By admin on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    2019 marks the 25th Best in Business Awards contest. Read more about this year’s contest.

    These are the most prestigious set of awards honoring excellence in business journalism in the world. This contest is for SABEW members only.

    Canadian members can also choose to participate in the smaller SABEW Canada Best in Business contest.

    Current Best in Business Honorees

    2018 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    Previous Best in Business Honorees

    2017 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    2016 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    2015 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    2014 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    2013 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    2012 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    2011 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    2010 SABEW Best in Business Honorees

    SABEW Canada Best in Business

    You’ll find a history of these winners here.

    For more information about the Best in Business contest, email Aimee O’Grady at bib at sabew dot org.

  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 24th Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday March 26, 2019

    The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) announces the results of its 24th annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding business journalism of 2018.

    Panels of judges selected 74 winners and 48 honorable mentions from 946 entries. Submissions came from 175 news organizations across all platforms representing the breadth of business journalism, from international, national and regional news outlets to specialized business publications.

    View the complete list of honorees and read the judges’ comments and journalists who contributed to the honored work.

    Highlights of the #SABEWBIB include:

    – The Financial Times, The Dallas Morning News, the Nashville Business Journal and American Banker earned general excellence honors.

    – Overall, The New York Times took home the most honors, including seven winners and two honorable mentions (one a collaborative effort with The Guardian/The Observer).

    – Bloomberg News and Bloomberg BNA had eight honors, including three winners.

    – The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal and Fortune Magazine each had four top-place awards, in addition to honorable mentions.

    – In the student categories, top honors went to Andres Guerra Luz of Arizona State University’s Cronkite News Bureau; Ryan Haar of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for a piece in the Triangle Business Journal; Hannah Denham of Washington and Lee University, for stories in the Tampa Bay Times; and a student team from Baruch College – City University of New York for work produced in Dollars & Sense.

    – Among smaller newsrooms, the Nashville Business Journal won three awards and one honorable mention, American Banker won three awards and InsideClimate News had two winners plus an honorable mention.

    – The contest reflected the growing trend of newsroom collaboration. Four collaborative projects won and two partnerships received honorable mentions, representing the combined work of 15 news organizations. The Associated Press, The Investigative Fund and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists partnered on more than one honored project.

    – A robust variety of winners in the medium and small newsroom categories included The Story Exchange, The Marshall Project, GateHouse Media, ProPublica, the Project on Government Oversight, RTO Insider, The Globe and Mail and Kaiser Health News.

    – Winners for commentary/opinion included Rana Foroohar of the Financial Times (large), Daniel Howes of The Detroit News (medium) and Rick Wartzman of Fast Company (small).

    “The winners of this year’s Best in Business contest are truly outstanding examples of business journalism, and SABEW is proud to recognize them,” said Joanna Ossinger, chair of the Best in Business Awards contest and an editor at Bloomberg News. “I’d also like to thank all the judges for volunteering their time to make this possible.”

    The journalists will receive awards at a celebratory dinner at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix on May 17 at SABEW’s 56th annual conference. Arizona State University’s Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication is hosting the conference at its Phoenix campus. Best in Business honorees are eligible to attend the conference at a discounted rate.

    SABEW is the world’s largest and oldest organization of business and financial journalists. It launched the Best in Business competition in 1995 to recognize excellence in the industry. SABEW Canada’s BIB winners will be announced next month.

    For more information on the contest, contact Aimée O’Grady at [email protected].

  • SABEW18 – Morgenson: ‘It’s about more than the awards’

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Saturday April 28, 2018

    By Sarah Foster
    Medill News Service

    April, 2018

    Gretchen Morgenson was walking up Third Avenue in New York City, still fresh off her move from The New York Times to The Wall Street Journal, when an abrupt shouting sounded in the distance.  

    “I don’t mean to bother you! I don’t mean to bother you!” the voice said.

    She didn’t acknowledge the commotion at first, thinking the pedestrian was just talking on his cell phone. But soon enough, he caught up to her.

    “He said, ‘I really don’t want to bother you, but I just wanted to let you know that, I really miss you in The New York Times. I don’t know where to find you. I love your stuff,’” Morgenson said. “I said (to him), ‘Don’t worry. You just made my whole week.’”

    The business reporter, known for her crusade-like coverage of Wall Street abuses, isn’t used to being recognized. Her byline, a staple on the Sunday front page of The Times’ business section for nearly two decades, was enough to make financial institutions fearful and fellow journalists prideful. Her face, however, has remained mostly unrecognizable.

    “I’m toiling in obscurity,” Morgenson said. “I’m not a television person. Nobody knows what I look like.”

    But these moments of recognition from her readers, she said, energize her — even more than her Pulitzer Prize, and most recently, the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s 2018 Distinguished Achievement Award, which she accepted Friday at a reception.

    Gretchen Morgenson, right, speaks at the Best in Business Dinner and Award Ceremony at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s spring conference. Morgenson received the Distinguished Achievement Award.

    The recognition is always great, she said, but journalism is about more than the accolades.

    Morgenson, who left the Times in November for a position on the investigations team at the Journal, remembers receiving a letter from a reader after the 2008 financial crisis. The writer thanked her for her pre-crash coverage on credit default swaps.

    You saved me from aggravation and loss, the reader wrote.  

    “If I can help people understand the complexities and the impact of these powerful institutions and people, that’s why I get up in the morning,” Morgenson said.

    Before she became the Gretchen Morgenson who helped take down Enron and WorldCom, a reporter who helped shine a light on the dot-com boom and bust, and who exposed questionable practices on Wall Street, she was Gretchen Morgenson: secretary at Vogue magazine.   

    She’d wanted to be a journalist early on in college, fueled by inspiration from Watergate reporters Woodward and Bernstein. Preparing to graduate from college, she mailed out countless job applications.

    Vogue was the only place that called her back.  

    “I could’ve written ‘The Devil Wears Prada’ because that was my life,” she said.

    She accepted the position, knowing it wasn’t what she aspired to do in the end, but realized the job would be a valuable introduction to life in New York. She met Truman Capote. Vera Wang. Jackie Kennedy Onassis. Eventually, an opportunity to write a monthly personal finance column opened up.

    Morgenson, who had never before taken an economics class, raised her hand.

    “I solved a problem for them by just saying I’d do it,” she said. “I was interested in it because I understood that finance and business obviously has a huge, huge impact on everybody’s lives.”

    But after five years at Vogue, Morgenson was ready for a change. She took on a position as a Wall Street stockbroker at Dean Witter Reynolds. She figured she couldn’t make a living at Vogue, where she earned just $10,000 a year.

    “I didn’t have a rich father to pay my expenses or a rich husband,” she said.

    The position gave Morgenson a front-row seat to business. It was a space where she could familiarize herself with its key players. She figured out where the bodies were buried, she said.

    She didn’t intend to go back to journalism when she left it in the early 1980s. But after witnessing a bear market in tech stocks in 1983, she couldn’t take it anymore. The market cracked open — and some people lost everything.

    “When things went wrong, when the market goes down, and it’s not anybody’s fault, it’s really hard to feel good about what you’re doing because people are losing money, and money is important,” she said. “I just found that part of the job was too stressful.”

    Morgenson found a position at Forbes and used her experience on Wall Street to set herself apart from other reporters. She idolized her editor at Forbes, who she said had incredibly high standards. The experience pushed her to learn more and improve.

    She worked stints at Money and Worth magazines. She worked as a press secretary for the 1996 presidential campaign of Steve Forbes. Eventually, she found her way to the Times, where she served as an assistant business editor and columnist.

    In 2002, she won the Pulitzer Prize for beat reporting.   

    Dean Murphy, an associate editor of the Times who worked closely with Morgenson, said even though she had won the Pulitzer, she continued to write and investigate, always working for her readers.

    “She just continued to be aggressive in her approach,” he said. “She was one of the most intrepid, fearless, hardworking reporters on my staff. She knew how to find things. She knew where to look. She wasn’t pushy that way, but she could really help people.”

    More than 20 years later, Morgenson shows no signs of walking away.

    “Business and finance intersects in every person’s life,” she said. “It’s at the intersection of Washington, Wall Street. Everybody has to save for retirement. Everybody has to put food on the table. Being able to cover it, to explain what’s happening, why it’s happening, who is doing it, is tremendously valuable.”

  • SABEW Canada’s 4th Annual Best in Business Awards Nominees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday April 3, 2018

    The nominees for SABEW Canada’s 4th Annual Best in Business Awards (in no particular order):

    Breaking news

    Bloomberg, Bank of Canada rate hike
    Theo Argitis, Greg Quinn, Maciej Onoszko, Erik Hertzberg, Josh Wingrove, Natalie Wong, Kevin Orland, Lily Jamali, Katia Dmitrieva, Dan Moss, Katherine Greifeld, Allison McNeely, Doug Alexander, Anny Kuo, Luke Kawa, Marc Perrier, Kristine Owram, Rita Devlin, Linly Lin and Courtney Dentch

    The Globe and Mail, the deaths of Barry and Honey Sherman
    Paul Waldie, Tim Kiladze, Alexandra Posadzki, Andrew Willis, Jeff Gray, Tavia Grant, Kelly Grant, Tu Thanh Ha, Molly Hayes, Joe Friesen, Josh O’Kane and Susan Krashinsky Robertson

    Canadian Press, the Equifax data breach
    Armina Ligaya, Aleksandra Sagan, David Hodges and Ross Marowits

     

    Commentary

    Eric Reguly, The Globe and Mail

    Rita Trichur, Report on Business magazine

    David Parkinson, The Globe and Mail

     

    Feature (long-form)

    Claire Brownell, Adrian Humphreys and Jake Edmiston, National Post
    “Two legacies, one dark mystery — the deaths of Barry and Honey Sherman”

    Charles Wilkins, Report on Business magazine
    “Home of the strange”

    Mark MacKinnon, Geoffrey York and Nathan VanderKlippe, The Globe and Mail
    “How Bombardier’s ‘success fees’ gave the transport giant an inside track to deals around the world”

     

    Feature (short-form)

    Peter Kuitenbrouwer and Laura Pederson, Financial Post
    “How Canada became a tomato superpower”

    Danielle Bochove, Bloomberg
    “The Canadian ghost town that Tesla is bringing back to life”

    Susan Krashinsky Robertson, The Globe and Mail
    “Saying goodbye: Kanata paper founded by 14-year-old is one casualty of Postmedia-Torstar deal”

     

    Package

    Sarah Efron, Brenda Bouw, Chris Hannay and Bill Curry, The Globe and Mail
    Small-business tax changes

    Allison McNeely, Bloomberg
    Shadow lending

    Mike Hager, Nathan VanderKlippe, Jill Mahoney, Matthew McClearn, Barrie McKenna, David Parkinson, Janet McFarland, Tamsin McMahon and Tim Kiladze, The Globe and Mail
    Housing

     

    Profile

    Steve Burgess, BCBusiness
    “The Way of the Dragan”

    Claire Brownell, Financial Post
    “Vitalik Buterin: The cryptocurrency prophet”

    Jacqueline Nelson, The Globe and Mail
    “Mark Machin: Appetite for risk”

     

    Personal Finance/Investing

    David Milstead, The Globe and Mail

    Prajakta Dhopade, MoneySense

    Sarah Efron, The Globe and Mail
    “Only the wealthy? The truth about the Liberals’ proposed small-business tax reforms”

     

    Investigative

    Tavia Grant, The Globe and Mail
    Canada’s deadliest jobs

    Marina Strauss, Report on Business magazine
    “Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”

    Grant Robertson and Tom Cardoso, The Globe and Mail
    White-collar crime in Canada

     

    Beat Reporting

    Joe Castaldo, Maclean’s
    Housing

    Christine Dobby, The Globe and Mail
    Canadian telecom

    Marina Strauss, The Globe and Mail
    Retailing

    Claudia Cattaneo, Financial Post
    Energy

     

    A huge thank-you to our judges:

    Greg Bonnell, Mark Brown, Lynn Cunningham, Henry Dubroff, Chelsea Emery, Pete Evans, Max Fawcett, Derek Finkle, David Friend, Lee-Anne Goodman, Megan Griffith Greene, Murad Hemmadi, Ken Hunt, Steve Ladurantaye, Amanda Lang, Andree Lau, Tracey Lindeman, James Madore, Susan Nerberg, Mira Oberman, Joanna Ossinger, Neil Parmar, David Scanlan, Cory Schouten, Anna Sharratt, Caleb Silver and Marty Wolk.

     

    We’d also like to thank our generous sponsors, who are making our awards night on April 18 possible:

    TD Bank, Accenture, Cision, Fidelity Investments, Schulich School of Business, Ivey Business Journal, Longview Communications and Cannex

  • Nominees Announced: SABEW Canada’s 3rd Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By David Wilhite on Friday March 31, 2017

    TORONTO, March 31, 2017 /CNW/ – The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Canada is excited to announce the list of nominees for the 3rd Annual Best In Business Awards competition, recognizing outstanding business reporting published or broadcast in 2016.

    This year, SABEW Canada received a record number of submissions from journalists across the country. The nominees represent some of Canada’s most venerable publications, including the Financial Post, Canadian Business, Bloomberg Canada, The Globe and Mail, the Wall Street Journal and more.

    Their stories shone a spotlight in 2016 on some of the most important issues in the Canadian business landscape  — from runaway house-flipping in Vancouver, Bombardier’s attempts to suppress information, and the failure of retail giant Target’s expansion into Canada.

    “Despite a difficult year in the media industry, we received a record number of submissions this year,” said SABEW Canada’s chairperson, Dawn Calleja. “Selecting finalists was an especially challenging task for our 27 judges, highlighting not only the depth and quality of business journalism in Canada, but also the valuable role it plays. ”

    There are a total of 27 finalists in nine categories this year, selected from well over 100 applicants. Categories include investigative, commentary, investing and personal finance, features, multimedia, beat reporting, package and profile.

    SABEW Canada would like to extend a very heartfelt thank-you to our distinguished judges, chosen from among Canadian and U.S. news outlets and journalism schools.

    The winners will be announced at the Best In Business Awards reception on April 19 at Baro in Toronto. Business journalists interested in attending can register at sabew.org/canada. The cost is $25 for SABEW members and $40 for non-members. Tickets include hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

    Nominees for SABEW Canada’s 3rd Annual Best in Business Awards (in no particular order):

    Beat Reporting

    Bloomberg News – Toronto Bureau
    Gerrit De Vynck
    Technology

    Financial Post
    Claudia Cattaneo
    Energy

    Globe and Mail
    Jacqueline Nelson
    Insurance

    Commentary

    Report on Business Magazine
    Eric Reguly
    International Business

    Report on Business Magazine
    Ian McGugan
    Investing

    Canadian Business
    Deborah Aarts
    The Realist Column

    Feature (Long-form)

    Canadian Business
    Joe Castaldo
    The Last Days of Target

    Report on Business Magazine
    Bruce Livesey
    Company Province, Provincial Company

    Globe and Mail
    Sean Silcoff
    Vision Critical

    Feature (Short-form)

    Bloomberg News – Toronto Bureau
    Gerrit De Vynck
    Bunz

    Financial Post
    Claire Brownell
    The End of Meat

    Bloomberg News – Vancouver Bureau
    Natalie Obiko Pearson
    Trump Brothel

    Investigative

    Globe and Mail
    Kathy Tomlinson
    B.C Housing Investigation

    Ottawa Citizen
    James Bagnall
    Built To Fail

    Financial Post
    Kristine Owram
    How Bombardier Suppresses Information

    Multimedia

    MoneySense
    Romana King, Mark Brown and Prajakta Dhopade
    City or Suburbs: Where can you afford to live?

    Financial Post
    Peter Kuitenbrouwer and Peter J. Thompson
    The Sault Ste. Marie Locks

    Globe and Mail
    Chris Manza, Jeremy Agius, Michael Pereira, Andrew Saikali, Tamsin McMahon, Brent Jang, D’Arcy McGovern, Duncan Hood, Matt Lundy and Rob Carrick
    Real Estate Data

    Package or Ongoing Series

    Bloomberg News – Vancouver Bureau
    Natalie Obiko Pearson, Katia Dmitrieva and Gerrit de Vynck
    Real Estate

    CPA Magazine – CPA Canada
    Susan Smith, Manon Chevalier, Rosalind Stefanac and Peter Carter
    The Immigration Issue

    Globe and Mail
    Rob Carrick, Roma Luciw, Jacqueline Nelson, Brent Jang, David Parkinson, Chris Manza and Matt Lundy
    House Poor

    Personal Finance/Investing

    Globe and Mail
    David Milstead
    Valeant Investing

    Money Sense
    Bryan Borzykowski
    Shocking Tax Tips You’re Missing Out On

    MoneySense
    Julie Cazzin, Mark Brown, Dan Bortolotti, Bryan Borzykowski, David Fielding and David Thomas
    Personal Finance Package

    Profile

    Globe and Mail
    James Bradshaw and Christine Dobby
    Blais

    BCBusiness Magazine
    Frances Bula
    Between a Rock and a Hard Place

    Report on Business Magazine
    Max Fawcett
    The Artist of the Deal

    About SABEW

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is a 50-year-old organization with more than 3,000 members across the globe. Journalists from The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, CNN and other organizations, big and small, are involved in the organization.

    About SABEW Canada

    A group of Canadian journalists launched SABEW Canada, SABEW’s first international chapter, last year. We now have more than 200 members, among them reporters and editors from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, MoneySense, Bloomberg, Canadian Press, the Wall Street Journal and more.

    SABEW Canada’s mission statement is simple: We want to define and inspire excellence in business journalism. We do that by hosting educational events with company chief executives, leading business journalists and well-known politicians, among others. We also offer teletraining to members to help improve their skills, and hold networking events where business journalists can make new connections, as well as catch up with colleagues and friends.

    For further information: Dawn Calleja at [email protected] or 416-554-6450

     

     

  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 21st Annual Best in Business Awards

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday March 17, 2016

    PHOENIX — The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) today announces winners and finalists in its 21st annual Best in Business (BIB) Awards competition, which recognizes outstanding business journalism that was published or aired in 2015.

    Adding up winners and finalists, Bloomberg led with seven honors, while The New York Times earned six honors — all winners. A diverse group of news outlets earned four honors apiece: ProPublica, Quartz, Reuters, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Minneapolis StarTribune, The Center for Public Integrity, and International Business Times. News outlets with three honors included The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press, CNBC, Portland Business Journal, Fortune, and Institutional Investor.

    The 116 honored works represent all corners of the financial news industry. To read the complete list of winners and finalists and the judges’ comments, click here. For a complete list of winners only, click here.

    “The quality of this year’s honorees is really excellent, and it’s great to see so many different organizations having an impact with their business reporting,” said SABEW President Joanna Ossinger, team leader at First Word Americas FX at Bloomberg News. “We at SABEW are proud to honor such good work.”

    SABEW will honor the winners and finalists at a ceremony on Saturday, May 21, during the 53rd annual spring conference in the Washington, D.C., area. The conference and ceremony will be held at the DoubleTree by Hilton hotel in Crystal City, Va. Conference speakers include Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson, and Washington Post executive editor Martin Baron. There will also be panel discussions covering the marijuana business, the rise of e-newsletters, how reporters can better delve into wage issues, and much more.

    Click here for conference details and registration information.

    “I am delighted to announce a special discounted conference rate of $250 for BIB honorees,” said SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham. “We plan to showcase the work of honorees throughout the conference to encourage, inspire, and teach fellow journalists.”

    More than 190 working journalists and academics served as contest judges, sifting through 880 entries representing 175 news outlets across 71 categories. Here is a sampling of the winners honored by SABEW judges:

    – The Associated Press investigated the Thai seafood industry’s use of slaves to catch and package seafood sold in the U.S., a series that led to the release of some 2,000 people.

    – ProPublica explained in words and interactive graphics how debt collectors are more likely to sue black people.

    – Quartz produced a thought-provoking and visually arresting feature about the Internet’s underground economy.

    – International Business Times examined how private prisons exploit inmates’ use of telecommunications by levying huge fees.

    – The Wall Street Journal cinematically chronicled the desperation of a young banker who admitted his role in an interest-rate rigging scandal.

    – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel exposed in a series of stories the health threats faced by workers in the coffee-roasting industry.

    – Bloomberg Businessweek revealed that a CEO who cast himself as a hero for cutting his salary later earned hefty amounts from speaking fees and a book deal.

    – The New York Times showed how billions of dollars tainted by corruption and tax avoidance flow unchecked into New York’s real-estate market.

    – Portland Business Journal exposed why Oregon has emerged as a haven for the registration of shell companies that often hide dubious activities.

    – Student journalists from Baruch College/CUNYproduced a series of multimedia stories on entrepreneurs in the emerging Cuba economy.

    – Fortune employed shoe-leather reporting and narrative skill to illuminate how lax computer security at Sony enabled hackers to leak company emails.

    – CNBC demonstrated great skill in using social media to deliver news in all formats and to engage with its audience.

    – Reuters produced a series of balanced and sharply written commentaries on the interplay between Wall Street and the gun industry.

    – Minneapolis StarTribune published a series of insightful columns on the beleaguered retailer Target, a major local employer.

    – The Seattle Times, The Center for Public Integrity, and BuzzFeed News jointly exposed the high fees and interest rates of a mobile-home business owned by Warren Buffett.

    SABEW, the world’s largest and oldest organization of business and financial journalists, began the Best in Business competition in 1995 to set standards and recognize excellence in the industry.

    For more information on the contest, contact Crystal Beasley at [email protected] or 602-496-7862.

  • Canadian SABEW member wins first prize in the PMAC Awards for Excellence in Investment Journalism

    Posted By admin on Thursday May 22, 2014

    Bryan BorzykowskiSpecial to SABEW

    The Portfolio Management Association of Canada (PMAC) announced the winners of its third annual PMAC Awards for Excellence in Investment Journalism (the PMAC Awards) today.

    First prize went to SABEW member Bryan Borzykowski for the Canadian Business Investor’s Guide 2014, an investment resource for all levels of investors.

    Winners were selected from 31 French and English entries from 13 unique publications. Judges represented a variety of professionals from within the field of journalism and investment/financial services.

    The prizes, including the $5,000 first prize, will be presented at an investment industry event in Toronto on June 16, 2014.

    Read the full story here.

  • Reynolds Center awards fellowship to two journalists to attend SABEW Conference

    Posted By admin on Thursday February 27, 2014

    Special to SABEW

    Phoeniz logoPHOENIX- The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism has awarded fellowships to two journalists to attend the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) spring conference in Phoenix from March 27-29.

    The fellowships were awarded to Jason Frazer of WFSB-TV in Hartford, Conn. and Sam Murillo of La Voz, Ariz. Both fellows will participate in the Reynolds Center training and SABEW events. Read the full story…

  • Winners of the Barlett and Steele awards include the Tampa Bay Times, NY Times and The Wall Street Journal

    Posted By admin on Tuesday October 1, 2013

    BarlettSteeleAward_2Special to SABEW

    PHOENIX–The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism announced today the winners of the prestigious Barlett and Steele awards.

    The gold prize went to  a Tampa Bay Times/Center for Investigative Reporting collaboration on “America’s Worst Charities,” a project by Kris Hundley and Kendall Taggart that identified charities that steered as much as 95 percent of donations to boiler-room operations and direct-mail companies.

    The silver award went to “The United States of Subsidies,” by Louise Story of The New York Time. The project tabulated the $80 billion that local governments dole out to corporations each year in tax breaks and other business incentives – expenditures to recruit and keep businesses that may or may not produce results.

    The bronze went to Susan Pulliam, Rob Barry, Michael Siconolfi and Jean Eaglesham of The Wall Street Journal for their work on “Inside Game: How Corporate Insiders Profit Ahead of the Public,” an  examination of how more than 20,000 corporate executives traded their own companies’ stock over the course of eight years.

    Read the full story here.

    The awards are named for the renowned investigative team of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, whose numerous awards include two Pulitzer Prizes, these annual awards, funded by the Reynolds Center, celebrate the best in investigative business journalism.

    The judges for this year’s awards were Amanda Bennett, editor-at-large for Bloomberg News; Paul Steiger, ProPublica’s founding editor-in-chief and current executive chairman; and Rob Reuteman, freelance writer, professor at Colorado State University and former president of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

    The awards will be conferred Nov. 18 at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University in Phoenix.

  • Jan. 21: Virtual Training from 2-3 p.m. EST: Using data to create powerful stories

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Tuesday December 24, 2019

    There’s never been a better time to be a data journalist. Society is increasingly being driven by data, and the widespread availability of all of this digital information is opening up new opportunities for storytelling. But how do you get started? SABEW’s next training session will teach you how to use data to produce high-impact stories. We’ll talk about how data journalists go about their jobs, and how different newsrooms define data journalism. Our presenters will also share their best practices and talk about some of their favorite data mining tools.

    The webinar recording will be available soon.

    Presenters:

    Ashleigh Cotting, assistant manager of the data journalism team, S&P Global Market Intelligence. Ashleigh manages the Commodities Data Journalism team within the newsroom at S&P Global Market Intelligence. Prior to managing the team, Ashleigh specialized in writing data driven coverage of the energy and metals and mining industries. Now, she leads the team’s efforts in using data to cover both breaking news and long term trends in both industries. Ashleigh also manages the Cartography team at S&P Global Market Intelligence, which produces maps for the company’s news and research teams for use in articles and reports. @ashcotz

    John Hillkirk, senior enterprise editor, Kaiser Health News. John previously was a reporter or editor at USA Today. His KHN team has won a variety of awards including a Bartlett and Steele Gold Medal, a Gerald Loeb Award and prizes from the National Press Club, NIHCM, AHCJ and National Headliners. At USA Today, John led the newspaper’s Investigations team, which won two IRE Silver Medals, a Gerald Loeb Award, a duPont-Columbia prize and a Pulitzer finalist. Prior to that, John was editor-in-chief at USA Today for three years and executive editor for five years. John has co-authored three books: “Xerox: American Samurai,” “Grit, Guts and Genius” and “A Better Idea: Redefining the Way Americans Work.” John graduated from and received an honorary doctorate degree from Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania. @johnhillkirk

    Elizabeth Lucas, data editor, Kaiser Health Health News. Liz specializes in data analysis and reporting for the KHN enterprise team. She came from Investigative Reporters and Editors, where she spent four years training and supporting data journalists around the world as the NICAR Data Library director. Previously she worked as a data reporter on health and the environment for the Center for Public Integrity. She has a master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism. @eklucas

  • Spring 2019 Blog Posts

    Posted By Tess McLaughlin on Thursday December 12, 2019

    Planning for Study Abroad: How to finance your semester BEFORE you get there

    By Mimi Wright

    If there is one piece of advice that I would give to any college student, it would be this: study abroad. The experiences, connections and sights you see are priceless. But unfortunately, the trip is not. Studying abroad is a hefty financial undertaking. It can be extremely overwhelming when you are faced with the program fee, because I know I was. A helpful tip: PLAN AHEAD. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How to travel cheaply while studying abroad

    By Chloe Thornberry

    Arriving in the country that’s you’ve chosen to do your study abroad is a thrill.  But it’s just the start – now that you’ve taken this big leap, you might as well see as much of the world as possible. If there are alarms going off in your head telling you that sounds off-the-wall expensive, take a breath. There are ways to travel abroad without breaking the bank. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Learning about financial aid, right from the source!

    By Sydney Calhoun

    Who would have thought that a journalism major would be working in a university financial aid office, but I’m glad I do!  In today’s world of student loans and repayment plans, life can get the best of your wallet. After all, two-thirds of students at public universities like mine have student loans. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: What to do when your campus job is a brain drain

    By Payton Cousins

    What do you do when your job is intellectually and mentally exhausting? What do you do when you need more hours to make more money, but you don’t have the brain power to keep working? This is a problem that I experience all the time. I currently work as a writing tutor at the University of Missouri, which means that my job is basically helping students at any stage in the writing process. It can be in any topic, from Engineering, English, Political Science… I have even edited creative writing pieces for Literature and Film Writing classes. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Saving Up to Giddy Up

    By Paulina Crum

    First – you have to know that I’m from Montana. I have been riding horses since I was six, and have desperately wanted a horse of my own, but I have never been able to afford to buy one. Now, it seems like there may be a way to finally purchase the horse I have always wanted. I have been hired for two good paying jobs this summer at a public relations firm and as a receptionist at an equine vet clinic. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: All Work, No Play: Why Everyone Needs to Find A Balance

    By Paola Rodriguez

    All work, no play makes Jack a dull boy. As much as this may seem to be true, working is quite important at the end of the day. It is a means to receiving income in order to live even if it creates a struggle to keep a balance of a social life, good grades, internships and living as comfortably as possible. For many students across the country, this is a reality. Devon Bennett, a junior at the University of Missouri- Columbia, admitted his own struggles as a working student. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How to Afford a Trip to the Movies

    By Abby Monteil

    College is often characterized as a place to gain exposure to new experiences and culture, as well as to meet new people. One reputable way to do this is to catch a new movie with friends. However, a trip to the theater is getting increasingly difficult to afford for college students who are dealing with the costs of attending school. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Money Saving Tips for Your Time Abroad

    By Eli Lederman

    So you’re studying abroad? Awesome. You’ve been accepted into your program. You’ve completed all the painstaking paperwork and endured the process of getting a visa or any other documentation process. You even performed all the financial gymnastics necessary and now, finally, you’ve arrived in Europe or South America or another far away land you’ve chosen to expand your horizons and experience the world. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Earning and Saving Money with Out Leaving Your Dorm Room

    By Meredith Westrich

    Juggling a job while being a full-time student can extremely stressful—there seems to never be enough time or money.  One solution is to make money on your own time schedule, without even ever having to leave your room. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Working full-time and being a student full-time is a challenge

    By Andrea Jennemann

    When the end of my first year of college ended, and everyone was moving out of the dorms and beginning to sign leases for apartments, my father told me I would be solely responsible for my living costs from that point on. Because of a change in roommates, I was late in signing my lease. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Hard financial choices lead to grit and determination in college

    By Crystal Cox

    In my first two years at college, I’ve had to make a decision that my high school self could not have imagined: go to class or be able to afford to eat. This is the reality that I, and many students who come from low-income families, face. Having to work 40 hours a week at an entry-level service job is difficult, but having to do so while being a full-time college student is beyond exhausting. Since being introduced to the economic concept of opportunity cost, I’ve thought a lot about how school and work are opposing variables in my life. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Finding a student job with medical limitations

    By Joseph Bartholomew

    Going into college, I had never had a job. In high school, during the summer going into my sophomore year, I was diagnosed with cancer, at the age of 15. This prevented me from living the normal life of a high schooler as I was pulled from my classes and began treatment. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Are Credit Cards Necessary for Students?

    By Tyler Head

    Will that be cash or credit? These days this question almost seems redundant. Our society is continuously advancing its technology and the thought of paying for things with physical dollar bills feels slightly antiquated to many students. According to a 2016 study done by Sallie Mae, a federally-back lending institution, 56 percent of college students have credit cards. However, the responsibility that comes with having credit cards isn’t for everyone and managing that responsibility raises the question among some of whether they should have credit cards or not. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: What You Should Know Before Signing a Rental Lease

    By Caroline Friedman

    A recent ranking conducted by the financial technology company SmartAsset found that seven of the top ten most transient cities in the country are college towns. In a city like Athens, Georgia, home to the University of Georgia and a transitory student population of nearly 38,000, the options for rental housing are seemingly endless. Although the search process is a relatively easy one for students here, it’s what follows that causes much consternation and difficulty. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Student Saves Money by Renting Textbooks

    By Lauren Diaz

    As a finance student at the University of Georgia, Nathan Moon is required to purchase textbooks that retail upwards of $120. Rather than purchasing them, however, Moon rents them through rental sites that help students save as much as 90 percent of the publisher’s price. “If I were to buy all of my books every semester, it would be close to $500,” Moon said. “If I rent them, I can stay within my budget and don’t have to spend a large portion of my money.” Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Overcoming Unexpected Medical Expenses

    By Mauli Desai

    A visit to the doctor’s office is often met with the question: “On a scale of one to 10 rate your pain.” Rajan Bedi’s response of nine out of 10 on the pain scale was the beginning of a yearlong ordeal. In 2018, while on his way to The Reserve apartment complex to watch the Philadelphia Eagles play the New England Patriots in The Super Bowl, Bedi, was hit on the driver side by a speeder who blew past a yield sign at an intersection on the east side of Athens, Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: What to Expect Financially When Studying Abroad

    By Steve Conyers

    Studying abroad offers a unique experience to students who gain new perspectives by visiting other countries. Broadening one’s world view through hands-on teaching in an unfamiliar culture, gaining valuable networking connections and increasing communication skills in an increasingly demanding global job market are just a few of the advantages students obtain when they study abroad. However, only 10 percent of undergraduate students in the U.S. will study abroad before they graduate, according to the Institute of International Education. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Scholarship Strain

    By Eleanor Cash

    With the end of spring semester approaching, college seniors across the country are looking forward to wearing their caps and gowns and receiving their diplomas.  Soon after flipping their tassels, however, many of these new graduates will be forced to confront a growing national problem: repaying their student loan debt. Student loans place only second to mortgage debt in the consumer debt category. In 2018, 69 percent of students took out loans, and graduated with an average debt of $29,800. To paint a broader picture, Americans owe over $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: College Budgeting: Taking it One Step at a Time

    By Ellie Bramel

    Kelsey Snelgrove was in the sixth grade when the Great Recession happened. The crash hit close to home, and she watched her parents lose the business they had worked to build. “My dad literally came to me one day and was like, okay, so we have a bag of money. It says for groceries. That’s it. We have no other money,” Snelgrove recalled. She said the experience gave her a deeper understanding of money as she learned how to stretch her family’s dollar. Now a junior at the University of Georgia, she uses that understanding to budget her paychecks, account for weekly expenses and adopt long-term savings goals. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Students Turn to Mobile Apps for Financial Tools

    By Jessica Wurst

    Mobile finance applications can offer a simple way for students to track personal finances, but they also can make it too easy to put money into the stock market without proper knowledge. App such as Mint and Acorns aid students with financial management by tracking spending and account balances. Similar apps providedby banks such as SunTrust and Wells Fargo are also attractive to students due to their simplicity and brand recognition. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Is the Master’s Degree the New Bachelor’s?

    By Rebecca Wright

    A bachelor’s degree may soon not be enough to win in a competitive job market. With increasing access to college education, students in the United States are looking for ways to differentiate themselves. Some choose to pursue multiple internships or dual majors, but more often students now are taking the GRE exam with hopes of qualifying for graduate school. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: College Students and Health Insurance

    By Jennifer Williams

    As college students graduate and enter the job market, they face a critical question: How will they pay for health insurance? The Affordable Care Act (ACA) plays a significant role in young adults’ coverage decisions, as it allows them to remain on their parents’ insurance until age 26. This is an advantage for many students who are worried about affording health care on their own as they start their careers and begin paying off student loans. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Worth of an Unpaid Internship

    By Sidhartha Wakade

    Employers today expect job-seekers — including soon-to-be or recent college graduates — to have some level of practical experience in their chosen fields. For many college students, this experience comes from part-time jobs, internships or work-study programs. Not all of these options provide pay, however. For Sarah Lanier, a 20-year-old junior public relations major at the University of Georgia, an unpaid internship has been part of her course of study. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Students and Their Loans

    By Jenny Vo

    When Russell Cochran left Faulkner University in Montgomery, Alabama, he also left behind a football scholarship worth about $22,000 a year. Cochran said he no longer wanted to play football and transferred to the University of Georgia to pursue a degree in Housing Management and Policy. “I was a sports management major there and I decided I wanted to do real estate and they didn’t have it, so I transferred,” he said, noting that it costs more to go to UGA. “But I believe it’s worth it.” Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: A Student’s Guide to Financial Understanding

    By Ashley Scott

    When Luke Morgan came to The University of Georgia to start his freshman year of college, he understood only as much about personal finance as he needed to get by. “It either comes from being raised in a family that teaches you, or doing it and learning, and the latter is probably the more effective way of doing anything,” he said. By learning as he went along, Morgan acquired the skills he needed to be near self-sufficient by his graduation in December 2018. He began with help from his parents, but gradually transitioned into paying for his expenses on his own. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Why Students Should Practice Budgeting While in College

    By Charlotte Norsworthy

    Before Alexis Manson decides to buy a concert ticket or go out to dinner with a friend, she pulls out her laptop to check her digital budget. “It’s like a game, she said. “It’s honestly kind of fun.” Manson is a junior international affairs major at the University of Georgia from Smithfield, Virginia, and while she doesn’t need to be financially independent from her parents, she likes to practice ways to curtail wasteful spending. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Students and Credit Scores

    By Spencer McGuire

    Are credit scores important to college students? Short answer: yes. But that’s not the whole story. Behind every credit score is a more detailed set of three credit reports, according to The University of Georgia’s Mary Carlson, a professor in the Financial Planning Master’s program. TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian are the three companies that pull a person’s financial history, and from that information, create a report about what kind of spender a person is along with a repayment history. If someone pays off the credit card debt consistently, or has a lot of unpaid debt, these companies will know about it. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Federal Work-Study Offers Flexible Job Opportunities for Students

    By Kelly Mayes

    Having a part-time job in college can be a balancing act for many students, but some may find the flexibility they need if they qualify for the Federal Work-Study Program. This program, offered by about 3,400 colleges in the U.S., awards grants for undergraduate and graduate students who qualify to gain valuable work experience pertaining to their career. Peyton Etheridge, a first-year intended public relations student at the University of Georgia, has worked in the front office of the Odum School of Ecology this year. The Federal Work-Study program has been a good option for her. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Car Repair Research Can Help Students Avoid Being Overcharged

    By Savannah Martin

    College is the time when many young adults find themselves facing huge financial responsibilities for the first time. But, sometimes it can be routine things such as car repair that cause the most concern. Emilie Gille, a senior at the University of Georgia, said she has been warned about general sexism toward women when it comes to car repairs and she is concerned about being ripped off. “I’m always very wary,” said Gille. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How Students Can Overcome the Intimidation of Tax Filing

    By Grace Langella

    Taxes can be intimidating, especially for students. Nique Roth, a University of Georgia marketing major, said taxes make her nervous because she knows so little. “If there was an outlet to learn about them, I wouldn’t be scared,” said Roth, “but because it’s kind of a free for all, I’m definitely intimidated by the idea of filing them myself.” According to Lance Palmer, a professor of Family Planning and Consumer Economics, many students have a skewed view of taxes because of the media. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Understanding Student Loan Repayment Options

    By Zach Jones

    Student debt in the United States has reached a staggering $1.5 trillion, but many students know very little about their own loans and how they factor into that giant number. When college students defer to their parents on loan decisions, they typically rely on their parents to do the research and pick the type of loan. This decision will ultimately affect the types of repayment options available once the students graduate. “I was kept in the dark really. My parents took care of picking what type of loan I got, and I was never aware that the type of loan could affect my repayment options,” said Michael Ackerman, a student at The University of North Georgia. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Cheap Peace of Mind: College Students and the Need for Renters Insurance

    By Collin Huguley

    College students living away from home for the first time often feel the need for more education on how to protect their living spaces and belongings from potential disaster. For these students, renters insurance is a new concept. “At this point in our lives, we haven’t really experienced much in the realm of home owning,” said 22-year-old University of Georgia student Amanda Gruner. “It’s not like a staple that we’re told about; that we need renters insurance. We’re taught that we need bedding, but not that we need insurance.” Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Navigating Life as a Student Entrepreneur

    By Michael Hebert

    Senior marketing major Kaitlin Lutz always wanted to be an entrepreneur. She started a dog walking business when she was younger, making flyers with her face, a picture of a dog and a little dog bone to promote her service around the neighborhood.“I’ve always had some sort of itch for entrepreneurship as long as I can remember,” Lutz said. As a student at the University of Georgia, Lutz sought out the training offered through the UGA Idea Accelerator, an eight-week program where students are trained in how to develop a business. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Lessons Learned About Life, Finances and Family

    By Noelle Schon

    When it comes to my personal experience with money, I am very lucky to have had parents who opened a college fund for me early on.  My parents are both in the business and finance field. My mother was a regional vice president for Bank of America before taking time off to raise me and my siblings. She is very helpful when it comes to explaining the financial world to me, which really piqued my interest in the field as I grew up. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Unexpected Costs of International Travel

    By Nicole Hernandez

    Peru was the trip of a lifetime. One week, five planes, two trains, six boats, two ATVs, and four zip lines all came together to create one amazing experience. Taking off from LAX in May of 2017 was one of the most exciting days of my life, and landing in Cusco at five in the morning the next day was even better. But getting to the point of stepping into a foreign country for the first time was a long, arduous process that revolved around – you guessed it – finances. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: Lessons From My Parents: Spending with a Purpose

    By Andres Guerra Luz

    As my family and I packed up the last of the belongings from my childhood home, a flurry of different feelings rushed over me. For as long as I could remember, home was an old-timey, multi-story building in an idyllic neighborhood in Chicago. But as my family adapted to some bigchanges, the house was becoming too large an expense. A part of me felt sad to leave the house behind, another part of me felt relieved that we were down-sizing to a more affordable place and yet another part of me was excited to live somewhere new. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Blue and Red Fibers of Financial Happiness and Despair

    By Mara Friedman

    Money is a funny thing. It is the only thing (other than your parents) that can be your best friend or a great nightmare. The blue and red fibers woven between its cotton may hold both happiness and despair. My life has been that blue fiber. I have been tangled up inside due to the money-making process. My life made a complete 360-degree turn in my teenage years when I found out that my immediate family was rich. It didn’t turn around the way you may think it would have, however. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: The Knowledge We Needed

    By Taylor Freds

    When I moved to Arizona for college, I quickly realized that high school had left me completely unprepared for the real world. The school’s need to be the best at standardized tests has left students without the actual knowledge they need when they walk out the door. Taxes, financial aid, savings, budgeting, debt (etc.) are all words that I knew the meaning of but had no real grasp on. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: When It Comes to Finances, Listen to Your Mother

    By Emily M. Dean

    I thought I knew everything when I was 19. That’s cliche, but it’s also true. I remember calling my mom with the master plan for my life. I was to move to Ithaca, New York, and take a job teaching dance. At this point in time my mother’s advice sounded a lot like an outdated and broken record to me. I remember telling her that the apartment I’d found would be $700 a month plus utilities. I remember her asking me if it was a nice apartment. I remember saying yes to spite her. Read more…

    College Connect Spring 2019: How I Used Airbnb to Continue My Education

    By Madeline Ackley

    In 2017, I found myself in a precarious financial situation, like so many 20-something college students do. I had left home and was living with two roommates in an apartment in downtown Phoenix so I could be close to campus. One consequence of living in a college town, however, is that things are more expensive. A lot more expensive in some cases. Each month the expenses piled higher and higher and I was barely squeezing by with my minuscule paycheck working part time as a doggy daycare attendant. So, I did what any cash-strapped millennial in 2017 would do: I illegally sublet my room to strangers on Airbnb. Read more…

  • 2019 Best in Business

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Monday December 2, 2019

    The 2019 Best in Business awards competition is now open for entries. Create a profile to submit your entries here

    This contest covers work published, broadcast and posted in the calendar year 2019. Starting this year, you’ll use a new online software that streamlines the entry (and judging) process.

    You will not enter the contest through the membership database. However, you’ll want to verify your membership status before starting the entry process.

    Click here for categories and guidelines.
    Click here for FAQs.

    Mark Your Calendar
    Dec. 2 – Jan. 2: Early-bird entry period. Submit your work by 5 p.m. EST to save $15 per entry.
    Jan. 3: General entry period opens.
    Jan. 31: DEADLINE for all entries is 11:59 p.m. EST

    Early Bird Entry Fees
    $60 for Story Type and Story Topic categories
    $125 for General Excellence categories
    $45 for freelancer Use the promo code Freelancer on the payment page.
    $30 for Students

    Entry Fees
    $75 for Story Type and Story Topic categories
    $140 for General Excellence categories
    $60 for freelancer Use the promo code Freelancer on the payment page.
    $30 for Students

    Staff Hours
    SABEW staff is available to help with BIB questions and entries, Monday – Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST [email protected].  If you need help renewing your membership so you can enter the contest, call Tess McLaughlin (602)496-7892‬ or email (tmclaughlin at sabew.org). If you need to speak with someone regarding the BIB, call Aimee O’Grady at (602)496-5188.

  • Think scholarships to defray the costs of studying abroad

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday November 19, 2019

    By Savannah Sicurella, University of Georgia

    Studying abroad provides students the opportunity to experience cultural perspectives, styles of education and academic, professional and social environments different from their own.

    It can be a transformative thing, undergraduate study abroad alum Tatiana Anthonysaid, but the experience of living, learning and laboring in another country isn’t cheap.

    With the average cost of studying abroad in 2019 amounting to roughly $14,295, according to a global cost analysisby travel directory GoAbroad, the financial hurdles students must jump through when planning a semester abroad are transparent.

    For Anthony, who set her sights on studying abroad early in her academic career at the University of Georgia, cost weighed as a heavy enough burden. But those expenses motivated her to apply for scholarships and external grant funding two semesters ahead of applying for a specific program. She knew that if she didn’t have the money upfront, studying abroad wouldn’t be a reality for her.

    “If you look at the numbers, it’s very clear who’s most likely to study abroad,” Anthony said. “And unfortunately that’s not kids in the minority. But if you want it, you can get it.”

    Yana Cornish, global education director at the University of Georgia, said “increased funding opportunities” have contributed to a growth in study abroad participation.

    But despite the growing percentage of students studying abroad, cost still remains one of the three top deterrents of studying abroad for both American and British college students, according to a 2017 reportby educational nonprofit The British Council.

    Anthony, now a senior psychology major, “went hard” to prepare herself for the financial commitment. Setting the goal to pursue a service-based Maymester in Tanzania, she studied the estimated cost sheet for the program and cleared out how much money she needed to commit.

    Anthony then got to work: after a “grueling” period of researching, applying and reapplying for several scholarships, Anthony received five separate awards to fund her desired program, including the U.S. Department of State’s Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship.

    “That’s what’s scary about studying abroad — jumping in financially,” Anthony said. “You need to have a realistic idea of where their money is coming from, because once you apply and you get in and you actually commit, even if you don’t go, you still have to pay those program fees. You need to be real.”

    Students must “clearly” understand the costs involved and “be aware of payment deadlines and when scholarships are disbursed” during the budgeting and fundraising processes, Cornish said.

    Websites like studyabroadfunding.org and USA Study Abroad’s financial resources portalserve as resources for students looking to cast a wide net for partial or full-ride scholarships, but often the first and most direct step of applying for funding begins with setting up appointments with university financial aid or global engagement offices, Anthony said.

    Despite the hefty financial undertaking, Anthony said the costs were justified in the context of the experiences she gained.

    The metrics of studying abroad show each experience pays off in dividends: the Georgia Learning Outcomes of Students Studying Abroad Research Initiative (GLOSSARI), which examined University System of Georgia data from 2000 to 2007, found students who studied abroad had higher graduation rates grade point averages than domestic students.

    But the greatest impact of studying abroad is often “less tangible,” Cornish said.

    Studying in Tanzania changed her life, Anthony said, and was worth every waking hour she spent writing up scholarship essays and cover letters.

    “If you let it, studying abroad can change you.” Anthony said. “Getting those scholarships was no walk in the park, but it worked out. My head is so big now— you can’t tell me nothing.”

    Savannah Sicurella is a journalism major in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia.

  • 2019 Best in Business FAQ

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Friday November 15, 2019

    Here are some basic questions and answers regarding the BIB.

    Q: Do I have to be a SABEW member to enter?
    A: Yes. At the time of submission, entrants must be either an individual member of SABEW or a journalist listed on a current institutional membership. If you are unsure if you’re a part of an institutional membership, please contact your organization’s SABEW representative or Tess McLaughlin, SABEW membership coordinator.

    Q: What is a “category” as defined by the contest?
    A: “Category” refers to the size of the news organization’s staff.

    Q: The rules state that I am limited to three elements per entry. What if I am submitting work from a series?
    A: We recommend selecting the three best examples from the series.

    Q: Can I “park” an entry in mid-submission and go back to it later?
    A: Absolutely. Entries are stored in “My Entries” if you need to take a break, gather more information, etc. You may resume the entry process at your convenience.

    Q: Can I pay for multiple entries all at once? 
    A: Yes. Your entries are stored under “My Entries” until you’re ready to submit. Upon completion of all entries, you can pay for all entries at one time.

    Q: Is an international media outlet eligible for other categories beyond the international division?
    A: Yes. You may compete in the same categories as their U.S. counterparts. The BIB is an international award competition. All entries must be submitted in English.

    Q: Can freelancers enter the Best in Business contest?
    A: Yes; however, freelancers who enter must be SABEW members.

    Q: When will I find out if I won?
    A: Winners and honorable mentions will be notified during the month of March. They will be honored at the BIB Awards Ceremony at SABEW20 in Toronto, Canada.

    Still can’t find the answer?  SABEW can help. Contact us at [email protected] or 602-496-7862 between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. EST.

  • Dec. 5: Night of SABEW

    Posted By David Wilhite on Friday November 15, 2019

    A Night of SABEW: Coast-to-Coast Social and Best in Business Awards Kick-Off

    Calling all business journalists from across North America! SABEW is organizing casual meetups on Thursday, Dec. 5. Come mingle over a drink, talk journalism and, of course, share your biggest stories of the year.

    SABEW’s 25th Best in Business Awards opens Dec. 2. Learn more about how to enter and get recognized for your outstanding work this year.

    Charlottesville
    Organized by Jenny Paurys, SABEW board member and managing editor at S&P Global Market Intelligence ([email protected])
    5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
    The Fitzroy, 120 E. Main St., Charlottesville, VA 22902
    Register

    Chicago
    Organized by Desiree Hanford, SABEW board member and a lecturer at Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University ([email protected]) and SABEW Vice President Kim Quillen, business source editor at the Chicago Tribune ([email protected])
    5:30 to 7:30 pm.
    Dylan’s Tavern & Grill, 118 S Clinton St, Chicago, IL 60661
    Register

    Los Angeles
    Organized by Mary Wisniewski, consumer banking reporter at Bankrate ([email protected])
    6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
    Momed — Atwater Village , 3245 Casitas Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90039
    Register

    Milwaukee
    Organized by SABEW Board Member Jim Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and instructor at Marquette University ([email protected])
    Meet the Media event at the Milwaukee Press Club
    5 to 8:30 p.m.
    Newsroom Pub, 137 E. Wells St., Milwaukee WI, 53202
    Register

    New York
    Organized by SABEW Board Member Robert Barba, spot news editor at The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires ([email protected])
    6 to 9 p.m.
    House of Brews , 363 W 46th St, New York, NY 10036
    (NOT THE 51ST STREET LOCATION!)
    Register

    Philly Suburbs
    Organized by Kathleen Graham, executive director, SABEW ([email protected])
    5 to 7:30 p.m.
    Paganini Wine Bar, 70 W State St., Doylestown, PA 18901
    To attend, please email Tess McLaughlin ([email protected])

    Toronto
    Organized by SABEW President Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business journalist ([email protected]); and SABEW Canada chair Dawn Calleja, deputy editor at Report on Business magazine ([email protected])
    6 to 8 p.m.
    Roxy on King, 284A King St W, Toronto, ON
    Register

    Washington, D.C.
    Organized by Josh Boak, economics writer at Associated Press ([email protected])
    5 to 7:30 p.m.
    Post Pub, 1422 L St. NW, Washington, DC 20005
    Register

    There will be a cash bar at each event. Reach out if you want to organize a local meetup not on the list above. Email [email protected] and let’s talk about planning one!

  • 2019 Best in Business Categories and Guidelines

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Friday November 15, 2019

    Eligibility: The Best in Business contest is open to regular members of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing in good standing as of the date of entry. International submissions are encouraged.

    Regular membership is defined by SABEW’s constitution and bylaws, particularly Article III, https://sabew.org/about/constitution-and-bylaws.

    Good standing means SABEW received your membership dues and your membership is current as of the date you submit your entries. Check your membership status on your member profiles, https://membership.sabew.org/membership/profile.

    For entries with more than one byline, one person must be a SABEW member in good standing.

    Please direct your membership questions to [email protected].

    Payment: Unless prior arrangements are made with SABEW, payment must be made by VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express through the secure BIB contest system. Payment must be received for an entry to be judged. Please note: When submitting multiple entries, the contest system does allow you to leave payment until all entries have been submitted.

    Judging: Each category will be judged by a panel of business journalists who will award one winner and up to two honorable mentions. No honorable mentions will be named in categories with fewer than 10 entries. Up to one honorable mention will be named in categories with 10 to 20 entries. Up to two honorable mentions will be named in categories with more than 20 entries. Judges and the conference committee reserve the right to move an entry into a different category if they deem it mis-categorized.

    Notification and recognition of winners: Winners and Honorable Mentions will be notified in March 2020. Winners will be recognized during SABEW20.

    CATEGORY DESCRIPTIONS

    There are 26 contest categories in 2019, including the General Excellence and Student Journalism awards.

    Categories are broken out by size, determined by the news organization’s total editorial staff.

    Small: Fewer than 50 editorial staff

    Medium: 51-300 editorial staff

    Large: 301+ editorial staff

    Industry Publications: There will be an additional General Excellence category for industry- or topic-specific publications. Otherwise, these publications will compete against other similarly-sized news organizations.

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE AWARD

    Entries should showcase the depth and breadth of quality in your news organization.

    Only one entry allowed per news organization or publication.

    A cover letter of up to 250 words may be submitted as a PDF attachment with entries. (Style the PDF title like this: yourpublicationcoverletter.pdf)

    Entrants will demonstrate general excellence by submitting at least one element from three of the five following areas of coverage (as PDFs or permalink URLs). You may submit up to five elements.

    1. Breaking news, scoop: A news story exclusive to your organization.

    2. Breaking news, event: One story from your organization’s coverage of an unexpected breaking news event.

    Entrants may include a 100-word description of the full day’s coverage plan to give a broader context.

    3. Explanatory/Feature: One enterprise story of the agency’s choosing.

    4. Investigative/Project: The main story of a large-scale project or investigative piece. Entrants may include a 100-word description of the overall package.

    5. Visual Storytelling: A stand-alone visual story — could be a video, a series of related photographs or an interactive data visualization.

    STORY TYPE AWARDS

    There is no limit on the number of entries per news organization; however, any individual story may only be entered into one story type. For example, the same story or package of stories cannot be entered into investigative and explanatory categories.

    News organizations compete against other similarly-sized organizations, regardless of format, unless otherwise noted. Freelancers will be grouped based on size of the outlet that published their work.

    An entry shall consist of no more than three elements. Elements should all contain the same theme, though they don’t need to be directly related to each other. An element can be a text, audio or video story, or an interactive. Accompanying photos and static graphics will not be counted as elements.

    A cover letter of up to 250 words may be submitted as a PDF attachment with entries. (Style the PDF title like this: yournamecoverletter.pdf)

    Breaking News: Coverage of a single news event on the day it breaks. Proactive news broken by a reporter or news organization’s reporting staff, or quality reactive reporting.

    Investigative: In-depth, enterprise reporting that: a) presents important and necessary information that was unknown to the general readership/viewership and was unavailable from other sources before publication; and b) demonstrates an obvious need for change in law/policy/behavior.

    Explanatory: In-depth reporting that presents, analyzes and simplifies a single important topic and/or news event in a way that allows audiences to understand it more clearly.

    Feature: Enterprise storytelling that may be presented as a trend story, a profile or a narrative, that draws on in-depth reporting to offer fresh discovery or insight in a memorable way.

    Commentary/Opinion: Reported coverage that reflects the point of view of the journalist or news organization. Category includes unsigned editorials, individual columns and blogs.

    Video: Coverage that is visually compelling and deeply engaging, demonstrating excellence in visual storytelling.

    Audio: Coverage that demonstrates excellence in audio storytelling. News organizations of all sizes will compete against each other in this category.

    Innovation: Entries should demonstrate a creative way to report, tell and/or distribute stories.

    Newsletter: Coverage published in a media outlet’s regularly produced newsletter distributed electronically or in printed format.

    STORY TOPIC AWARDS

    There is no limit on number of entries per news organization; however, any individual story may only be entered into one story topic. For example, the same story or package of stories about automated driving cannot be entered into autos/transportation and technology categories.

    News organizations compete against other similarly-sized organizations, not by format, unless otherwise noted. Freelancers are grouped based on size of outlet that published their work.

    An entry shall consist of no more than three elements. Elements should all contain the same theme, though they don’t need to be directly related to each other. An element can be a text, audio or video story, or an interactive. Accompanying photos and static graphics will not be counted as elements.

    Submit entries as PDFs or permalink URLs.

    A cover letter of up to 250 words may be submitted as a PDF with entries. Not required. (Style the PDF title like this: yournamecoverletter.pdf)

    Energy/Natural Resources

    Travel/Transportation

    Health/Science

    Technology

    Media/Entertainment

    Economics

    Government

    International Reporting

    Retail

    Markets

    Banking/Finance

    Personal Finance

    Small Business/Management/Career

    Real Estate

    STUDENT JOURNALISM

    An entry shall consist of no more than three elements. Elements should represent the best work of the contributor(s) over the contest year. An element can be a text, audio or video story, or an interactive. Accompanying photos and static graphics will not be counted as elements.

    Submit entries as PDFs or permalink URLs.

    A cover letter of up to 250 words should be submitted as a PDF with entries indicating the year of graduation (or expected graduation for each contributor). Please also indicate if the student is an undergraduate or graduate student. A cover letter is required. (Style the PDF title like this: yournamecoverletter.pdf)

    Stories for Professional News Organizations
    Entries should feature one student. The elements submitted can include other bylines, contributors and producers, but all should primarily be the work of the entered student. The cover letter should address what contributions were made to the stories by others.

    Stories for Student News Organizations
    Entries should feature one student. The elements submitted can include other bylines, contributors and producers, but all should primarily be the work of the entered student. The cover letter should address what contributions were made to the stories by others.

    Student Projects and Collaborations
    Work done in the contest year by more than one student, with minimal contributions from non-students. Entries should all fall under one theme.

    Note: Judges and the conference committee reserve the right to move an entry into a different category if they deem it miscategorized.

  • April 30-May 1: SABEW’s spring conference, Toronto, Ontario

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Friday November 1, 2019

    SABEW is hosting the 2020 spring conference outside of the U.S. for the first time in its 56-year-history. The annual spring conference will be held in Toronto, Canada, on April 30 and May 1 at Ryerson University’s School of Journalism (RSJ), the country’s top journalism school.

    SABEW President, Bryan Borzykowski, along with conference co-chairs David Milstead and Dawn Calleja, both from the Globe and Mail, and the SABEW20 spring conference committee will produce sessions centered on the theme of global business and international journalism. The program will offer newsmaker CEOs, politicians and economic policy makers, and skills sessions led by leading U.S. and Canadian journalists.

    The 2019 Best in Business awards will also be handed out in Toronto to celebrate and recognize the outstanding impact made by business journalists over the past year.

    With opportunities to learn about the global economy, participate in hands-on journalism training and network with journalists from the New York Times, Globe and Mail, Bloomberg, CNBC, CNN, Washington Post, National Post and many other outlets, this conference is not one to be missed.

    Registration, hotel and programming details will be posted as they become available. Contact Bryan Borzykowski for more information or to get involved in SABEW or spring conference planning. Contact Renee McGivern if you are interested in sponsoring or exhibiting at the conference.

    As a reminder, apply for a passport no later than February 28 should you need to get yours renewed.

    We look forward to seeing you in Toronto!

  • Quartz Executive Editor Xana Antunes wins Front Page Lifetime Achievement Award

    Posted By Renee McGivern on Monday October 14, 2019

    Quartz Executive Editor and SABEW board member Xana Antunes recently won the Front Page Lifetime Achievement Award from The Newswomen’s Club of New York.

    Antunes is executive editor at Quartz. Prior to starting there in 2014, she was executive editor and vice president at CNBC Digital; editor at Crain’s New York Business; executive editor at Fortune and CNNMoney.com; and editor, deputy editor and business editor at New York Post.

    The Newswomen’s Club of New York is the only professional organization exclusively for women journalists in the New York metropolitan area. It was established in 1922 and members include women who work in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, photography and new media.

    The club’s signature event is the annual Front Page Awards, which honor journalistic excellence by newswomen. The Front Page Awards are among the most prestigious in journalism and are unique in focusing on the contributions of women journalists.

  • How to harness technology for innovative journalism

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Thursday September 19, 2019

    The digital focus of today’s news business requires journalists to take on new skills and learn new technologies. But just how specialized does your skill set need to be? Coding is great, but learning to collaborate and leverage technology when it makes sense is better. Knowing how the internet works, how structured information can be leveraged and looking at stories with new thinking patterns can unlock engaging possibilities. We’ll explore some of these ideas in SABEW’s next virtual training session.

    Watch the video.

    Presenter
    Zach Wise is an associate professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. Wise teaches in both the graduate and undergraduate programs in the subjects of interactive storytelling, design and photojournalism. He is also the lead faculty member of the Knight Lab, where he helps develop products and tools for journalists that utilize technology for storytelling.

    In 2007, Wise’s video and interactive graphic on construction deaths on the Las Vegas Strip contributed to the Las Vegas Sun’s first Pulitzer Prize. That year, Wise’s work was also recognized by the National Headline Awards, Online News Association, Webby Awards and NPPA Best of Photojournalism. In 2008, Wise joined The New York Times’ multimedia team. His work there garnered a Peabody, several Emmy nominations, an Emmy award and numerous other industry honors.

    Every year, he travels nationally and internationally for speaking engagements, workshops and competitions on the subject of multimedia and interactive storytelling. He also continues to freelance for publications including The New York Times and This American Life.

    Since joining the Knight Lab, Wise has created several popular tools for storytellers and journalists. Timeline JS and StoryMap have been used to create stories seen by over a hundred million people each year. Timeline is also available in more than 65 languages and is used by major news organizations around the world.
    @zlwise

  • Virtual Training June 2019: How to Cover One of the Newest Beats on the Business Desk: Marijuana

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Wednesday May 29, 2019

    As more states consider legalizing recreational marijuana, the nation’s cannabis industry has emerged as one of today’s hot business stories. The fast-growing marijuana sector is creating jobs, generating new business opportunities and, increasingly, justifying its own beat on the business desk. SABEW’s next virtual training session will do a deep dive into the growing cannabis industry. Our panel will talk about how to cover the business of cannabis beat, the nuances associated with that coverage and potential big stories on the horizon. We’ll also look at what’s ahead for this burgeoning sector.

    Listen to the recording.

     

    Moderator
    John Schroyer, Marijuana Business Daily. A Sacramento-based journalist, John Schroyer has focused on Colorado politics for most of his career, which included covering the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver. In 2012, he covered the Amendment 64 campaign to legalize recreational marijuana for the Colorado Springs Gazette. As then-video editor for The Gazette, he was on hand for the first-ever legal recreational marijuana sale in Denver on Jan. 1, 2014. He’s been writing about the cannabis industry since joining Marijuana Business Daily over the summer of 2014.

     

     

     

    Panelists
    Dan Adams, The Boston Globe. Dan Adams is a cannabis reporter at The Boston Globe and author of the “This Week in Weed” email newsletter — the irreverent and definitive insider’s diary of legalization in Massachusetts. A graduate of Emerson College and eight-year veteran of the Globe, Dan previously covered breaking news, municipal politics, business and the alcohol industry. He was a member of the team that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in breaking news reporting for its coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings and manhunt and drew acclaim for his investigation into illegal pay-to-play tactics by major brewers and beer distributors. Since being named the Globe’s first-ever dedicated cannabis journalist in 2017, Dan has embedded himself in the marijuana community and spotlighted the concerns of marginalized groups, while holding the industry and government officials to account.

    Kris Krane, 4Front Advisors. Having founded 4Front Advisors in 2011, Kris Krane is now president of the firm. Prior to forming 4Front, Kris served as director of client services for CannBe, a pioneer in developing best practices within the medical cannabis industry. Kris has dedicated his career to reforming the nation’s drug policies, working as associate director of NORML from 2000 to 2005 and executive director of Students for Sensible Drug Policy from 2006 to 2009. He serves on the National Cannabis Industry Association board of directors as well as the New Jersey Cannabis Industry Association Board, the largest nonprofit association in the state dedicated to the legal cannabis industry.

     

     

     

    Brooke Edwards Staggs, Orange County Register. Brooke Edwards Staggs is a reporter based at the Orange County Register in Anaheim, Calif. She covers the politics, business, health and culture of cannabis for her company’s chain of newspapers and websites throughout California. That coverage has led to multiple TV and radio appearances plus a number of awards, including a win for explanatory writing in the 2017 Best of the West competition, honoring the best journalism in the western United States, and best enterprise news series in the recent 2018 California Journalism Awards. Brooke also covers state and federal politics through an Orange County lens. The Big Bear native earned her bachelor’s degree in English from California Baptist University, then got her master’s in education as she taught high school English in the Inland Empire. She left in 2006 to be a student again herself, earning a master’s degree in journalism from New York University while freelancing for a variety of publications.

     

     

    Linn Washington, Temple University. Linn Washington Jr. is a professor of journalism at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pa. He continues to work as a professional journalist, specializing in investigative news coverage and analytical commentary. Linn’s reporting and research examine issues involving race-based inequities impacting both the criminal justice system and the news media. His reporting career has involved news coverage across the U.S. and on four of the world’s seven continents. He has held positions ranging from general assignment reporter to executive editor.

  • Bryan Borzykowski becomes SABEW’s first Canadian president

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Thursday May 23, 2019

    Phoenix – May, 2019

    Bryan Borzykowski, an independent business journalist who has written for CNBC, the New York Times, the Globe and Mail, BBC Capital, Fortune, Inc., and Financial Planning, among other publications, was installed as the new president of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) at its annual conference on May 18, 2019, in Phoenix.

    He succeeds Mark Hamrick, Washington bureau chief and senior economic analyst for Bankrate.com, who served as SABEW’s president for the last two years.

    Borzykowski, who now lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba, after spending more than 15 years in Toronto, is SABEW’s first Canadian president in the organization’s 55-year history. He helped bring SABEW to Canada in 2015 and served as SABEW Canada’s first chair.

    “SABEW has given me so much over the years; it’s an honor to be able to give back in a bigger way and help others get as much out of the organization as I have,” he said. “Creating strong business journalism – and high-quality journalism in general – has never been more important. SABEW has a crucial role to play in helping writers, editors, producers, broadcasters, bloggers, podcasters, and others enhance their training and develop the connections they need to succeed.”

    Over the next 12 months, Borzykowski and SABEW’s 22-member board, plan on creating new training programs for its members, new opportunities to network and new ways to showcase its members’ work. SABEW will also continue to produce its popular monthly virtual training programs and its Best in Business Awards, one of the most highly respected business journalism award programs in the world.

    “We want to do even more for our members and give business journalists everywhere the skills and opportunities they need to tell the stories they need to tell,” said Borzykowski.

    In addition to Borzykowski (@bborzyko), SABEW’s officer ladder is comprised of Kim Quillen (@QuillenKim), SABEW’s vice-president and business source editor of the Chicago Tribune, and Caleb Silver (@calebsilver) SABEW’s secretary/treasurer and Investopedia’s editor-in-chief and SVP content.

    As well, ballots were cast during the SABEW19 conference for six seats on the SABEW Board of Governors, all with a term ending in 2022.

    SABEW members elected three new members to the Board of Governors:

    • Alan Deutschman, professor and Reynolds endowed chair of business journalism University of Nevada, Reno
    • Desiree Hanford, lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University
    • Scott Wenger, group editorial director, SourceMedia

    Three incumbent governors were also re-elected, each serving three-year terms:

    The rest of SABEW’s board includes:

    • Xana Antunes, executive editor, Quartz
    • Cesca Antonelli, editor-in-chief, Bloomberg BNA
    • Robert Barba, deputy spot news editor, the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires
    • Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business
    • Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press
    • Pallavi Gogoi, chief business editor, NPR
    • Glenn Hall, chief editor, Dow Jones Newswires
    • Andrew Leckey, president/business journalism chair, Donald W. Reynolds National Center, ASU
    • Heather Long, economics correspondent, the Washington Post
    • Dean Murphy, associate masthead editor, the New York Times
    • James B. Nelson, business editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and business journalism instructor Marquette University
    • Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Ex-officio members:

    • Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst, Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com
    • Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News
    • Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journa
    • Marty Steffens, SABEW chair in business and journalism School of Journalism, University of Missouri

    About SABEW
    SABEW, the largest association of business journalists, encourages comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and upgrades the skills and knowledge of business journalists through continuous professional development and educational efforts. For more information, contact Executive Director Kathleen Graham at [email protected] Follow @sabew on twitter.

  • Susanne Craig provides a look into The New York Times’ Trump tax exposé – SABEW19

    Posted By David Wilhite on Sunday May 19, 2019

    Susanne Craig of The New York Times gave a glimpse inside the 18-month investigation into the original of President Donald Trump’s wealth.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    By Andres Guerra Luz
    The Cronkite School

    When Susanne Craig and her colleagues began what would turn into an 18-month investigation into the origins of President Donald Trump’s wealth, the New York Times reporter said they had a simple question that originated from the president’s 2005 tax returns.

    “The most stunning thing on them was that Donald Trump made money that year,” Craig told audience members at the Society for Advancing Business Writing and Editing spring conference. “We couldn’t figure out how, knowing what we knew about his financial condition.”

    The three reporters knew from previous work that Trump reported an almost $1 billion loss in his 1995 tax records. Then, Trump’s 2005 tax records leaked to former Times journalist David Cay Johnston showed that Trump made $153 million in income that year.

    Craig and her colleagues focused on bridging the gap in between, diving into the cash empire of the president’s father, Fred. The result was an over yearlong investigation that involved more than 100,000 pages of documents, meticulous sourcing and piecing together findings from a patchwork of public and private documents.

    Craig recently received a Pulitzer Prize and SABEW Best in Business award for her work on the investigation and the followup stories that spawned from it.

    She spoke at the SABEW conference for a Friday session titled “Go Inside The New York Times’ Trump Tax Exposé,” which featured a discussion between her and Pulitzer Prize winner Kevin Hall, who is chief economics correspondent and senior investigative reporter for McClatchy Newspapers and a former SABEW president.

    In the over hour-long session, Craig answered questions from both Hall and audience members to offer unique insight on how her team provided a definitive narrative on how Trump made his riches.

    Describing the reporting process, Craig said she and her colleagues first worked to establish what all Fred owned. Then, they logged biographies for every building and listed chronologically what happened in each building, some of which dated back to the late 1940s.

    One of the biggest revelations in the reporting process was discovering an obscure family-owned company named All County Building Supply & Maintenance.

    Craig said she made the finding when she was passing time one night, Google searching an outdated term the team had come across in their reporting, “mortgage receivable.” From there, Craig said she found an unredacted disclosure form that Trump’s sister, Maryanne, filed in relation to a Senate hearing to confirm her appointment as a federal judge.

    The document showed a $1 million contribution from All County, which Craig said led the team to inquiries that ultimately revealed the Trump family was using the company to move cash from Fred’s companies to his children without paying for a 55 percent tax on gifts.

    Craig said she and her team also took a lot of considerations into who they spoke to and how they interviewed them. When preparing for the interview, Craig said the team deliberated how many of them should go, what information they would bring up and sometimes which one of them was best suited to speak with the source, depending on their characteristics.

    Henry Dubroff, founder and editor at the Pacific Coast Business Times and a judge for the SABEW Best in Business awards, praised Craig and the team for the project.

    “It had never been so clear to us that a story was superior to all the other entries in a category,” Dubroff said.

    Craig said the significance of the story was that it uncovered outright fraud that Trump and his family participated in and reversed a narrative that the president created about how he gained his wealth.

    “We’ve written definitively the matter of his life,” she said. “I still can’t believe what we’ve found. And that’s now out there, and it’s told powerfully through their own documents and their own words.”

  • How to write an award-winning business story – SABEW19

    Posted By David Wilhite on Saturday May 18, 2019

    Andres Guerra Luz, left, a student journalist from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Politico’s Margaret McGill and Hannah Denham, a student journalist from Washington and Lee University, discuss their stories recognized in this year’s Best in Business Awards.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    By Hailey Mensik
    The Cronkite School

    Both student journalists and veteran reporters spoke about the projects that caught the attention of SABEW judges and earned them recognition at this year’s Best in Business Awards.

    Andres Guerra Luz from the Cronkite School won a best in business award as a student journalist for his story on the aftermath of Hurricane Maria and Puerto Rico’s efforts to rebuild through its tourism industry.

    He said that after a semester of pre-reporting from Arizona, being able to actually visit the island and talk with residents gave the story the color and direction it needed to stand out from other coverage.

    “What I was trying to do was capture the whole picture, not just San Juan or some of the bigger areas, but see what’s going on in mountains rural areas people didn’t know about,” Guerra Luz said.

    Another student winner, Hannah Denham from Washington and Lee University, produced an award-winning story out of what moderator Jim Nelson from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel called an “intern’s dream.”

    She received a tip about unfair charges from freeway toll roads and reached out to sources to turn a quick daily. After receiving a scoop several days later, she ran with the story and ended up producing a 15-part investigative series for the Tampa Bay Times on the company contracted to handle toll lanes on Florida freeways.

    Professional journalists too spoke about their award winning business stories, and lauded their publications for supporting their projects and providing the resources needed to tell them.

    Margaret McGill, a technology reporter with Politico, was covering the digital divide affecting rural areas in the country with limited internet access when she found her award-winning story.

    “If we’re going to do something on the digital divide, we have to go to the place, and write about the people who are literally the least connected, the farthest away and have the most problems,” McGill said.

    She used data from the Federal Communications Commission to find that tribals lands in Idaho had some of the lowest broadband connectivity in the nation. She asked her editor to travel there for just a day and speak with those affected.

    Despite covering a niche community, she made the story relatable through vignettes of residents who drive miles just to send an email.

    One of the largest projects to receive an award was from the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. It involved over 250 reporters in 30 different countries.

    The group covered faulty medical implant testing and procedures, which led countries such as Canada and the United Kingdom to look into their practices, 

    The news organization is unique in its collaborative efforts and global reach, said Will Fitzgibbon, senior reporter with the ICIJ.

    “We do not spend 12 months, which is the average length of our project, doing investigations unless there is a certain quantum of journalists and countries involved,” he said.

    Stories produced by the ICIJ have appeared in international papers such as La Monde, The Indian Express and Times of Zambia, among others.

    You can find a list of winners and other highlights from the awards here.

  • SABEW19 Student Newsroom

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Friday May 10, 2019

    Miss the SABEW19 conference? Check out our ASU student coverage at #SABEW19 and below. Click here for the student bios.

    Despite challenges, Stelter sees bright future for journalism

    While there are a number of challenges affecting the industry, journalists continue to find new and innovative ways of reporting and telling stories, said CNN’s Brian Stelter at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing spring conference Friday in Phoenix. Click here to read more.

    Gov. Ducey: Arizona leads the way in business climate

    Discussing a number of topics ranging from taxes to the state’s relationship with Mexico, Gov. Doug Ducey highlighted the role pro-business policies played in growing Arizona. Click here to read more.

    Covering health care important as ever for business reporters

    Stephanie Innes, a health care reporter at The Arizona Republic, and health care experts Swapna Reddy, clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University’s School for the Science of Health Care Delivery, College of Health Solutions, and Colin Baillio, director of policy and communications at Health Action New Mexico discussed the ramifications of the ACA and how it affects health care. Click here to read more.

    Susanne Craig provides a look into The New York Times’ Trump tax exposé

    New York Times reporter Susanne Craig gave a glimpse inside the 18-month investigation that allowed her team to develop a definitive narrative on how President Donal Trump made his riches. Click here to read more.

    Data reporting and the backbone of investigative journalism

    Reporters Maurice Tamman of Reuters, David Ingold of Bloomberg and John Hillkirk of Kaiser Health News outlined how they use data on a daily basis and for larger investigative pieces. At a time when empirical evidence is more important than ever for reporters, data can constitute the hard facts in any story. Click here to read more.

    U.S. Sens. Sinema and McSally talk trade, immigration

    Talks of immigration and trade in Arizona consumed much of U.S. Sens. Kyrsten Sinema and Martha McSally’s SABEW sessions in Phoenix. Click here to read more.

    Women continue to break barriers in newsrooms

    Two longtime newsroom leaders spoke about what it means to be a woman in the news industry at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing spring conference in Phoenix on Friday. Click here to read more.

    Michelle Singletary, SABEWS’s Distinguished Achievement Award winner

    Michelle Singletary of The Washington Post accepted SABEW’s Distinguished Achievement Award on Saturday. Singletary credited the financial and life lessons she learned from her grandmother, “Big Mama,” for setting her on her career path. Click here to read more.

    How to write an award-winning business story

    Both student journalists and veteran reporters spoke about the projects that caught the attention of SABEW judges and earned them recognition at this year’s Best in Business Awards. Click here to read more.

    Innovation in fact checking

    In a session moderated by NPR’s Pallavi Gogoi, fact checkers Bill Adair, the creator of PolitiFact, Karen Mahabir, head of fact-checking at the Associated Press and Wyatt Buchanan, an editor at The Arizona Republic, each went into some of the innovative ways they’re keeping up with misinformation. Click here to read more.

    Parsons brings message of perseverance to SABEW journalists

    GoDaddy founder Bob Parsons closed the SABEW 2019 spring conference with a keynote imparting words of advice based on personal highs and lows in his business and personal life. Click here to read more.

  • SABEW Board of Governors Elections 2019

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday April 30, 2019

    Ballots will be cast during SABEW19 for six open SABEW Board of Governors seats with three-year terms ending in 2022. If you are interested in running send your statement of intent, bio and photo to Aimee O’Grady at [email protected] by next Tuesday May 7.

    Voting members will receive their ballot information directly from online voting service provider Opavote.org.

    Board Candidates as of 4/30/19 (listed in alphabetical order)

    Megan Davies
    Editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters
    I’d be honored to serve a term as a SABEW board member. I’m passionate about journalism and dedicated to the field of business reporting. I’ve held various leadership roles within Reuters in the United States and Russia and reported on a wide variety of business topics. I’m particularly passionate about enterprise reporting. I’d be keen to be involved in SABEW to further high standards of business journalism and try and encourage the next generation of reporters.

    Alan Deutschman
    Professor and Reynolds Endowed Chair of Business Journalism
    University of Nevada, Reno
    I have enjoyed chairing committees as a judge for the Best in Business Awards, and I would like to get more involved with SABEW by serving on the board. For the past eight years I’ve been a professor of business journalism, and I would like to help expand SABEW’s outreach efforts to students and faculty on college campuses. We’ve seen rising interest in business journalism at universities, and I think that SABEW is the perfect organization for bringing together practitioners and professors. We can do a lot more to attract talented newcomers into our field and to provide valuable training and resources for teachers at j-schools and liberal-arts programs. We can also help to lead the public conversations on campuses about many issues.

    Before joining the faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno, I spent 22 years working as a business journalist in New York and San Francisco. I covered Silicon Valley for Fortune and Fast Company, wrote the “Profit Motive” column for GQ, and contributed to Vanity Fair and New York Magazine. I’m also the author of four books including The Second Coming of Steve Jobs. In my current position as a business journalism professor, I can spend as much as 20% of my time on service to my field. It would be an honor to devote that time and energy to serving on the SABEW board.

    Desiree Hanford
    Lecturer, Medill/Northwestern University
    I would like to be a member of SABEW’s board because I have a great amount of respect for SABEW’s mission and my fellow members, and I would like to collaborate with fellow board members to further the organization’s mission. I think it’s important to cultivate and nurture the next generation of business reporters – those who are in college and just beginning their careers – in addition to supporting veteran business reporters and editors.

    I’ve been involved in SABEW for a few years, helping to run the student newsroom during past spring conferences and judging the Best in Business Awards. I recently joined the Training Committee and look forward to contributing to its work. I can also contribute through member recruitment, conference and workshop planning and more. I am happy to lend a hand wherever it is needed.

    I teach a number of undergraduate and graduate courses at Medill, including business and money reporting, and I was a business reporter at Dow Jones Newswires before joining Medill’s faculty. In addition to Chicago and Evanston, Medill has a presence in Washington, San Francisco and Qatar.

    I’ve been fortunate to bring Medill students to SABEW’s fall and spring conferences, and each time the students have been grateful for the connections they’ve made and inspired by the work of fellow SABEW members. They’ve left the conferences excited about their futures in business reporting, and I’ve left invigorated by their enthusiasm and humbled to spend time with the best in the industry.

    I would be honored to serve as a SABEW board member. Thank you for considering me in the upcoming election.

    James Madore
    Economics writer, Newsday
    I’m seeking re-election to the SABEW Board of Governors to continue my work on the group’s finances and advocacy of the First Amendment.

    I have had the privilege these past three years to chair the Finance Committee and to serve on the Executive Committee.

    The Finance Committee, which includes rank-and-file members and board governors, meets monthly with the executive director and bookkeeper to review income and expense reports. The committee also reviews the proposed budget and audit every year.

    Thanks to the fine work of many, I can report that SABEW’s finances are strong and our reporting is transparent. The Finance Committee provides advice and oversight to the executive director on all financial matters.

    I have found my work as vice chairman of the First Amendment Committee to be very rewarding, particularly SABEW’s support for the independence of federal statistical agencies.

    I hope to continue this important work should I be fortunate enough to win re-election.

    In addition, I hope to work with other governors to increase the involvement of rank-and-file members in SABEW activities. The organization’s greatest strength is its membership, which on a daily basis provides news that’s essential to the financial lives of millions of people in the United States and Canada.

    Thank you for your consideration.

    Jenny Paurys
    Managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence
    When I became a business journalist in 2005, I discovered a profession that prized curiosity, analytical thinking and explanatory prose. I feel these remain the central attributes of business journalism, but the importance of the craft has grown considerably in the intervening years. Globalization, driven by the information age, is now the shaping force of the world economy; markets, investors and business owners depend more than ever on finding trusted sources of information to help them navigate this increasingly complex ecosystem.

    I still work for the newsroom I joined in 2005, though it has more than quadrupled in size since then. Our news organization is fortunate to be expanding while others are contracting, based in part on our dedicated audience, sector-focused approach to journalism and the longtime practice of integrating data into our reporting. I feel these attributes of our newsroom provide me with a unique perspective that I can bring to my role at SABEW.

    Further, my position as managing editor provides me with the opportunity to travel widely and utilize that travel to help SABEW continue to build its membership, especially outside of the U.S. I would like to use my base in Arlington, Va., to help build participation by D.C.-area journalists. Finally, I would like to support SABEW’s ongoing work to modernize its website and collateral to help attract new business media to our ranks.

    My initial half-year on the SABEW board offered me a set of peers I had not found before: a group of professionals from competing newsrooms who volunteer their time and resources to collaborate for the singular purpose of elevating business journalism. These initial months have so inspired me that I am seeking your support for election to the board, in the hopes that I can work with you to move SABEW forward into its next chapter.

    Scott Wenger
    Group Editorial Director, SourceMedia
    I look forward to helping my fellow business journalists bolster and develop new skills and connections to make the work we do even more relevant and valuable to our readers.

    I am eager to help build on what I see as SABEW’s core competencies: training, networking, inspiring and recruiting. And, most crucially, developing practical ideas to share so we can best engage and grow our readerships. I also look forward to helping SABEW advance its mission of global expansion.

    A core goal of mine will be to strengthen SABEW at a time of revolutionary and exciting changes in our field, which have seen the creation of small organizations that have proved so potent, digital journalism powerhouses and industry-specific content organizations like my own that aspire to deliver savvy analysis, thoughtful enterprise and deeply reported multimedia investigative projects.

    Over the years — from my current role as a group editorial director at SourceMedia, where I manage Financial Planning, Employee Benefit News and four additional brands, to earlier years at The Wall Street Journal, The Hartford Courant, CNBC, CNN, the New York Daily News and as a health care analyst at Alex. Brown & Sons — I’ve seen just how impactful business journalism can be, and needs to be.

     

  • Scott Wenger

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Tuesday April 30, 2019

    Scott Wenger is a group editorial director at SourceMedia, managing its Investment Advisor and Employee Benefits Groups, including the flagship titles Financial Planning and Employee Benefit News, as well as four additional brands.

    Over his career, Scott has reported or managed editorial teams at some of the nation’s top media outlets, including the New York Daily News, CNN, CNBC, The Wall Street Journal and The Hartford Courant. Scott also worked as a health care analyst at Alex. Brown & Sons, where he was a Series 62 registered securities representative.

    Under Scott’s leadership, his teams have won numerous reporting, commentary and digital media awards. A groundbreaking investigation by Financial Planning edited by Scott that probed the links between financial distress and military suicide resulted in congressional action. The project received awards from SABEW, the Society of Professional Journalists, Connectiv/Business Information Association, and was a finalist for a Gerald Loeb Award. Also under his leadership, Scott’s teams have won several SABEW awards and more than a dozen Connectiv/Business Information Association Jesse H. Neal Awards, including for General Excellence/Best Media Brand and Best Website.

    Scott rose to Managing Editor/Money & Business at the New York Daily News, where he created the Your Money personal finance section and the Small Biz: Big Impact conferences. Scott was honored for excellence in economic reporting by the Institute on Political Journalism for a weeklong series he authored on China’s economic expansion, and was part of the team that produced the Daily News’ 9/11 coverage, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

    Scott also worked as a senior producer at CNN and CNN International, and as a producer at CNBC. Earlier, his investigative journalism at The Hartford Courant contributed to a George Polk reporting award. His professional and personal travels have taken him to all seven continents.

    Follow him on Twitter: @ScottWengerNYC

  • College Connect Spring 2019: The Scholarship Strain

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday April 10, 2019

    By Eleanor Cash

    With the end of spring semester approaching, college seniors across the country are looking forward to wearing their caps and gowns and receiving their diplomas.  Soon after flipping their tassels, however, many of these new graduates will be forced to confront a growing national problem: repaying their student loan debt.

    Student loans place only second to mortgage debt in the consumer debt category. In 2018, 69 percent of students took out loans, and graduated with an average debt of $29,800. To paint a broader picture, Americans owe over $1.5 trillion in student loan debt.

    Students searching for ways to ease the financial burdens of a college education are increasingly applying for scholarships. According to the College Board, from 2014-2015, approximately two-thirds of full-time college studentsused scholarships and grants to help pay for school. However, even with billions of dollars up for grabs each year, the scholarship hunt is becoming more competitive.

    “It was super stressful. I remember talking to my guidance counselor and she was like you need to apply for three scholarships a week,” said Alexis Crewse, a 2017 graduate from the University of Georgia. “As a high school student, I worked 20 hours a week, I played sports, I was involved in extracurriculars, I needed to make good grades to keep my college acceptances on the table.”

    According to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions website, UGA gave more than $7 million in scholarships and awardsto undergraduate students last year. At a university with over 28,000 undergraduate students, it may seem hard to know where to even begin looking for scholarships, or to even know if achieving a scholarship is possible.

    Most universities including UGA provide comprehensive lists of scholarships and online search tools to help find them, but the sheer numbers can be overwhelming. Crewse, however, suggested that students should use those numbers to their advantage rather than become intimidated.

    “If you have time, use the spaghetti-at-the-wall tactic. Throw it all at the wall and see what sticks, because there’s a lot out there and you never know where you’re going to shine as an applicant,” said Crewse. “Be diligent and ask around. There’s money out there and people want to give it away.”

    Karen Sterk has served as the executive director of the Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund (JRF) since 2015. The fund has raised over $3 million in scholarships and has assisted more than 1,000 women since the first scholarship was awarded in 1978.

    The scholarships serve non-traditional students, specifically women aged 35 and older. Sterk noted that these scholarships also are unique because they can be used for daily living expenses like buying food or paying for car and home expenses.

    “As every student knows, it costs more than just tuition and books to go to school,” said Sterk.

    As someone who reviews hundreds of scholarship applications a year, Sterk has found a few qualities that make an applicant stand out. Her number one tip: present a clear picture of future aspirations.

    “Two biggest things: they have goals, they’ve achieved goals, and they know what they want to do,” said Sterk. “Grit and perseverance are those things that we talk about and they show through their life experiences and what they share with us on the page.”

    Sterk recommended approaching the application process from a place of authenticity.

    “Tell your story. It’s really  . . .  the story that supports what you’re saying your goals are that get us,” said Sterk.

    Eleanor Cash is a journalism student at the University of Georgia.

     

  • College Connect Spring 2019: Federal Work-Study Offers Flexible Job Opportunities for Students

    Posted By David Wilhite on Tuesday April 9, 2019

    By Kelly Mayes

    Having a part-time job in college can be a balancing act for many students, but some may find the flexibility they need if they qualify for the Federal Work-Study Program.

    This program, offered by about 3,400 colleges in the U.S., awards grants for undergraduate and graduate students who qualify to gain valuable work experience pertaining to their career.

    Peyton Etheridge, a first-year intended public relations student at the University of Georgia, has worked in the front office of the Odum School of Ecology this year. The Federal Work-Study program has been a good option for her.

    “I would definitely recommend Federal Work-Study to anyone who qualifies for it,” said Etheridge. “Since I’m living on campus it’s so much easier to work on campus as opposed to a fast-food joint because I don’t have a car here.”

    Etheridge said the program puts students first, recognizing they are in school to learn. Providing they communicate with their supervisors and meet hourly requirements, the schedule can be flexible, she said.

    Students participating in Federal Work-Study must prove through their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) that their family’s income is low enough for them to qualify. They are then awarded a grant for Federal Work-Study based on their family’s income and have the option of applying to work at various positions at their university.

    Participating universities provide a list of on-campus positions available for students and award grants that are paid bi-weekly throughout the semester.

    According to the University of Georgia Fact Book, in 2018 the university provided 373 undergraduate Federal Work-Study awards totaling $750,405.

    Students can only work a certain amount of hours per week depending on what their award allows them to be paid. Etheridge said that while this lightens her financial burden, sometimes it is not enough to cover all of her expenses.

    John Grable, professor of financial planning, housing and consumer economics at UGA, said pre-planning is essential if they want to participate in programs such as Work-Study. Students who know they are in need of assistance should begin looking for opportunities before they enter college, he said.

    “Having a job can be good for the pocketbook and also just good for college performance,” said Grable.

    While some students may believe a part-time job takes away from the college experience or hurts their academic performance, Grable said that may be offset by establishing relationships that could help students get a job in the future.

    Grable also pointed to a 2014 study by researchers at Winona State Universityindicating that students who have a job in college often perform better academically when they work less than 11 hours a week.

    According to Grable, working a reasonable amount can provide structure to college life because students allocate their time intentionally to balance work and classes.

    “Literally, just this week I had a paper that I had worked very last minute on and I was able to call out of work to work on my paper,” said Etheridge. “They always tell me to put school first if I have a hard assignment or anything going on in student life.”

    Kelly Mayes is a journalism student at the University of Georgia.

     

  • Best in Business Canada

    Posted By sabew_admin on Tuesday April 2, 2019

    This Best in Business contest is a subset of the overall prestigious North American Best in Business award, specifically for members of SABEW’s Canadian chapter.

    6th Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Contest Dates

    Contest open for entries: Feb. 3 – Feb. 21 at 5:00 p.m. EST

    Winners announced: Mar. 20

    Awards banquet: April 7

    Previous contest years

    5th Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Award Winners

    SABEW Canada Announces the Finalists for the 5th Annual Best in Business Awards

    4th Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Award Winners

    3rd Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Award Winners

    2nd Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Award Winners

    1st Annual SABEW Canada Best in Business Award Winners

  • Mourning the loss of SABEW board member Sho Chandra

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Friday February 22, 2019

    SABEW is saddened to report the death of board member Shobhana Chandra. Known as Sho to friends and colleagues, she served as an economics reporter for Washington-based Bloomberg News, which she joined in 1998.

    Sho joined the SABEW board in 2015. Read more about her impressive career and volunteer efforts. View the video tribute produced by Brendan Murray.

    Among those mourning Sho’s passing and saluting her legacy is SABEW President Mark Hamrick, who noted the many reporters whom Sho helped to train and encourage. “As a SABEW board member, Sho was a remarkable, beloved and highly respected mentor and leader within the tight-knit business and financial journalism community. We mourn the loss of her friendship, high degree of professionalism, dedication, collegiality and sense of humor,” said Hamrick, Washington bureau chief and senior economic analyst with Bankrate.com.

    “Sho was a delightful colleague, both on the SABEW board and at Bloomberg News. Whether she was helping organize a conference or judging the Best in Business Awards, among so many other examples, she was ready to help. She was also always there with a friendly greeting or words of support. This is a great loss to both SABEW and the profession, but the many happy memories of Sho will live on,” said Joanna Ossinger, markets editor at Bloomberg, former SABEW president and current Best in Business Awards contest chair.

    “Sho brought an international perspective to the SABEW Board of Governors and was a well-liked member by everyone,” said Kathleen Graham, executive director of SABEW. “She was an eager volunteer and shared her time and talent with the SABEW membership. Her contributions to the profession and the organization will be recognized at the SABEW spring conference at ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, May 16-18.”

    SABEW sends its condolences to Sho’s family, many friends and colleagues. If you would like to make a donation in memory of Sho, you can mail a check to:

    SABEW
    Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
    Arizona State University
    555 North Central Ave., Suite 302
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1248

    Or you can donate online, please designate your contribution in memory of Sho Chandra.

  • Michelle Singletary Biography

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Friday February 8, 2019

    Biography

    Michelle Singletary is a nationally syndicated personal finance columnist for The Washington Post. Her award-winning column, “The Color of Money,” is carried in dozens of newspapers across the country.

    She is the author of three books:

    “The 21 Day Financial Fast: Your Path to Financial Peace and Free” (Zondervan)

    “Your Money and Your Man: How You and Prince Charming Can Spend Well and Live Rich” (Random House).

    “Spend Well, Live Rich: How to Live Well With the Money You Have” (Random House)

    In January 2012, Singletary was part of the cast for “The Revolution,” a daytime program on ABC. She was the show’s financial expert and did regular money segments. For two years, Singletary was host of her own national television program “Singletary Says” on TV One.

    In 2011, “Spend Well, Live Rich with Michelle Singletary,” an hour-long program, premiered on the PBS station WNED-TV Buffalo/Toronto.

    For several years, Singletary was a regular personal finance contributor for National Public Radio’s afternoon program “Day To Day.” She is also a frequent contributor to various NPR programs including “1A,” “On Point,” “Weekend Edition,” and American Public Media’s “Marketplace Money.” She has appeared on all three major networks, NBC, ABC and CBS. She has prepared personal finance segments for local and national news programs, and for a number of cable and nationally syndicated programs, including “Oprah,” NBC’s “Today Show,” “The Early Show” on CBS, CNN, MSNBC, “The View, and “Tavis Smiley” on PBS. She has also appeared on “Meet The Press.”

    As part of her commitment to community service, Singletary volunteers as the director of “Prosperity Partners Ministry,” a financial program she founded at her church, First Baptist Church of Glenarden (FBCG), in which women and men, who handle their money well, mentor others who are having financial challenges.

    Singletary and her husband, Kevin, also volunteer in Maryland prisons to teach financial literacy to male and female prison inmates involved in a prerelease program. At FBCG’s The Institutes, Singletary and her husband teach a class called “Mastering Money In Marriage.” In 2010, Singletary was named Ministry Leader of the Year at FBCG, one of the largest churches in Prince George’s County with more than 15,000 members. She was recognized for her direction of Prosperity Partners and her prison volunteer work.

    Singletary has written for the flagship “O, The Oprah Magazine.” For a time, she was the personal finance columnist for “O at Home” magazine. The quarterly magazine was a spinoff of the monthly “O, The Oprah Magazine.”

    She is currently the host of a popular weekly live online chat on washingtonpost.com. She also writes two widely read weekly newsletters on retirement and personal finance, which are distributed by The Washington Post to 65,000 subscribers. In her column, chats, newsletters, television show and books Singletary delivers advice on personal finance issues that range from lending your honey money (Don’t do it!), to raising money smart kids (You can do it!) to the importance of saving and investing (You must do it!).

    Her column won a prestigious award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. Singletary is the recipient of numerous national awards for her journalistic work. In 2005, she won the Consumer Federation of America Betty Furness Consumer Media Service Award. In 2013, The National Foundation for Credit Counseling honored her with the organization’s Making the Difference Award for her significant contributions toward advancing financial education in America. Consumer Action awarded her its 2014 Consumer Excellence Award in the media/press category. In 2015, she was the recipient of Generations United Media Award. She has also received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Johns Hopkins University.

    In 2018, she won a Wharton Seminars for Business Journalist fellowship awarded by National Press Foundation to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

    She is a graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park, and Johns Hopkins University, where she earned a master’s degree in business and management. Singletary and her husband reside in Maryland with their three children and dog, Simba.

  • Jan. 2019 Spotlight

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Thursday January 24, 2019

    SABEW January Spotlight

    New Institutional Member

    SABEW welcomes new institutional member Bloomberg BNA. Would an institutional membership benefit your organization? Member Benefits.

    Best in Business Awards Contest Deadline Jan. 31

    Best in Business Award contest closes at midnight, Jan. 31. Enter your work from 2018 to be awarded in one of 26 categories, including general excellence. New newsletter category added for 2018 contest. You must be a SABEW member to enter. Guidelines and categories. See who won a Best in Business Award for 2017.

    SABEW19

    SABEW19 is May 16-18 at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at ASU in Phoenix. Early bird deadline for registration ends April 28. SABEW19 webpage.

    Contact Renée McGivern, director of sponsorships, at (651) 210-0911 for SABEW19 exhibitor and sponsor information.

    Freedom Forum Institute’s Power Shift Project

    The Power Shift Project is expanding the reach of its unique Workplace Integrity training, designed to change cultures in newsrooms by eliminating harassment and discrimination. The project will underwrite tuition and travel support for qualified media organizations to attend the Train the Trainers workshops, which prepare individuals in the news industry and journalism education groups to deliver this one-of-a-kind training curriculum in their own organizations. For details.   To apply.

    InsideClimate News Training Opportunity

    InsideClimate News, the Pulitzer Prize-winning national nonprofit newsroom, will hold a free, two-day training for about a dozen winning applicants March 7-8 in Nashville. The workshop will be focused on business journalism and center on covering the clean energy economy in the Midwest. The training is part of ICN’s National Environmental Reporting Network, and journalists from Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin are encouraged to apply by Feb. 1. Details and a link to the application form.

  • Joanna Ossinger of Bloomberg News will receive the 2018 SABEW’s President’s Award

    Posted By Aimee O'Grady on Thursday September 27, 2018

    Joanna Ossinger, markets editor at Bloomberg News, will be presented with the President’s Award by the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing on Oct. 25, 2018, during SABEWNYC18, SABEW’s annual fall conference, in New York. 

    Ossinger, a former SABEW board member who served as SABEW president from 2015 to 2016, was chosen for this honor based on her years of service to the organization.  

    “Although it has been more than a couple of years since she served as SABEW president, Joanna has continued to provide significant, invaluable support, often behind the scenes, to our organization and leadership. At the top of the list is her leadership and hard work on our vitally important Best in Business awards, which continue to grow in scale and impact. By honoring her in this way, our members can help celebrate her remarkable continued involvement,” said Mark Hamrick, SABEW president and senior economic analyst, and Washington bureau chief at Bankrate.com. 

    “I’m truly honored to receive this award,” Ossinger said. “I believe wholeheartedly in SABEW’s mission and have been happy to play a part in helping the organization thrive at a time when quality business journalism is more important than ever.” 

    Ossinger is an editor in the cross-asset group, which covers markets globally, at Bloomberg News, where she has worked since 2010. She is the first Bloomberg representative to be SABEW president.  

    She previously worked as a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal, as the manager of day-to-day website operations at Fox Business and as a managing editor at TheStreet.com. 

    Ossinger has a master’s degree in public policy from Georgetown University and a dual B.A. cum laude in chemistry and classical civilizations from Cornell University. She is a native of Colorado. Follow her on twitter at @ossingerj.  

    About SABEW: Members of SABEW band together in the individual and collective pursuit of the highest standards of economic journalism. The organization recognizes that economic freedom is inextricably linked to political freedom and that an informed citizenry can ensure these freedoms are sustained. It is SABEW’s mission as an independent, nonprofit organization to encourage comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and to increase members’ skills and knowledge through continuous education. 

    SABEW recently has become more focused on press freedom. To that end, it has issued statements and created events and training highlighting the importance of journalism, including the principle that fact-based reporting is necessary for the health of robust democracies. SABEW advocates for full access to financial and economic data, including information collected and distributed by governments. 

     

  • Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW) Unveils New Logo

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday July 30, 2018

    SABEW has launched a new logo in conjunction with its name change to the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. The logo also represents a more modern and evolving organization.

    “The logo better communicates what SABEW stands for today,” said SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham. “We’ve used visual elements to emphasize our forward-thinking mindset, and digital and global expansion objectives.”

    The logo’s overlapping circles reflect inclusion and the blending of print, broadcast and online journalism. The circles also represent innovation, globalization and forward motion. Accents of green signify money and the important role SABEW members play in reporting on business, personal finance and the economy.

    The unveiling of the logo marks an evolution for the SABEW brand. The design brings with it a more sophisticated, professional and inclusive brand expression.

    SABEW recently changed its name from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers as part of a broader effort to rebrand and embrace a global focus on business journalists and other stakeholders around the world.

    Having “American” in the original name suggested SABEW did not offer membership or training to international journalists. In fact, SABEW expanded into Canada, holding its first Toronto event in 2010, and has since hosted workshops in investigative journalism and other training seminars. The new logo and name more closely align SABEW to business journalists around the world.

    About SABEW:
    It is SABEW’s mission as an independent, nonprofit organization to encourage comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and to increase members’ skills and knowledge through continuous education.

    SABEW recently has become more focused on press freedom. To that end, it has issued statements and created events and training highlighting the importance of journalism, including the principle that fact-based reporting is necessary for the health of robust democracies.

    SABEW advocates for full access to financial and economic data, including information collected and distributed by governments.

    SABEW also holds an annual Best in Business awards competition, recognizing outstanding journalism conducted in the U.S. and abroad among professionals and students.

    For more information about the organization, go to SABEW.org or contact SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham at [email protected].

  • Dig Deep into Health Care Data

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday June 11, 2018

    How do you get past the press release on the health beat? The hardest thing for reporters, veterans or newbies alike, is knowing where to look for information. What kind of financial shape is your local hospital or health insurer? How does the state or federal government rate that nursing home? Does a particular doctor have an unusually high number of medical malpractice claims? We are going to dig into these and other issues with veteran investigative reporter Matt Dempsey of the Houston Chronicle.

    View the webinar.

    Listen to the recording.

    Health Care Data Tip Sheet

     

    Matt Dempsey, Data Reporter at the Houston Chronicle
    Matt Dempsey is the data editor for the Houston Chronicle’s Investigations team. He joined the Chronicle in 2014. Matt previously worked for the Arizona Republic and Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His data journalism skills were used in projects involving payday lending, wildfires, state pensions and inequalities in high school sports. His passion for public records frequently leads to disclosure of important data from agencies at all levels of government. Matt has trained journalists at professional conferences and taught graduate and undergraduate students at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Matt has received four first-place awards from the Arizona Press Club, including two in 2013, for sports reporting, environmental/science reporting and education reporting. He won first place from the Best of the West for growth/environmental reporting, was an IRE Award finalist in 2010 and received the Valley of the Sun Chapter of SJP First Amendment Award in 2006.

    Made possible by a grant from:

  • College Connect: Finances of a First-Generation College Student

    Posted By David Wilhite on Monday May 7, 2018

    By Kayley Allen

    Being a first-generation college student is a blessing and a curse. The feeling of being the first person in my family to go to college was, hands down, one of the best accomplishments of my life.

    Nonetheless, with this feeling of excitement came a dark, looming cloud of uncertainty to what lies ahead. My parents are knowledgeable in many ways, but when it came to questions about college, especially questions about student loans and the FAFSA, they don’t have the answers.

    For a first-generation college student, money is a major stressor, but there are many ways to find answers and tips on how to save effectively while in school. Here are few ways to become more knowledge about financial aid and for finding financial opportunities for college.

    1. Scholarships. This is an obvious one but is extremely important. Because scholarships can be such a hassle to apply for, many students may overlook them; nonetheless, a few $1,000 scholarships here and there can truly add up. While there are many scholarships that offer need-based and academic scholarships, many people don’t know that there are also a number of scholarships that are offered specifically for first-generations students. These awards recognize and are aware of the hardships that may come with being a student from a family with no college graduates. Whether it be financial hardships or others, these awarders are continuously impressed with the work ethic they see from these students and use these scholarships as a way to encourage and aid first-generation students to attend college.

    2. The TRiO Program. TRiO is a federal outreach and student services program “designed specifically to identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds.” Across the U.S colleges have TRiO programs implemented and are working towards serving low-income individuals, first-generation college students, and individuals with disabilities. The program offers opportunities to students such as special academic advising, financial literacy programs, and scholarships. Become a part of the TRiO program can open so many doors full of opportunity. There’s a team of knowledgeable staff members waiting to advise and assist you in ways that your family might not be able to, and that’s okay! You’ll also meet other first-generation students, which can help the campus feel smaller and to make you feel not alone with whatever financial hardships you may encounter. More information on the TRIO Programs can be found here: https://www.benefits.gov/benefits/benefit-details/411

    3. Ask for help. Whether you’re in high school or already in college, you’re surrounded by professionals that are there to help you. Many high schools assign their juniors and seniors to a college counselor who can guide you in not only deciding what school to attend, but also financial aid and scholarship opportunities as well. Most likely, they went to school and got their degree, and want to see you do the same. If you’re already in college, there’s a good chance you were assigned to a financial aid advisor upon enrollment. They are there specifically to help you with whatever financial questions you may have! Whether it be help with the FAFSA, student loans or scholarships, or even a breakdown of tuition, they can tell you everything you need to know about how financial aid works at your school. Having a conversation with my financial aid advisor taught me a lot of simple things such as financing, but also about my student loans and how to apply for them.

    Being the first in my family to go to college was scary. I was constantly comparing to myself to others and felt alone when my parents didn’t know the answers to some of my questions. Being a first-generation student doesn’t have to feel like this! Each and every college and university strive to make sure every student feels welcome. Knowing where to look for information about financial aid and scholarship opportunities can make the start of your college career a stress-free one.

    Kayley Allen is a freshman from St. Louis at the University of Missouri.

     

     

     

  • Executive Director’s Report May 2018

    Posted By David Wilhite on Wednesday May 2, 2018

    SABEW18
    This year’s conference was all about getting back to the basics and building skills. We’ve seen a number of ground-breaking stories over the past year, and all were done the old-fashioned way — by cultivating sources, digging into documents and data, collaborating with editors, and finding angles that matter most to people. Hats off to SABEW18 conference chairs Bernie Kohn and Bryan Borzykowski and the committee that worked hard to create solid programming and networking opportunities.

    New name
    SABEW’s familiar acronym remains the same, but the organization has changed its name to the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. The change is part of a broader effort to embrace a global focus on business journalism. Having “American” in the name implied that we did not offer membership or training to international journalists. The rebrand is about engaging and encouraging news professionals from across the globe to become members.

    First Amendment Committee
    SABEW wants to lead members in efforts to band together to fight fake news, support the credibility of journalism, protect access to information and pursue the truth. To that end, SABEW created the First Amendment Committee to address members’ needs and desires, including advocacy of journalism, at this challenging time for the industry. Over the past year, it has released public statements in support of press freedom, partnered with other groups concerned about protecting the quality of government data, advocated for safety as journalists have experienced unprecedented risks and threats, and offered programming opportunities related to press freedom, transparency and access to data.

    AWARD HIGHLIGHTS

    2017 Best in Business Awards
    We celebrated the 2017 BIB Award honorees at a ceremony on Friday evening, April 27, 2018. The 121 winners and honorable mentions came from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. SABEW18 conference attendees were encouraged to attend the “BIB Winners: How They Did It” session to learn from this year’s winners. The 2018 BIB contest opens Dec. 1, 2018.

    SABEW Distinguished Achievement Award
    Congratulations to Gretchen Morgenson, senior special writer in the investigations unit at The Wall Street Journal, who received the Distinguished Achievement Award at the Best in Business ceremony Friday evening, April 27. The award is given to an individual who has made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who has served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession. Morgenson shared insights, career highlights and thoughts on journalism during a special Q&A session led by Lisa Gibbs, director of news partnerships at The Associated Press.

    Larry Birger Young Business Journalist of the Year Award
    Jillian Berman, 28, a New York-based reporter for MarketWatch, was the 2017 winner of the Larry Birger contest. It is the fourth year of the competition. Berman received the award and a $1,500 honorarium at the 2017 SABEW New York fall conference. Thanks to rbb Communications for funding this award and to Josh Merkin for his help shepherding the grant. Deadline for this year’s applications is July 31, 2018.

    Membership
    We have just over 3,000 members. This includes 2,637 institutional members from 132 media outlets, 51 institutional members from six academic institutions, 175 journalist members, 135 student members and 12 associate members. Keep your membership current and share your Twitter handle by updating your profile in the membership database.

    TRAINING HIGHLIGHTS

    Monthly training calls
    The training calls continue to be extremely popular – since last year’s spring conference, we’ve held 13 calls for over 500 participants. The calls are archived and can be accessed at any time on SABEW.org. Highlights include sessions on freelancing, international trade in the Trump era, the state of press freedom, and how to cover cryptocurrency. We strive to offer a variety of topics and to recruit presenters who represent diverse backgrounds and organizations. Thanks to SABEW members Kim Quillen and Patrick Sanders for leading this effort.

    Data-immersion workshop
    Our fifth annual Goldschmidt fellowship week in Washington, D.C., was a huge success. Twenty-two business journalists participated in the seminar that immersed them in data and accounting skills. Janet Yellen, then-chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, addressed the group in the historic Fed boardroom. Journalists also heard from experts at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Participants received special briefings from the Council of Economic Advisers and the Federal Reserve. Many thanks for the continued work of SABEW leaders Marty Steffens and Kevin Hall and donor Jim Goldschmidt of the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation for supporting this initiative. The application process for the winter 2019 workshop begins in November.

    SABEWNYC17 fall conference
    The October 2017 event in New York was a huge success. It attracted some 200 people over the course of two days of programming including a daylong personal-finance reporting workshop produced by NEFE’s Paul Golden.

    College Connect
    Check out SABEW’s student-written personal-finance blogs on SABEW.org. Topics range from family financial crises to how much outside employment a student should undertake during the academic year. The ongoing program is funded by NEFE. Students from the University of Missouri, Arizona State University and the University of Georgia are the bloggers.

    Sixth annual Business of Health Care Summit in Washington, D.C., June 28-30
    SABEW is seeking applications for a workshop that will help journalists better understand health-care economics and will provide an update on the Affordable Care Act. Attendees will be able to share and test out story ideas at this summit. Space is limited to 15 journalists. Selected participants will receive a stipend to offset travel-related expenses. Go to SABEW.org to apply. Made possible by a grant from The Commonwealth Fund.

    SABEW Canada
    SABEW Canada continues to expand and thrive with new members, social events, programs and BIB awards! Bryan Borzykowski, SABEW’s well-known Canadian board member who has been instrumental in leading expansion, now serves as vice president of SABEW.

    Finance
    In keeping with best practices for non-profits, SABEW conducted an independent audit of our 2016 financials, and we will do so again for the 2017 financials. The audit will help set the table for future financial growth since audits are a requirement of many grant-giving organizations. SABEW will end 2017 with $447,337 in net assets

  • 2018 – 2019 Committees

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Tuesday May 1, 2018

    (*) indicates Committee Chair
    (**) indicates Vice Chair

    Executive Committee
    Consistent with the requirements of the Society’s constitution and bylaws, the Executive Committee typically meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to discuss business, to make decisions and to lead the organization. These discussions include coordination of plans with the executive director.

    *SABEW President, Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief, Bankrate.com

    SABEW Vice President, Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    SABEW Secretary/Treasurer, Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal (ex-officio member)

    Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    First Amendment Committee
    The First Amendment Committee is dedicated to helping protect press freedoms. We are vigilant in our role as a watchdog over government agencies, working to ensure that journalists – and all citizens – have access to accurate, relevant government-supported data. The committee regularly issues statements in support of press freedom and for sufficient funding of government-collected and issued information. It engages government officials, private economists, watchdogs, other stakeholders and the public on the importance of robust and transparent economic and financial data as well as on the mission of business and financial journalism more broadly.

    *Henry Dubroff, founder and editor, Pacific Coast Business Times

    **James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Bernie Kohn, editor-at-large, Bloomberg BNA

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report

    First Amendment Legal Counsel: Steven D. Zansberg, partner, Ballard Spahr

    Membership Committee
    The membership committee is focused on ensuring SABEW remain a vibrant professional organization that is useful and relevant to future generations of business journalists. It will seek to fulfill its mission by increasing the number of individuals and institutions affiliated with SABEW, improving diversity, and strengthening the connections between existing SABEW members.

    *Xana Antunes, executive editor, Quartz

    Robert Barba, spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    Cindy Perman, partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com

    Nominations Committee
    *Cory Schouten, senior newsletter editor, The Wall Street Journal

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Dean Murphy, managing editor for Investigations, The New York Times

    Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    Marty Wolk, freelance

    Finance Committee
    The Finance Committee meets monthly either in-person or via conference call to review SABEW’s financial statements and other statements with SABEW staff. The committee also reviews the organization’s annual budget.

    *James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    **James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    Michael Rapoport, reporter, The Wall Street Journal

    Zoe Sagalow, federal tax and data reporter, Tax Notes Today

    Investment Sub-Committee
    This group helps monitor and optimize SABEW’s long-term investments, with the goal of balancing return with preservation of funds to help ensure the Society’s long-term financial success. 

    *James T. Madore, economics writer, Newsday

    Gail Marks Jarvis, syndicated financial columnist, Chicago Tribune

    David Milstead, freelance writer and columnist, The Globe and Mail

    SABEW19 Committee

    *Chair – Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    **Vice Chair Newsmakers and Headliners – Caleb Silver, editor-in-chief & SVP content, Investopedia

    ASU Representative – Andrew Leckey, chair ASU Walter Cronkite School, president Reynolds Center

    Robert Barba, spot news editor, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires

    Rich Barbieri, executive editor, CNN Business

    Brad Foss, global business editor, Associated Press

    Matthew Goldberg, consumer banking reporter, Bankrate

    Kevin Hall, chief economics correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers

    Bernie Kohn, editor-at-large, Bloomberg BNA

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Ryan Randazzo, reporter, The Arizona Republic

    Jennifer Strong, radio correspondent, The Wall Street Journal

    Training Committee
    The Training Committee supports SABEW’s mission by planning and coordinating near-monthly distance training programs, utilizing moderators and presenters who represent a variety of backgrounds and organizations. As many newsroom budgets shrink, SABEW training programs are an important resource, and offer an added value by promoting the professional development of SABEW members.

    *Patrick Sanders, assistant managing editor/investing, U.S. News & World Report

    *Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    Roseanne Gerin, English news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Jenny Paurys, managing editor, S&P Global Market Intelligence

    Marty Steffens, SABEW Chair in business and financial journalism, School of Journalism, University of Missouri

    Best in Business Committee
    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

    **Kim Quillen, business source editor, Chicago Tribune

    International Committee
    The International Committee seeks to encourage and expand SABEW’s impact and membership within the global business and economic journalism community.  Business journalists worldwide deal with issues of corporate transparency, reliability of government data, trade conflicts and personal financial wellbeing that directly affect readers, viewers and listeners. SABEW’s dedication to improving financial knowledge and accuracy, commending outstanding coverage and upholding the highest ethical standards has relevance in all countries. Seeking new members for SABEW, the International Committee finds opportunities to share information and training while encouraging business journalists at all experience levels regardless of borders.

    *Bryan Borzykowski, freelance business writer

    *Andrew Leckey, chair ASU Walter Cronkite School, president Reynolds Center

    Megan Davies, editor/reporter, Thomson Reuters

    Roseanne Gerin, news editor, Radio Free Asia

    Awards System, Membership Database and Website Committee

    James B. Nelson, business editor at Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; instructor at Marquette University

    Heather Long, economics correspondent, The Washington Post

    Renee McGivern, Director of Conference Sponsorships

    Past President Committee
    Grateful for their substantial contributions over many years, this committee engages former presidents of the Society by maintaining communication and involvement with current leadership, encouraging meetings and other activities.

    *Joanna Ossinger, editor, cross-asset group, Bloomberg News

  • SABEW18-Morgenson receives Distinguished Achievement Award

    Posted By Student Newsroom on Friday April 27, 2018

    By Charlotte Norsworthy
    University of Georgia

    With the bull market in stocks in its ninth year, Gretchen Morgenson, a senior special writer in the investigations unit at The Wall Street Journal, said she thinks business journalists should be prepared for when things change.

    Morgenson, who won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for her coverage for The New York Times of Wall Street during the dot-com boom and subsequent bust, was this year’s recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s Best in Business Awards on April 27.

    “I think that when the market turns, if it does, then we’re really going to see that the kind of structure of the market is probably more fragile than anybody realizes,” she said, “and we will realize it when stocks go south.”

    After more than a 20-year career, Morgenson covered a variety of business scandals including the collapse of the Long-Term Capital Management hedge fund in 1998, the bursting of the dot-com bubble in 2000, the accounting scandals of Enron in 2001 and WorldCom in 2002 and the 2008 financial crisis that wiped out family income and net worth by 40 percent, according to the U.S. Federal Reserve.

    Lisa Gibbs, director of news partnerships at The Associated Press asked Morgenson during the ceremony what business journalists should prioritize when it comes to coverage looking forward.

    “I think market structure would be my main thing that I think we should be trying to pay attention to,” Morgenson said, “because we’ve lived through a great bear market and a great bull market.”

  • SABEW18 Student Newsroom

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday April 26, 2018

    Welcome to the SABEW18 Student Newsroom.

    Business journalism students cover sessions from this year’s SABEW Spring Conference, SABEW18.

    Click here for the student bios.

    Check back for our latest stories and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for continued coverage of SABEW18.

    Canada ambassador expects permanent U.S. tariff exemption

    Canada is “fully confident” that it will receive permanent exemptions on aluminum and steel tariffs from the U.S. despite challenging trade negotiations, said David MacNaughton, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S., Thursday night at the Embassy of Canada. Click here to read more.

    Rubenstein expects private equity investors to look to emerging markets

    Private equity investors are likely to focus more on opportunities in emerging markets as countries like China and India increase their share of the global economy, said David Rubenstein, co-founder and co-executive chairman of private equity giant The Carlyle Group. Click here to read more. 

    Ross, Hassett address policy impact on economy

    Trump administration officials defended recent tax reform and tariffs Friday at the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing’s spring conference in Washington, D.C. Click here to read more.

    BEA director: County-by-county GDP to roll out this fall  

    The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis said it plans to develop county-by-county gross domestic product data and expects to have prototype statistics available by this fall, Director Brian Moyer said on Friday. Click here to read more. 

    Morgenson receives Distinguished Achievement Award

    With the bull market in stocks in its ninth year, Gretchen Morgenson, a senior special writer in the investigations unit at The Wall Street Journal, said she thinks business journalists should be prepared for when things change. Click here to read more.

    SEC ‘best interest’ standard well-intended but challenges remain

    The new “best interest” standard for brokers proposed by the Securities and Exchange Commission is a positive step with good intentions but several problems, said Maureen Thompson, vice president of public policy at Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. Click here to read more. 

    More than just ‘white noise’: Media leaders address solutions to harassment

    In the wake of the New York Times Harvey Weinstein investigation and the Me Too movement,  female media leaders tackled the issue of sexual harassment and the systems that enable such behavior. Click here to read more.

    Morgenson: ‘It’s about more than the awards’

    Gretchen Morgenson was walking up Third Avenue in New York City, still fresh off her move from The New York Times to The Wall Street Journal, when an abrupt shouting sounded in the distance. Click here to read more. 

    Cryptocurrency and blockchain pose challenges for news organizations

    New and arcane technologies such as blockchain and cryptocurrency pose challenges and opportunities for major news organizations that are scrambling to meet reader demand for more coverage, according to top news editors interviewed at SABEW’s spring conference. Click here to read more.

  • The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Announces Name Change to Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday April 23, 2018

    SABEW’s familiar acronym remains the same, but the organization is changing its name to the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. The change, which is effective immediately, is part of a broader effort to embrace a global focus on business journalism. The new name comes in advance of the SABEW18 annual spring conference in Washington, D.C., April, 26-28, 2018.

    As an example of SABEW’s global reach and impact, the conference’s opening event will focus on international trade and be held at the Embassy of Canada. In 2014, SABEW Canada was launched and continues to thrive with new members, social events, programs and BIB awards.

    The SABEW Board of Directors approved the name change as part of the organization’s international expansion and rebranding effort directly reflecting its global growth initiatives.

    “The Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing name more closely aligns SABEW to business journalists and other stakeholders around the world,” said Kathleen Graham, executive director. “Having ‘American’ in the name suggested that we did not offer membership or training to international journalists. The rebrand is about engaging and encouraging news professionals from across the globe to become members.”

    Said President Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief of Bankrate.com: “SABEW will always be primarily invested in business and financial journalism excellence, respect for press freedom and the need for robust and transparent financial and economic data. I’m confident we can gain further traction with a more inclusive name. I encourage our members and others currently outside our terrific organization to join us in these critically important pursuits.”

    A new SABEW logo will be unveiled in the next phase of the group’s strategic branding process.

    About SABEW: Members of SABEW band together in the individual and collective pursuit of the highest standards of economic journalism. The organization recognizes that economic freedom is inextricably linked to political freedom and that an informed citizenry can ensure these freedoms are sustained. It is SABEW’s mission as an independent, non-profit organization to encourage comprehensive reporting of economic events without fear or favoritism and to increase members’ skills and knowledge through continuous education.

    SABEW recently has become more focused on press freedom. To that end, it has issued statements and created events and training highlighting the importance of journalism, including the principle that fact-based reporting is necessary for the health of robust democracies. SABEW advocates for full access to financial and economic data, including information collected and distributed by governments.

    SABEW also holds an annual Best in Business awards competition, recognizing outstanding journalism conducted in the U.S. and abroad among professionals and students.

    For more information about the organization, go to SABEW.org. For information about the upcoming SABEW18 conference, contact SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham at [email protected].

  • 4th Annual BIB Canada Winners

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday April 19, 2018

    And the winners of the 4th annual Best in Business Canada Awards are…

    Beat Reporting

    Gold: Christine Dobby, The Globe and Mail (Telecom)

    Silver: Claudia Cattaneo, Financial Post (Energy)

    Breaking News

    Gold:Paul Waldie, Tim Kiladze, Alexandra Posadzki, Andrew Willis, Jeff Gray, Tavia Grant, Kelly Grant, Tu Thanh Ha, Molly Hayes, Joe Friesen, Josh O’Kane and Susan Krashinsky Robertson,The Globe and Mail (The murders of Barry and Honey Sherman)

    Silver: Theo Argitis, Greg Quinn, Maciej Onoszko, Erik Hertzberg, Josh Wingrove, Natalie Wong, Kevin Orland, Lily Jamali, Katia Dmitrieva, Dan Moss, Katherine Greifeld, Allison McNeely, Doug Alexander, Anny Kuo, Luke Kawa, Marc Perrier, Kristine Owram, Rita Devlin, Linly Lin and Courtney Dentch, Bloomberg News (Bank of Canada rate hike)

    Commentary

    Gold: Rita Trichur, Report on Business magazine

    Silver: Eric Reguly, The Globe and Mail

    Long Feature

    Gold: Charlie Wilkins, Report on Business magazine (“Home of the Strange”)

    Silver: Claire Brownell, Adrian Humphreys and Jake Edmiston, Financial Post (“Two legacies, one dark mystery — the deaths of Barry and Honey Sherman”)

    Short Feature

    Gold: Danielle Bochove, Bloomberg News (“The Ghost Town Tesla is bringing back to life”)

    Silver: Susan Krashinsky-Robertson, The Globe and Mail (“Saying Goodbye: Kanata paper founded by 14-year-old is one casualty of Postmedia-Torstar deal”)

    Personal finance and investing

    Gold: Sarah Efron, The Globe and Mail (“Only the wealthy? The truth about the Liberals’ proposed small-business tax reforms”)

    Silver: David Milstead, The Globe and Mail (Investing columns)

    Investigative

    Gold: Marina Strauss, Report on Business magazine (“Inside the messy transformation of Tim Hortons”)

    Silver: Tavia Grant, The Globe and Mail (“Canada’s deadliest jobs”)

    Profile

    Gold: Jacqueline Nelson, The Globe and Mail (“Mark Machin: Appetite for risk”)

    Silver: Claire Brownell, Financial Post (“Vitalik Buterin: Cryptocurrency prophet”)

    Package

    Gold: Mike Hager, Nathan VanderKlippe, Jill Mahoney, Matthew McClearn, Barrie McKenna, David Parkinson, Janet McFarland, Tamsin McMahon and Tim Kiladze, The Globe and Mail (Housing)

    Silver: Sarah Efron, Brenda Bouw, Chris Hannay and Bill Curry, The Globe and Mail (“Small business tax changes”)

     

  • SABEW Board of Governors Elections 2018

    Posted By David Wilhite on Thursday April 5, 2018

    Ballots will be cast during SABEW18 for seven on the SABEW Board of Governors, six with a term ending in 2021 and one ending in 2019. Voting members will receive their ballot information directly from online voting service provider Opavote.org.

    Board Candidates (listed in alphabetical order)

    Xana Antunes
    Executive editor, Quartz
    My two-plus years on the SABEW board have afforded me a close-up appreciation of the vital role the organization plays in the business journalism community. SABEW is an ideal forum to advance excellence in coverage of the global economy, nurture and share best practices, set high ethical standards, and provide networking opportunities for members. Its annual Best in Business awards offer both a measuring stick and a guidepost for our profession as it navigates evolving platforms of choice, quicksilver audiences, and prevailing values and standards that are routinely reapplied and reinterpreted.

    These are all areas in which I can make a real, and I hope, lasting contribution, in the spirit of giving back. I bring deep experience in our profession to the task, having worked in leadership roles across newspapers (NY Post), magazines (Fortune, Fortune.com), and television (CNBC Digital). Today, as Executive Editor at Quartz, I’m able to put that experience at the service of a young and innovative business publication that’s quickly established a reputation for smart, thoughtful coverage.

    And that’s the perspective I bring to the SABEW board. The globalization of business — and the digitization of everything — calls for a professional body that’s especially attuned to the challenges and opportunities before us. As board secretary, a position I served in for a year, and as a member of the team that modernized our BIB Awards, I have shown that I can both help infuse the organization with a deeper digital sensibility, and support members’ efforts to develop the tools and skills they need as they transition to a fully digital future.

    I would be honored to have your support in the upcoming SABEW board election.

    Rich Barbieri
    Executive editor, CNNMoney
    As a longtime business journalist, I have a lot vested in the profession. SABEW holds an important place in as a thought leader in the field. As executive editor of CNNMoney, I spend considerable effort mentoring the next generation of business journalists as well as leading coverage of a major business news outlet. Those two roles make me well suited to serving on the board of SABEW.

    I can contribute to SABEW as judge in contests, recruiting new members, championing the organization within the profession and helping to shape conference content. I’d be honored to serve another term.

    Megan Davies
    Editor and reporter, Thomson Reuters
    I’d be honored to serve a term as a SABEW board member. I’m passionate about journalism and dedicated to the field of business reporting. I’ve held various leadership roles within Reuters in the United States and Russia and reported on a wide variety of business topics. I’m particularly passionate about enterprise reporting. I’d be keen to be involved in SABEW to further high standards of business journalism and try and encourage the next generation of reporters.

    Brad Foss
    Global business editor, Associated Press
    My first full term as a SABEW board member has been rewarding and productive. Being part of the team that revamped the BIB contest to make it more relevant in the digital era was a great way to learn about the organization and the needs and concerns of its members. While SABEW’s challenges are significant, so are its opportunities.

    It would be a privilege to remain part of the leadership team that helps SABEW transform itself further and thrive — although not just by expanding its membership and strengthening its financial foundation. Whether it is developing training programs, running contests or speaking out on ethics, SABEW’s role in setting high standards matters. I want to help steer SABEW toward decisions and actions that will benefit business journalists and their readers, and help sustain the organization for the long run.

    For the past four months, I have been global business editor at The Associated Press, guiding the business news agenda for the world’s largest news organization. AP caters to a general-news audience and the experience I have gained while working there shapes the perspective I bring to SABEW’s diverse and talented board, and to its members.

    I will do my best to marshal any resources and newsroom expertise that will further SABEW’s goals. And I am happy to serve as an ambassador for SABEW in any way needed.

    Thank you for considering me to serve again as a SABEW board member.

    Andrew Leckey
    Chair in Business Journalism, ASU Cronkite School
    President, Reynolds Center 
    As a long-time business journalist and SABEW member, I understood the importance of our professional organization to the momentum and integrity of our field. The honor of serving on its Board of Governors, however, has since given me opportunity to join with outstanding board members in promoting SABEW’s high ideals.

    My primary areas of focus on the board have been promoting international goals, organizing Speed Networking sessions for students at conferences and providing an assist in sponsorship of SABEW events. I’d be honored to serve another term to continue our international expansion building upon the success in Canada, bolstering SABEW finances, attracting young people to our field and seeking new members from a variety of newsrooms.

    I was a syndicated investment columnist for Chicago Tribune for many years, an author and long-time broadcaster whose positions included CNBC anchor and reporter. This led to my  position as Chair in Business Journalism at Arizona State University Cronkite School and President of Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. Receiving Fulbrights in business journalism in China and Uganda reinforced my belief that SABEW can expand its much-needed influence beyond North America.

    Heather Long
    Economics correspondent, The Washington Post
    SABEW is as important as ever for two reasons: Training and networking. I am running for SABEW board member because this organization has been critical for me to strengthen my network and skill set, and I have a lot of ideas on how to enhance that even more for SABEW members in the coming years. I was part of the team that put together SABEW’s Spring 2018 Conference in Washington D.C., helping to secure great speakers including Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. I would also love to see SABEW organize more mini-networking nights and send out a newsletter to members every other week highlighting job openings and sharing the stories of some of SABEW’s members so we can get to know each other better. Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to getting to know more amazing SABEW members at the Spring Conference and finding ways to collaborate.

    Cindy Perman
    Partnerships and syndication editor, CNBC.com
    I think connecting with each other and sharing ideas is the key for us as individuals and as an industry to grow and thrive – that’s why I want to be a part of SABEW and the board. I think I bring a unique digital background to the table, having been a part of the growth of two major digital operations, as well as CNBC’s integration of its TV and digital operations, and navigating new platforms like Apple News. I’m really creative and am excited about the prospect of helping to craft panels and events that inform and inspire our members. One of my most rewarding career experiences was managing CNBC.com’s intern program. I loved being a part of their development, giving them advice and encouragement – but also hearing their insight. I think we don’t bring young people to the table often enough and say, “Hey, what do you think?” So, one of the things I would like to focus on as a board member is recruiting more young people to the organization, having more events that are geared toward them and really integrating them with more experienced journalists. One thing I think would be cool would be to do some pairings of young journalists with experienced journalists but not in the traditional mentoring way. Set it up in a way where both are asking questions and learning from each other. Let some younger journalists do panels – whether it’s mixed or an all-millennial panel. I’m really inspired by the idea of a two-way flow. I hope to have the opportunity to share these ideas and brainstorm others with the board! I would welcome the opportunity and I think I have a lot to contribute.

  • Gretchen Morgenson to receive SABEW’s 2018 Distinguished Achievement Award

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday March 12, 2018

    Gretchen Morgenson, senior special writer in the investigations unit at The Wall Street Journal, will receive the Society of American Business Editors and Writers’ highest honor, its Distinguished Achievement Award, for 2018. The award is given to an individual who has made a significant impact on the field of business journalism and who has served as a nurturing influence on others in the profession.

    “I am thrilled and honored to receive this distinguished award from SABEW. It underscores my belief that speaking truth to power has never been more crucial than it is today,” said Morgenson. “I look forward to attending the spring conference in Washington. Thank you SABEW!”

    Morgenson will accept the award Friday, April 27, 2018, at the SABEW Best in Business Dinner and Awards Ceremony in Washington, D.C., during the SABEW18 spring conference. She will share insights, career highlights and thoughts on journalism during a special Q&A session led by Lisa Gibbs, director of news partnerships at The Associated Press. Early-bird registration for the conference, which includes admission to the Best in Business ceremony, is $349 (ends March 31). Tickets to the BIB reception and dinner are $149.

    Prior to joining The Wall Street Journal in November 2017, Morgenson spent almost 20 years as assistant business and financial editor and a columnist at The New York Times. She began covering the world financial markets for the newspaper in May 1998 and won the Pulitzer Prize for beat reporting in 2002 for her “trenchant and incisive” coverage of Wall Street.

    Morgenson, a graduate of Saint Olaf College in Minnesota, joined Forbes in 1986. Nine years later, she became national press secretary to magazine editor Steve Forbes when he ran for president of the United States. When he withdrew from the race in March 1996, she returned to writing and editing at the magazine. She was named assistant managing editor in September 1997.

    Morgenson is co-author, with Joshua Rosner, of “Reckless Endangerment,” a New York Times bestseller about the origins of the 2008 financial crisis published. She has won two Gerald Loeb Awards, one in 2009 for her coverage of Wall Street and another in 2002 for excellence in financial commentary.

    The SABEW Distinguished Achievement Award was established in 1993, when it was awarded to Hobart Rowan of the Washington Post. There have been 24 recipients since its inception. SABEW is the world’s largest organization dedicated to business and financial journalism.

    For more information, contact Kathleen Graham, SABEW executive director, at [email protected].

  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 23rd Annual Best in Business Competition

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday March 8, 2018

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) announces the results of its 23rd annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding journalism of 2017.

    The 121 winners and honorable mentions come from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. For a complete list of honorees, click here. To read the judges’ comments, click here.

    The Los Angeles Times received 11 honors, while The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal each earned seven. Fortune also earned seven, including one it shared with Quartz. ProPublica won five awards; the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, InsideClimate News and The Center for Public Integrity each got four.

    “This year’s contest was incredibly competitive across all categories,” said Joanna Ossinger, chair of the Best in Business Awards contest and an editor at Bloomberg News. “The strong field shows just how much business journalism is thriving. Congratulations to all the winners, and thank you to the nearly 200 judges who volunteered their time and without whom the contest couldn’t succeed.”

    The winners for General Excellence were The New York Times in the Large category, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel in Medium, health-focused publication STAT in Small, and The Real Deal in industry-specific publications.

    Winners included The New York Times in Investigative for “Culture of Harassment,” ProPublica and NPR in Explanatory for “Sold for Parts,” and The Wall Street Journal in Commentary/ Opinion for the technology columns of Christopher Mims. Honorees in Innovation included the Los Angeles Times for “Disneyland Wait Times” and GateHouse Media for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms.” Organizations as diverse as Crain’s Chicago Business, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Reuters, Portland Business Journal, Bloomberg News and The Motley Fool also garnered prizes.

    In the Student categories, top honors went to Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic; Danielle Chemtob of the University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal; and Shen Lu from Northwestern University’s Medill News Service.

    Contest honorees will be celebrated at a ceremony April 27, 2018, during the 55th annual SABEW conference at the Capital Hilton hotel in Washington, D.C. Honorees are eligible to attend the conference at a discounted rate. This year’s conference will feature notable names from the worlds of politics and business, as well as training sessions and a discussion of journalistic ethics through the lens of the #MeToo movement.

    SABEW is the largest association of business journalists, with more than 3,000 members. The SABEW Canada Best in Business finalists will be announced April 3. For more information, email Crystal Beasley at [email protected].

  • Journalists Honored in SABEW’s 23rd Annual Best in Business Competition

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday March 8, 2018

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) announces the results of its 23rd annual Best in Business competition, which recognizes outstanding journalism of 2017.

    The 121 winners and honorable mentions come from all corners of the business-journalism world. One hundred seventy-three news organizations submitted 986 entries across 68 categories. For a complete list of honorees, click here. To read the judges’ comments, click here.

    The Los Angeles Times received 11 honors, while The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal each earned seven. Fortune also earned seven, including one it shared with Quartz. ProPublica won five awards; the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, InsideClimate News and The Center for Public Integrity each got four.

    “This year’s contest was incredibly competitive across all categories,” said Joanna Ossinger, chair of the Best in Business Awards contest and an editor at Bloomberg News. “The strong field shows just how much business journalism is thriving. Congratulations to all the winners, and thank you to the nearly 200 judges who volunteered their time and without whom the contest couldn’t succeed.”

    The winners for General Excellence were The New York Times in the Large category, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel in Medium, health-focused publication STAT in Small, and The Real Deal in industry-specific publications.

    Winners included The New York Times in Investigative for “Culture of Harassment,” ProPublica and NPR in Explanatory for “Sold for Parts,” and The Wall Street Journal in Commentary/ Opinion for the technology columns of Christopher Mims. Honorees in Innovation included the Los Angeles Times for “Disneyland Wait Times” and GateHouse Media for “In the Shadow of Wind Farms.” Organizations as diverse as Crain’s Chicago Business, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Reuters, Portland Business Journal, Bloomberg News and The Motley Fool also garnered prizes.

    In the Student categories, top honors went to Emily Mahoney and Charles Clark of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and The Arizona Republic; Danielle Chemtob of the University of North Carolina and Triangle Business Journal; and Shen Lu from Northwestern University’s Medill News Service.

    Contest honorees will be celebrated at a ceremony April 27, 2018, during the 55th annual SABEW conference at the Capital Hilton hotel in Washington, D.C. Honorees are eligible to attend the conference at a discounted rate. This year’s conference will feature notable names from the worlds of politics and business, as well as training sessions and a discussion of journalistic ethics through the lens of the #MeToo movement.

    SABEW is the largest association of business journalists, with more than 3,000 members. The SABEW Canada Best in Business finalists will be announced April 3. For more information, email Crystal Beasley at [email protected].

  • SABEW Announces New Executive Leadership Ladder

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Monday January 22, 2018

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW), the largest association of business journalists, has elected new executive officers effective immediately. The terms of service are through spring 2019 at the annual SABEW conference. The executive ladder changes were approved unanimously by the SABEW Board of Governors.

    Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief of Bankrate.com, will lead SABEW as president for a second term.

    An award-winning journalist, Hamrick joined personal-finance site Bankrate.com in January 2013 after leading business news for the Associated Press’ radio and television/online video operation in Washington, D.C., for more than 18 years.

    Along with his work analyzing economic developments, financial markets, politics and business for Bankrate.com, Hamrick provides commentary or content hundreds of times a year for radio, television, print and online news organizations. Before joining the SABEW board in 2014, he served as president of the National Press Club.

    Xana Antunes, executive editor at Quartz, will resign as SABEW vice president effective immediately due to personal time demands inhibiting her ability to serve as an officer. Antunes will remain engaged and supportive of SABEW’s mission through her service as a board member.

    Bryan Borzykowski, a freelance business writer, will take over as vice president through spring 2019, when he will become SABEW’s first Canadian president. Borzykowski is a Toronto-based business writer, editor and author. He has written for a number of publications in Canada and the U.S., including The Globe and Mail, Canadian Business, The New York Times, CNBC, BBC Capital and CNNMoney.

    Kim Quillen, an editor on the Chicago Tribune business desk, will be secretary/treasurer. Quillen joined the Tribune staff in 2016 from The Arizona Republic. She also has been business editor at The Times-Picayune, where she was involved in the New Orleans newspaper’s award-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina and the 2010 BP oil spill.

    “The SABEW executive ladder is in excellent hands with Mark Hamrick, Bryan Borzykowski and Kim Quillen. Mark has raised SABEW’s profile on First Amendment issues; Bryan has expanded our international efforts; and Kim has produced incredible virtual training for members,” said SABEW Executive Director Kathleen Graham. “I’m thankful to have Mark’s steady leadership for another term, and I’d also like to thank Xana Antunes for her work on the Best in Business Awards and ongoing contributions to SABEW as a board member.”

    The Society of American Business Editors and Writers was formed in 1964 to promote superior coverage of business and financial news and issues. The non-profit organization promotes excellence through training opportunities, including conferences, workshops, fellowships and online programs.

    For more information, contact [email protected] or follow us on Twitter @SABEW.

  • Young Journalists, Big Impact

    Posted By Crystal Beasley on Thursday October 19, 2017

    Monday, October 30
    2 p.m. EDT

    There’s a lot to be learned from today’s young financial journalists through their strong beat reporting.

    Take Jillian Berman, 28, of MarketWatch, for example. Her work covering the student-debt crisis earned her this year’s Larry Birger Young Journalist Award, which honors journalists under the age of 30. The judges of the contest noted that on this extensively covered topic, Berman repeatedly found new story angles. She dug through mounds of data, distilled complex information and told compelling stories of those affected by this crisis.

    On SABEW’s next teletraining session, hear from Berman, as well as our Birger award finalists Sarah Freir of Bloomberg and Jen Wieczner of Fortune, as they discuss how they work sources, develop their beats and uncover unique ways to tell important stories.

    Moderator

    Jon Chesto, a business reporter for the Boston Globe, served as Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize judging team chair. Jon covers the leaders who shape Boston’s business community. He has been reporting on business and politics in New England for the past two decades. Before joining the Globe, he was managing editor at the Boston Business Journal. Prior to that role, he was the business editor at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy. His weekly Ledger column, “Mass. Market,” won several national awards with SABEW. A graduate of Wesleyan University and Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism, he has also worked as a business reporter at the Boston Herald and as a political reporter with Ottaway Newspapers.

    Panelists

    Jillian Berman, a New York-based reporter for MarketWatch, is the 2017 winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist contest, honoring journalists younger than 30. Berman focuses on student debt. Previously, she worked as a business reporter for HuffPost, covering retail and food companies as well as gender politics at work. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Bloomberg.

    Sarah Frier is a technology reporter at Bloomberg News, where she is focused on breaking news and writing features about social media companies including Facebook and Snap. Her work appears on Bloomberg.com, in Bloomberg Businessweek and on Bloomberg Television. In her more than six years at Bloomberg, she has received several awards from SABEW. Sarah’s most praised award was for her in depth investigation into the online flourishing fake id card market. Doing undercover orders from numerous id makers and finding one site that made an identical to real scannable fake id. Was amazing to watch how easy it was to use this identity card to enter and pass everywhere Sarah tested.

    Jen Wieczner is a senior writer at Fortune covering Wall Street, finance and cryptocurrency. She has profiled business leaders including two-time Fortune 500 CEO Meg Whitman; controversial Mylan CEO Heather Bresch; and hedge fund billionaire Steve Cohen, featuring his first interview since his involvement in a record-breaking insider trading case. Recently, she launched The Ledger, a publication within Fortune dedicated to covering the intersection of money and technology. Previously, Jen covered health care for MarketWatch and The Wall Street Journal. Her work has also appeared in SmartMoney, The Atlantic, Fast Company, New York, Edible Manhattan, Boston, Glamour and Marie Claire. In 2017, she received the American Society of Magazine Editors “Next” Award honoring journalists under 30. Originally from Boston, Jen graduated from Northwestern University with a B.S. in journalism.

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